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Vol. 47 Issue No. 30

Anpetu Iyamni, July 27, 2016

Inside this Edition –

Highlights of Korean Veterans honoring ceremony

Would Self-Governance assist the Tribe in exercising sovereign authority?

Matrix Model meth addiction recovery training comes to SWO

Buffalo Lake District brings bowling back to Sisseton

New billboard takes aim against sex trafficking

SWC announces Spring Dean's List

Next week: SWO, FEMA sign historic agreement

S-W Federal Credit Union announces annual meeting

Note to candidates: New Sota discounted rates, pre-payment policy

Deadline for receipt of copy is Friday noon

SWO and Roberts County VSO combined event –

Ceremony held honoring Veterans with Korean War Medals

Photo highlights by John Heminger

The SWO Tribe and Roberts County Veteran Service Offices co-sponsored a ceremony Saturday afternoon, July 16th, to present local Veterans with the Korean Ambassador Peace Medal. The event was well attended and took place at Anderson Park in downtown Sisseton, SD in conjunction with the community's Horse & Buggy Days. Roberts County had the most medals to present of any county in the state of South Dakota. There were 50 Medals presented! Read about this event in Tribal VSO Geri Opsal's report this week to Akicita.

"From the desk of Geri Opsal, Tribal Veteran Service Officer"

GeriO@SWO-NSN.gov

Phone 605-698-3388

*KOREAN AMBASSADOR PEACE MEDALS WERE PRESENTED on Saturday, July 16th. 2016 @ 3:00PM. Please see accompanying photos. Thank you John Heminger for taking the pictures. The day started with Assembly; it was awesome to hear that live after many years! The colors were posted by the Honor Guards of: American Legion Post #314, Otto-Quande Renville American Legion Post #50, Kit Fox Society & Desert Era Veterans. The National Anthem was sung by Pat Schubert, and it was beautiful! A brief welcome was given by Joe George, Commander of Post #50; Geri Opsal, TVSO introduced Dave Flute, Tribal Chairman who sang a Dakota Flag Song. He had some words to share speaking of our love of the Flag and how the Flag Song is our National Anthem. Geri Opsal read a letter from the Congressional delegates followed by Larry Goette who introduced Matt Glynn who read a letter on behalf of the Mayor of Sisseton Terry Jaspers. Geri introduced Steve Emery, Secretary of Tribal Relations of Pierre, SD. The medals were presented by Chairman Flute, with assistance from Steve Emery, Larry Goette, Geri Opsal and Roberts County newest addition Veteran's Service Office Angela Booth. There were 11 living Korean War Veterans, and it was a huge honor to stand before these highly decorated veterans much of whom had purple hearts. I stated that we had a Congressional Medal of Honor, KIA's, POWs and many Purple Heart and Bronze Star Medals. After the presentation of medals we had the Cook Brothers Drum Group sing a Honor Song. It truly was a proud moment for all of Roberts County as well as the Oyate. I want to thank everyone who took part in making this happen. All of the Veterans came together to make this a wonderful event. Lastly I would like to thank Brice Roberts for all the hours he spent on our submission of over 200 DD214's of our Tribal Veterans. It took many weeks and we are grateful that we received what we did. Thank you all who attended it was a great day for our Korean War Veterans!

*Veterans Cemetery: Equipment has been hauled up to our Cemetery site; it's very excited to see our dream come true. We are hoping it will be done by winter but of course it's all going to depend on our South Dakota weather.

*UNITED VETERANS ASSOCIATION MEETING: Wednesday, July 27, 2016 @ 6 PM at the TVSO Office. Please attend.

*VETERANS: PLEASE CALL OUR OFFICE IF YOU NEED ASSITANCE; WE ARE HERE TO SERVE! 698-3388

*WOMEN VETERANS CALL CENTER: 1-855-VA-WOMEN. Crisis Help Line: 1-800-273-8255, available 24/7, and tell them you are a veteran. All calls are confidential.

*REMEMBER: We are here to serve you our fellow Veteran, widows, dependents. And also you see a Veteran shake their hand---that small gesture means a great deal to them! Call us at 698-3388 or cell 268-0502.

*American Legion Post #314- Delano Renville, Commander Cell: # 268-0354 / Vietnam Veterans Kit Fox Society - Phone: # 698-3901 ask for Doc / Desert Era Veterans – Justin Chanku, Commander 1-605-268-0977. For GAS ASSISTANCE: Geri Opsal 698-3388.

Have a good week. Geri Opsal, Tribal VSO.

SWO Tribal Law Enforcement welcome back Officer Keith DeCoteau

Submitted by Tribal Law Enforcement

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Police welcomed back newly graduated Police Officer Keith DeCoteau. A formal welcoming ceremony was held on June 10th.

Officer Keith DeCoteau attended the Indian Police Academy in Artesia, New Mexico for 15 weeks.

He was honored to give his graduating class the Invocation during the graduation ceremony.

Thank you for your sacrifice, being away from your family and friends. Welcome back and a job well done.

Please see accompanying photo highlights.

Would Self-Governance assist SWO to exercise sovereign authority "promote public health?"

Submitted by the SWO Self-Governance Work Group

The question "Why?" the Tribe might want to assume operation of the Indian Health Service can be looked at from different ways. An earlier article addressed the question by describing the flexibility that Self-Governance affords Tribes in improving services for the people. This article discusses from the perspective of the Tribe's sovereignty and inherent role as a public health authority.

As we know, American Indians exercised their inherent rights to self-determination and self-governance from time immemorial. Keeping the people healthy is one domain of self-governance. The legal basis for Tribal sovereignty is found in the United States Constitution, treaties, Federal laws or statutes, court cases, executive orders, and administrative policies. Federal laws, such as the Indian Self-Determination and Educational Assistance Act and Indian Health Care Improvement Act, have reaffirmed that Indian nations retain their inherent right to govern themselves and their territories subject only to limitations imposed by Federal law.

So is health care within the scope of SWO's authority? The SWO Constitution and By-laws ARTICLE VII, Section 1, authorizes the Tribal Council to: (h) to promote public health, education, charity, and other services as may contribute to the social advancement of the members . . . ." What, then, is "public health"? Public health has been defined by the Centers for Disease Control and other entities. The 10 Essential Public Health Services is a US government document which codifies the responsibilities of public health agencies and institutions in the United States. The systems, or ten essential services, are:

1.  Monitor health status to identify and solve community health problems.

2.  Diagnose and investigate health problems and health hazards in the community.

3.  Inform, educate, and empower people about health issues.

4.  Mobilize community partnerships and action to identify and solve health problems.

5.  Develop policies and plans that support individual and community health efforts.

6.  Enforce laws and regulations that protect health and ensure safety.

7.  Link people to needed personal health services and assure the provision of health care when otherwise unavailable.

8.  Assure competent public and personal health care workforce.

9.  Evaluate effectiveness, accessibility, and quality of personal and population-based health services.

10. Research for new insights and innovative solutions to health problems.

Who remembers that IHS used to be known as "Public Health?" Do we presume that IHS is performing the ten essential services in behalf of the Tribe? If that was the assumption at one time, is it still true today? Or has IHS has carved out a smaller footprint that is primarily clinical in nature? Have the requirements to bill for third party reimbursement from Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurance caused the IHS to change its scope from public health to personal health services? Legally and operationally can the IHS as a Federal Agency serve as the "public health" arm of the Tribe? Might the fact that it CAN NOT be a factor in the frustration Tribes have with IHS recently?

The wrap-around ten essential systems are intrinsic to the public health authority that resides with SWO as a sovereign government. At this time SWO has VERY LITTLE resources to staff and operate as a public health authority. Assuming operation of IHS could provide SWO with critical mass and better infrastructure to fulfill its role of promoting public health. Self-Governance may provide SWO with the capacity to redirect resources that are currently focused primarily on clinical services to better align / integrate with the public health model and the Tribe's health priorities.

An example of a current public health concern is drug and alcohol use during pregnancy. As a Federal Agency the Indian Health Service is not compelled to comply with SWO laws or initiatives to prevent drug-exposed newborns. The Tribe cannot direct the Indian Health Service to set up a method to monitor this problem, to mobilize partnerships or develop policies to address it, to enforce its laws, or to provide any data the Tribe might use to evaluate whether interventions are working. The Indian Health Service is a Federal Agency, separate from the Tribe. The individual employees can agree that this is an important issue and help where they can, but the Agency itself is a massive bureaucracy and cannot respond quickly - if at all. Six years ago a SWO team made a site visit to a Self-Governance tribe and inquired as to how they dealt with prescription drugs such as opioids. There was some shock when the Tribal CEO responded, "We don't believe in them and do not dispense them from any of our pharmacies." If opioids are a big public health and safety concern in our community, contributing to crime, elderly abuse, drug use during pregnancy, impairments in children exposed in utero, why prescribe them? This policy change would be controversial and the Tribe probably would never consider it. However, under Self-Governance SWO could exercise its powers as a public health authority to decide if it would make sense. It could then monitor whether the policy made an impact in the health of the people through data surveillance.

*****

The purpose of the Self-Governance planning phase is to explore whether health care services, health status, and access for the Oyate would improve under Tribal operation. More fully exercising sovereign authority "to promote public health" would be an answer to the question of "Why?" the Tribe might want to participate in Self-Governance.

SWO represented at regional tribal action plan workshop

The SWO Tribe was represented last Wednesday at a regional tribal action plan workshop in Aberdeen, SD.

Purpose was to bring together Tribal officials, health program administrators, and counselors to confront addiction. The Tribal Action Plan Workshop was held to prevent and reduce alcoholism, addiction, and alcohol and substance use within tribes.

"Wiggle your toes, tap your knees, shake yourself off to be present." This was a mantra shared by participants to begin brainstorming.

"Learn how to manage yourself in hostile territory. Hug yourself, use positive self-talk."

And "All great plans start with love!"

"Today," writes SWO Tribal Secretary Crystal Owen, "I am surrounded with other thinkers and doers in tribal communities sharing ideas and learning and taking healthy risks!"

Crystal also wanted to give special recognition to the Tribal Health Coordinator Sara DeCoteau: "When working on Tribal Action plans the SWO is fortunate to have Sara DeCoteau on the Health and Human Services team since the 1970s. She's always been committed to helping and guiding and sharing her knowledge to those who take the time to listen. So today I give her encouragement and appreciation for all her good works!"

Here are photo highlights provided by Secretary Owen.

One step in bringing meth addiction recovery to the Lake Traverse Reservation –

SWO mental health counselors provided Matrix Model workshop

Dakotah Pride Center hosted training from the Matrix Institute on Addictions over three days, July 6-8, at the administration building. Presenter was Sam Minsky.

Dakotah Pride Counselors along with three Counselors from the Canku Teca Center in Lake Andes, SD learned about the Matrix Model of Intensive Outpatient Treatment.

The Matrix Model Groups have begun here at Dakotah Pride Outreach Center last week, on Monday, July 18.

They provide an additional service to community members who are struggling with substance abuse.

People who are struggling with stimulant drug abuse are encouraged to contact Dakotah Pride to set up an evaluation.

If you have any questions, please call 698-3917 ext 114.

About the Presenter: Sam Minsky

Sam Minsky, MA/LMFT, is the senior national and International trainer in the Matrix Model, an evidence based manualized outpatient model that is recommended by NIDA and SAMHSA.

The model supports abstinence for people with Substance Use Disorders and is non shaming and non confrontational. It incorporates CBT, Motivational Interviewing, Contingency Management and Relapse Prevention Training. It is widely utilized throughout the U.S. and internationally in South Africa, Spain, Vietnam, a number of South Sea Island Nations and Territories, Nicaragua, Canada and Abu Dhabi and other nations.

In addition clients are referred to community programs, spiritual or secular programs like SMART Recovery while in treatment. No one is forced to go but some research indicates that formal CBT treatments are enhanced when clients concurrently utilize informal treatment in the community. Goals of treatment include the acquisition of skills necessary for behavioral change and also changing social context when indicated.

Many Native American and Canadian First Nation utilize culturally adapted versions of the Matrix Model.

His areas of specialization include Substance Use Disorders, Families, Adolescents, Systemic Family Interventions, Training, Consultation, CBT, MI, and Family Systems Theory particularly as it relates to Substance Use Disorders.

Sam Minsky is currently based in Sarasota, Florida.

More about the Matrix Model

The Matrix Model - Why it works:

It's an optimum length – normally 16 weeks – for intensive outpatient treatment. Opportunity for successful outcome is increased when the client has a protracted engagement in treatment plan. The Matrix Model treatment protocol can be extended up to 12 months through continuing care/aftercare. It's structured differently than inpatient treatment, using methods proven-effective with stimulant addicts.

It's less confrontational:

Progress is gradual. The focus is on the present. "Core issues" are not immediately addressed.

The client's allegiance is to the therapist rather than the group.

A non-judgmental attitude is basis of client-therapist bond.

Change recommendations are based on scientific data. Changes are incorporated immediately into lifestyle.

It's more directive and behavior-focused than general therapy.

Visit frequency results in strong transference, which is encouraged and utilized.

The goal is stability versus comfort.

Focus is abstinence; bottom-line is always continued abstinence.

Therapeutic team approach is utilized. Therapist frequently pursues less motivated clients.

Focus is on behavior rather than feelings; the behavior is more important than the reason behind it.

Family system support is encouraged.

Therapist functions as a coach/advocate.

It's proven-effective.

The organizing principles of the Matrix have been developed and modified over a 20 year period, using data from the treatment experience of 6,000 cocaine and 2,500 methamphetamine addicts.

The Matrix Model works because it creates explicit structure and expectations; establishes a positive, collaborative relationship with each patient; teaches information and cognitive-behavioral concepts; positively reinforces positive behavior change; provides corrective feedback when necessary/roll with resistance; educates family regarding stimulant abuse recovery; introduces and encourages self-help participation; uses urinalysis to monitor drug use and take the issue of use "off the table."

It's evidence-based.

The Matrix Model has over 20 years of research and development, and was recently tested in the CSAT Methamphetamine Project, the largest randomized clinical trial of treatment of methamphetamine addiction to date. Clients assigned to the Matrix Model:

Attended more groups.

Stayed in treatment longer.

Provided more methamphetamine-free urine samples during treatment.

Had longer periods of methamphetamine abstinence

For more information on the Matrix Model, go to www.matrixinstitute.org

Special feature courtesy of the Sisseton Courier –

Bowling returns to Sisseton with the Buffalo Lanes opening in near future

By Katy Heinecke

Courier Staff Writer

The Buffalo Lake District has been working extremely hard the last few months to get their newest business up and running. The Buffalo Lanes Inc. will soon be opening and there will once again be a bowling alley in the Sisseton area, which will make community bowlers extremely happy.

The plan to start a bowling alley business venture was presented to the Buffalo Lake District members in the form of a business plan presented by member Norman Johnson. The ball started rolling immediately and the board issued a "shut down" of the current roller rink, effective December 2013. The District Economic Development Board, consisting of five district members, was already in place to carry through with the proposed plan and had been previously incorporated as a business under the authority of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate.

The Board held several meetings and a request was submitted to the SWO Tribe for economic development funds. In 2014, through its Section 7 funds, the Tribe gave the Buffalo Lake District a grant for $75,000 for the planned bowling alley project. An additional $75,000 loan was approved and funded from the Tribe's Economic Development Program.

It was decided by the District to submit the business plan and loan request to renovate the roller rink building for the bowling alley business to the Great Plains Bank in Eden. In the meantime, the District approved a plan to submit a BIA guaranteed loan application to the BIA Loan Office in Colorado. Upon approval, the BIA loan program guarantees 95% of the loan. The Board of Directors in Eden denied the loan, even though the Bank President was in favor of approving the loan application. The Buffalo Lake District made a subsequent decision to submit a loan application the People's State Bank in Summit, SD for renovation costs of the project.

Full Speed Ahead Upon Loan Acceptance

The District Economic Board was removed and replaced with the District Executives as the Board of Directors for the bowling alley project, previously named The Buffalo Lanes, Inc. by the District Council in the fall of 2014. Lorraine Rousseau was appointed at the same meeting to follow through with the district executives with the paperwork needed to secure the BIA guaranteed loan and to complete the bank loan application process.

After several months and many meetings with People's State Bank President Tim Gapp, the loan was approved, contingent on several other conditions being met. The BIA Guaranteed Loan office in Colorado approved the project's loan application, setting forth several conditions to be met by the Bank and the Corporation. The Corporation met all of the conditions for the Bank and the BIA Guaranteed Loan Office, finally culminating with the closing of the loan on April 19, 2016. The Chairman and Vice-Chairman of the District signed the necessary closing documents and the following day the construction contracts were signed. The construction/renovation of the old roller rink building began immediately upon the signing of the contract.

A resolution of support from the Tribe was required for both loan applications. The Tribe followed through with the allocation of additional funds for the start-up costs of the bowling alley project just prior to the closing of the loan.

Christopherson to Manage the New Endeavor

The District Executives have been advised by the contractors, Landmark Builders and Dakota Resurfacing, that the project's completion tentative date is right after the installation of the scoring system, which is scheduled for August 15, 2016. The announcement for a grand opening date will happen soon after the last phase of the project is completed. John Christopherson has been hired as the manager and Nathan Owen has been hired as the pin setter/maintenance staff person, and they will be attending a training session in Muskegon, MI that will entail learning the operation and maintenance of the bowling alley equipment.

The Buffalo Lanes, Inc. will be offering bowling, a snack bar and lounge area, along with a gaming area that will offer darts and pool tables. A large gathering room has been built to accommodate meetings, parties and banquets, etc. The snack bar will be set up deli-style, offering a variety of foods such as pizzas, hotdogs, brats and other foods yet to be decided by the District Executives. The lounge will be serving alcoholic beverages as well as beer and wine for customers. Watch for future details in the Sisseton Courier for league meeting and league information.

Buffalo Lake District Working Aggressively for Fall Season

The District Executives are the people that make the decisions for the bowling alley project. Those members are as follows: Chairman Louie Johnson, Vice-Chairman John Lincoln, Councilman Kenneth "Dickie" Johnson, Secretary Lisa RedWing and Treasurer Kayleen LaBelle. Lorraine Rousseau works with the District Executives per the District motion to carry out the District Executive's directives.

"The major challenge for this project is the huge amount of paperwork required by the Bank and the BIA Guaranteed Loan Office. It required a lot of communication and cooperation from the various individuals in the gathering of the needed documents," said Rousseau.

The project has received a lot of support from the non-Indian community as well as from the Tribe. Feedback has  mainly been the question of when the bowling alley is expected to become a reality. The most common statement made by community members was been one of anxiety for the bowling alley to be completed, according to Lorraine.

The goal of the District Executives is to have a flourishing new bowling alley business. It is anticipated that a total of four employees will be hired including John, Nathan, a snack bar worker and a lounge worker. Starting as soon as late August, the plan is to capture the bowling enthusiast by way of radio, newspaper, and conversation letting everyone know the eight-lane bowling alley is open. The plan is to have league bowling, open bowling and invite student bowlers from surrounding schools to attend. The Buffalo Lake District is looking forward to offering bowling to all of the bowling enthusiasts in the surrounding communities.

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate has within its boundaries a total of seven districts: Big Coulee - Wilmot/Peever area, Buffalo Lake - Eden/Sisseton area, Enemy Swim - Waubay, Heipa/Veblen - Veblen area, Lake Traverse - Browns Valley area, Long Hollow - Sisseton Area and Old Agency - Sisseton area.

The Buffalo Lake District has been the only district that has had an established business, the Buffalo Lake Roller Rink, which transitioned from one business into the other. While the district has had its struggles with the roller rink, it was able to remain a business until the Buffalo Lake District decided to convert the roller rink into the bowling alley.

Reception scheduled for local artist

The Sisseton Arts Council will host an artist reception with George Frerck at the Nicollet Tower this Thursday, July 28 from 4:00-600 p.m.

More than twenty of George's paintings are on display at the Tower from late June through August.

George is a versatile artist, at home with both abstract and realistic paintings. This exhibit tends toward realism, depicting familiar scenes in Roberts and Marshall County, with much of the subject matter coming from within two miles of the Frerck home on Buffalo Lake.

George prefers to work in oils to capture the wildlife and landscapes that he enjoys painting.

"To collect my subject matter I take walks in the country and bring a camera," Frerck says. "I use the photos as a reference to create a more realistic painting. I may change color, value or add and subtract subject matter to enhance the composition of my work."

As a long-time art instructor at Sisseton High School George influenced and inspired many students. The reception on July 28 provides an opportunity for the public to visit with George and view some of the work he has created in recent years.

ARTIST STATEMENT: GEORGE FRERCK

As an artist I have always enjoyed both abstract and realism. When I was a student of the arts, I was often annoyed when an instructor would degrade a student because of his style, be it abstract or realism. Both styles have their place in the realm of art history.

I actually like abstract a little more because of the intellectual challenge. The difficultly of the challenge can be compared to an author who has a blank page. The writer must decide on the book's premise. Should it be fiction or nonfiction? The writer must also take on the complexity of cast of characters, location, time, etc. Most importantly, the writer must capture the interest and emotions of the person reading the story.

Painting an abstract work of art is very much like writing a book of fiction. Nothing exists. One has this blank canvas and has to create something of interest to create some emotional response from the observer. Abstract art is an invention of a different style of art, "thinking outside the box." If an artist did not explore new and different types of painting, art would become stagnant.

This exhibit is primarily realism. The challenge with this style of painting is mastering the craft of painting and developing techniques to capture reality. Another aspect of the creative process is composition. One may add or subtract elements of their painting to capture the observer's interest. What one wishes to accomplish, is to lead the viewer on a journey through the painting to establish some emotional response from the observer. The ability to convey the emotion one feels as you paint it on the canvas is for me, the most difficult.

Most of the painting scenes are from the local area of Roberts or Marshall County. I live on North Buffalo Lake, and the subject matter in many of the paintings are within 2 miles of my home. Wildlife and landscapes are the major subject matter for my paintings and I primarily work with oil. To collect my subject matter I take walks in the country and bring a camera. I use the photos as a reference to create a more realistic painting. I may change color, value, or add and subtract subject matter to enhance the composition of my work.

Secrecy makes Nebraska landowners nervous about Keystone Pipeline replacement

By Caheidelberger

Dakota Free Press – July 20, 2016 – I'm not the only one who's suspicious of Big Oil. In response to concerns that TransCanada's substandard steel may have leaked oil in Nebraska as its shoddy welding did in South Dakota, Bold Nebraska is giving landowners along the Keystone pipeline route jars for collecting soil and water samples.

The sense of unease… stems from what they see as a lack of oversight and lack of information as TransCanada Corp. digs up and replaces sections of its Keystone pipeline.

"I'd kind of be an idiot not to be concerned," said Russ Gubbels, who was one of about 25 people who attended a meeting organized by Bold Nebraska and held at the Red Road Herbs Retreat & Learning Center near Stanton [Nicholas Bergin, "TransCanada Replacing Parts of Keystone Pipeline; Bold Nebraska Cautions Landowners," Lincoln Journal Star, 2016.07.20].

Citizens might fret less if TransCanada and the government would just be open with their information:

"Our fear is slow leaks have been happening and they know that and that is why they have been doing these replacements … We feel there should be some level of accountability of TransCanada," said [Bold Nebraska leader Jane] Kleeb, one of the foremost grassroots organizers who opposed TransCanada's failed Keystone XL, the final phase of its Keystone pipeline network.

…PHMSA has had inspectors at Keystone excavation sites, Pickett said, but their reports are not made public. Kleeb said Bold Nebraska plans to file Freedom of Information Act requests demanding those reports [Bergin, 2016.07.20].

The Republican Party's new platform says that the abandoned Keystone XL pipeline proposal "has become a symbol of everything wrong with the current Administration's ideological approach" [pp. 19–20]. Yet the existing Keystone pipeline that runs under eastern South Dakota and Nebraska symbolizes everything that is wrong with the Republican ideological approach that puts Big Oil profits over landowner rights and environmental protection.

Rural Development, SDSU Extension select region for community economic development coaching

(Editor's note: As the Glacial Lakes region incorporates most of the downsized Sisseton-Wahpeton homeland, the SWO Tribe ought to make use of the added resources. This announcement means added support for assistance that has already been in place here for the past four years.)

Pierre, SD – July 18, 2016 – One region within South Dakota has been selected to participate in the "Stronger Economies Together (SET)" initiative to receive coaching and technical assistance for rural regional economic development.

A region called Glacial Lakes South Dakota which is comprised of Day, Grant, Marshall and Roberts Counties were awarded this opportunity for regional coaching and collaboration.

"It is exciting once again to offer this regional coaching opportunity across the state. South Dakota is at the forefront to increase regional economic competitiveness and collaboration of resources through the SET process," said Acting USDA Rural Development State Director Bruce Jones.

USDA Rural Development (USDA RD) and South Dakota State University (SDSU) Extension are collaborating for this initiative and have delivered this regional coaching opportunity for four years now. It is proposed to strengthen the capacity of rural communities and counties to work together in developing and implementing economic development blueprints that strategically build on the current and emerging economic strengths of the region. The SET Program is sponsored by USDA RD and the nation's four Regional Rural Development Centers.

Each regional team will examine regional demographics, opportunities, assets and barriers, and create a regional economic development plan. Training and technical assistance will be delivered by a core team of SDSU Extension and USDA RD staff as well as state-wide and area resource providers and experts.

This region was part of an application process earlier this year and was self-designated. The award process and scoring of the applications were facilitated by SET partner representatives from SDSU Extension, USDA RD, State of South Dakota Governor's Office of Economic Development, Dakota Resources, Small Business Development Center, Rural Electric Economic Development, Inc., and Grow South Dakota.

For questions contact Kenneth Sherin, Community Development Field Specialist, Kenneth.sherin@sdstate.edu or 605-995-7378.

Off-Grid Solar Furnace project underway; Note deadlines approaching

Submitted by SWO Planning Department

The Tribal Energy Office (TEO), is offering to the SWO elderly the opportunity to attain solar heating systems in their homes.

By completing an application, you are requesting to receive a free supplemental off-grid solar furnace, paid for by the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate. If you are selected you will have to provide monthly statements from your electric company for the previous year and monthly electric statements for one- year following the off-grid solar air furnace installation.

Only ten homes will be selected for this project.

The applications are provided at the Planning Department Office in the Sisseton-Wahpeton Administration Building and are due at Friday, July 29th, 2016 at 4:30 p.m.

Requirements of applicant must be a home owner who is at least 55 years or older. In addition to the TEO office providing the off-grid solar furnace to the SWO elderly, it is also accepting applications from all members who are interested in learning how to assemble and install the off-grid solar furnaces. Limited applications will be selected to 20-participants. The deadline in submitting the application will also be July 29th, 2016 at 4:30 p.m.

For more information please contact Hazen T. LaMere at the Planning Office:

Phone: 605-698-8212

E-mail: hazenl@swo-nsn.gov.

S-W Federal Credit Union announces annual meeting

The annual meeting of members of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Federal Credit Union will be held on Thursday, August 18, 2016 at 5:00 p.m. at the Tribal Elderly Center, Agency Village, SD.

Here is the agenda:

1. Financial report.

2. Committee reports.

3. Election of three (3) board members. (Note: This is a voluntary board, no stipends.)

4. Other business.

5. Door prize drawings

Any member of the SWFCU, 21 years of age or older with knowledge about the Credit Union or willing to learn can run for a position by filing a notice of intent at the Credit Union office by 3:00 p.m. on Thursday, August 18, 2016 and must be current on any obligations at the Credit Union.

To be eligible for the door prizes, you must be a member of the Credit Union by 3:00 pm on Thursday, August 18, 2016 and current on any obligations to the Credit Union.

Free solar air heating training coming to Lake Traverse Reservation

SWO Energy Office of Planning and Economic Development Aug. 15-25, 2016

Lakota Solar Enterprises (LSE) - Henry Red Cloud is the Founder and Sole Proprietor of Lakota Solar Enterprises (LSE) on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota. One of the first 100% Native American- owned and operated renewable energy companies in the nation, LSE employs tribal members to manufacture and install solar air heating systems for Native American families living on reservations across the Great Plains.

Additionally, Henry co-manages the Red Cloud Renewable Energy Center (RCREC), a one-of-a-kind educational facility where tribes from around the U.S. receive hands-on green job training in renewable energy technology and sustainable building practices including solar electric, solar water pumping, solar mobile power stations, solar radiant floor heating, wind turbines and building with straw bales and compressed earth blocks (CEBs).

Working in partnership with the Colorado non-profit organization, Trees, Water & People; Lakota Solar Enterprises has built and/or installed more than 1,000 solar air heating furnaces for ten western tribes. Additionally, Lakota Solar Enterprises has conducted renewable energy, energy efficiency and sustainable housing workshops for more than 30 additional tribal governments and organizations across the Great Plains and beyond.

This summer Lakota Solar Enterprises is partnering with the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate, Office of Planning and Economic Develop to offer a Solar Air Furnace training. The Solar Air Furnace Training will be on Aug 15-25, 2016 and include instruction in assembling solar air furnace kits, as well as hands-on experience installing these solar heaters in the field, on the homes of local families.

The training will provide:

*Overview of solar heating principals and methods

*Testing and quality-control of electric assembly

*Site evaluation

*Complete installation of solar heater systems at multiple sites

*Education and training of heating system recipients

This solar air heater workshop Aug 15-25 continues Lakota Solar Enterprise's successful history of providing renewable energy training opportunities to help tribal communities meet their renewable energy goals. For more information or to register for this training please contact:

Hazen LaMere, Tribal Energy

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

Planning & Economic Development Department

Email: hazenl@swo-nsn.gov

Office: (605) 698-8212

Cell: (605) 268-3963

About Henry Red Cloud

Henry Red Cloud's efforts to bring sustainable energy solutions to Indian Country have earned both national and international recognition. In 2014, he was selected by the White House as a Champion of Change for Solar Deployment. He also received the 2014 Berea College Service Award and the Oglala Lakota Service Award. The American Solar Energy Society honored Henry with the prestigious 2013 Charles Greeley Abbot Award for his significant social contribution to the field of solar energy. In 2012, he traveled to Vienna to receive the World Energy Globe Award in both the "Youth" and overall "World" categories. Henry received the 2010 Annual Innovation Award from the Interstate Renewable Energy Council, as well as special recognition from the 2010 Nuclear Free Future Award. In 2009, Henry was named Innovative Idea Champion by the Corporation for Enterprise Development and shared his concept of renewable energy on tribal lands at the national 2009 Innovation Summit in Washington, D.C.

About Trees, Water & People

Trees, Water & People is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization committed to improving people's lives by helping communities to protect, conserve and manage the natural resources upon which their long-term well-being depends.

Editorials –

Sota guest editorial –

New billboard takes aim against sex trafficking

Hooray! It is up!

Take a peek at the new anti-sex trafficking billboard by the Peever exit along I-29!

You can see it while traveling south from Sisseton on the interstate just before the Peever interchange on the west side of the highway.

This billboard was able to happen by a private donation.

The cost of this type of billboard is $3,000.00 per year and costs can run up to $450.00 per month.

We are working on hopefully putting up more in the state of South Dakota and trying to keep them up for more than a year.

If you know of someone who needs help or if you want information for someone you know involved in sex trafficking of any form, please pass the hotline number on to them:

1-888-373-7888

If you suspect of sex trafficking going on, please report it to the local authorities. This is a national hotline number. The information is also on the digital sign at I.H.S. Let's protect our people and help those whom can't help themselves and send them many prayers for their healing.

Remember be aware that sex trafficking is a form of having someone or yourself trade sex acts for anything of value, such as; money, drugs, alcohol, items of value. Including force and violence. Yes, this is happening in our area and getting worse, due to poverty and meth.

I am currently looking for an artist to draw up a picture to be used for future billboards and other awareness items, especially around Indian country.

The Watertown Initiative to Prevent Sex Trafficking (WIPST) grant is out of money until the new one hopefully comes through, so we are currently working with our donations and donated time from many good people.

If you have any ideas or want to help with awareness in our community, please email me or contact me at 605-698-3917 ext. 111.

Thanks, Teresa K. White, LAC, Youth Counselor.

(Editor's note: See our photo of the billboard, showing its location along the west side of the interstate at the Peever exit … and a closeup inset.)

Sota guest editorial –

I NEED To Get High

Written by Lorelie Rozzano

I am not your child, or spouse, or friend. I've changed. I don't belong to you any more. I don't care about you. Not in the way you want me too. I care about getting high. I WANT to get high. I will do ANYTHING to get high. I LOVE getting high. I NEED to get high ... and I will step over you to do it. When I look at you, I don't see YOU. I see a means to an end. You have money. I want it. End of story. I don't care if you can't pay the rent. I don't care if you need groceries. I don't care if you promised you wouldn't give me money again. I don't care if you lie to Dad. I don't care if you're broke. Sell your rings, take a loan, sell your electronics, max out your credit cards, borrow the money from someone else, because if you don't, I will STEAL it. I WILL find a way to get HIGH. You think you can CHANGE me, or SAVE me. You are WRONG! Something cold and dead slithers within me. I no longer respond to love or truth. You can CRY all you want. I don't care. I have no integrity or values. My morals are a thing of the past. I will say anything, do anything, and hurt anyone, to get my next FIX.

Although I may play the game with you, make no mistake. I don't play it because I LOVE you, I play it because I want my DOPE. I will say whatever you want to hear, I will promise you the world, I will look you in the eyes, and I WILL break your heart. Over and over again. I don't have a heart any more. I have a HUNGER. It's calculating and manipulative, and it OWNS me.

In a strange way you're thankful for this hunger. For when I feel it coming on, I find you, quick! Then when I've gotten what I want from you, I leave. You're anxious without me. You offer to buy my food, or pay my rent. You always GIVE me something.

By now, you're NEED is almost as great as mine.

I can't stay SICK without you. You can't breathe without ME.

You think you're helping me. You believe you're making a difference, but what you're really helping… is my ADDICTION.

I won't tell you this, but you know it, deep down.

If we keep going like this, one or both of us will die. Me from an overdose, that you paid for, and you from a heart attack, or stroke.

You'll wait YEARS for me to change, or see the light, and I take full advantage of this. You keep my secrets and protect my lies. You clean up my messes and bail me out. You love me to the exclusion of EVERYONE else.

You are bitter and resentful. You hide from your friends and isolate. You HATE.

Your world revolves around one thing only… ME.

But will your LOVE ever become greater than your FEAR? Would you be strong enough to reach out for help? Will you learn to say NO? Will you allow me to experience the consequences of my actions? Will you LOVE me enough to feel your own discomfort and stop enabling my addiction?

I lay trapped with within the confines of this cold dark, serpent – addiction – and I am … dying.

Brief editorial comments from the editor's desk –

On and Off the Lake Traverse Reservation

Thank you to our SWO Tribal Veteran Service Officer Geri Opsal and to Roberts County Veteran Service Officer Larry Goette for organizing a great ceremony honoring all of our area's Korean War veterans – Native and non-Native alike.

Please read Geri's report to the Akicita to learn about the honoring.

And our thanks to photographer John Heminger for capturing these visual images for us from the ceremony held at Anderson Park in Sisseton Saturday afternoon, July 9th.

*****

This past week the SWO Tribe and FEMA signed an historic agreement which identifies cultural sites and allows quick response in the event of any disaster that strikes the Lake Traverse Reservation.

This Tribe is only the third in the country to have entered into this kind of "programmatic agreement."

Watch for details of the agreement, and photos of the signing ceremony, in next week's Sota.

*****

Please read our guest editorial provided by Teresa White, Counselor at Dakotah Pride Center, on the back page.

And help by becoming involved in expanding awareness of how extensive sex trafficking is … not only across the country, but right here in our own community.

And while driving along I-29 check out the new billboard!

*****

Our thanks to Dionne Crawford Lake for providing information for our article on the Matrix Model.

Here is a great tool to bring to the Lake Traverse Reservation in order to help those with addictions, including meth, in recovery.

*****

The whole community mourns the loss of 18-year-old Justin Magnuson.

He was an outstanding young man who had many friends, including Oyate.

Anyone who has shopped at Teal's and had him help carry out groceries will remember his kindness.

*****

Our thanks to the Sisseton Courier and their staff writer Katy Heinecke for sharing their special feature on Buffalo Lake District's transformation of the former Bde Tanka Tioskata (roller skating rink) into a bowling alley.

BIA Superintendent Russell Hawkins has twice, during the past two general councils, tipped his hat to Buffalo Lake for staying the course and utilizing the BIA loan guarantee for this project.

Incidentally, Superintendent/former Chairman Hawkins at the June 2016 general council, praised Enemy Swim District for applying for similar assistance in developing a c-store at Waubay.

The remodeling is essentially complete, and the machinery is being installed now.

Watch for a grand opening announcement to come soon.

*****

This week's guest editorial on page three was suggested by several readers who are involved in our Oyate meth recovery program.

We are all blessed to have some wonderful people coming from their own recovery to reach out to help others.

The meth support group had a guest speaker last Monday evening. The event was to have been held at the Sisseton Wahpeton College but was instead moved to the SWO Memorial Park.

Watch for more motivational speakers to come.

And please, let's do all in our power as community to support prevention and recovery.

Recovering from meth addiction, especially, can very challenging … and can take a long time.

Read about the Matrix Model workshop that was provided by Dakotah Pride Center a week ago.

That story will be found in this edition of your Sota.

*****

The SWO Self-Governance work group provides Oyate information on how self-governance might assist the Tribe in exercising sovereignty.

Check out the article elsewhere in this week's issue.

*****

We see in the Sisseton School Board minutes that the new Sisseton School Superintendent Dr. Neil Terhune came to Tribal headquarters July 11th and met with the SWO Tribal Council.

Hopefully, this is the beginning of a positive relationship.

It would be great to see cooperation and compliance on the part of the public school district with the rule and spirit of law regarding use of federal impact aid dollars. And, more important than the dollars, getting past old attitudes that have long divided the community.

*****

Please read our SWO Health Education article this week on vaccinations.

Gypsy is providing the established modern medical community's reasons for getting vaccinations as prescribed and mandated by law.

But keep an open mind, however, because not even your medical practitioners understand all the ingredients being administered in your body and your children's bodies.

*****

The Reservation Election Board has announced the names of candidates with preliminary certification for office in the upcoming primary election.

Primary election is scheduled for October 4, 2016.

See more information in the REB notice in our legals section.

*****

Please read the new Sota policy concerning political advertising.

The rates reflect a greater discount rate for full, half and quarter page advertisements – as much as 70 percent off the commercial rate, depending upon size of the ad.

Full page: $180.

Half page: $100.

Quarter page: $50

Smaller sizes will still be discounted, but will be charged $2.50 per column inch: for example, 2 col. x 10" ad (20 col. inches) would cost $50, the same as a quarter page; another example, 2 col. x 5" ad (10 col. inches) would cost $25.

The policy is a re-statement that all political advertising must be pre-paid. No exceptions.

Advertising copy can be mailed with an accompanying check or money order to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279; or placed in the Sota mailbox at Tribal headquarters (no postage required).

If an advertisement is sent electronically, by e-mail or fax, then a check must be mailed to the Sota, either at headquarters or through the postal service.

There can be no exceptions.

*****

Elder's Meditation:

"You must speak straight so that your words may go as sunlight into our hearts." –Cochise "Like Ironweed" CHIRICAHUA APACHE

Come into my heart this morning. Allow me this day to live in the now. Help me to see all the beauty You have created in all things. Let me know myself. Today, as I make mistakes, let me see them as lessons. Guide me. When I see others make mistakes, let me honor them for where they are. Let me realize that they are Your children and only You, my Grandfather, knows what is really going on. When my lips move, let the words be Your words.

Allow me to have the courage to speak Your truth.

*****

Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

There is no safety in numbers, or in anything else. James Thurber (1894 - 1961), New Yorker, Feb. 4, 1939, "The Fairly Intelligent Fly"

Finance is the art of passing money from hand to hand until it finally disappears. Robert W. Sarnoff

Patience has its limits. Take it too far, and it's cowardice. George Jackson (1941 - 1971)

Sometimes I lie awake at night, and I ask, "Where have I gone wrong?" Then a voice says to me, "This is going to take more than one night." Charles M. Schulz (1922 - 2000), Charlie Brown in "Peanuts"

It is dangerous to be right when the government is wrong. Voltaire (1694 - 1778)

Usually, terrible things that are done with the excuse that progress requires them are not really progress at all, but just terrible things. Russell Baker (1925 - )

Of all forms of caution, caution in love is perhaps the most fatal to true happiness. Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970), Conquest of Happiness (1930) ch. 12

The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds; and the pessimist fears this is true. James Branch Cabell (1879 - 1958), The Silver Stallion, 1926

*****

The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Earlier receipt of copy is always appreciated. So, if you are aware of a date or message that needs to be publicized or advertised, please let us know about it in advance of the weekly deadline.

The preferred way to submit typed articles and ads, art and photos, is by e-mail.

The editor can be reached at the following e-mail address:

earthskyweb@cs.com

For more information, leave a message on the Sota production office voicemail (605) 938-4452, or send a fax to the 24-hour dedicated line (605) 938-4676.

-- CDF

Obituaries –

Celebration of life for Adeline King

Adeline (Dolly) King (La Blanc), 83, of Pueblo Colorado passed away July 3, 2016 after a long fought illness.

Dolly was born on August 14,1932 in Veblen, SD and was a proud member of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux.

She was a very kind and generous soul, who loved her family and friends dearly and always had candy to pass out to the children when they came to visit her.

Dolly was a proud homemaker who loved to cook for family and friends. She enjoyed reading health books and was devoted to the practice of homeopathic medicine.

She will be deeply missed by all.

Preceded in death by parents Peter La Blanc and Grace Wanna, brother Wesley, sisters Celeste, Elvera, and Germaine. Husband Melvin King. Survived by sister Barbara (Bobby) Robbins. Daughters Cindy (Gene) Pritchett, Loleen King, and son Melvin King Jr. Grandchildren Curtis Delgadillo, Misty (Chris) Siggins. Great grandchildren Kyle Delgadillo, Summer Siggins and Johnny Siggins. Her special nieces Christy and Lynette. Great grand niece and nephew, Mariah and Josh. And all of her relatives in SD, ND, MN, CO, and CA.

A celebration of her life was held on July 16, 2016, at her daughter Cindy's house.

Special thanks to the San de Cristo hospice care in Pueblo Colorado, for making Dolly's last moments as comfortable as possible.

Funeral services held for Elizabeth Armstrong

Elizabeth Marie "Libby" Armstrong, age 35, of Morton, Minnesota journeyed to the Spirit World on Tuesday, July 12, 2016 at her residence.

She was born on March 31, 1981 the daughter of John Jason Armstrong and Cindy Billyboy.

Libby was formerly employed at The Royal River Casino.

She enjoyed cooking, music, jingle dancing, native crafts and being with her family, especially her brother John.

Survived by her four children: Lamuel "L.J.", Lathaniel, Cadence and Terrence; her father: Jason Armstrong of Flandreau; her mother: Cindy Billyboy of Hayward, Wisconsin; three brothers: John Billyboy, Montana Armstrong and Dylon Armstrong; her grandmother: Fannie Armstrong all of Flandreau, South Dakota; two nieces: Paizlee and Braelynn; many aunts, uncles and cousins.

Preceded in death by a niece Secrets Marie Billyboy, her paternal grandfather and maternal grandparents.

Funeral services for Elizabeth Marie "Libby" Armstrong were held on Monday, July 18th at 11:00 A.M. at Eastman Hall in Flandreau, South Dakota.  Pastor Paula Armstrong officiated.

An all-night wake was held on Sunday, July 17th beginning at 7:00 P.M. at Eastman Hall.

Honorary Casket Bearers were Elise Montoya, Shaylene Montoya, Rose Crow, Sunni Blair, Kimberly Cloud, and Sarah Benting.

Casket Bearers were Montana Armstrong, Dylon Armstrong, John Billyboy, Lamuel "L.J." Armstrong, Lathaniel Armstrong and Mike Tollefson.

The Chilson Funeral Home in Winsted, Minnesota served the family. Online condolences may be made to www.chilsonfuneralhome.com

Services held for infant Ca'tan Edward LaBelle

Ca'tan Edward LaBelle was born in Fargo, ND on July 11th, 2016. He was the youngest of four handsome boys, precious 3.8 pounds and 16 1/2 inches long.

Unfortunately, Tunkasila called him home to the Spirit World.

He will be greatly missed and forever loved by his mother, Edith LaBelle, older brothers Quentin Jr., Carter Lee and Wambdi and many other family members.

Fly high son, watch over us!

We love you unconditionally!

An all-night wake service was held on Tuesday, July 19, 2016 at the Heipa District Center, Veblen, SD.

Funeral services were held on Wednesday morning, July 20, 2016 at Heipa District Center.

Interment is at St. Matthew Cemetery, Veblen, SD.

Chilson Funeral Home, Winsted, MN assisted the family with arrangements.

On-line condolences can be made at www.chilsonfuneralhome.com

Funeral services Monday for Justin Magnuson

Justin Wayne Magnuson, 18, of Sisseton, SD passed away on July 20, 2016 from injuries received in a one-vehicle car accident. Funeral services were scheduled this Monday, July 25, 2016 at 10:30 a.m. at St. Peters Catholic Church in Sisseton, SD.

Visitation was on Sunday at the Cahill Funeral Chapel.

Services for Leonard Shepherd

Leonard Shepherd left for the spirit world in a hospital at Fargo, ND on Saturday, July 23, 2016.

All-night wake services will be held Monday night beginning at 7:00 p.m. at the SWO Community Center, Agency Village, SD; and Tuesday all-night beginning at 7:00 p.m. at the Toka Nuwan Community Center.

Funeral services will be held Wednesday, July 27, 2016 at 2:00 p.m. at the Toka Nuwan Community Center.

Burial will be at St. James Episcopal Cemetery, Toka Nuwan.

Chilson Funeral Home, Winsted, Minn., is in charge of arrangements.

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor's note: The following comes from the editor's column and the Sota "deadlines and policies" statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and must be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Rollover crash kills teen

Summit, SD – July 20, 2016 – A one-car rollover accident on a rural Roberts County road near Summit, SD, claimed the life of 18-year-old Justin Wayne Magnuson of Sisseton.

Justin, who was driving, was pronounced dead at the scene.

Two ten-year old girls, passengers in the vehicle, were taken to the hospital for what Highway Patrol officers describe as serious but not life-threatening injuries.

The accident took place about 9:40 p.m. last Wednesday.

Funeral services are scheduled for Justin xxx

Family to file lawsuit over police officer's actions

Last Tuesday night, July 19th, Delroy Hill was walking along Big Coulee Road in rural Peever. The 48-year-old SWO man was intoxicated.

A Tribal police cruiser pulled alongside, driven by Officer Cody DuMarce.

What happened next will have to be determined by Tribal Court.

Here is what is alleged by Delroy's mother, Ruth Hill.

What she believes is that Officer DuMarce asked her son who he was and determined to take him into custody.

Being intoxicated amounted to a probation violation for Delroy.

Then, she said, the officer "beat him up."

"He knocked him (my son) to the pavement," she said, "then kicked him in the face and head."

Delroy was taken by ambulance to Coteau des Prairie Hospital in Sisseton.

 "There was blood splatter on his pant legs (in the Coteau hospital emergency room later)," she added.

Ruth went on to say that two medical doctors worked on his injuries – stitching the top and inside of his mouth.

"His nose was broken … so badly they (medical staff) couldn't do anything for it."

"His neck was hurting," she added.

Tribal Police took him from the ER to the Tribal jail, but she said he was scheduled to go to Woodrow W. Keeble Memorial Health Care Center later in the week for further treatment.

At the hospital, she said, she confronted several Tribal officers about the incident.

She said she spoke to Officer DuMarce, asking if he was the one who had done this to her son, and "he nodded yes."

According to Ruth, Cody said that he believed Delroy was "sizing me up" (to resist arrest).

It needs to be noted that among his injuries, Delroy had damage to his knuckles. The police report and video could help explain how that occurred.

Because of his probation violation, Delroy was given four days to serve in jail, and was due to be discharged over the past weekend.

Ruth said she hopes that the body camera (worn by Tribal police officers) will show the court what actually happened.

Here are photos taken in the hospital emergency room by his family on Tuesday night, then a follow-up picture taken during at appointment at the IHS clinic Thursday afternoon.

By Friday, Delroy's family still had not talked with the public defender, who had been assigned by the court on Wednesday.

And they had still not gotten a copy of the police report.

Delroy was scheduled to be released from jail on Saturday, and he has a court appearance set this Wednesday, July 27.

(Editor's note: This report provides allegations of Delroy's family. Judgment based on the police report, video from the officer's body camera, and other evidence, should come from the court.)

Reception scheduled for local artist

The Sisseton Arts Council will host an artist reception with George Frerck at the Nicollet Tower this Thursday, July 28 from 4:00-600 p.m.

More than twenty of George's paintings are on display at the Tower from late June through August.

George is a versatile artist, at home with both abstract and realistic paintings. This exhibit tends toward realism, depicting familiar scenes in Roberts and Marshall County, with much of the subject matter coming from within two miles of the Frerck home on Buffalo Lake.

George prefers to work in oils to capture the wildlife and landscapes that he enjoys painting.

"To collect my subject matter I take walks in the country and bring a camera," Frerck says. "I use the photos as a reference to create a more realistic painting. I may change color, value or add and subtract subject matter to enhance the composition of my work."

As a long-time art instructor at Sisseton High School George influenced and inspired many students. The reception on July 28 provides an opportunity for the public to visit with George and view some of the work he has created in recent years.

ARTIST STATEMENT: GEORGE FRERCK

As an artist I have always enjoyed both abstract and realism. When I was a student of the arts, I was often annoyed when an instructor would degrade a student because of his style, be it abstract or realism. Both styles have their place in the realm of art history.

I actually like abstract a little more because of the intellectual challenge. The difficultly of the challenge can be compared to an author who has a blank page. The writer must decide on the book's premise. Should it be fiction or nonfiction? The writer must also take on the complexity of cast of characters, location, time, etc. Most importantly, the writer must capture the interest and emotions of the person reading the story.

Painting an abstract work of art is very much like writing a book of fiction. Nothing exists. One has this blank canvas and has to create something of interest to create some emotional response from the observer. Abstract art is an invention of a different style of art, "thinking outside the box." If an artist did not explore new and different types of painting, art would become stagnant.

This exhibit is primarily realism. The challenge with this style of painting is mastering the craft of painting and developing techniques to capture reality. Another aspect of the creative process is composition. One may add or subtract elements of their painting to capture the observer's interest. What one wishes to accomplish, is to lead the viewer on a journey through the painting to establish some emotional response from the observer. The ability to convey the emotion one feels as you paint it on the canvas is for me, the most difficult.

Most of the painting scenes are from the local area of Roberts or Marshall County. I live on North Buffalo Lake, and the subject matter in many of the paintings are within 2 miles of my home. Wildlife and landscapes are the major subject matter for my paintings and I primarily work with oil. To collect my subject matter I take walks in the country and bring a camera. I use the photos as a reference to create a more realistic painting. I may change color, value, or add and subtract subject matter to enhance the composition of my work.

Let me know what you think

By Sen. John Thune

Each week the Senate is in session, I travel back and forth from my home in Sioux Falls to Washington, D.C., for hearings, votes, and other meetings. While I love representing South Dakotans in Washington, it's no secret that I'm happiest when I'm home in South Dakota, hearing directly from you. So, as I head back to spend several weeks traveling the state and connecting with you, I wanted to share some of the big things we've accomplished in the Senate over the last 18 months and look forward to hearing what you think.

Our top priority has been to focus on policies that boost America's economic security and strengthen our national security. We passed the first significant education reform bill since 2002, the first major trade promotion authority bill since 2002, the first significant reforms to Social Security since 1983, and the first major environmental law reauthorization since the 1990s. We worked hard to pass legislation that prevents states from imposing unworkable mandates on the food supply and protected the homeland by passing the National Defense Authorization Act, key cybersecurity reforms, and sanctions against the North Korean regime.

I knew serving as chairman of the Senate Commerce Committee would give South Dakota's interests the national attention they deserve, and the results speak for themselves.

Congress passed and the president signed my bipartisan bill that makes landmark reforms to the Surface Transportation Board, the federal agency that oversees our nation's rail system. These reforms will make the agency more accountable to the people who depend on rail transportation, like our agriculture producers. The president also signed the first multi-year highway bill since 2005 – the longest since 1998. And all Americans will benefit from the aviation security reforms I authored as well as the consumer protection provisions included in the bipartisan aviation bill that I helped get to the president's desk. All of that is good news for states like South Dakota where a safe, reliable, and effective transportation system is critical.

While a lot was accomplished, there's a lot more we tried to do. Unfortunately, Senate Democrats and President Obama have made it difficult to approve must-pass bills like the Department of Defense appropriations bill, which would fund our troops, and the Military Construction/Veterans Affairs appropriations bill, which would fund key infrastructure programs and support our veterans. Despite bipartisan attempts to reach an agreement, Democrats opposed a $1.1 billion funding bill that would have helped tackle the nationwide Zika threat. I'm most disappointed, though, that amid all of the threats we face from terrorist groups like ISIS, President Obama has yet to lay out a concrete and comprehensive plan to defeat the group and its radical ideology. These are important issues, and they deserve to rise above politics.

If our paths cross this summer, please stop and say hello. I can't do my job without knowing what's important to you, and your feedback on what I'm working on in the Senate is invaluable. If we don't catch up in person, you can always call my office, write me a letter, or send me an email. Either way, I look forward to hearing from you this summer.

From SWO Community Health Education –

New 6th Grade Vaccinations requirements

The South Dakota Department of Health is now requiring students entering the 6th (on or after their 11th birthday) to receive:

1. One dose of Tdap vaccine

2. One dose of MCV4

A child may receive the Tdap prior to their 11th birthday, but NOT earlier than their 7th birthday. If a child had not reached age 11 at the beginning of 6th grade, the requirement will be deferred until the 11th birthday. The child will have 45 days after their 11th birthday to get the vaccine. Parents are encouraged to talk with their provider about immunizing their child against other diseases such as HPV (which causes many cervical cancers) and Hepatitis A (which causes diarrhea).

Resource: South Dakota Department of Health 2016.

IHS launches Medicaid and Medicare enrollment pilot

Enrollment push benefits patients, who gain more access to health care, expanded IHS services

The Indian Health Service is launching a new effort to increase Medicaid and Medicare enrollment of IHS patients at six health facilities in four states. The pilot targets American Indian and Alaska Native IHS patients eligible for Medicaid and Medicare who are not yet able to access the health care options and support available through those programs because they are not enrolled.

The participating facilities are: Phoenix Indian Medical Center in Phoenix, Arizona; Pine Ridge Hospital in Pine Ridge, South Dakota; Rosebud Hospital in Rosebud, South Dakota; Sioux San Hospital in Rapid City, South Dakota; Blackfeet Community Hospital in Browning, Montana; and Quentin N. Burdick Memorial Health Care Facility in Belcourt, North Dakota.

"For our patients, having Medicaid or Medicare coverage means having more access to health care. The goal of this pilot is to increase Medicaid and Medicare enrollment in the selected sites, help the IHS identify best practices to increase Medicaid and Medicare enrollment in all of our communities and leverage resources to provide access to quality health care," said IHS Principal Deputy Director Mary Smith. "I encourage Indian Country to get enrolled in Medicaid and Medicare: it benefits you, your family and your community."

The project is expected to increase resources available for IHS to spend on patient care. IHS collects reimbursements from Medicaid and Medicare for services provides to Medicaid and Medicare beneficiaries at IHS facilities, and the Indian Health Care Improvement Act provides that all third-party revenue collected by a facility remains at the local level. This revenue is used to meet conditions of participation in the Medicaid and Medicare programs, and to supplement needs at the local level such as hiring more providers, purchasing new equipment and funding additional services. IHS is working with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, which oversees Medicaid and Medicare, as well as other federal agencies, national and regional Indian organizations, states and Tribes to offer enrollment assistance training and host on-site enrollment events at the six facilities. Specific enrollment event dates for August and September will be posted on the IHS calendar in the following weeks.

IHS is working to strengthen and design systems to better serve patients, and that includes increasing Medicaid and Medicare enrollment across our facilities. As part of this project, IHS is improving data systems and training staff.

IHS Division of Business Office Enhancement oversees IHS business offices and staff and advises on third-party reimbursements from Medicaid, Medicare and private health insurance.

The IHS, an agency in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, provides a comprehensive health service delivery system for approximately 2.2 million American Indians and Alaska Natives.

IHS tribal consultation on draft policy regarding purchasing health coverage

Policy supports tribes, urban Indian organizations that buy qualified health plans for tribal members

The Indian Health Service will conduct a 30-day consultation with tribal leaders and confer with urban Indian organization representatives on a draft policy that provides guidance to tribes, tribal organizations and urban Indian health programs on purchasing health insurance for tribal members. Th tribal consultation period is open from July 18 to August 17.Under section 402 (25 U.S.C. § 1642) of the Indian Health Care Improvement Act (IHCIA), which was made permanent under the Affordable Care Act, tribes and tribal organizations may purchase health coverage, or "sponsor" premiums, for IHS beneficiaries using federal funding to the extent available under the law. "This new draft policy on sponsoring health premiums is one important way IHS works with and supports tribes in their efforts to enhance access to care for their members, improve third-party collections, and achieve cost savings," said Mary Smith, IHS principal deputy director. "By using their health care funds to purchase qualified health plans for their tribal members, tribes can maximize the benefits for their members."

For IHS patients, having health care coverage means having more health care options. This draft policy also supports IHS facilities by increasing third-party billing revenue, which in turn increases resources available for IHS to spend on patient care. The draft circular shared today includes information on determining eligible beneficiaries and funding sources, along with recommended language to be included in new or existing contracts, compacts or funding agreements between tribes and organizations and IHS. The draft circular also provides guidance on when a health plan self-funded in part or whole with ISDEAA funds will be considered eligible for reimbursement from the IHS Catastrophic Health Emergency Fund.

Smith also sent a letter to tribal and urban leaders informing them of the circular and consultation and confer. A telephone session is scheduled for July 25, 2016. Draft Circular 16-08 is available online.

According to the IHS Tribal Consultation Policy, tribal consultation occurs when there is a critical event that may impact Tribes, new or revised policies or programs are proposed or the IHS budget request and annual performance plan are being developed. Read more about IHS Tribal Consultation.

The IHS, an agency in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, provides a comprehensive health service delivery system for approximately 2.2 million American Indians and Alaska Natives.

IHS to launch Medicare, Medicaid Pilot Program requested for Turtle Mountain

Turtle Mountain will be one of six pilot programs nationwide

Bismarck, ND – July 21, 2016 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today announced that the Indian Health Service (IHS) has agreed to launch a pilot program – which Heitkamp has long requested – to increase Medicare and Medicaid enrollment in tribal communities in North Dakota and beyond. The pilot will be offered at the Quentin N. Burdick Memorial Health Care Facility in Belcourt, which serves the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians, and five IHS facilities in other states across the country.

By targeting patients who are eligible but not currently enrolled in Medicaid or Medicare, IHS expects the pilot program to expand health care options for IHS patients and increase resources available for IHS to spend on patient care. The pilot program is one of six launched nationwide and the only one in North Dakota. Medicaid and Medicare reimburse IHS for services that IHS facilities provide to Medicaid and Medicare beneficiaries, so expanding enrollment in these programs can free up funds for local facilities to spend on hiring, new equipment, and additional services.

"Successful communities start with healthy families, and the pilot program I pushed for will make sure folks on Turtle Mountain and beyond get the care they need," said Heitkamp. "As this pilot program begins in Belcourt and at other facilities, I encourage IHS patients eligible for these programs to enroll. In the last year we've seen serious and unacceptable problems at some IHS facilities in the Great Plains. As I push to maintain and improve the quality of care in North Dakota, it's vital for our communities, families, and children that folks take advantage of every opportunity they can to access quality care."

Heitkamp has long fought to make sure Native communities in the Great Plains have access to quality health care – including by expanding enrollment in Medicare and Medicaid. Just last month, Heitkamp hosted a meeting in Grand Forks to bring together tribal leaders from across North Dakota with a top U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) official, so tribes could share their concerns about ongoing challenges at IHS facilities in the region. Acting Deputy Secretary of HHS Mary Wakefield – a Devils Lake native – provided an update on the agency's efforts to improve IHS care, and Heitkamp pressed her for action.

In April, Heitkamp met with IHS Acting Director Mary Smith to press her to maintain quality health care for North Dakota's tribal communities as the agency invests attention and resources to fix severe shortcomings at health facilities in South Dakota. The next month Heitkamp toured Fort Yates Hospital, an IHS facility on the Standing Rock Reservation, to check in on conditions on the ground.

IHS provides health services to 122,000 tribal members across the Great Plains area, including in North Dakota, South Dakota, Iowa, and Nebraska.

Pine Ridge, Rosebud, and other IHS facilities across the Great Plains have experienced severe service disruptions in recent years, which prompted Heitkamp to request a February U.S. Senate Committee on Indian Affairs oversight hearing to investigate the problems. At the hearing, Heitkamp called out a "culture of failure" at the Indian Health Service. Heitkamp urged the agency to begin tackling the substandard quality of Indian health care and other severe problems at IHS facilities in the Great Plains, particularly in South Dakota.

The persistent disruptions that prompted the hearing included emergency room closures, inadequate staffing, unsafe and unsterile conditions, and regulatory violations – all of which put the health of communities who rely on the hospitals at risk. Heitkamp and a bipartisan group of senators requested the oversight hearing in January.

As a member of the U.S. Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, Heitkamp has long fought to improve the quality of health care across Indian Country. The first bill Heitkamp introduced as a U.S. senator was her bill to create a commission on steps the federal government should take to improve the lives of Native children, including improving health care in Native communities.

Heitkamp has also fought to provide quality health care for Native veterans. In October 2015, Heitkamp hosted her second Native American Veterans Summit on the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indian Reservation to connect Native veterans from across the state with top officials, guaranteeing veterans access to health care and other support they deserve. Native Americans serve in the military at four times the rate of any other group. Heitkamp held her first Native American Veterans Summit at United Tribes Technical College in Bismarck in 2014, bringing together more than 140 Native veterans with federal officials and advocates who provided resources and guidance.

Summit to address Native oral health

Fargo, N.D., July 21 – A one-day summit to address important dental health issues among the state's Native American population is scheduled for Monday, Aug. 1, at the Ramkota Inn in Bismarck, North Dakota.

The Tribal Nation's North Dakota Oral Health Summit is expected to attract tribal leaders, tribal health professionals, dental professionals, law makers and policy makers. Participants will identify long-term solutions to dental health disparities in North Dakota's tribal communities and identify steps to reduce those disparities.

The event is sponsored by the National Indian Health Board and the North Dakota State University American Indian Public Health Resource Center.

One of the featured presenters will be Donald Warne, NDSU chair of public health, associate professor and Mary J. Berg Distinguished Professorship in Women's Health.

"Our purpose for holding this meeting is to address the significant shortage in access to oral health services in North Dakota," Warne said. "Unfortunately, it is the children in rural, underserved and reservation communities that suffer the most from lack of access. Other states, including Alaska and Minnesota, have developed creative ways to improve access to services. We are hoping to develop a plan for improving oral health access in North Dakota."

Other scheduled presenters at the summit include: · Mary E. Williard, director of oral health promotion, commander, U.S. Public Health Service, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium

· Shawnda Schroeder, research assistant professor, University of North Dakota Center for Rural Health

· Kimberlie J. Yineman, director of the oral health program, North Dakota Department of Health

· Brad Hawk, Indian Health Systems administrator, North Dakota Indian Affairs Commission

· Swinomish Tribal Council representative, LaConner, Washington

· James Roberts, senior executive liaison for intergovernmental affairs, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium

· Jaci Seefeldt, prevention coordinator, North Dakota Department of Health

Returning from the Battlefield to a Battle at Home

By Rep. Kristi Noem

July 22, 2016

Nearly two dozen veterans a day fall victim to suicide. Not only is this number about twice as high as civilian suicide rates, but as of 2012, more men and women in uniform lost their life to suicide than in combat. We cannot accept this as the status quo. We, as a nation, have to do better.

In recent years, the VA has seen its funding increase. Some reforms have been made. But the bureaucracy has remained the same. Wait times are too long. Calls into the veteran suicide crisis hotline have gone to voicemail, according to the VA's own Inspector General report earlier this year.

Still, there is hope. Veterans who have been able to cut through the VA's red tape are less likely to lose their life to suicide. That's one of the reasons why I've been so vocal about the fact that we need to keep the Hot Springs VA Hospital open. This is a facility that has served veterans for more than 100 years. Its position in the Black Hills provides a level of serenity that aids in the healing process – especially for those facing Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), traumatic brain injury (TBI), and similar illnesses.

Those who receive care there have lobbied hard to make sure it stays open, as has the Hot Springs community. Despite all this, the VA has incrementally depleted the number of services offered in Hot Springs and pushed forward a plan to close the facility altogether. Now is not the time to shutter the doors and tell our veterans to find help elsewhere.

The House has voted to block the VA from using funds to close the facility in Hot Springs or limit services there through FY2017, provisions I fought to include; but veterans deserve a permanent solution.

Earlier this Congress, the House also passed the Clay Hunt SAV Act, which helps increase access to mental healthcare at the VA. The bill became law only months later and implementation is underway. Additional services are also offered to veterans in major mental health legislation that passed Congress just a few weeks ago.

There are also incredible organizations throughout South Dakota that are reaching out and making a difference. Over Independence Day this year, I had the opportunity to meet members of the Lane Logan Memorial LTD at a parade in Watertown. They are working hard to fight PTSD and veteran suicide in memory of Lane, who lost his life to suicide at just 28 years old after serving his country.

The Sergeant Derr Foundation in Rapid City also does important work to advocate and assist those fighting battles after returning home. Sergeant Colton Derr lost his life far too young. As his biography reads, "Colton's one unfulfilled desire was to share his love with a family of his own. Instead, Colton is sharing his love with our God and family in Heaven."

Our office is also here to help. If you or a loved one ever faces an unresponsive VA, we are here to help usher you through, ensure they respond, and hold the agency accountable for its failure.

The VA's directive is to serve our nation's veterans and provide them with the care they have earned. Especially for those fighting a battle at home against PTSD, TBI and other mental illnesses, it's time that they begin treating veterans on the service members' terms, not the VA's.

Crystal clear swimming pool

By Richard P. Holm MD

The leading cause of blindness worldwide is from cataracts. That is the clouding and browning of the natural lens, which is mostly due to aging and sun-damage. It is like the difference in swimming with goggles in a crystal clear pool versus in an algae-blooming prairie lake in August. People with cataracts progressively lose their vision as their lens opacifies.

More than 2600 years ago, a physician from India was the first to write about cataract surgery. He described using a curved needle to push back completely clouded over lenses into the vitreous fluid in the middle of the eye, out of the field of vision. This reportedly would return some vision for people completely blinded in that eye by a cataract, and he called it "couching."

The vitreous is the sack of fluid that separates the iris, pupil, and lens at the front of the eye from the retina or light sensitive nerve blanket that catches the image in the back of the eye and sends the photo message to the brain. Pushing or couching cataracts back and hopefully to the side into that vitreous would allow light through to the retina, however the vitreous would be disrupted, could possibly become infected, and there would be no lens to focus the light. Still this was better than nothing.

Couching cataracts eventually spread to China, Arabia, Africa and Europe, but it is not difficult to understand why this procedure was used only as a last resort. Other methods to remove the lens completely from the eye, without disrupting the vitreous, gradually were developed during the Middle Ages and up unto today. But until we learned how to control infection in the mid-1800s this was still very dangerous and not commonly done. Eventually very thick external glasses were devised that would replace the lost natural lens, and starting in the 1940s these removable glasses began to be replaced with lenses that are surgically implanted into the eye.

Now the surgery to extract opaque and diseased cataract lenses is much better, and keeps improving. And the lenses we implant continue to advance as well.

It is like cleaning out all that vision blocking algae, and swimming in a crystal clear pool.

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

SWC announces Spring 2016 Dean's List

The following students have been named to the Dean's list for academic excellence during the Spring 2016 semester at Sisseton Wahpeton College. To earn Dean's List distinction students must have completed a minimum of 12 credits and must have earned at least a 3.5 grade point average on a 4.0 scale.

Ikiciyuskinpi Owasin! (Congratulations All!)

Shantelle Crandall

Kinew DesRosiers - Big Coulee District

Erin Keoke - Heipa District

Thomas German - Lake Traverse District

Bobbi Iyarpeya - Enemy Swim District

Brenda Jackson - Big Coulee District

Darrell Quinn Jr.* - Long Hollow District

ShoShana Saddler - Chippewa

Kunsi's Garden students take field trips

Last week these ESDS students took a field trip that included a stop at Nicollet Tower at Sisseton and the Waubay National Wildlife Refuge. They also enjoyed a day's visit to a farm! There they met and interacted with the animals and their caretakers.

Here are photos from these outings.

Drivers license exams

Driver license examinations are held in Sisseton at the City Hall, 406 2nd Ave.

Examikners are there from 8:15 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. each Wednesday of the month.

Important:

File application at least one hour in advance of scheduled closing hours if you wish to complete the exam on the same day.

Driver license applicants should bring one item to prove identity, date of birth and lawful status (such as certified birth certificate, etc.); one document to prove Social Security number; and two documents to prove residential address.

If your name is different from the name on your identity document, you need to bring additional proof of your legal name, such as a certified marriage certificate, certified adoption document, or court order authorizing a name change.

The examiners must be able to trace from your birth name to your current name.

No driving tests will be given from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

For more information, call 1-800-952-3696 or visit the website at dps.ed.gov

Minnesota Historical Society offers research grants

The Minnesota Historical Society is pleased to announce the fourth round of Gale Family Library Legacy Research Fellowships. Applications are due by October 3, 2016, with Legacy Fellowship research to begin January 1, 2017.

Awards of $1,000 or $5,000 are available to successful applicants.

The fellowship is open to any post-college Minnesota scholar who is engaged in Minnesota-related scholarship/research that draws on Gale Family Library resources and adds to the body of knowledge and interpretation of pre- and post-statehood history. Independent scholars and scholars--including graduate students—who are not eligible for funding through employment at academic institutions are especially encouraged to apply.

The competitive fellowship is designed to support research on Minnesota history that is conducted at the Gale Family Library at the Minnesota History Center. Fellows will work at the library and interact with MNHS staff.

Applications will be evaluated according to how well a proposal directly relates to the library's research resources, fulfills the requirements of the particular fellowship for which the candidate is applying, and has the potential to educate and engage public and scholarly audiences about Minnesota history and cultural heritage.

For more information, including application instructions, visit the Legacy Research Fellowships website.

The Gale Family Library Legacy Research Fellowship is made possible by the Legacy Amendment's Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund through the vote of Minnesotans on Nov. 4, 2008.

*****

About the Minnesota Historical Society MNHS is a non-profit educational and cultural institution established in 1849. MNHS collects, preserves and tells the story of Minnesota's past through museum exhibits, libraries and collections, historic sites, educational programs and book publishing. Using the power of history to transform lives, MNHS preserves our past, shares our state's stories and connects people with history.

STEM scholarships available at AIGC

The American Indian Graduate Center (AIGC) has announced the limited availability of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) specific, graduate-level Loans for Service made available through the Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) for the academic year 2016-2017.

The purpose of the SPGSF is to provide financial assistance to eligible American Indian and Alaska Native graduate and professional degree candidates, to promote STEM research and opportunities for careers with Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) and BIE funded organizations on and off reservation and tribal governments.

SPGSF is a Loan for Service Program and recipients must agree to relocate, if necessary, to obtain acceptable employment for the service payback agreement. (One year of funding per one year of service payback.) The maximum award is may be up to $30,000 per academic year.

Basic SPGSF eligibility:

Must be an enrolled member of a United States federally-recognized American Indian tribe or Alaska Native group, or possess ¼ degree federally-recognized Indian blood, verified only through submission of the AIGC Tribal Eligibility Certificate (TEC).

Must be (or will be) pursuing a master's or doctoral degree, as a full-time, degree-seeking student, at an accredited graduate school in the United States. Exclusive consideration is paid to degree candidates in the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) fields (may include: Medical and Life Sciences; Engineering and Physical Sciences; Mathematics and Computational Sciences, Earth, Environmental and Agriculture Sciences and Technology), to be verified through the submission of current transcripts or proof of acceptance to an eligible program.

Must be able to demonstrate financial need, through submission of the Financial Needs Form (FNF).

For more information email fellowships@aigcs.org.

Funding to assist students in pursuing education

Dickinson, ND – July 18, 2016 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today announced over $750,000 in two federal grants to the University of North Dakota and the Cankdeska Cikana Community College that will support vulnerable students as they complete high school and access higher education.

"The demands of today's world creates the need for everyone to have access to a well-rounded education, whether it is traditional academics such as a college education or vocational training," said Heitkamp. "I have the opportunity to chat with students each year who take advantage of TRIO programs, like Talent Search, and they are some of the most motivated and dedicated students I meet. These federal funds will continue to push students to complete their education and pursue goals that provide the lives they have always wanted."

The federal grant funding is distributed to the following North Dakota Schools:

· University of North Dakota: $466,080

· Cankdeska Cikana Community College: $288,000

Theses federal funds are made available through the U.S. Department of Education's Talent Search Program, one of eight student support plans under the Department's TRIO Program. Talent Search provides resources to schools that specifically help disadvantaged students, such as those on the Spirit Lake Indian Reservation that have a graduation rate of only 72 percent – 17 percent lower than the entire state. The federal funding will target first generation and low-income students to help keep them on track for their high school graduation and encourage them to pursue a higher education.

First annual conference on Native American nutrition

September 26-27 in Prior Lake, Minnesota

This conference will be a first-of-its-kind forum to share and advance knowledge related to the dietary health of Native communities. It represents a commitment by the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community and the University of Minnesota to co-organize a series of annual national conferences focused on the nutrition of Native peoples.

Tribal leaders, Native and non-Native practitioners, researchers, public health experts, and others are invited to exchange Indigenous and academic scientific knowledge; discuss current practices; listen to, connect with, and learn from each other; and candidly explore ways to overcome the existing obstacles to greater understanding. Additionally, the conference aims to identify areas of needed research, discuss practical applications, and foster new collaborations.

More than 20 confirmed speakers include both academics, students, and practitioners working in Indian Country, including:

· Treena Delormier (Mohawk), University of Hawaii

· Faith Spotted Eagle (Yankton Sioux), Braveheart Society

· Abigail Echo Hawk (Kitkehahki Band of Pawnee Nation/Upper Athabascan People of Mentasta Village), Washington State University

· Gary Ferguson (Unangan/Aleut), Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium

· Joel Gittelsohn, Johns Hopkins University

· Janie Hipp (Chickasaw Nation), University of Arkansas School of Law's Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative

· J. Neil Henderson (Chocktaw Nation of Oklahoma), University of Oklahoma

· Harriet Kuhnlein, Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment at McGill University

Abstracts for poster presentations may be submitted online until August 15. The full agenda, registration, abstract submission, and other information are available at SeedsOfNativeHealth.org/Conference.

Native Arts and Cultures Foundation announce 2016 national artist fellowship awardees

Vancouver, WA – July 20, 2016 – For the sixth year, the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation (NACF) has awarded its National Artist Fellowship to a new group of 16 artists in five categories selected from a national open call of American Indian, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian artist applicants who were reviewed by a panel of art peers and professionals.

The awardees reside in 14 states: Alaska; California; Connecticut; Georgia; Hawai'i; Maine; Massachusetts; Minnesota; New Mexico; New York; Oklahoma; Oregon; Virginia and Washington.

"NACF fosters and supports the vision, creativity and innovation of Native artists in a number of disciplines that feature the ongoing vibrancy and range of artistic careers and accomplishments across the U.S.," said NACF Director of Programs Francene Blythe, Diné/Sisseton-Wahpeton/Eastern Band Cherokee.

"We are honored to award this year's National Fellows. They, too, continually raise the visibility of Native arts and cultures to higher levels of achievement, excellence and endeavor."

The NACF National Artist Fellowship includes a monetary award that provides additional support for Native artists to explore, develop and experiment with original and existing projects. Fellows also work with their communities and share their culture in numerous ways. The National Artist Fellowships are made possible with support from the Ford Foundation, Second Sister Foundation and the generosity of arts patrons.

2016 National Artist Fellows are listed here.

Artistic Innovation:

Mark Keali'i Ho'omalu, Native Hawaiian

Erica Tremblay, Seneca-Cayuga Nation

Literature:

Kelli Jo Ford, Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma

Susan Power, Yanktonai Dakota

Music:

Tiokasin Ghosthorse, Mnicoujou/Itazipco Lakota

Thea Hopkins, Aquinnah Wampanoag

Laura Ortman, White Mountain Apache

Aaron J. Sala, Native Hawaiian

Traditional Arts:

Theresa Secord, Penobscot Nation

TJ Young, Sgwaayaans, Haida Nation

Visual Arts:

Luzene Hill, Eastern Band Cherokee

Cannupa Hanska Luger, Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara, Lakota

Brenda Mallory, Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma

Preston Singletary, Tlingit

Visual Arts in Painting:

Bunky Echo-Hawk, Pawnee, Yakama

Mateo Romero, Cochiti Pueblo

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation's mission is to promote the revitalization, appreciation and perpetuation of American Indian, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian arts and cultures through grant making, convening and advocacy. To date, NACF has supported 180 artists and organizations in more than 26 states and Native communities. To learn more about the National Artist Fellows and NACF's work—nurturing the passion and power of creative expression, visit: www.nativeartsandcultures.org.

Legals

PUBLIC NOTICE

In accordance with Policies and Procedures Insuring Tribal and Parental Involvement in the Development of Educational Programs for the Sisseton School District 54-2, the Sisseton School Board will conduct a district-wide public hearing on Monday, August 8, 2016 at 5:45 p.m. in the high school library for the purpose of receiving public comment concerning the implementation of these policies and procedures. The public is invited to attend and participate in the discussion.

Published twice at the total approximate cost of $6.

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 11-037

SWOCSE/ April Thompson, PLAINTIFF

VS.

BRUCE GERMAN, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Review Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 16-110

SWOCSE/ Michelle Blue, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ANTHONY RENVILLE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 08-005

SWOCSE/ Daisy Hare, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ANTHONY RENVILLE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Dismiss Child Support and Establish Arrears, Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 16-104

SWOCSE/ Lucille Eastman, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CARSON LABATTE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 07-169

SWOCSE/ Orvella Bird, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CARSON LABATTE, Sr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 16-105

SWOCSE/ SD/ David Potts, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ELSIE CAMPBELL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 09-008

SWOCSE/ Marlena DuMarce, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CARSON LABATTE, Sr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 14-075

SWOCSE/ Tiffany Schaak, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MIKA RONDELL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 16-123

SWOCSE/ Jeff Salinas, PLAINTIFF

VS.

RHEA ROCKWOOD, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 16-102

SWOCSE/ Dustin Locke, PLAINTIFF

VS.

BELINDA LOCKE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 16-128

SWOCSE/ Gerald Thompson, Jr., PLAINTIFF

VS.

FAUSTINE HISGUN, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 16-124

SWOCSE/ Linda Cantu, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SONYA LADWIG, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 16-120

SWOCSE/ Jewel Bearhill, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CHELSEA HEMINGER, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 16-118

SWOCSE/ Jewel Bearhill, PLAINTIFF

VS.

RYAN HILL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 16-216

SWOCSE/ Winona Thompson, PLAINTIFF

VS.

FAUSTINE HISGUN, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Establish Arrears and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 11-022

SWOCSE/ Holly Renville, PLAINTIFF

VS.

BENJAMIN YANKTON, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Review Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 16-122

SWOCSE/ Linda Cantu, PLAINTIFF

VS.

BENJAMIN YANKTON, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Establish Paternity and Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 16-134

SWOCSE/ Kevin Farmer, PLAINTIFF

VS.

TORENNA MACCONNELL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 16-088

SWOCSE/ Elizabeth Janisch, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CICILY JANISCH, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 16-136

SWOCSE/ Amanda Hanson, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CICILY JANISCH, DEFENDANT

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 16-126

SWOCSE/ Carlton Crawford, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ELIZABETH HANSON, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 16-112

SWOCSE/ Alexis Renville, PLAINTIFF

VS.

FELIX JOHNSON, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

Trading Post ads

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

Job Openings

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate is seeking to fill the following positions(s):

Director, Early Childhood Intervention

Adult Daycare Provider, Tribal Elderly

Director, Office of Environmental Protection

Closing Date: July 29th, 2016 @ 04:30 PM

Receptionist, Administration Building

Tribal Ranger, Fish & Wildlife

Investigator, Child Protection Program

MCH Aide, CHR/MCH

Data Entry/Finance Clerk, Child Support Enforcement

Health Assistant/Family Service Worker, Early Head Start

Teacher (4), Early Head Start

Cook, Head Start

Teacher, Head Start

Teacher Aide (3), Head Start

Special Needs Assistant/Family Service Worker, Head Start

Bus Driver/Custodian, Head Start

Teacher Aide, Enemy Swim Head Start

Closing Date: August 5th, 2016 @ 04:30PM

All interested applicants may obtain application and job description information at the Human Resource Department, of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate or contact Arnold Williams at (605) 698-8238 or Denise Hill at (605) 698-8251. (Tribal preference will apply).

 

SWO Fuels Inc.

Manager

Job Summary:

The Fuel Inc. manager is responsible for day to day store operations, including scheduling, report writing, maintenance deadlines, DOT and insurance specifications, and supervising employees and assistant manager.  The manager is responsible for the profits, and all controllable expenses including labor, inventory levels, and cash and inventory shortages.

List of Responsibilities for Fuel Inc. and C-store

*Motivate, encourage, and challenge employees.

*Promote and resolve customer complaints, in a timely and professional manner.

*Maintain quality brand image standards as pass evaluations.

*Supervise and discipline all employees (and assistant manager/supervisor) according to company policy.

*Monitor daily retail gasoline competitors and sending the prices to the corporate office in a timely manner as established by management.

*Complete daily paperwork and computer entry in a timely manner as established by management.

*Monitor cash over/short, inventory shrinkage and drive offs daily.

*Conduct store meetings as needed with employees. (A minimum of one monthly)

*Have the physical ability to perform all duties as needed.

*Understand all information in the daily reporting of store operations.

*Follow and enforce all Company Policies and Establish Procedures in the store Operations.

*Implement Monthly promotions, insure all POS advertising/signage is properly posted at the proper time.

*Communicate and perform all price changes, mark downs /mark ups as requested by manager.

*Maintain pricing in price book of Red River program when needed.

*Implement and enforce all merchandising and vendor policies and procedures.

*Enforce all Safety and Security Issues and report any and all unsafe conditions.

*Conduct regular safety and security meeting and document with employees attending signatures.

* Report and process all employee and/or customer incidents or accidents following company procedure.

*Maintain all Mandatory UST records and related equipment.

*Perform other Duties as assigned by Management.

Education/ Experience: Bachelors Degree or five years or more of business management experience.

Open until filled.

For more information, or to apply, contact SWO Fuel Inc., 2202 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262; phone 605-698-3521.

 

Sisseton Wahpeton College

Has the following vacancies:

Facilities/Custodian

There is an opening for a temporary full-time Custodian in our Facilities Department at SWC. Requirements are: High School Diploma or GED. Previous janitorial experience required. Physically able to perform moderate to heavy manual labor under various conditions, as necessary. Position closes at 430 p.m. on July 28, 2016. Visit our website www.swc.tc for a complete job description and application or contact the HR office at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118.

Facilities/Shuttle Drivers

There are openings for two (2) part-time Shuttle Drivers in our Facilities Department. Requirements are: High School Diploma or GED. Must be at least 25 years of age, have a valid driver's license and a clean driving record. Position closes at 4:30 p.m. on July 28, 2016. Visit our website www.swc.tc for a complete job description and application or contact the HR office at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118.

Extension Coordinator

There is an opening for a full-time Extension Coordinator at SWC. Requirements are: Bachelor's degree in Agriculture or related field. Position closes at 4:30 p.m. on July 28, 2016. Visit our website www.swc.tc for a complete job description and application or contact the HR office at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118.

Comptroller

There is an opening for a full-time Comptroller at SWC. Requirements are: Master's degree in accounting or bachelor's degree with five years' experience in accounting. Certified Public Accountant (CPA) preferred. Three (3) years' experience in a supervisory role in a business office of an educational institution is preferred. Position closes at 4:30 p.m. on July 28, 2016. Visit our website www.swc.tc for a complete job description and application or contact the HR office at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118.

Science Instructor

There is an opening for a full-time Science Instructor at SWC. Requirements are: Master's degree in Nutritional Food Science. Previous teaching experience. Position closes at 4:30 p.m. on July 28, 2016. Visit our website www.swc.tc for a complete job description and application or contact the HR office at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118.

Enrollment Management Coordinator

There is an opening for a full-time Enrollment Management Coordinator at SWC. Requirements are: BA/BS degree. Experience working with students preferred. Marketing and sales experience preferred. Position closes at 4:30 p.m. on July 28, 2016. Visit our website www.swc.tc for a complete job description and application or contact the HR office at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118.

29-2tc

 

Tiospa Zina Tribal School

Job Openings

Current Vacancies:

Substitutes needed for custodial, kitchen, teaching, and transportation - starting at $10/hr, varies per position Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma (please contact the HR office for more information) Applications are accepted on an on-going basis

2016-2017 School Year Vacancies:

Vacancy: High School Science Teacher ($2,000.00 Sign-on Bonus) Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a High School Science Teacher Opening Date: January 29, 2016 Closing Date: open until filled

Vacancy: Career and Technical Education Teacher ($2,000.00 Sign-on Bonus) Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Career and Technical Education Teacher Opening Date: March 11, 2016 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Middle School Social Studies Teacher ($2,000.00 Sign-on Bonus) Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Middle School Social Studies Teacher Opening Date: April 22, 2016 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Middle School 6th Grade Classroom Teacher ($2,000.00 Sign-on Bonus) Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Middle School 6th Grade Classroom Teacher Opening Date: June 21, 2016 Closind Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Gear-Up School Based Coordinator (Part-time) Qualifications: Current South Dakota Teaching Certificate and possess a valid South Dakota drivers license Opening Date: May 23, 2016 Closing Date: Open until filled

2016-2017 Coaching Vacancies- Closing Date: Open until filled

Proof of all SDHSAA coaching requirements at the time application is submitted. Requirements are to complete the following courses through the National Federation of High School Sports (NFHS): Fundamentals of Coaching, and First Aid and Safety for Coaches. Must also submit a letter of intent that answers the questions found on form Athletics Coaching Questionnaire. **Do not need SDHSAA/NFHS Coaching Requirements.

Head Wrestling Coach

Head Girls Basketball Coach

Head High School Track Coach

**Jr. High Boys Basketball Coach

**Jr. High Girls Basketball Coach

**5/6 Grade Boys Basketball Coach

**Jr. High Football Coach

Jr. High/Assistant Track Coach Assistant Varsity Boys Basketball Coach

Assistant Varsity Girls Basketball Coach

Assistant Volleyball Coach

Assistant Wrestling Coach

Assistant Track Coach (2) Assistant Varsity Football Coaches

2016-2017 Extra-Curricular Vacancies-Closing Date: Open until filled

Horse Club Adviser

Science Club Adviser

Close-up Foundation Adviser

Destination Imagination Coach

Drum Adviser

Junior Class Adviser

Military Club Adviser

Senior Class Adviser

Classroom Substitute Information:

Tiospa Zina classroom substitutes must complete substitute training before they can substitute for teaching staff. If you are interested in Substitute Teaching you either have to attend and complete the Substitute Teacher training offered by Tiospa Zina or register with STEDI.org and complete the Substitute Teacher training offered online. If you choose to take the online training all furnishings and costs are the trainees' responsibility. The button below is the link to the online training. The button is also the link to subscribe to STEDI.org, free of charge, which gives you access to substitute teacher tools, resources, newsletters, and trainings.

If you would like to apply to be a part of the TZ tiwahe you may pick up an application and background check form from the TZTS HR office located at #2 Tiospa Zina Dr. Agency Village, SD 57262. Applications may also be printed off the HR web page. Completed applications may be sent to PO Box 719, Agency Village, SD 57262. Faxed to: 605-698-7686. For further information call 605-698-3953 ext. 208. Indian Preference employer. At will employer. All applicants are subject to a Background Check and Pre-Employment Drug Test, pursuant to SWSB policy and United States Code Title 25 Chapter 34 - Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention. United States Code Title 25 Chapter 34 - Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention.

 

Enemy Swim Day School

Vacancies

Bus Monitors

Enemy Swim Day School has openings for bus monitors for the 2016-2017 school year. This is a part-time position with a minimum of 4 hour per day on school days. Requirements: HS Diploma/GED, pass a background check. If interested please pick up an application from the business office or visit our website: www.esds.us. Call (605) 947-4605 or (888) 825-7738 and ask for Ed Johnson for details. Indian preference policies apply. Open until filled.

After School Group Leaders

Enemy Swim Day School has openings for Group Leaders for our afterschool program for the 2016-2017 school year. Schedule: Monday-Thursday 12:30-5:30 pm and occasional scheduled evenings. Hourly wage. Indian preference will apply. Call Rebecca Dargatz at 947-4605 or (888) 825-7738 for more details. Applications available on-line at www.esds.us or at the school.

29-2tc

 

Dakota Magic Casino

Job Openings

Housekeeping Department: Porter (12 Full-Time or Part-Time) as needed

Slots Department: Technician (Full-Time or Part-Time) Rotating

Closing Date: July 29, 2016 at 4:00 p.m.

Starting Wage: D.O.E.

High School Diploma or GED required for most positions

Two identifications documents required upon hire

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department, 16849 102nd Street SE, Hankinson ND 58041.For complete Job Description contact James Neconish 701-634-3000 ext. 2582 Indian Preference will apply / EEO. (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment). Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

ADMINISTRATION: ADMINISTATIVE ASSISTANT (FULL TIME). GENERAL FUNCTION: Serves as Administrative Assistant to the General Manager and performs a variety of functions which involve the activities of clerical and office personnel. POSITION REQUIREMENTS: High school graduate or G.E.D. equivalent. Minimum of three years secretarial experience. Thorough knowledge of Business English, Spelling, Punctuation, Office Practices, Procedures and equipment. Knowledge of the principles and practices of supervision. Proficient typing skills required. Must have computer knowledge. Able to work independently and exercise independent judgments. Able to meet and deal effectively with associates and the general public. Able to sit for long periods of time and perform repetitious computer work. Must obtain a Non Gaming License.

This position will close on July 28th, 2016 at 4 pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

Slot Department:

Slot Technician (1) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, weekends & holidays, and the ability to work flexible hours. Excellent customer service skills with both external and internal customers. Math skills are essential, mechanical skills, and the physical ability to lift heavy objects. Knowledge of other gaming related equipment. Will be exposed to noise and tobacco smoke. Appropriate dress code. Must be at least 21 years old, have a High School diploma or GED, must be able to obtain a Key Gaming License.

Security Department:

Officer (1) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, weekends, holidays, and the ability to work flexible hours. Mobility throughout the facility 45% percent of time; will be stooping, bending, walking for long periods of time, able to lift up to 40 pounds, computer skills required for report writing. Will be exposed to noise and tobacco smoke. Appropriate dress code. Must be at least 21 years old, have High School Diploma or GED, must be able to obtain a Key License.

Opening date: Thursday, July 14, 2016

Closing date: Wednesday, July 27, 2016 @ 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 
 

 

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