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Vol. 47 Issue No. 21

Anpetu Iyamni, May 25, 2016

Inside this Edition –

Note: This week's Sota is being distributed one day late due to staff training

UVA and Kit Fox to observe traditional, federal Memorial Day

Report on Tribal self-governance public forum

Meeting held on youth activities on the Lake Traverse Reservation

Highlights of last week's honoring for Women Veterans

Congratulations SWO 2016 graduates!

Tribal Elder Health Fair coming this Thursday, May 26

Note to candidates: New Sota discounted rates, pre-payment policy

Deadline for receipt of copy is Friday noon

Continuing the traditional honoring –

SWO Kit Fox Society Memorial Day observance

We will once again in an honorable and humble tradition, be honoring our fellow veterans and Dakota warriors on Memorial Day. Due to unforeseen circumstances and prior commitments, we will conduct the honoring of our fellow veterans and Dakota warriors on Sunday, May 29, 2016. And due to a family request, a tribute will be conducted at the Janisch Veterans Memorial near the Buffalo Lake District Center.

1. LaBelle's Cemetery 8:00 a.m.

2. St. Luke's Cemetery 8:15 a.m.

3. St. Matthew's Cemetery 8:30 a.m.

4. St. Matthew's Church 9:00 a.m.

5. Mayasan Church 9:30 a.m.

6. Sieche Hollow Cemetery 9:45 a.m.

7. St. Benedicts Cemetery 10:10 a.m.

8. Long Hollow Church 10:30 a.m.

9. Rollin Ryan Home 10:45 a.m.

10. Max/Gill Family Cemetery 11:15 a.m.

11. Francis Janisch Vets Memorial 11:30 a.m.

12. Buffalo Lake Church 11:45 a.m.

13. Oyate Traditional Cemetery 12:15 p.m.

14. Sisseton Veterans Circle 1:00 p.m.

15. Hoks'ina Wayakapi Cemetery 1:30 p.m.

16. Morgan Redday home 2:00 p.m.

17. Goodwill Church 2:30 p.m.

18. St. Mary's Church 2:45 p.m.

19. Renville Cemetery 3:00 p.m.

20. Pickerel Lake (south) Cemetery 3:15 p.m.

21. St. James Church 3:445 p.m.

22. Emmett Roberts home 4:00 p.m.

23. Moses Gill Cemetery 4:30 p.m.

24. Big Coulee Church 5:00 p.m.

25. Lake Traverse Church 5:30 p.m.

26. St. Johns Church 6:00 p.m.

These are estimated times and some may be early or late depending on climatic conditions and other factors.

On federal Memorial Day holiday, Monday, May 30 –

SWO UVA to hold flag ceremonies at Lake Traverse Reservation cemeteries, churches and homes

Continuing the tradition of honoring their fallen fellow service members, veterans from the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate United Veterans Association (UVA) – Dessert Era Veterans and Woodrow W. Keeble American Legion Post 314 honor guards – will travel to cemeteries, churches and homes across the Lake Traverse Reservation on the federal Memorial Day holiday, Monday, May 30th, 2016.

Here is the schedule, with estimated times and some may be early or late depending upon weather conditions and other factors:

1. LaBelle's Cemetery 8:00 a.m.

2. St. Luke's Cemetery 8:25 a.m.

3. St. Matthew's Cemetery 8:40 a.m.

4. St. Matthew's Church 8:55 a.m.

5. Mayasan Church 9:15 a.m.

6. SWO Traditional Cemetery 9:30 a.m.

7. Long Hollow Church 10:00 a.m.

8. Rollin Ryan House 10:20 a.m.

9. Buffalo Lake Church 10:50 a.m.

10. Gill's Cemetery 11:15 a.m.

11. Sisseton Circle 12:00 noon

12. Lake Traverse Church 12:30 p.m.

13. St. John's Church 12:50 p.m.

14. Morgan Redday Home 1:20 p.m.

15. Goodwill Church 1:45 p.m.

16. St. Mary's Church 2:00 p.m.

17. Renville Cemetery 2:15 p.m.

18. Emmett Roberts Cemetery 2:45 p.m.

19. St. James Church 3:10 p.m.

20. Big Coulee Church 4:00 p.m.

Community forum to address concerns regarding sidewalk project

Homeowners and residents along BIA 706 and Little Crow Drive are invited to take part in a community form this Tuesday, May 24, 2016 from 5:00-6:00 p.m. at Tribal headquarters.

The meeting will be held in the training room (adjacent to the Tribal Enrollment office).

Purpose is to allow you to voice concerns regarding the sidwalk construction project.

If you are unable to attend, please call or email comments and/or concerns by 4:00 p.m. Tuesday to:

Chairman Flute, 605-698-8285, chairman@swo-nsn.gov

Cliff Eberhardt, 605-698-8355, clifforde@swo-nsn-gov

Sandwiches and refreshments will be provided by the Chairman's office.

The forum is co-sponsored by the Chairman's office and Construction Management.

SWO Tribal self-governance public forum

Nearly fifty people attended the community forum at the Elderly Nutrition Center Thursday, May 12, 2016, to learn more about the Self-Governance planning process.

Following dinner catered by Dakota Connection, members of the Self-Governance Planning Work Group answered questions from community members on a wide range of topics.

Community members stayed for more than two hours to hear from Self-Governance consultants about Self-Governance authorities, to dispel misconceptions, and to provide examples of Self-Governance Tribal best practices.

For those that were not able to join the forum, here is a summary of the discussion.

Self-Governance Misconceptions

Many of the questions during the forum were related to community members' misunderstanding of previous experiences. For instance, one community member mentioned that the Tribe once took over a Bureau of Indian Education program that cost more to operate than the funding the Tribe received from the Federal Government. In that situation, the Federal Government would not reassume the program and the Tribe was caught up in an expensive program.

However, as Myra Munson, Partner at Sonosky, Chambers, Sachse, Endreson & Perry, LLP, explained, Tribes which assume authority over health programs receive the same amount of money the Indian Health Service (IHS) does and have greater flexibility to increase third party collections and reassign funding to address Tribal priorities.

She also explained a process that would allow the Tribe, if it decided, to retrocede any assumed health program back to IHS. This process is supported by law, but to date has never been used by a Self-Governance Tribe operating a health program.

At the beginning of the program SWO Tribal Chairman Dave Flute described this as an "exit strategy" and noted this was one reason he was supportive of the current planning process.

In addition, to a Tribe's choice to retrocede, the Federal Government can "reassume" any health operation in the event that the Health and Human Services Secretary finds an imminent substantial and irreparable endangerment of the public health caused by an act or omission of the Self-Governance Tribe and the endangerment arises out of a failure to carry out the compact or funding agreement.

To date, the Federal Government has never reassumed a health program run by a Self-Governance Tribes.

Other forum participants had the impression that Tribes operating their services under Self-Governance do not receive year-end funds as Federally-operated programs do and that services may be diminished because the Tribe would take its administrative costs from the funding base, leaving fewer resources to provide the services.

Ms. Munson provided information to the contrary.

She explained to attendees that Self-Governance Tribes are entitled to any unobligated fiscal year-end funds just as any other health program - with one difference - Self-Governance Tribes do not have to spend their money in the year it was appropriated, but may reserve it for future costs.

In addition, since a 2011 Supreme Court decision, the Federal Government must provide Contract Support Costs over-and-above the Tribes' negotiated Indirect Cost rates to carry out assumed health programs.

The Federal Government is also required to provide pre-award costs for expenses incurred in planning and development of the Self-Governance compact and start-up costs for those one-time, non-recurring expenses associated with assuming operation of a health program, service, function or activity.

Self-Governance and the Federal Trust Responsibility

As one attendee stated, "The Tribe must really weigh how Self-Governance would impact our relationship with the Federal Government."

In response, Ms. Munson strongly agreed and explained to the forum participants that Self-Governance is an extension of Tribal Sovereignty, "Choosing how health services will be delivered is an act of Sovereignty - no matter the choice."

She went further to share that Self-Governance Tribes remain active in legislative and policy advocacy to increase available resources to the Indian Health Service, flexibility to deliver quality care, and coordination between other health-related programs.

She also challenged attendees to consider how many treaties the Federal Government continues to uphold - none - and weigh Self-Governance as an avenue the Federal Government uses to fulfill part of its responsibility.

Ms. Munson ended her response saying, "You absolutely must continue to demand the Federal Government live up to its responsibility, but you must also consider the needs of Tribal citizens today. For Tribes who assume health programs under Self-Governance, the stakes are just as high. There's no one to point to when the program is not funded properly and services are being provided as they normally are."

Health Services under Self-Governance

Even though Self-Governance Tribes do not receive more money than IHS does, they are typically better at increasing third party collections and expand services.

"Often," Munson said, "Self-Governance Tribes will expand services locally depending on health needs and priorities."

Self-Governance Tribes, unlike Title I Contractors, are able to redesign their health programs without oversight by IHS.

They can review patient data, contracted care, and community feedback to change the menu of services provided at a clinic. Munson held that over a long period of time Self-Governance Tribes assess community health factors and start to shift funding to emphasize early intervention and prevention, to address local public health concerns, and to provide traditional and/or alternative care to patients.

One example Munson shared included a shift to increase Behavioral Health Services.

She described a remote village in Bethel, AK that is completely off the road system with limited access to providers.

Recognizing the challenges facing the community to recruit specialized providers or maintain a patient pool large enough to support those providers, leaders chose to incorporate telehealth to fulfill specialized needs, such as dental and behavioral health services. Linking doctors from other communities and local mid-level providers electronically broadened the scope of services citizens could receive locally and showed significant changes in the overall health and welfare of the community.

Ms. Munson confidently said, "At the time, IHS would not have had the flexibility to observe localized needs and initiate a specialized response to those needs."

This was just one of the many examples Ms. Munson shared throughout the evening. Over the next few weeks the SWO Self-Governance Planning Work Group will share others here and on their Facebook Page, "SWO Self-Governance Planning." Readers should also look on the Facebook page for more information about Self-Governance, future opportunities to visit with Self-Governance Consultants, and updates from the Work Group.

If you have other questions visit the Facebook page or email Sara DeCoteau at Sara.DeCoteau@ihs.gov. The Planning Work Group will work to provide responses to your questions, continue to publish articles related to Self-Governance, and make recommendations to Tribal Council this summer based on their research of the Service Unit and assessment of Tribal capacity.

From the office of SWO Tribal Secretary –

Report on SWO youth meeting

Attending the meeting were:

Crystal Owen, Tribal Secretary

Lennie Peters, TSO

Susan Peters, ES Youth Board

Jo Roberts, ES Youth Board

Chris Owens, ES Youth Board

Dustina Gill, Aliive

Everett Blackthunder, Youth Dept.

Derrick McCaulley, Youth Dept.

Sam Crawford, Youth Dept.

Natasha Renville, Diabetes Fitness Center

Elise Johnson, Youth Dept.

Angel Wanna, Heipa Youth Board

Nadine LaBelle, Heipa Youth Board

Kateri Dumarce, Heipa Youth Board

Darrell Quinn Jr., Long Hollow Youth Board

Jeremy RedEagle ES Youth Board

Winona Burley, BC Youth Board

Tribal Secretary opening meeting with reasons why she called the meeting. "The only way things are going to happen is if we make them happen. This meeting is to connect our resources to make things even better."

Stepping outside the box and taking that healthy risk.

Reminder that every activity, especially the youth should start with a prayer. It reminds them that prayer is a part of spirituality that we have as Dakota people and to keep in mind of our people when we do what we do.

The more we share our stories, the more healing we bring ourselves.

Sam Crawford offered the opening prayer.

Derrick shared the story of what we do we need to remember that we need to be the voice of the youth.

Everett shared a song, reminding the people about our youth and children and asking them to remember all the youth in their prayers.

The meeting is being held where we can get away from the everyday setting to help us reset and recharge ourselves. Its hard to do that for some because of the costs for such things such as gas, etc.

Introductions were made, with participants sharing why we work with the youth.

Susan Peters is involved for a variety of reasons, mainly she has 33 grandchildren and she wants to create a safer environment for them and change what exists today. Wants the kids to know how to be safe and they can trust adults and to be proud. Wants to eliminate drinking and drugs from the communities because she sees the damage it does. Lost her son and daughter and grandchildren to a drunk driver.

Jo Roberts: "Times are changing and events are evolving. This includes funding to be able to offer things to the youth. They don't have a voice to speak for themselves, and as a board member we can help be that voice. The youth are very innocent and eager to learn and I want to help keep moving them in the right direction to have good lives."

Chris Owen: "I remember being a youth and the stuff they had for us was fun and interesting. Now that I am an adult I want to be a part of that."

Darrell Quinn Jr.: "I got involved because growing up there wasn't anything here or opportunities to do and I didn't have a very good life. My dad told me if I want change I need to get involved, so I did."

Lennie Peters: "Love working with youth and want to share my love of softball to help the youth learn the different skills and how to play and learn to love the game too. Whatever I can do to help with the youth I try to do. Our kids are like sponges and what we can do to help them learn good things is what we will do."

Dustina Gill: "I volunteer with the youth in pretty much anyway I can."

Everett Blackthunder: "I love working with our boys to help them be strong good men and fathers. I know what that life is like without male role models and I want to help change that so it's not the normal for our kids."

Derrick McCauley: "Been working in the Youth Dept. for about a year now. Its been growing fast, we now have a cultural center, etc. This is a tough job, we are servants of the kids and we need to work together to make sure our kids are taken care of. I want to be somebody that I needed when I was a kid. The hardest part is seeing what our kids need and not being able to help them the way we need to."

"Things are getting out of hand in our communities, drugs, suicide, pregnancy, we want to save every kid but I know we can't and it hurts and that's a big part of our fight. Understanding that we keep trying because we are making that difference. It took awhile for us to get to this point, but we are here now and let's do this."

Sam Crawford Jr.: "What I have experienced since I have been a part of this team at the youth dept. Our kids are hurting and we don't talk about it, we don't reach out for help for them. Our kids are hungry, hiding food and home alone. The youth dept has come a long way since the youth dept started. This is a great thing to be a part of. I am proud of our Dakota language and archery that took off. We can hear the boys in Everettts room singing while the girls are with Charlotte doing their thing. There's so many things for our kids this summer. I hope you guys speak up and give us input because our drive is the kids and that's who we work with."

Elise Johnson, Office Manager: "I love my job because these kids can turn our days around and we help them grow and succeed. Before I came to the youth dept I felt like there was more to life and now that I am here I see it."

Natasha Renville: "I started because our youth in the district got pushed into the back. They didn't have a voice, and the kids who live in Lake Traverse don't have what the kids in other places have. We are looking to have more activities but its always a fight because our Execs are always shutting the youth down. I am so glad the kids have the youth dept because the kids have somewhere to go. There are young girls who are prostituting themselves out for drugs and this kind of place is what is needed for our kids to go to if they can't be home or don't have somewhere safe to go outside of home."

Angel Wanna: "I got out of youth stuff for awhile, but now that I have grandkids I have become active again, since I wasn't there for my older children, I want to be there for my younger kids and grandchildren. I like to do stuff with our kids."

Nadine LaBelle: "I really enjoy working with the youth because they get to do things that I know they aren't able to do when they are home."

Kateri Dumarce: "Growing up I never got to do family type things, and now that I am single parent I wanted to make sure my kids had a good life and now I want to make sure that other kids in my district do too. I want to see more parent involvement."

Jeremy RedEagle: "I have been working with youth for about 8-9 years. Ive always been passionate about kids. I grew up with that struggle of an unhealthy home and I realized that I those struggles led to who I am today and I want to help our kids not have that kind of a life and use our Dakota way of life to help our kids combat unhealthy homes and lives. Theres a lot of things we are up against in our communities. I believe our spirituality is our base to becoming healthy and living healthy. We need parents and families more involved."

Crystal Owen: "I can hear we have a lot in common and why we work with the youth. We have to heal ourselves so we are prepared to work with the youth. They bring in a lot of good energy that heals us too. Our jobs aren't just jobs, we are shaping their lives. We are making a difference in the lives of our children."

"How do we make a parent want to change? What kind of campaign do we make to help our parents parent. Kids are sponges, we shape what happens to them. Be the change you want to see in the lives in our children. Overcoming the dysfunction we saw in our lives. We all bring something to the table."

Each District gets $25,000 to do something with our youth this summer. How do we make sure it's a learning experience for the families?

The past two events at the Youth Dept. (xmas/Halloween) showed the need that is out there and we need to have a team to make it happen. If there is an event, we can have each others backs.

What resources do we have? What do we need?

TRIBALWIDE WEAKNESSES (important to understand what we need to improve):

Communication (Skills) District vs. Oyate Parent Involvement

Gossip - Uniformed decision making

Territorial thinking districts not wanting to work with other district youth living in the community

Lack of Compassion for the youth

Fear of Change

Transportation

Collaboration Efforts Collaborating with other tribal programs

Lack of Engagement

Lack of Training

Lack of Cultural Teachings and Values

Traumas not being addressed

Accountability of parents and guardians

Lack of Resources Survival Mode Finance Accountability Lack of local political support @ districts

Lack of Spirituality

Lack of Program Accountability Programs need training Lack of Adult Services Lack of Empowerment and how Empower Social/Community exposure to alcohol and drugs Lack of Aftercare Burnout/Compassion Fatigue Entitlement mentality Lack of Prevention Lack of mental health services Two Spirit Community/Identity struggles Bullying

STRENGTHS/OPPORTUNITIES:

Veblen - Planning Phase from an idea that was once on paper Lake Traverse - New youth board, motivated and expanding on events.

Enemy Swim – Very Active Youth Board Own Youth Center with Kitchen Very good youth worker Community Support in regards to funding Respect between the members because of the close-knit structure Lake access Long Hollow - active youth board, host many seasonal and holiday events community support in regards to funding supportive for youth travel higher education financial awards.

So many good things going on in the different communities - The Youth Dept. is there for any help, rent out the youth center to the districts etc., on board to help the Districts to help bring that change for the kids. What we think is normal, sometimes isn't. Going door to door to offer help to work with youth in the home in different aspects. Reciprocity within the community. Include life skills into the activities

OPPORTUNTIES:

Come to Council meetings with the Youth Dept. to meet with Council Coordinate Transportation to be involved in activities that are at the youth centers Training - for Districts and youth volunteers Gardening/Seed Harvesting/Food Harvesting Recycling/Environment Bring the holistic approach to everything we do Monthly youth powwows district surveys youth group trainings 3 year plans for districts in regards to youth Technical Assistance.

Create District event calendars posted monthly in the Sota monthly district feeds and fairs monthly youth organizers meeting.

RESOURCES:

Monthly meetings.

Next meeting scheduled for June 22nd at the SWC log cabin, from 5:00-7:00 p.m.

"From the desk of Geri Opsal, Tribal Veteran Service Officer"

GeriO@SWO-NSN.gov

Phone 605-698-3388

*Open House was a success! Thank you to all of the Women Veterans that took the time out of their busy lives to come and spend the afternoon with us! We had women from all branches of service; US Army; US Air Force, US Navy and US Marines (none from the US Coast Guard). I was so proud that our oldest Veteran was from the Korean War Era, Naomi Barker Parker, US Army and we also had Vietnam Era, Gulf, OEF, OIF, OND. It was a fun time visiting about our experiences in the Military. We were all proud to receive the Women's Veterans Coin along with a gift bag from Fargo VAMC (Glenda Trochmann, Women's Program Manager) as well as Teri St. Pierre, Sioux Falls VAMC (Minority Veterans Program Coordinator). We also had one of our very own SWO Lorrena Alameda, SFVAMC in attendance and as well as my field officer from Pierre, Keven Swanson. I'm so thankful that our Pierre office and both VAMC have such great staff that take the interest to attend functions that we the VSO's host. I also want to thank Justin Chanku, Legis-Aide on behalf of the Chairman's Office who assisted in handing out the coins, Travis Max, Sr. & drum group who sang a Flag and Honor Song for us. We were blessed with two of the Lakota Women Warriors who presented the colors for us. Thank you all who assisted = DCC for your assistance and for Brice who did the back breaking work of hauling everything for us. Thank you all on behalf of all of us Women Veterans in attendance. (See accompanying photos by John Heminger.)

*Last week Thursday - May 12th the South Dakota Department of Veterans Affairs hosted their annual spring Mini Conferences. Training conferences were held in Rapid City, Pierre, and Brookings for all County and Tribal Veterans Service Officers. Representatives from the South Dakota Department of Human Services Rehabilitation Distribution program opened each of the sessions with information on their Telecommunications Equip Distribution program. SDDVA's Will Huffmon, Jerry Lemme, Don Thomson and Caitlyn Zylstra made presentations on pension eligibility and fully developed claims, completion of pension forms, and working with VBMS, MAPD, SHARE, Virtual VA, VetraSpec and D2D. SDDVA staff also conducted hands-on pension exercises and assisted the C/TVSOs as they worked through the various scenarios. SDDVA Secretary Zimmerman provided brief remarks at each location and thanked the C/TVSOs for the work they are doing to assist our veterans and their families. The next training program for the C/TVSOs will be the annual SDDVA Benefit School August 22-25 in Pierre. It was mandatory for our salary supplement so I attended this informational meeting. Thank you.

*2nd Annual Bataan Memorial March: Is scheduled to take place on Friday, July 1st, 2016 and we will have it early morning like we did last year. We will host a meeting to go over details and will have it posted here in the Sota so please take note. Last year we had such a great turnout in HONOR of our survivors and all survivors and those who perished on the actual Bataan Death March WWII. We hope you can join us this year. Our WWII Veteran survivors of the Death March are: Winfield Thompson, Sr, WWII and Louis Williams, WWII Veteran. Please mark your calenders!

*VETERANS: PLEASE CALL OUR OFFICE IF YOU NEED ASSITANCE; WE ARE HERE TO SERVE! 698-3388.

*WOMEN VETERANS CALL CENTER: 1-855-VA-WOMEN. Crisis Help Line: 1-800-273-8255, available 24/7, and tell them you are a veteran. All calls are confidential.

*REMEMBER: We are here to serve you our fellow Veteran, widows, dependents. And also you see a Veteran shake their hand---that small gesture means a great deal to them! Call us at 698-3388 or cell 268-0502.

*American Legion Post #314- Delano Renville, Commander Cell: # 268-0354 / Vietnam Veterans Kit Fox Society - Phone: # 698-3901 ask for Doc / Desert Era Veterans - Danielle DeCoteau, Commander Cell#: 268-1765. For GAS ASSISTANCE: Geri Opsal 698-3388.

Have a good week.

Geri Opsal, Tribal VSO.

ECIP holds honoring ceremony for Carole Adams

The Early Childhood Intervention Program (ECIP) hosted an honor ceremony last Friday, May 20th, for Carole Adams who has been with the program for 21 years, starting as a Tracking Paraprofessional and later as a Registration Specialist. She is now retiring.

SWO Tribal Chairman Dave Flute presented Carole with a star quilt for a total of 30 years of service with the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate.

An honor song was performed by Travis Max, T.J. Max, Delmer Bernard, Eric Jens, Jace Pratt and was later joined by Dave Flute.

Amy Crawford who was the ECIP Program Manager when Carole joined the program in 1995, Dr. Sherry Johnson, SWO Education Director many SWO employee were on hand to thank Carole Adams.

The ECIP Staff is very grateful for Carole's service and support and wish her good health and a happy retirement.

See accompanying photos.

Update on SWO Tribal Research Office

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Research Office is a relatively new entity within the Tribe.

In 2014, the increasing number of research projects being presented for review before Tribal Council led to the establishment of a Tribal Research Office.

Tribal Council recognized that official regulation of research on the Lake Traverse Reservation was necessary and charged the Tribal Research Office with developing and implementing a Tribal Research Code.

The Tribal Research Office staff worked for a year writing what would become SWO Chapter 77. This is the SWO Tribal Research Code.

Chapter 77 was approved as tribal law by Tribal Council on July 14, 2015 by Tribal Council Resolution No. SWO-15-080.

Anyone conducting any kind of research on the Lake Traverse Reservation must abide by all the provisions within the code or be subject to civil penalties in Tribal Court.

After passage of Chapter 77, the Tribal Research Office has been busy instituting the formal policy, procedure, and processes which govern all of the activities of a research office.

They have also worked on creating a Local Research Review Board, which is the formal process created to approve, monitor, report, and archive all requests for research.

At present, the Tribal Research Office is strictly a regulatory entity, but is working towards the goal of performing research in the future.

The Tribal Research Office is currently staffed by two employees.

The Research Specialist is Heather Larsen, an enrolled member of the Buffalo Lake District. Ms. Larsen is currently pursuing a Masters of Education degree in Counseling and Human Development from South Dakota State University.

A summer extern, Shannon White, will be assisting the Research Office throughout the summer of 2016. This assistance was made possible through the Community Health Education's Student Extern Program.

The Tribal Research Office is housed within the Education Department at the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Offices and funded through a grant provided by the Collaborative Research Center for American Indian Health (CRCAIH).

Information about the Tribal Research Office is available on the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate website at: http://www.swo-nsn.gov/departments/department-of-education/research-office/

From the office of SWO Tribal Secretary Crystal Owen –

And the winner is …

The winner of the SWO homeless center naming contest!

There were 15 entries submitted in the Name the SWO Homeless Shelter Contest during the month of April.

On May 13 over 350 Tribal members voted, mostly elders who voted on the day they picked up their gift cards.

The new name for the shelter, submitted by Joann Spider, is:

Wacinyan Tipi

… which means to trust in, depend upon, to need, to believe in.

We wish to thank all of the participants who took the time to submit an entry.

There were so many good suggestions.

We believe with this new name and the good energy it brings with it will give encouragement and support to all the relatives who come through the doors.

For a tour, to volunteer, or to donate to the shelter please contact Dani TwoStars at 605-698-2020.

Nina Wopida.

Public forum on new transportation code, zoning code revision

The SWO Judicial Committee has scheduled a public forum on the new SWO transportation code and revisions to the zoning code.

The forum will be held next Tuesday, May 31st, 2016, from 5:00-7:00 p.m. at Sisseton Wahpeton College in room two on the main floor.

There will be beverages and snacks.

Purpose is to get community comments.

copies of the codes are available at your District Center.

For more information, contact your District representative to the Judicial Committee.

If confirmed, Native American site may delay $3.8B pipeline

By David Pitt

Des Moines, IA – AP – May 20, 2016 – Discovery of an archaeological site that may have cultural significance to Native Americans could further delay construction of a $3.8 billion oil pipeline if government officials require the route to be moved.

Houston-based Dakota Access LLC wants to build the pipeline — designed to carry a half-million barrels of oil a day — from northwest North Dakota to a storage facility in south-central Illinois. Construction has begun in North Dakota, South Dakota and Illinois, but the Iowa Utilities Board has not authorized work to begin.

On Friday, Iowa State Archaeologist John Doershuk said his office had received information indicating a possible Native American site in northwest Iowa that, if confirmed, could result in relocation of the pipeline. He said details should start falling into place by next week, "as we confirm site characteristics and ownership/jurisdiction, as well as position relative to the planned pipeline construction activities."

Doershuk said in an email that those construction activities "may then be shifted, although the necessity of this course of action remains to be determined," he said.

Officer restrains boy at Killeen school; Police investigate Rhode Island pitches the X Games a return to its roots Current, former lawmen charged in cocaine trafficking case This handout photo provided by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department shows Aimee Hurt, right, Director of Operations for Working Dogs For Conservation, working with the aid of Lily to demonstrate a dog's ability to sniff out invasive zebra mussels and their microscopic larvae at the Toyota Texas Fest in Frisco, Texas, Friday, May 20, 2016. The Texas Parks & Wildlife Department launched a boater awareness campaign called "Clean, Drain and Dry," to fight the spread of zebra mussels. (Earl Nottingham/Texas Parks & Wildlife Department via AP) Texas steps up anti-zebra mussels effort going into summer FILE - In this May 9, 2015 file photo, pipes for the proposed Dakota Access oil pipeline that will stretch from the Bakken oil fields in North Dakota to Illinois are stacked at a staging area in Worthing, S.D. Construction on the pipeline is now underway in North Dakota, South Dakota and Illinois, three of the four states that will carry the oil from western North Dakota. The pipeline also will cross Iowa, but regulators there have declined to act quickly on a request to allow Texas-based Energy Transfer Partners to begin construction in that state. If confirmed, Native American site may delay $3.8B pipeline.

Final approval for the Iowa section is pending because the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which must issue permits for the pipeline to cross the Missouri and Mississippi rivers, hasn't issued its permits. A Corps spokesman said permits for the Iowa leg of the project are 60 to 120 days away.

Iowa was the last state to issue a permit for the pipeline, and the permit requires that Dakota Access prove it has all required federal and state permits before starting construction in Iowa.

Dakota Access is pressuring the Iowa Utilities Board to let it begin work at sites outside the jurisdiction of the Corps, but the board has declined to act quickly, saying it is reviewing comments from all sides before making a decision. Last week, the company said it had to start laying pipe this week in order to finish before winter and avoid disturbing farmland for a second growing season.

The Corps' main goal is to avoid impact to the environment and historically significant sites, and that often means working with the applicant to reroute the pipeline to avoid a sensitive area, said agency spokesman Ron Fournier, who serves a Corp district including Iowa and Illinois.

"If this is a significant Indian historical site that certainly could delay the permitting process if we have to get involved in realignments and avoid and minimize issues," Fournier said.

Dakota Access spokeswoman Vicki Granado said the company will continue to work with regulatory agencies "as we continue to move forward in preparation for the start of construction in Iowa."

SWO member dies of apparent hanging in Codington Co. Jail

Watertown, SD – KWAT Radio – May 16, 2016 – An inmate at the Codington County Detention Center is dead in an apparent suicide.

Sheriff Toby Wishard says 28 year-old Raina Autumn DeMarrias of Lake Norden was found hanging in her cell on Saturday.

She was taken to Prairie Lakes Hospital by ambulance where she was pronounced dead.

DeMarrias was being held without bond on a Hamlin County charge of Aggravated Assault on an Officer stemming from the alleged stabbing of a Lake Norden police officer on March 5th.

DeMarrias had been in custody since her arrest.

"Our condolences go out to the family of Ms. DeMarrias, and our thoughts are with the corrections staff who responded heroically to this tragic incident," Wishard said.

The South Dakota Division of Criminal Investigation is investigating the death.

(Editor's note: Raina is an SWO Tribal member, and her family and friends are calling for a thorough investigation of what happened while she was being held in the jail.)

Oglala Sioux Tribe caught up in $60 million scam

Rapid City, SD - Rapid City Journal - May 13, 2016 - A man once dubbed "Porn's New King" was arrested in Los Angeles on Wednesday on charges he scammed the Oglala Sioux Tribe in South Dakota and other investors of more than $60 million.

Charges against Jason Galanis and six others were announced by U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara in Manhattan. Defense lawyers did not immediately comment.

Prosecutors said Galanis and others lied to an entity of the Oglala Sioux Tribe from March 2014 through April about how proceeds from its bonds would be invested. They said the dealings occurred with the Wakpamni Lake Community Corp., an economic development corporation arm of the Oglala Sioux Tribe of South Dakota's Pine Ridge Reservation.

Tribal officials said late Thursday that they had just been informed of the matter on Wednesday and were working to determine what long-term impacts the bonds, reportedly valued at $43 million, could have on the Oglala Sioux.

"I've gotten calls on it and people are asking if we are aware of the situation," said Jacqueline Siers, a tribal councilwoman representing the Wakpamni District, located on the eastern side of the reservation. "I'm sure we'll be addressing it."

Siers said that when it was formed, the Community Corporation had asked the OST for approval of its economic development ventures, but the Tribal Council had turned it down.

"The tribe never approved it," she said. "As a community corporation, they were doing it on their own. It's a separate form of government."

OST spokesman Kevin Yellow Bird Steele said he believed the transactions involving the bonds dated to the previous administration of President Brian Brewer, and referred calls for comment to the Wakpamni Lake Community Corp.

New York City attorney Marc Mukasey, representing the Community Corp., said his client was "absolutely a victim in this case," but declined to discuss how much money was involved, what the bonds were used for, and what entity might ultimately be responsible for paying it all back.

Noting that seven defendants had been charged in the scheme, a statement released Thursday by the Community Corp. stated, "As this is an ongoing legal matter, the Wakpamni Lake Community Corporation is not able to comment further at this time."

Charging documents totaling 43 pages filed Wednesday by the Security and Exchange Commission allege the accomplices exerted undisclosed control over the "sham Native American tribal bonds," the proceeds of which they ultimately diverted to their own use, spending money on other investments, supporting a technology company's initial public offering, and buying luxury goods at retailers such as Gucci and Prada.

The government alleges that Galanis and the others also purchased homes, cars, travel and jewelry with the funds. It said they duped investors into buying the bonds as well. Galanis was charged with conspiracy to commit securities fraud, conspiracy to commit investment adviser fraud and investment adviser fraud.

"Instead of investing the proceeds in a way that would provide capital for development and help cover the interest payments, the defendants allegedly pocketed most of it to pay for their own personal expenses," Bharara said in a statement. "The defendants' alleged fraud has left devastation in its wake: a tribe with tens of millions in bond obligations it cannot pay, and investors out tens of millions, left holding bonds they did not want."

Diego Rodriguez, head of New York's FBI office, said: "The alleged fraudsters named in this case didn't just see an opportunity to steal money when they thought no one was looking, they allegedly hatched a plan to scam a municipal entity from the start. The most egregious fallout from this scheme is that the bondholders now hold worthless securities, and the tribe can't make the interest payments due."

Galanis was labeled "Porn's New King" by Forbes magazine when it reported in 2004 that he had bought the nation's largest payment processor for internet porn.

Bill to reform Poverty program advances

Washington, DC – May 11, 2016 – Rep. Kristi Noem's TANF Accountability and Integrity Improvement Act (H.R.2959), which aims to improve the outcomes of the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, was unanimously passed by the House Ways and Means Committee today. The move sets the legislation up to be voted on by the full House of Representatives next.

"Some states are falling short of their TANF commitments – both in terms of financial support and outcomes – and still receiving the full federal block grant. It's unfair to recipients who aren't getting the support they need and to states, like South Dakota, that run the program as it was intended," said Noem. "H.R.2959 helps close the loophole. I'm hopeful that by bringing greater accountability to the TANF program in this way, we can improve outcomes and ensure more families achieve financial independence."

TANF is the predominant federal program used to support low-income individuals and transition them into the workforce. It requires states to ensure 50% of program recipients participate in work-related activities, such as working, searching for a job, or training for one. If states spend more than the federal government requires, the 50% threshold can be decreased. In extreme cases, the threshold can be reduced to 0%.

Some states are counting third-party spending as "state spending" and driving their apparent investments to artificially high levels. As a result, those states don't need as many TANF recipients to be engaged in work-related activities in order to continue receiving full federal funding. Under H.R.2959, states could no longer count spending by third parties as state spending, meaning states would need to engage more adults in work-related activities in exchange for federal benefits, as the program was originally intended.

Of note, South Dakota does not count third-party spending as state spending in order to reduce the portion of TANF recipients engaged in work-related activities.

SD tribe seeks children's century-old remains

By Regina Garcia Cano

Rosebud, SD – Rapid City Journal – May 9, 2016 – The remains of at least 10 Native American children who died nearly 2,000 miles away from their homes while being forced to attend a government-run boarding school in Pennsylvania more than a century ago could soon be repatriated under an effort taken up by a South Dakota tribe.

The exhumation and return of the bodies of the children who as students of the Carlisle Indian Industrial School were stripped of their culture and left vulnerable to abuse won't be an easy undertaking. But leaders of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe hope that a meeting with representatives from the U.S. Army and other tribes scheduled for Tuesday will begin the negotiation process to repatriate the remains of the 10 children, and eventually, of the dozens more who died while attending the school as part of an assimilation policy intended to rid the children from Native American traditions and replace them with European culture.

"We are hoping that the United States government will say 'Yes, let's bring your relatives home,'" said Russell Eagle Bear, the historic preservation officer for the Rosebud Sioux Tribe. "Back then, the military had total control over us and they took these kids, and especially during those first five years of starting that school, our youth died. Back then in that timeline, our people were basically under almost a hostage situation so our people couldn't go all the way out to Pennsylvania to retrieve loved ones."

The boarding school, founded by Army officer Richard Henry Pratt, operated between 1879 and 1918 and saw more than 10,000 Native American children, who upon arrival were required to have their braids cut off and dress in military-style uniforms in an effort to grind out their heritage. Students were punished for speaking their native language and had to go by a European name.

The students lived under harsh conditions that included physical abuse and were used as farm labor during the summer. Children also were left susceptible to various types of disease, such as tuberculosis, which led to their early death. Nearly 200 students died and were buried at the school, which is now part of the U.S. Army War College.

The Army in a statement on Monday said the meeting Tuesday will begin a formal government-to-government consultation that will help all parties better understand the legal requirements to disinter a person buried in any Army? cemetery.

"It is the Army's desire to work with these leaders, work (a) successful resolution, and bring the young men and women home," according to the statement.

Leaders from the Standing Rock Sioux and Northern Arapaho Tribes are among those expected to attend the gathering.

This is the first major effort to repatriate the remains, and it began after a youth group on its way back home from a summit at the White House last summer stopped by the former school. Sydney Horse Looking, a high school senior who was part of the group, said the youth didn't like what they saw.

"They didn't get a proper burial, in my opinion, and the cemetery itself is pretty close to one of the main roads there, and people just drive by," said the 17-year-old Horse Looking, who along with the rest of the youth group pressed the tribe's council to begin the repatriation effort. "I think those kids should be brought home and reunited with their families. It wasn't their choice to go to that school."

Eagle Bear said his office has identified 10 children who are buried at the former school. He said the identification process has been challenging because some records have the children's European names, not their native names. Furthermore, he said, the graves were relocated between the late 1920s and early 1930s and some headstones lack names.

Eagle Bear said that if the Army authorizes the exhumation, he will take a medicine man with him to have a spiritual ceremony to help identify the remains, and DNA testing will be a backup. He hopes the exhumation can begin as early as this summer.

"A lot of these moms and dads went to their graves without knowing what happened to their child and how that child was treated," Eagle Bear said. "So, let's roll up our sleeves, let's lay out a plan and let's bring them back."

Rounds statement on bringing home remains of Native youth

Washington, DC – May 10, 2016 – U.S. Sen. Rounds (R-S.D.) made the following statement after representatives from his office participated in a meeting with Army representatives and tribal representatives in Rosebud, South Dakota. The meeting was to discuss returning the remains of Native American children buried at Carlisle Indian School in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, to their rightful home on their tribal land:

"During the 19th and early 20th centuries, nearly 830,000 Native American children were forcibly removed from their families and sent to boarding schools—like Carlisle—to assimilate them into what was considered 'modern society.' It is past time that the remains of the children who are buried at Carlisle Indian School be returned to their rightful home."

"I thank the Army representatives for working with tribal leaders to begin the formal process of bringing the children home to their relatives. Today's meeting was - by all accounts - a success. My office will remain engaged throughout the process and stands ready to assist in any way possible."

The Carlisle Indian School, founded in 1879, was one of many boarding schools across the country whose goal was to assimilate Native American youth by removing them from their families, cultures and traditions. Faculty cut students hair short, enforced a strict dress code and confiscated sacred objects that students may have brought with them from home in an effort to introduce them to 'modern' American culture. Today's meeting included representatives from the Rosebud Sioux, Oglala Sioux, Northern Arapaho, Cheyenne River Sioux, Northern Cheyenne, Standing Rock Sioux and Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate, whose members are among those buried at the Carlisle Indian School. The Defending Childhood Initiative Sicangu Youth Council and the Tokala Inajinyo Suicide Prevention Peer Mentors, two groups of middle and high school students from the Rosebud Sioux tribe, also participated in today's meeting. After a trip to Carlisle last year, they have been very active in working to bring their relatives home.

Rounds recently sent a letter to the Army requesting the transfer of tribal remains from the cemetery at Carlisle Barracks to South Dakota. At today's meeting, the Army representatives confirmed they intend to use their resources to return the remains home.

Statement on Committee Passage of NDAA

Washington, DC – May 13, 2016 – U.S. Senator Mike Rounds (R-S.D.), a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, today issued a statement after the committee's passage of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA). The bill includes a number of provisions he introduced, including his provision requiring the administration to define a cyber act of war.

"Passing the NDAA each year is critical to protecting and advancing our national security," said Rounds. "It's a testament to Chairman McCain and Ranking Member Reed's leadership that members from both sides of the aisle were able to work with each other to pass this important legislation.

"I'm also pleased that my Cyber Act of War Act was included in the NDAA. As the nature of warfare continues to evolve, it is critical that our armed forces have the authorization and ability to defend against cyber-attacks on our critical infrastructure such as the electric grid, transportation systems and water supplies. Clearly defining what constitutes an act of war in the cyber realm is the first step in this effort."

Rounds' Cyber Act of War Act would require the administration to develop a policy to determine when an action carried out in cyberspace constitutes an act of war against the United States. It would also require the Department of Defense to include the definition in its Law of War Manual.

Legislation Rounds introduced to improve DOD prescription drug monitoring for PTSD, training of DOD personnel who hire cyber security professionals and DOD's purchase of commercial services was also included in the NDAA.

Thune, Inhofe praise NDAA Impact Aid provision

Washington, DC – May 13, 2016 – U.S. Sens. John Thune (R-S.D.) and Jim Inhofe (R-Okla.) today praised the inclusion of a provision to the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for fiscal year 2017 that fixes statutory language negatively affecting the Impact Aid program, which provides funds to eligible public schools in all 50 states.

"Impact Aid is a critical program to South Dakota, which is why I want to thank my colleagues, especially Sen. Inhofe who agreed to offer this amendment, for working with me over the last few weeks as we negotiated this important bipartisan fix," said Thune. "Without action, dozens of South Dakota schools could face hundreds of thousands of dollars in deep funding cuts. For the schools across our state and the students who depend on them, I'm glad this issue is one step closer to being resolved."

"Impact Aid is a crucial program for our local schools that are impacted from the loss of local tax revenue due to the presence of military bases," said Inhofe. "In Oklahoma, Impact Aid funding has helped to provide education for thousands of military children whose parents are stationed at one of our five installations. For many years, I have fought to protect Impact Aid funding levels in the National Defense Authorization Act despite historic defense budget cuts during the Obama administration. This year, I joined Sen. John Thune to also address the distribution of aid for schools that are categorized as 'Heavily Impacted.' With our provision, Oklahoma's schools will be protected from a $450,000 cut in Impact Aid funding. We appreciate our colleagues on the HELP Committee and Sens. Cornyn and Cruz for supporting our fix to the program."

Impact Aid was most recently reauthorized in December 2015, in the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). The Inhofe amendment included in the NDAA corrects an ESSA drafting error that, if left unresolved, would have inadvertently disqualified some districts from the program whose boundaries are within the perimeter of a military installation. This language also delays a provision in ESSA related to the qualification formula for the heavily impacted section of the program to provide additional time to collect data on the effects on participating school districts. Lastly, the amendment modifies the program to ensure annual payments to one district experiencing demographic changes are not higher than Congress intended. Had this gone unchanged, over 1,000 school districts across the country would have experienced substantial, unexpected cuts in funding. Because of the Inhofe amendment, Oklahoma and South Dakota will be protected from cuts of $450,000 and $700,000, respectively, in fiscal year 2016.

Bill would require definition of Cyber Act of War

Washington, DC – U.S. Senator Mike Rounds (R-S.D.), a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee (SASC), today will introduce the Cyber Act of War Act of 2016. The Cyber Act of War Act of 2016 would require the administration to develop a policy to determine whether a cyber-attack constitutes an act of war.

"With the Internet playing a major role in nearly every aspect of our lives, we not only face the threat of losing our personal information online, but we are at risk of having our daily lives interrupted by cyber-attacks that have the ability to cripple our power grid, water supplies and communications networks," said Rounds. "Cyber-attacks on our critical infrastructure are capable of impacting our entire economy and causing significant destruction. This legislation would require the executive branch to define which of these actions constitute a cyber act of war, which would allow our military to be better able to respond to cyber-attacks and deter bad actors from attempting to attack us in the first place."

During a February 9, 2016, SASC hearing, Rounds questioned Director of National Intelligence James Clapper, Jr., and Lt. Gen. Vincent Stewart, Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency, about whether it would be helpful to define an act of war in cyber space. Lt. Gen. Stewart responded, "I think it would be extremely helpful to have clear definitions of what constitutes cyber events versus acts of war…if we get much fuller definition of the range of things that occur in cyber space, and then start thinking about the threshold where an attack is catastrophic enough or destructive enough that we define it as an act of war, I think that would be extremely useful."

The Cyber Act of War Act of 2016 would require that in developing the policy for determining when an action carried out in cyberspace constitutes an act of war against the United States, the administration would be required to consider: · the ways in which the effects of a cyber-attack may be equivalent to effects of an attack using conventional weapons, for example with regard to physical destruction or casualties; and intangible effects of significant scope, intensity or duration.

It would also require the Department of Defense to include this definition in its Law of War Manual.

The report would be due 180 days after enactment.

Testifies on protecting tribes from costly Employer mandate

Washington, DC – May 17, 2016 – Rep. Kristi Noem today testified before the House Ways and Means Committee on her Tribal Employment and Jobs Protection Act, which would protect Native American tribes from the Affordable Care Act's costly employer mandate. The federal government is already responsible for providing healthcare to tribal members. Imposing the employer mandate on them is unnecessary and duplicative. Without relief, tribal governments could be required to cut important services while tribally-owned businesses could be forced to cut jobs.

"Only in Washington – with hastily written legislation like the Affordable Care Act – could you come up with the scenario tribes and their members now find themselves in," said Noem. "Tribes are being forced to offer coverage, or pay a tax penalty for not providing coverage, to people the federal government is already responsible for caring for. This unnecessarily diverts limited resources that could be used better in other areas. We owe it to tribes to provide them the certainty they need to provide for the general welfare of their members and exempt them from the employer mandate."

Exempting tribes from the employer mandate has been endorsed by the Great Plains Tribal Chairmen's Health Board, which represents tribes in South Dakota, North Dakota, Nebraska and Iowa. Additionally, the Tribal Employment and Jobs Protection Act has been endorsed by the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI), the National Indian Health Board (NIHB) and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

The legislation, which Noem sponsored alongside Rep. Ryan Zinke (R-MT) in the House, has also been introduced by Sens. John Thune (R-SD) and Steve Daines (R-MT) in the Senate.

Eligibility for $38 million Keepseagle grants distribution

Fast-track registration opens May 25, applications close June 24

Washington, DC – May 17, 2016 – Class counsel in the Keepseagle v. Vilsack settlement today announced details about the Native American Agricultural Fast Track Fund (NAAFTF), a one-time distribution of $38 million in settlement funds. Awards from this fund will be made on a competitive basis to non-profit organizations, tribal programs and educational institutions which provide agricultural, business, technical or advocacy services to existing and aspiring Native American farmers and ranchers.

"Among the far-reaching benefits of the Keepseagle settlement is the means for organizations which have a track record of supporting Native American farmers and ranchers to deliver valuable assistance to promote their continued engagement in agriculture – an important component of the economy in Indian Country," said Joseph M. Sellers, lead counsel for the plaintiff class. "The Fast Track Fund will make vital resources available to these important efforts by the end of this year."

The NAAFTF award process begins with a one-month period for letters of intent applications to be submitted to determine eligibility (after review, eligible applicants will be invited to submit full proposals). This first step starts May 25 at 12 p.m. MDT, when registration, application materials, and further process details and a timeline are made available at www.indianfarmclass.com/NAAFTF.aspx. An applicant must submit a letter-of-intent application no later than Friday, June 24, 2016, by 5 p.m. MDT. Technical assistance relating strictly to the application process will be available by dedicated phone and email contacts.

To be eligible, an applicant organization must document that it provided agricultural, business, technical or advocacy services to Native American farmers or ranchers between January 1, 1981, and November 1, 2010; is based in the United States; and is one of the following:

• 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization

• 7871 designation as a non-profit organization chartered under the tribal law of a state or federally recognized tribe

• An educational institution described in 170(b)(1)(A)(ii)

• An instrumentality of a state or federally recognized tribe, designated under 7701(a)(40)

An applicant organization must propose its use of award funds to provide assistance designed to further Native American farming or ranching activities. Litigation, lobbying or political activities will not be eligible for funding.

The letter-of-intent application must include a description of the applicant organization, demonstrate eligibility through required documentation of a tribal or board resolution, the purpose for which funding is being sought, the applicant organization's total annual operating budget, total project costs (if applicable), and requested amount.

An advisory committee will review the letters-of-intent applications and issue an invitation to selected organizations for full proposals on July 28, 2016.

The process will be managed under the supervision of class counsel by Echo Hawk Consulting. Class counsel will make recommendations to the Court, based on input from the Advisory Committee. The Advisory Committee is comprised of six individuals with experience and expertise in the fields of Native American farming, ranching and philanthropy. All awards are subject to Court approval. Awards will range in size depending on an organization's or tribe's budget, focus and scope. NAAFTF will consider as well applications from intermediary organizations having existing, relevant grant programs which can be expanded through awards.

Background

On April 20, 2016, the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia approved a modification to the Keepseagle settlement agreement, which included a process for the distribution of funds to cy pres beneficiaries. The modification to the settlement also provides for additional damage awards to be paid to prevailing claimants. The remaining funds, approximately $265 million, will go to a Trust that will distribute funds at the direction of an independent board of trustees for up to 20 years. NAAFTF is separate from the Trust, and is designed to ensure that a substantial portion of the remaining funds are distributed to qualifying organizations much more quickly than the Trust will be able to begin making grants.

NAAFTF was created to make awards to such organizations already involved in supporting Native American ranchers and farmers before the original Keepseagle settlement was agreed to in 2010.

The Court's order is open to appeal through June 20, 2016. If an appeal is filed, the grant process will be suspended until a decision on the appeal is rendered.

Expands Buy-Back Program across Indian country

After government-to-government discussions, new schedule includes locations with 96 percent of eligible landowners

Washington, DC – May 17, 2016 – Following extensive outreach with tribal leaders and American Indian landowners, Interior Deputy Secretary Michael L. Connor today announced an expanded schedule for implementing the Land Buy-Back Program for Tribal Nations (Program) at 63 additional locations from 2018 through mid-2021. Since it began making offers in December 2013, the Program has paid more than $740 million to individual landowners and restored the equivalent of nearly 1.5 million acres of land to tribal governments.

The expansion brings the number of locations planned for the Program to 105, a total that includes more than 96 percent of all landowners with fractionated interests and more than 98 percent of both purchasable fractional interests and equivalent acres in Program-eligible areas. About 245,000 landowners hold nearly three million fractional interests across Indian Country.

"The Buy-Back Program embodies the priorities set forth by the Obama Administration's goal to build effective partnerships with American Indian communities, promote sustainable economic development and tribal culture, and protect tribal lands," said Deputy Secretary Connor. "In partnership with tribal governments, this Program is generating new opportunities to work more efficiently, stimulate community dialogue and facilitate land use planning, while ensuring that lands stay in trust for the benefit of tribal nations."

The Program implements the land consolidation component of the Cobell Settlement, which provided $1.9 billion to purchase fractional interests in trust or restricted land from willing sellers at fair market value within 10 years. Individuals who choose to voluntarily sell their interests will receive payments directly in their Individual Indian Money accounts. Consolidated interests are immediately restored to tribal trust ownership for uses benefiting the reservation community and tribal members.

Informed by early planning activities and tribal engagement in 2013-2014, Interior identified 42 locations in November 2014 where land consolidation activities – such as planning, outreach, mapping, mineral evaluations, appraisals or acquisitions – have either already occurred or are expected to take place through the middle of 2017.

In November 2015, the Program announced a Planning Initiative to assist in the development of the implementation schedule announced today. Through discussions with tribal leaders and events with landowners, the two-pronged Planning Initiative gathered input from tribal governments and landowners. The Program received Expressions of Interest from a significant number of tribal governments and – since the beginning of the Program through the Planning Initiative's deadline of March 11, 2016 – 37,059 individuals registered as willing sellers.

Because effective planning and coordination take many months, it is critical that the Program begin the process to educate landowners, identify tribal priorities, and build cooperative working relationships. A Program representative will contact each Tribe as planning for the expanded implementation begins at each location.

Decisions about where to schedule implementation were based on a number of factors that were developed through months of government-to-government discussions, including: severity of fractionation; degree of ownership-overlap between reservations; appraisal complexity; tribal readiness and interest; number of owners who have demonstrated an interest in selling fractional interests; and cost and time efficiency.

U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell has discussed a need for Interior to work with Congress on a longer-term solution to deal with fractionation, given that the funding and time limits of the Cobell Settlement do not provide enough to consolidate all fractional interests across Indian Country. Secretary Jewell directed the oversight board that manages the Buy-Back Program, led by Deputy Secretary Connor, to undergo a 60 day analysis with the many offices involved in implementation. The board will send options to the Secretary for review to extend the life of the Program so that future participants can benefit and allow the Program to return to locations where implementation has already occurred.

The Program continues to reallocate unused land purchase funds to scheduled locations. This will help determine if remaining resources exist, and where they might be used at additional locations or locations where purchase offers have already been sent. Additionally, interested landowners at locations not scheduled for implementation, or on locations where offers have already been extended, are encouraged to call the Trust Beneficiary Call Center (Call Center) at 888-678-6836 to indicate that they are a willing seller and/or to update contact information.

Registering as a willing seller does not commit you to selling your land, nor does it guarantee an offer will be extended; it merely identifies interest to help advance planning. The Program will re-evaluate its resources and progress by November 2018 to determine if additional locations can be added to the schedule.

Individuals can contact the Call Center or visit their local Office of the Special Trustee for American Indians (OST) or Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) office to learn more about their land and their options – including how the Program works. The Call Center and local OST staff can also help landowners think strategically about how to use funds they may receive through the Program.

For more details about the Program, the Planning Initiative, implementation to date, and the significant economic impact in Indian Country, please see the Program's 2015 Status Report.

The following is a list of the 63 additional locations added to the Buy-Back Program schedule for implementation from 2018 through mid-2021:

Absentee Shawnee Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma

Apache Tribe of Oklahoma

Blue Lake Rancheria, California

Cherokee Nation

Cheyenne & Arapaho Tribes, Oklahoma

Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma

Colorado River Indian Tribe of the Colorado River Indian Reservation, Arizona and California

Comanche Nation, Oklahoma

Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon

Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma

Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin

Fort Independence Indian Community of Paiute Indians of the Fort Independence Reservation, California

Habematolel Pomo of Upper Lake, California

Ho-Chunk Nation of Wisconsin

Hoopa Valley Tribe, California

Hopi Tribe of Arizona

Kalispel Indian Community of the Kalispel Reservation, Washington

Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, Michigan

Kickapoo Tribe of Indians of the Kickapoo Reservation in Kansas

Kiowa Indian Tribe of Oklahoma

Kootenai Tribe of Idaho

Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin

Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of the Lac du Flambeau Reservation of Wisconsin

Minnesota Chippewa - Bois Forte Band (Nett Lake)

Minnesota Chippewa - Grand Portage Band

Minnesota Chippewa - Leech Lake Band

Minnesota Chippewa - Mille Lacs Band

Minnesota Chippewa - White Earth Band

Morongo Band of Mission Indians, California

Muckleshoot Indian Tribe

Nisqually Indian Tribe

Omaha Tribe of Nebraska

Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma

Pala Band of Luiseno Mission Indians of the Pala Reservation, California

Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma

Pechanga Band of Luiseno Mission Indians of the Pechanga Reservation, California

Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico

Quileute Tribe of the Quileute Reservation, Washington

Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin

Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, Minnesota

Rincon Band of Luiseno Mission Indians of the Rincon Reservation, California

Sac & Fox Nation of Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska

Sac & Fox Nation, Oklahoma

Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan

Santee Sioux Nation, Nebraska

Skokomish Indian Tribe

Spirit Lake Tribe, North Dakota

Spokane Tribe of the Spokane Reservation

Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin

Suquamish Indian Tribe of the Port Madison Reservation

Sycuan Band of the Kumeyaay Nation

The Chickasaw Nation

The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma

The Muscogee (Creek) Nation

The Seminole Nation of Oklahoma

Tohono O'odham Nation of Arizona

Tulalip Tribes of Washington

Upper Sioux Community, Minnesota

Ute Indian Tribe of the Uintah & Ouray Reservation, Utah

Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah

Walker River Paiute Tribe of the Walker River Reservation, Nevada

Yurok Tribe of the Yurok Reservation, California

Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico

A full list of the 105 locations now identified for implementation, can be found at: >https://www.doi.gov/buybackprogram/program-implementation-schedule<.

'Heidi Helps' Session in Wahpeton

Washington, DC – May 16, 2016 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today announced that her staff will hold a "Heidi Helps" session in Wahpeton on Wednesday, May 25 from 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at Leach Public Library. During the session, Heitkamp's staff will help North Dakotans address federal concerns such as veterans' benefits, social security, and more.

"North Dakotans across our state should have easy access to services and support from my offices, which is why we're hosting a 'Heidi Helps' session in Wahpeton this month," said Heitkamp. "For folks who don't live near one of my five state offices, this is a great opportunity to meet with my staff and ask questions about federal programs. Getting out into your communities helps me stay connected and informed about how I can best advocate for you in the U.S. Senate."

Leach Public Library is located at 417 2nd Ave North in Wahpeton.

Heitkamp's staff holds "Heidi Helps" sessions to better serve North Dakotans who don't live near her five state offices in Bismarck, Dickinson, Fargo, Grand Forks, and Minot. The sessions are held in temporary locations for a few hours to help Heitkamp and her staff be as accessible as possible to communities all across North Dakota. Past sessions have been held in Bottineau, New Rockford, Lisbon, Carrington, and Langdon.

Members of Heitkamp's staff will be available to assist North Dakotans with questions and casework, and to provide information about internship opportunities and service academy nominations. All information provided is private and confidential. No appointments are necessary.

Mental Health Resources for Rural Veterans

Washington, DC – May 19, 2016 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today announced that her bipartisan legislation to promote better access to needed mental health resources for veterans in rural areas was unanimously approved and will be included in a spending bill the U.S. Senate is currently considering.

To help address many of the challenges veterans in rural areas face transitioning to civilian life, Heitkamp's legislation aims to expand readjustment and mental health counseling services for veterans in rural areas – particularly for those recently returning from combat in Iraq and Afghanistan. Heitkamp hopes that her bill, which also requires the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to report within a year on its plan to increase capacity to provide rural veterans with these critical resources, will pave the way for a new Vet Center in Grand Forks – which she has long been calling for.

"North Dakotans answer the call to serve in large numbers, leaving their families and friends and putting their lives on the line. But too often when they return home, they don't have access to the readjustment and psychological counseling resources they need to transition back to civilian life," said Heitkamp. "Not a single veteran should be left behind in our state – and my bipartisan legislation will help make sure that doesn't happen. By directing the VA to focus on veterans in rural areas, we can start addressing the internal battle that can continue when they return home, often in the form of post-traumatic stress or a sense of isolation. It's my hope that the coordination required by this provision will identify the need we know exists in the Grand Forks region, and pave the way for a new Vet Center in the area."

Specifically, Heitkamp's legislation would require better coordination between the Readjustment Counseling Service and the Office of Rural Health within the VA to make sure veterans in rural areas can access the support they need, which is often difficult to come by in small towns or remote regions. It was incorporated into a larger bill to fund the VA, military construction, as well as federal transportation and housing agencies.

Transitioning servicemembers often cluster around military bases after concluding their military service – and in North Dakota, the majority of the state's more than 7,000 post-9/11 veterans have settled near U.S. Air Force bases in Minot and Grand Forks. A Vet Center in Grand Forks would help address some of the unmet needs of veterans in rural areas, including high rates of homelessness and suicide.

Vet Centers help vulnerable veterans who served in combat zones readjust to civilian life by providing free counseling, screening, and referral services, while removing the stigma of seeking mental health care. The VA currently maintains three Vet Centers in North Dakota – in Fargo, Bismarck, and Minot.

Background

Heitkamp has worked to stand up for North Dakota veterans, particularly those in rural areas, by:

· Pressing VA Secretary for better care for rural veterans: In November 2015, Heitkamp pressed VA Secretary Robert McDonald for a Grand Forks Vet Center to help address the mental and physical health challenges many newly returning veterans experience during their readjustment to civilian life. The next month, Heitkamp pushed McDonald to visit North Dakota to see the challenges rural veterans face getting quality care. In February, Heitkamp pressed VA Under Secretary Shulkin on the immediate need for a Vet Center in Grand Forks.

· Helping newly returning veterans readjust to civilian life: Heitkamp has long pressed for policies that better connect new veterans with services they need to readjust to civilian life. Last summer, Heitkamp reintroduced her bipartisan Connect with Veterans Act, which aims to address the challenges newly returning veterans in North Dakota face in obtaining needed services and benefits, including employment opportunities, education assistance, and health care like mental health services.

· Strengthening resources for mental health support services for rural veterans: The bipartisan year-end spending bill Congress passed in December, which Heitkamp supported, included $258 million for Readjustment Counseling Services, which is $15 million above the requested level. The increased funds are directed toward Vet Centers to address unmet mental health needs of veterans in rural and very rural areas like North Dakota.

· Hearing directly from North Dakota veterans about the challenges they face: As co-founder of the bipartisan Senate Defense Communities Caucus, Heitkamp has long stood up for veterans and servicemembers. In October 2015, Heitkamp hosted her second Native American Veterans Summit on the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indian Reservation where Native American veterans, local Veterans Service Officers, and VA officials to meet about persisting issues and to exchange information about available housing, health care, and other resources. Shortly after joining the Senate, she conducted a statewide listening tour, meeting with veterans across the state and discussing their concerns to better understand the challenges many of them face.

GROW SD to attend and present at National Rural LISC conference

GROW South Dakota will lead a panel discussion at the Rural LISC Seminar May 24-26, an annual national conference for rural community development professionals. This year's Seminar will be held in Washington, D.C., and will provide valuable insight into ways to improve our communities, and offer networking opportunities with rural colleagues from around the country.

GROW SD CEO, Lori Finnesand, will be on a panel on small business development. "We have worked with Rural LISC for years," said Finnesand. "GROW SD was one of the first chartered members when Rural LISC was formed in 1995. We and the communities we serve have benefited from Rural LISC in many ways."

Lisa Mensah, USDA Undersecretary for Rural Development, will welcome attendees with a keynote address about rural issues and the USDA. Other highlights will include sessions about:

*Reinvesting in Rural America - a plenary featuring speakers from the Independent Bankers of America and the USDA.

*Small Business Development - a panel discussion by GROW South Dakota; Northern Initiatives in Marquette, MI.; Hope Enterprise Corporation in Jackson, MS.; and Communities United in Arkansas.

*Rural Creative Place Making - a panel featuring South Carolina Arts Commission; National Endowment for the Arts, Tucker County Development Authority in Thomas, WV; Dance Place, Washington, DC; and ArtPlace America, Brooklyn, NY.

"GROW South Dakota exemplifies the very best in innovative programming to their community, and we are delighted that they are attending this year's Seminar," said Suzanne Anarde, Rural LISC Program Vice President.

About GROW South Dakota

GROW South Dakota has served South Dakota communities since 1966. The organization excels at providing housing, community, and economic development to 10,000 customers annually. GROW South Dakota consists of three separate private nonprofit agencies.

About Rural LISC

Launched in 1995, Rural LISC is the rural component of the largest community development support organization in the country called LISC (Local Initiatives Support Corporation). Rural LISC provides a wide range of services, including training, technical assistance, information and financial support, to help rural community developers address the problems rural communities face. This assistance comes in the form of loans and grants, national policy support, and technical and management assistance. Since 1995, Rural LISC has helped rural groups build over 29,000 homes; $3.2 million square feet of commercial or community facilities; helped over 550 small businesses; helped create 6,250 jobs in rural areas; and helped place 1,000 children in new child care facilities and after-school programs; and generated over $120 million in matching funds raised by rural community development corporations. For more information about GROW South Dakota's housing and business development programs and services, please visit our website at www.growsd.org or call (605) 698-7654.

*****

GROW SOUTH DAKOTA is an Equal Opportunity Lender, Provider, and Employer Complaints of discrimination should be sent to: USDA, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Ave SW, Washington DC 20250-9410.

Veblen man accused of leaving child outside bar

Aberdeen American News and KSFY – Veblen, SD – May 19, 2016 – A Veblen man is accused of leaving a child alone in a car while he got drunk in a bar.

The American News reports that 48-year-old Mitchell Lufkins was arrested Monday after officers were alerted to a child crying in a car outside of The Cantina in Veblen. Marshall County Sheriff Dale Elsen says Lufkins was passed out inside the bar.

Lufkins appeared in court Tuesday on nine charges including felony child abuse and was released on a personal recognizance bond. It wasn't clear if he has an attorney, and a home telephone listing for him couldn't be found.

The child was younger than 7 and is now in protective custody.

Sisseton citywide rummage sales

The Sisseton Area Chamber of Commerce is coordinating the 17th Annual Citywide Rummage Sales to be held on Saturday, June 4, 2016.

The Chamber will compile a listing of sales in the city that day. Contact the Chamber office at 698-7261 with your name, address, hours of the sale, and a few categories of items you will be selling. (Or email sissetonchamber@venturecomm.net) The deadline to get your sale included on the printed list will be Wednesday, June 1.

Businesses that would like to have rummage sale flyers available to distribute may pick them up at the Chamber Office after 12:00 Noon on Friday, June 3.

Vendors sought for 2016 Maga Farmers Market

Plans have begun for the sixth year of the Maga Farmers Market in Sisseton.

The market season will start June 3 and markets will continue each Friday through late September.

This year the market will again be located along East Highway 10, in the lot south of the Rosalie's Restaurant.

Maga Farmers Market will be open 3:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. on Fridays during the season.

Some regional vendors that will be participating grow their produce in "high tunnels" which allow them to sell fresh products earlier than those with traditional outdoor gardens. So even with the market beginning in the early summer, there will still be great fresh produce and other homemade food items available for sale.

"Maga" is the Dakota word for "garden" and it's hoped there will be lots of fresh produce, flowers, specialty crops, eggs, value-added products and much more from local/area gardeners.

If you are interested in selling produce and/or homemade goods at the markets, call the Roberts County Extension Office at 698-7627 for information on how to get registered.

Because of support from a South Dakota Department of Agriculture grant, there will be no fees for booths at the Maga Farmers Market during the 2015 season.

Editorials –

Sota editorial –

SD Congressional delegates call out IHS for failures, but fail to include SWO grievances

The SWO Tribe has hosted public forums, last year and again this year, to allow Tribal members to vent frustration over quality of services provided at the Sisseton IHS unit.

Not only to vent, but provide details – often in writing, with their signatures – to aides representing Senators Thune and Rounds.

What the aides were given was a litany of complaints.

These range from wrongful death, misdiagnosis, inappropriate treatment (examples include prescribing opioid pain medication rather than contract specialty surgery and other treatment options), and (a big area is) lack of payment for contract health services. Tribal members have lost their credit due to medical bills not being picked up by IHS … bills for very much needed medical treatment including surgery.

The list is long, and it has been given to South Dakota's Congressional delegates.

What we have so far seen are press releases about failures of IHS in three of the Great Plains Region hospitals.

No mention of SWO and other tribes' clinic facilities, or other hospitals.

Here is a statement from A. Gay Kingman, Executive Director of the Great Plains Tribal Chairman's Association, and we concur:

RE: South Dakota Senator Blasts Great Plains Area Indian Health Service (a press release from Senator Rounds in mid-April).

"The point has been raised and I agree, that all the hospitals and clinics in the Great Plains Region should be investigated and improved because all have non-compliance issues, poor treatment, unfilled positions, lack of adequate doctors, nurses and staffing, poor management etc. etc. The three hospitals that were cited by CMS for many points of non-compliance and sub-standard care are featured by I.H.S. for improvement and this is good, if it works."

"Tribal members are asking for a similar review and increasing quality care for their hospitals and clinics on other reservations of the Great Plains because they are just as much in trouble and in need of upgrading care. Other reservation hospitals in the Great Plains haven't been visited by CMS therefore, the sub-standard care in these hospitals is not public knowledge and allowed to go on…"

"We cannot let this poor treatment of our tribal members continue because this is genocide of our People plus the problems on our reservations are increasing with Meth and many other concerns."

"The Great Plains Tribes can collectively come together to correct this. We have to!"

Here is an article published April 18, 2016 by Indian Country Today, written by David Rooks, which was included with Gay Kingman's statement.

South Dakota Senator Blasts Great Plains Area Indian Health Service

In a press release on Thursday, U.S. Senator Mike Rounds, R-SD, said, "Tribal members have been suffering and dying due to inadequate or improper health care provided by IHS." The Senator then met with area tribal officials in Pierre, South Dakota on Friday.

ICTMN contacted Rounds' office and found that preliminary preparations are in the works for field hearings in the Indian Health Service's (IHS) Great Plains Regional area to begin at an undetermined date, though Rounds Public Affairs Director Natalie Krings believes they are in the planning for the near future.

Citing specific trouble spots, Rounds said, "My office has begun working on an in-depth profile analysis of IHS. We're working with the Congressional Research Service and analyzing data and reports from the Government Accountability Office and the Department of Health and Human Services to find answers."

The Senator turned the heat up, stating, "What we have found so far says a lot about why IHS is failing so miserably." Rounds turned his fire specifically at the Great Plains Regional Area of the IHS, saying "South Dakota, North Dakota, Nebraska and Iowa is plagued with systematic problems."

The junior senator said: "Tribal members have been suffering and dying due to inadequate or improper health care provided by IHS. It is time for IHS to get its act together and follow through on its trust responsibility to deliver quality health care to Native Americans."

Rounds listed a multitude of problems that have arisen since he took office in January 2015: "[I]f we don't solve the problems at IHS, we will continue to see more hospitals failing to meet basic requirements to provide safe health care, therefore losing essential services like emergency care. The Rosebud hospital's emergency department has been on diversion — which essentially means it is shut down — for four months, forcing patients to be diverted to facilities 50 or more miles away. The Winnebago and Pine Ridge hospitals have also been cited for serious safety deficiencies."

Rounds said the focus needs to be on why so many problems are repeated over and over without any apparent fix. "I plan on finding answers to these questions and working with the tribes on solutions," he said. "We heard horrific stories of dirty or broken medical equipment, poor record-keeping, and in one inexcusable case, a woman gave birth to her baby on a bathroom floor with no nurses or doctors around to help her.

"Tribal members have told my office that some IHS hospitals they visit are working with outdated, inadequate and sometimes broken medical equipment. Through our research, we have found that IHS allocates less than 0.5 percent of its $4.8 billion budget to equipment purchases.

From the Rounds release: "The Great Plains Area IHS, which operates 35 of the total 153 IHS facilities, only receives copy16 million for direct care, or 2 percent of the IHS total appropriation. We also learned that IHS has more than 15,000 employees but only 750 are identified as doctors, yet more than 3,700 employees are dedicated to Medicaid billing.

"It's hard not to come to the conclusion that the IHS system is more concerned about protecting a bureaucracy than taking care of people. IHS has no funding formula, no consistent qualitative reporting measurements, and too many of their 'Area Directors' appear to be little more than temporary employees. Lastly, IHS spends less per capita than the Bureau of Prisons spends on each inmate's health care.

"Looking at statistics like these makes it clear that IHS will never be able to function properly unless it undergoes major changes. More taxpayer money won't solve the dysfunction. Both systematic and financial changes need to occur.

"The state of IHS has resulted in a federal government-initiated crisis in Indian country. The Great Plains Area ranks second highest in infant mortality rates among all IHS regions. We have the highest diabetes death rates, highest tuberculosis death rates and the highest alcohol-related death rates. Great Plains Area tribal members have the lowest life expectancy rate at 68.1 years, while the U.S. average is 77.7."

In January, Rounds requested the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs hold a hearing "to examine a number of reports of negligence at IHS hospitals in the Great Plains Area."

*****

We would like to see our SD Congressionals follow-up as promised, and expected, in taking specific problems of health service delivery on the Lake Traverse Reservation to Washington, DC.

One other note.

It has been positive, overall, to hear them being so vocal in DC railing against the failures of IHS.

But, even as they now play the role of crusaders, remember, it was partly their decision to cut funding levels to IHS below levels needed to fill those vacant professional medical positions. And that is one of the deficiencies they cite in their crusade on behalf of Indian country against IHS.

Meanwhile, on the Lake Traverse Reservation, Tribal Executives and Council are seriously studying the wisdom and means of contracting health services delivery. Watch for ongoing information about work of the self-governance work group.

-- CDF

Brief editorial comments from the editor's desk –

On and Off the Lake Traverse Reservation

Our thanks to Tribal Health Coordinator Sara DeCoteau and self-governance working group for helping us provide an accurate summary of the recent public forum.

All of the Oyate ought to be concerned about how health services are administered for themselves and future generations.

This is an extremely critical time, as so many grievances have come to the surface. These range from errors causing death, to lack of coverage for needed contract health services leaving members with bad credit ratings.

Please read this, and future articles.

And check out the working group's Facebook page for updates:

https://www.facebook.com/SWO-Self-Governance-Planning-123369994733745/

*****

Our heart goes out to family and friends of Raina Autumn DeMarrias.

It sure appears this tragedy need not have happened.

While authorities in Codington County are promising an investigation, circumstances leading up to, and including her hanging herself in her cell demand outside investigators. None with ties to those who failed their basic responsibility to humanely house inmates can be put in charge.

It certainly looks like criminal neglect by the very people charged with protecting and serving everyone. And that protection and service includes providing basic rights to inmates.

*****

Thank you Joann Spider, winner in the homeless center naming contest, and all others who submitted a name.

From now on, the SWO homeless center is to be known as Wacinyan Tipi!

How fitting.

See the news item submitted by Tribal Secretary Crystal Owen.

*****

Please note: There are AA meetings taking place at the Wacinyan Tipi weekly.

AA is now meeting from 6-7 p.m. every Saturday.

Everyone is welcome to attend.

There will be refreshments, coffee and cookies.

*****

Please read the new Sota policy concerning political advertising.

The rates reflect a greater discount rate for full, half and quarter page advertisements – as much as 70 percent off the commercial rate, depending upon size of the ad.

Full page: $180.

Half page: $100.

Quarter page: $50

Smaller sizes will still be discounted, but will be charged $2.50 per column inch: for example, 2 col. x 10" ad (20 col. inches) would cost $50, the same as a quarter page; another example, 2 col. x 5" ad (10 col. inches) would cost $25.

The policy is a re-statement that all political advertising must be pre-paid. No exceptions.

Advertising copy can be mailed with an accompanying check or money order to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279; or placed in the Sota mailbox at Tribal headquarters (no postage required).

If an advertisement is sent electronically, by e-mail or fax, then a check must be mailed to the Sota, either at headquarters or through the postal service.

There can be no exceptions.

*****

Elder's Meditation:

"…Grandmother the Earth. That power is here all the time. It is continuous, and nobody controls it." –Wallace Black Elk, LAKOTA

There are certain powers that the human being has no choice but to obey. We cannot negotiate or barter with this power. Our choice is either to conform or to live out of harmony. Whatever our choice, it will be the end result in our lives that we notice. So it is with the powers of the Earth which produce life. The Earth has the life force power. If anyone plants a seed, the seed will grow. The Earth treats everyone equally. The human cannot interfere, only obey. We should all show great respect for the Earth and Her powers.

Great Spirit, today, let me honor and respect the power of the Grandmother, the Earth.

*****

Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

The nice thing about standards is that there are so many of them to choose from. Andrew S. Tanenbaum

Advertising may be described as the science of arresting the human intelligence long enough to get money from it. Stephen Leacock (1869 - 1944)

It has been said that man is a rational animal. All my life I have been searching for evidence which could support this. Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

It is always the best policy to speak the truth--unless, of course, you are an exceptionally good liar. Jerome K. Jerome (1859 - 1927)

Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe. H. G. Wells (1866 - 1946), Outline of History (1920)

Most of the change we think we see in life is due to truths being in and out of favor. Robert Frost (1874 - 1963), The Black Cottage

If one sticks too rigidly to one's principles, one would hardly see anybody. Agatha Christie (1890 - 1976)

The public will believe anything, so long as it is not founded on truth. Edith Sitwell (1887 - 1964)

*****

The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Earlier receipt of copy is always appreciated. So, if you are aware of a date or message that needs to be publicized or advertised, please let us know about it in advance of the weekly deadline.

The preferred way to submit typed articles and ads, art and photos, is by e-mail.

The editor can be reached at the following e-mail address:

earthskyweb@cs.com

For more information, leave a message on the Sota production office voicemail (605) 938-4452, or send a fax to the 24-hour dedicated line (605) 938-4676.

-- CDF

Obituaries –

Services held for Geraldine Marks

Funeral service for Geraldine "Gerri" Marks, 77, of Peever, South Dakota, were held last Monday morning, May 16, 2016 at St. Mary's Episcopal Church, Agency Village, SD.

Officiating were Rev. Fr. Charles Chan and St. Mary's Lay Readers. Pianist was Billy Kohl and special music was provided by Episcopal Lay Readers.

Pallbearers were Jerwyn "JJ Marks, Vine Marks Jr. "Hoky", Leonard DuMarce, Justin Redday Jr., Chad Marks, Tom Flute Sr., Tyson Flute, Thomas Flute Jr., Tanner Flute, Landon LaFromboise, John Bissonette, and Hunter Jones.

Honorary Pallbearers were Beatrice Biddell, Paulette Cloud, Bonnie & Norbit Bellonger, Betty & Harley Christopherson, InaLou Kirk, Barb Cloud, Peggy Redday, St Mary's Lay Readers, Lorna Hansen, Dean Abraham Sr., Melvin Renville, Joyce Crantz and Annette Heminger.

Burial was in St. Mary's Episcopal Cemetery, Agency Village, SD.

A wake service was held Sunday evening at St. Mary's Episcopal Church.

Cahill Funeral Chapel, Sisseton, SD was in charge of arrangements.

Geraldine (Gerri) Marks was born on October 27, 1938 to John and Beulah DuMarce Sr. in Sisseton SD. She grew up in Drywood Lake with her 2 brothers and 5 sisters.

She attended and then graduated from the Flandreau Indian School.

She met and married Vine Marks Sr. and to this union was born her 5 children – Sherilyn, Lori, Hoky, J-J and Rainee.

She made her home in the country near Agency Village where she raised these "precious" kids along with taking care of her nieces and nephews, grandkids and her great-grandkids.

She worked for the Sisseton Public School as a cook for many years; she was "grandma" to many kids. She also worked at Schiltz's Foods and Tekakwitha nursing center until she retired in September 2004.

She loved to bake cakes, pies, her special salad, sewing, visiting her sisters, attending the 4th of July pow-wow and spending time with her grandkids and great-grandkids. She also enjoyed telling stories, laughing and giving advice.

Geraldine passed away on May 12, 2016 at Sanford Hospital, Sioux Falls, SD.

Gerri is survived by her five children, Sherilyn Marks, Lori Marks, Vine Marks Jr. "Hoky", Jerwyn "JJ" (Mary) Marks and Rainee (Galen) DeMarrias. Her sisters Marvel Bursheim and Faye Finley; her 13 grandchildren and 21 great-grandchildren and she also has a great- grandchild on the way. She had many nieces and nephews.

She is preceded in death by her parents John & Beulah, her brothers Leonard and John Jr. "Tiggy" and her sisters Feanette, Karen and Corrine.

For Geraldine's obituary and online registry please visit www.cahillfuneralchapel.com

Carol Ann White services held

Carol Ann White, age 67, of Agency Village, SD journeyed to the Spirit World on Sunday, May 15, 2016.

She was born on August 16, 1948 in Sisseton, SD the daughter of Virgil and Cora (Brant) White Sr.

Carol attended school in Crow Creek, Sisseton, and Plankington, SD. She then attended the Job Corps at Excelsior Springs in Missouri for Nursing.

She then worked at various nursing jobs in Sisseton, Minneapolis and Plymouth, MN.

She moved back to Sisseton in the early 1990s to take care of her Grandma Annie One Road Shields.

She loved cooking and cooked for the Buffalo Lake District and ran an Indian Taco Stand at the Pow-Wow for 14 years.

Her last job was managing/cooking at the Warcloud Drop In Center where she retired in 2014.

Her most important job she had was the last 10 years of her life, helping to raise her grandkids.

Carol's grandchildren were her life. Her pride and joy was her church family and bingo.

Carol lost a long, hard-fought battle with cancer and will be greatly missed by her grandkids and family.

She is survived by sons Donovan White and Conrad White both of Sisseton, SD; seven grandchildren; one great-grandson; brothers Gary White Sr. of Sioux Falls, SD, Orville White and Dean White of Sisseton, SD and one half-brother Virgil White Jr. of Sisseton, SD; sisters Gloria Powless of Oneida, WI, Sandra White of Sisseton, SD, Patsy Metoxen of Oneida, WI and Crystal White of Sisseton; many nieces and nephews; other relatives and friends.

She is preceded in death by her parents Virgil White Sr. and Cora Brant White; grandmothers Annie One Road Shields and Ella White and two brothers Arnold White Sr. and Ernest White.

Funeral services for Carol Ann White were held on Thursday morning, May 19, 2016 at the Christian Outreach Center in Sisseton, SD. Pastor Fearing officiated.

An all-night wake was held on Wednesday at the Outreach Center.

Interment was at Goodwill Presbyterian Cemetery in Agency Village, SD.

Honorary Casket Bearers were Jim and Kathy Konsor, Marne Snaza, Mavis Hill, Joyce Pickthorn, Mary Simon, Karen Janish, Roxanne Cochran, Faith "FeeFee" Just, Freda Poyet and Her Church Family.

Casket Bearers were Barry White, Randy White, Damon White, Loren White, Kirk Snaza, Donovan White and Irvin Hill.

Chilson Funeral Home, Winsted, MN assisted the family with arrangements.

On-line condolences can be made at www.chilsonfuneralhome.com

Services for Raina Autumn DeMarrias

Raina Autumn DeMarrias, age 28, journeyed to the Spirit World on Saturday, May 14, 2016.

She was born on July 15, 1987 in Sisseton, South Dakota the daughter of Thomas W. & Dawn D. (Renville) DeMarrias.

Raina was a "Free Spirit." She enjoyed singing, being a favorite auntie/uncle to her nieces and nephews, taking care of Caden and had a good sense of humor.

Survived by her mother: Dawn D. Renville; step father: Ira Zephier Sr.; a brother: Ira Zephier Jr.; sisters: Kaylene Renvillle, Shaina DeMarrias, Starlyte DeMarrias and Summer DeMarrias; her grandmother: Vernice Feather; a host of other relatives and friends.

Preceded in death by her father Thomas W. DeMarrias, a brother Nico Jarrod Renville, grandfather Mandis Renville, nephews Jareece Rain DeMarrias and Javery Storm and by a special cousin Vernon K. Renville Jr.

Funeral services were held on Friday morning, May 20, 2016 at the community center, Agency Village, SD.

Officiating were Clyde Kampeska and Darrell Mirreau. Traditional spiritual service was provided by the Buffalo Lake Sundance Committee.

Drum Group was "Bear Tracks."

Interment was at St. Mary's Episcopal Cemetery in Agency Village, South Dakota.

All night wake services were held Wednesday and Thursday at the community center.

Honorary Casket Bearer were Special friend Erikka Divis, Armine Stoneman, Renae Eckes, Norma Clairmont, Albert Poor Bear, Shannon Keeble, Frankie Bowker, Misty A. Renville, Sheridan Renville, Journey Renville, favorite aunts: Kaye Renville, Liz Owen, Trisch Owen, Maria Redday, Melonie Renville, Kim Lake, and all her sisters.

Casket Bearers were Ira Zephier Jr., Galan Renville Sr., Robert Renville Sr., Jace Renville, Spirit Renville, Dusty Robertson, Jesse Lee Owen, Jimma Kier and Tarique Owen as Alternate.

Service Monday for Ambrose St. John

Funeral service for Ambrose Sylvan St. John (October 12, 1953 - May 20, 2016) is this Monday, May 23, 2016 at 10:00 a.m. at St. Kateri Tekakwitha Catholic Church, Sisseton, SD.

Wake services were held Saturday and Sunday (all night) at Cahill Funeral Chapel, Sisseton.

Watch for a complete obituary in next week's Sota.

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor's note: The following comes from the editor's column and the Sota "deadlines and policies" statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and must be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Custer State Park visitor injured after getting too close to buffalo

Rapid City Journal - May 13, 2016 – Custer State Park officials say a visitor was hospitalized Thursday after suffering injuries while getting too close to a buffalo.

Officials say the visitor was injured along Wildlife Loop Road and was flown to a Rapid City hospital.

Park Superintendent Matt Snyder says buffalo are wild animals, and visitors are urged to keep a safe distance.

Custer County South Dakota Emergency Management said on its Facebook page that a 50 year old woman from Missouri was gored by 5-year-old bull.

Officials didn't release the person's name or the extent of the injuries. Park rangers are continuing to look into the incident.

(Editor's note: Having stood close by while our SWO buffalo management work the Tribal herd, it is beyond pure foolishness to treat these animals as pets. Even young animals must be respected.)

Sisseton to host health professions students

Yankton, SD – Sisseton joins 13 other South Dakota communities in welcoming health professions students for four weeks during the summer of 2016. Ashley Reierson, South Dakota State University (SDSU) pharmacy student from Pollock and University of South Dakota (USD) - Sanford School of Medicine medical student Rebecca Jarratt from Sioux Falls will follow providers at Coteau des Prairies Health Center starting May 31.

Communities selected to participate in Rural Experiences for Health Professions Students (REHPS) summer experience must have populations under 10,000 people and house a critical access hospital. The program is designed to bring health professions graduates to rural South Dakota for rewarding careers.

Starting its sixth year, REHPS will bring 28 students to 14 South Dakota communities. The students were selected in a competitive process earlier this year. Each community hosts two students from different areas of healthcare. The REHPS program began in 2011, when three communities welcomed six students. Students are inspired by the experience, due in large part to the host communities, and their professionals' mentoring skills.

"I would have to wrap up this experience as one of the best choices I have made in my program to pursue. … I mentioned my fondest memory will be having shared a moment with a provider that is retiring while following her with one of her patients of 30 years. He was weeping, wondering where he would find care. Nothing is more intimate than a man telling you that you are like a daughter to him. As I witnessed this, I felt that this physician is such a reminder of what it means to be rural. She stuck by this man through so many things in his life. I consider her a role model for providers. I hope to experience this someday in my career. As I exited the site, I had to let her know she raises the bar very high for providers everywhere. I look forward to looking for employment as a future NP in the near future and I do look forward to seeking a position (in) a rural community," said SDSU family nurse practitioner student Kelli Hinsch about her experience last year in Sisseton with USD master of social work student Dana Martens.

The 2016 REHPS communities are: Bowdle, Chamberlain, Custer, Faulkton, Hot Springs, Miller, Parkston, Philip, Platte, Redfield, Sisseton, Sturgis, Wagner, and Winner. The REHPS program connects interprofessional groups of students enrolled in clinical psychology, family nurse practitioner, medical, medical laboratory science, physician assistant, pharmacy, and social work programs at SDSU and USD.

"When selecting a site to host REHPS students, we look for a facility interested in the education of health professions students and an understanding of how important it is to give these students a first-hand look at how rewarding a career in rural medicine can be. We are also looking for vibrant and active communities who will welcome students and hopefully entice them to return when they are finished with their education. I would encourage families willing to host students for dinner or a family outing to contact the facility to make those arrangements ," said Cheri Buffington, REHPS Program Manager.

REHPS receives funding from the Office of Rural Health/South Dakota Department of Health and is managed by the Yankton Rural Area Health Education Center. Follow the student's experiences at www.rehps.org.

Bringing Some Much-Needed Accountability to the IHS

By Sen. John Thune

The crisis plaguing the Indian Health Service (IHS) and its facilities throughout the Great Plains area isn't new. In fact, if you ask Native Americans in South Dakota to share their personal experiences dealing with the agency, you'd be hard-pressed to find any positive reviews. The stories they've shared with me are heart-wrenching and call into question the commitment of the IHS leaders who are responsible for ensuring our tribal citizens get the quality care they deserve, but unfortunately haven't been receiving.

It's hard to imagine walking into a medical exam room that is anything less than clean and orderly, but based on some of the stories I've heard, a clean exam room would be a luxury for many IHS patients in South Dakota. The idea that medical professionals are sometimes relegated to using dirty and unsanitary equipment is hard enough to fathom, but we've also heard of patients being prematurely discharged from hospitals. This substandard environment is unacceptable, it's dangerous, and it's having a real and oftentimes devastating impact on Native Americans, their families, and their communities.

It is clear the IHS is ineffectively managed. For example, it settled an $80 million lawsuit with unions, $6.2 million was taken from Great Plains area service units alone. This all occurred because IHS could not properly manage an administrative task like overtime pay, and IHS took money that would have been better suited for patient care.

In February, Sen. John Barrasso (R-Wyo.), the chairman of the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, invited me to participate in a hearing he organized to examine a number of these ongoing issues and try to determine what can be done to finally fix them. During the hearing, we heard from witnesses, including representatives from the Oglala and Rosebud Sioux tribes, about the abysmal conditions they'd been exposed to. The hearing was a good opportunity for my Senate colleagues to hear about these experiences firsthand, and it provided us with more than enough information to help craft a comprehensive bill that would address this crisis head on.

Sen. Barrasso and I have been working together for months to craft the right kind of bill that tackles patient care and safety issues and emphasizes the need for greater transparency and accountability at the agency. The IHS Accountability Act of 2016, which Sen. Barrasso and I just introduced, does just that. This bill would address some of the systemic failures at IHS by implementing several key, common-sense reforms.

Most importantly – it says it in its name – the IHS Accountability Act increases accountability. It creates an expedited procedure for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) secretary, who oversees IHS, to terminate senior leaders at the agency who aren't doing their jobs. Leadership starts at the top, so if an underperforming member of leadership is creating a barrier to fulfilling the agency's core mission of providing quality care to patients, then it's time for them to find a new line of work.

The bill also streamlines the hiring process so we can get more dedicated, hard-working people on the job faster and keep them there longer. Tribal input is key, which is why we built in a provision to the bill that ensures tribes are consulted during the hiring process for area directors, service unit CEOs, and other key officials. Retaining good employees has always been a problem, which is something we sought to correct by giving the HHS secretary greater flexibility to create competitive pay scales and reward employees for good performance.

Protecting whistleblowers was also an important goal of ours, which is why the bill requires the Government Accountability Office to review the protections that are currently in place and determine whether or not any changes are required to create additional layers of protection. And in the spirit of complete transparency, the bill requires the HHS Office of Inspector General to investigate each and every patient death in which the IHS is involved.

The IHS Accountability Act is hands-down the most comprehensive IHS bill introduced this Congress. And while this is an important step, it's just the first step. Our effort will mean nothing unless we continue to engage with the tribes, solicit their input, and improve this bill where we can. I look forward to continuing that conversation and building on the important groundwork we've laid together.

Comprehensive Bill to Reform the Indian Health Service

"My message to our tribal citizens is clear: IHS leaders must be held accountable, and this legislation would put us in a much better position to do so." – Sen. Thune

Washington, DC – May 19, 2016 – U.S. Sens. John Thune (R-S.D.) and John Barrasso (R-Wyo.), chairman of the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, today introduced the IHS Accountability Act of 2016, comprehensive legislation that would address the systemic failures at IHS by increasing transparency and accountability at the agency. By implementing these common-sense reforms, IHS and its leaders could refocus on their key mission, which is to provide tribal citizens with access to safe, quality health care.

"After years of inaction at IHS, there are still more questions than answers for the tribal members who depend on the agency for their health care needs," said Thune. "IHS has failed – both in its treaty obligation and moral duty – to provide the quality care that Native Americans across the Great Plains area, including South Dakota, deserve. Sen. Barrasso and I have spent months working together on a comprehensive approach to address the IHS crisis, and I'm grateful for his commitment to tackling this important issue. My message to our tribal citizens is clear: IHS leaders must be held accountable, and this legislation would put us in a much better position to do so. I look forward to continuing to work with Sen. Barrasso and the delegations from our region to improve IHS."

"A patient-centered culture change at the Indian Health Service is long-overdue," said Chairman Barrasso. "This bill is an important first step toward ensuring that tribal members receive proper healthcare and that there is transparency and accountability from Washington. We have heard appalling testimonies of the failures at IHS that are unacceptable and will not be tolerated. We must reform IHS to guarantee that all of Indian Country is receiving high quality medical care."

In February, Thune joined Chairman Barrasso in an oversight hearing and listening session on the substandard quality of care provided by IHS to the Great Plains area. Following the hearing, Thune penned an op-ed on the importance of holding IHS leaders accountable.

The IHS Accountability Act would improve transparency and accountability at IHS by:

· Expanding removal and discipline authorities for problem employees at the agency;

· Providing the secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) with direct hiring and other authorities to avoid long delays in the traditional hiring process;

· Requiring tribal consultation prior to hiring area directors, hospital CEOs, and other key leadership positions;

· Commissioning Government Accountability Office reports on staffing and professional housing needs;

· Improving protections for employees who report violations of patient safety requirements;

· Mandating that the secretary of HHS provide timely IHS spending reports to Congress; and

· Ensuring the Inspector General of HHS investigates patient deaths in which the IHS is alleged to be involved by act or omission.

The IHS Accountability Act also addresses staff recruitment and retention shortfalls at IHS by:

· Addressing gaps in IHS personnel by giving the secretary of HHS flexibility to create competitive pay scales and provide temporary housing assistance for medical professionals;

· Improving patient-provider relationships and continuity of care by providing incentives to employees; and

· Giving the secretary of HHS the ability to reward employees for good performance and finding innovative ways to improve patient care, promote patient safety, and eliminate fraud, waste, and abuse.

The IHS Accountability Act is based primarily on feedback and information received by Thune, Barrasso, and members of the Senate Indian Affairs Committee during the February hearing and listening session. Further input from Indian Country is essential to fixing the underlying problems at IHS, which is why the senators will continue to engage with the tribes for ideas on how to improve this legislation.

SD congressional delegation demands answers from IHS

Washington, DC – May 16, 2016 – U.S. Sens. John Thune (R-S.D.) and Mike Rounds (R-S.D.) and U.S. Rep. Kristi Noem (R-S.D.) recently joined Sen. John Barrasso (R-Wyo.), chairman of the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, in sending a letter to U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell requesting that the Indian Health Service (IHS) provide answers regarding the recent system improvement agreements executed by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and the IHS. These agreements were designed to avert the imminent loss of CMS reimbursement due to non-compliance at multiple IHS facilities in the Great Plains Area.

In the letter, the delegation and Barrasso pose several questions that have yet to be answered by IHS concerning the agreements, despite multiple requests from Indian tribes.

"During a recent briefing for congressional staff, the acting director of the IHS presented a system improvement agreement, which we understand is intended to improve the quality of care at IHS facilities in the Great Plains Area," the members wrote. "We want to be helpful in this endeavor, but must also ensure that this approach is viable and responsive to the needs of impacted tribes. Unfortunately, during [a] recent briefing, more questions were raised than answered."

The letter continues to pose seven questions to Secretary Burwell and requests the department's prompt response. "The speed and efficacy with which your department and its agencies act directly impacts patient care and safety in the IHS system," the members continued. "We look forward to your prompt response to these questions by June 1, 2016."

In February, Chairman Barrasso, Thune, and Rounds participated in an oversight hearing and listening session on the substandard quality of care provided by the IHS to the Great Plains Area. Barrasso, Thune, Rounds, and Noem have continued to raise concerns about the quality of care at the IHS, particularly in the Great Plains Area, and remain committed to finding ways to improve the IHS.

Full text of the letter can be found below:

The Honorable Sylvia M. Burwell, Secretary

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

200 Independence Avenue, S.W.

Washington, DC 20201

Dear Secretary Burwell:

We write to ask for additional information regarding the recent system improvement agreements executed by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Indian Health Service (IHS). As we understand, these agreements were designed to avert the imminent loss of CMS reimbursement due to non-compliance at multiple IHS facilities in the Great Plains Area.

As you are aware, in 2010, Senator Byron Dorgan (D-N.D.), then-Chairman of the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, produced a report outlining many of the same issues identified this Congress through investigation by the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs. Recent congressional investigations made clear that despite significant examination and documentation of the systemic problems at IHS, the agency was still not providing tribal citizens access to safe, quality health care.

During a recent briefing for congressional staff, the Acting Director of the IHS presented a system improvement agreement, which we understand is intended to improve the quality of care at IHS facilities in the Great Plains Area. We want to be helpful in this endeavor, but must also ensure that this approach is viable and responsive to the needs of impacted tribes. Unfortunately, during this recent briefing, more questions were raised than answered.

So that we may assist the Department in its work to improve the quality of care in the Great Plains and be responsive to Indian tribes, we hope your staff can respond in writing to the following questions.

1. Please identify and provide the specific legal authority and legal opinion IHS has relied upon to implement the Rosebud system improvement agreement to contract with a hospital management firm and place federal employees under the direction of private hospital management.

2. What is the estimated cost associated with executing the Rosebud agreement? What is the estimated cost associated with executing the similar systems improvement agreement regarding the Pine Ridge facility? This is an essential piece of information for potential private partners to know when considering whether or not to bid.

3. Will tribes be consulted about the decision of whether to extend these agreements?

As you know, workforce recruitment and retention has been a significant challenge for IHS in the Great Plains Area and nationally, yet the system improvement agreements appear to provide little information about how the IHS plans to improve staff recruitment and retention. The new system improvement plan requires the IHS to "identify needs, barriers, and potential resources and actions to design and implement an effective long term workforce development strategy..."

4. Can you explain with specificity each workforce-related barrier identified by the IHS?

5. Please explain in detail this administration's current strategy for IHS staff recruitment and retention. If a strategic plan exists, we would welcome a continuing dialogue on how to best address these issues.

Finally, we understand that IHS continues to suffer from significant vacancies, both in the Great Plains Area and nationally.

6. So that we may better understand the nature and scope of this problem, please identify the number and type of vacancies in each IHS Area.

7. Additionally, please identify the comparative cost of filling the same vacancies with full time equivalent employees.

The speed and efficacy with which your Department and its agencies act directly impacts patient care and safety in the IHS system. We look forward to your prompt response to these questions by June 1, 2016.

Sincerely,

John Barrasso Chairman, Senate Committee on Indian Affairs

John Thune U.S. Senator

Mike Rounds U.S. Senator

Kristi Noem Member of Congress

Noem to introduce legislation addressing tribal health crisis

Washington, DC – Rep. Kristi Noem today announced plans to introduce legislation aimed at stemming the current tribal health care crisis and putting structural reforms in place to make necessary long-term corrections.

"Tribal health care is in a state of emergency," said Noem. "There are dangerous and deep-rooted problems within the Indian Health Service that have gone unresolved for years and its costing people their lives. We need real reforms to the system. By offering new incentives to attract a better medical and managerial workforce, getting more mileage out of every dollar IHS spends, and holding the agency genuinely accountable for the service it provides, my legislation will offer many of the real reforms tribal members need."

Noem's legislation is expected to be one of the most thorough bills addressing the crisis thus far. Included are provisions to:

+ Improve IHS's ability to secure long-term contracts for hospitals in emergency conditions.

+ Address the current recruitment problem – for both medical staff and hospital leadership – by putting provisions in place to:

· Allow for faster hiring.

· Make the existing student loan repayment program tax free, as an added incentive for high-quality employees.

· Provide incentives to attract competent and well-trained hospital administrators as well as medical staff.

+ Reform the Purchased/Referred Care (PRC) Program by, among other things:

· Requiring IHS to develop a new formula for allocating PRC dollars. Under Noem's bill, IHS would be required to develop a formula based on need, population size, and health status to ensure those areas that have the greatest need receive a greater portion of the funding.

· Requiring IHS to negotiate Medicare-like rates for services it pays for with private providers. IHS currently pays a premium for PRC services. Noem's proposal would bring payments in line with what Medicare pays to stretch every dollar further.

· Requiring IHS to address the backlog of PRC payments to private providers. Private hospitals in the Great Plains Area have long expressed concern because IHS has failed to pay their bills. Noem would require IHS to put a strategy in place to get these hospitals paid what they are due.

+ Restore accountability through strategies, such as:

· Require IHS to begin mandatory random drug tests, as instances of narcotic drug theft by IHS employees and employees working while intoxicated has been reported multiple times over the past several years.

· Require IHS to be accountable for providing timely care.

"The problems plaguing IHS are profound, so producing real results will require collaboration with the medical community, tribal communities, tribal leadership, and IHS," said Noem. "In the weeks after this legislation is introduced, I will be meeting directly with each of these constituencies to discuss my bill and get their input and feedback. We have to get this right."

Noem's legislation is expected to be introduced in the coming weeks.

IHS and CMS partnership to strengthen hospital care quality

Focus on hospital quality through Hospital Engagement Networks benefits patients by preventing adverse events

The Indian Health Service, in conjunction with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), announced today a new partnership to strengthen the quality of care delivered in IHS-operated hospitals. IHS hospitals will receive assistance from a CMS-supported Hospital Engagement Network (HEN). The purpose of a HEN is to help health care facilities deliver better care and to spend dollars efficiently. Through this partnership, IHS will actively participate in HEN activities to strengthen patient safety and share best practices, including implementing quality improvement plans. IHS hospitals will be able to access training and technical assistance that supports hospitals in making patient care safer. This effort includes IHS hospitals in the Great Plains Area, including Rosebud and Pine Ridge IHS hospitals in South Dakota and Omaha Winnebago IHS hospital in Nebraska.

"IHS is committed to leveraging every opportunity to ensure quality health care for patients, and IHS hospitals will now access valuable technical assistance through a Hospital Engagement Network," said Mary Smith, IHS principal deputy director. "This benefits IHS patients, who are our first priority. Quality improvement is a continuous effort at IHS hospitals—as it is at all healthcare facilities. Working with a Hospital Engagement Network brings more resources and underscores our commitment to focus on delivering efficient and high quality care for our patients."

"We have made progress in keeping patients safe and are focused on accelerating improvement efforts through collaboration and reliable implementation of best practices," said Patrick Conway, M.D., CMS Acting Principal Deputy Administrator and Chief Medical Officer. "We, like many of our sister agencies, are dedicated to working with the IHS to help improve the safety and quality of care for the patients served by the hospitals in this network." Click here to learn more about how Agency collaboration is leading to better patient outcomes Exit Disclaimer: You Are Leaving www.ihs.gov.

HENs are one part of a framework established by the Affordable Care Act to deliver better care and to spend dollars efficiently. Read the CMS fact sheet on HENs: Continuing Forward Momentum on Reducing Patient Harm Exit Disclaimer: You Are Leaving www.ihs.gov.

The HENs focus on reducing preventable patient harm such as hospital acquired infections and avoidable readmissions, in accordance with best practices for hospitals. The program helps to identify proven solutions that work to reduce hospital-acquired conditions and to share them with other hospitals. HENs track and monitor hospital progress in meeting quality improvement goals. As part of the efforts, IHS hospitals will welcome teams of quality improvement experts for site visits. CMS oversees both the Hospital Engagement Networks and the Quality Innovation Network-Quality Improvement Organizations (QIN-QIOs), in which IHS already participates.

This new effort builds on previous IHS work on quality improvement: Some parts of IHS previously participated in activities of a first round Hospital Engagement Network early 2013 and ending December 2014. The second round of HENs continues the work of the previous round. IHS continues to participate in the Great Plains Quality Innovation Network, a CMS QIN-QIO serving Kansas, Nebraska, North Dakota and South Dakota. The Great Plains Quality Innovation Network promotes effective prevention and treatment of chronic disease, makes care safer, and promotes effective communication and coordination of care.

The IHS, an agency in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, provides a comprehensive health service delivery system for approximately 2.2 million American Indians and Alaska Natives.

Addressing the Opioid Epidemic

By Rep. Kristi Noem

May 13, 2016

It could start with a headache. Or perhaps an injury from sports or even a military deployment. Maybe it was a surgery and the prescription pain medication was supposed to be used only for a short time. Eventually, however, the medicine you relied on to heal became the drug that made you sick.

Nationwide, around 15 million Americans abuse prescription drugs annually, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Drugs like hydrocodone, oxycodone, and morphine – which as a category are called opioids – are frequently prescribed by doctors and some are even common in medicine cabinets and on bathroom counters across South Dakota. If they are abused or happen to fall into the wrong hands, they can be fatal.

In 2013 alone, the latest year where reliable data is available, 32 South Dakotans died from opioid overdoses. Nationwide, we lose one person to a drug overdose almost every 12 minutes.

Earlier this month, I voted to advance a series of bills that combat the opioid epidemic and help heal those suffering most. It was a bipartisan effort that I'm incredibly proud of.

One of the bills, which I helped lead on, specifically addressed opioid addiction in mothers who are pregnant or just had their babies. The number of infants born to mothers dependent on drugs nearly quadrupled from 2004 to 2013. In South Dakota, there were more than 200 reported cases of opiate use by new moms between 2009 and 2013, according to a presentation given at SDSU in coordination with the South Dakota Department of Health.

The bill I cosponsored improved the support offered for counseling, pediatric health care, prenatal and postpartum health care, and parental training. It also created a pilot program for state substance abuse agencies to figure out ways to bridge the gaps in service for pregnant and postpartum women who are addicted to drugs.

In addition to these provisions, I helped pass legislation to get first responders better access to the training and equipment needed for administering new medicines that can reverse opioid overdoses on the spot. This is a goal the South Dakota legislature has been working toward as well, passing legislation in recent years to help give first responders and family members better access to these life-saving antidotes. I'm hopeful our efforts on the federal level can support what's already being done in the state.

Treating only the symptoms will not cure the problem though. Approximately three-fourths of the world's opioid prescription drugs are prescribed in the U.S. – even though we only comprise about 5 percent of the world's population. If this legislation becomes law, it would bring together federal agencies, state medical boards, health care professionals, and experts from pain and addiction-recovery communities, challenging them to come up with better practices to manage acute and chronic pain.

The Senate has also acted on a bipartisan legislative package to fight opioid addiction. With two strong bills on the table, the House and Senate will be coming together to work out the differences before getting it to the President to sign. There's momentum on both sides to get this done, so I'm optimistic new provisions will take effect soon.

No state – no community – is immune from opioid addictions. Whether in Sioux Falls, Pierre or Pine Ridge, families are struggling with it. But while it is a chronic disease, it doesn't have to be terminal. I'm hopeful new federal resources will be available soon. Still, to overcome the epidemic, all of us need to play a role. If you or a family member is concerned about the use or abuse of prescription pain medication, please talk to your doctor immediately. Help is out there.

Ripple Effect –

15 ways to reduce nutrients in lakes and streams

We all understand how important it is to protect and conserve our water resources. The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) has many tips to help keep our water clean and safe. No matter who you are or where you live, there are many ways you can help. Just start by doing one thing for our water. Small changes can make a big difference!

5 Ways for Residents

Use no-phosphorus fertilizer on lawns and gardens Be sure to check the bags when you buy them. Look for the package formula of nitrate-phosphorus-potassium, such as 22-0-15. The middle number, representing phosphorus, should be 0. Keep grass clippings in the lawn When mowing the grass, avoid blowing grass clippings into the street, where they wash into storm sewers that drain to lakes and rivers. Keep leaves and other organic matter out of the street Again, streets drain to storm sewers, which in turn drain to rivers and lakes. Sweep it Sweep up any grass clippings or fertilizer spills on driveways, sidewalks and streets. Leave a wide strip of deep-rooted plants along shoreland Instead of planting and mowing turfgrass here, plant wildflowers, ornamental grasses, shrubs or trees. These plantings absorb and filter runoff that contains nutrients and soil, as well as provide habitat for wildlife.

More information at reduce.org (http://www.reduce.org/garden/index.html).

5 Ways for Farmers

Buffer strips help Leave a wide strip of deep-rooted plants along ditches, streams and lakes to absorb and filter runoff. Many programs, including ditch authorities, pay rent for these filter strips. Change the plan on marginal land Plant marginal cropland to perennial crops or convert to water retention areas. Use smarter drainage Install controlled drainage systems instead of traditional pattern tiling. Manage the nutrients Follow nutrient management plans to ensure efficiencies and protect water resources. Manage the manure Follow manure management plans, including setbacks from water resources when applying manure to fields.

Ways for Cities

Spread the word Educate residents about keeping grass clippings and other organic matter out of storm sewers. Pet waste and litter Enforce laws on littering and pet waste disposal. Provide trash cans along popular pedestrian routes. Leave a wide strip of deep-rooted plants along shoreland Instead of planting and mowing turfgrass here, plant wildflowers, ornamental grasses, shrubs or trees. These plantings absorb and filter runoff that contains nutrients and soil, as well as providing habitat for wildlife. Construction work best practices Educate contractors and excavators on best management practices for sediment control and enforce related laws. Have city staff do it right Require employees to follow best management practices for mowing, fertilizer application and other maintenance work.

*****

For more good tips on keeping our resources healthy, go to the MPCA website at www.pca.state.mn.us. The RRBC is a grassroots organization that is a chartered not-for-profit corporation under the provisions of Manitoba, North Dakota, Minnesota, and South Dakota law. Our offices in Fargo, ND and Winnipeg, MB can be reached at 701-356-3183 and 204-982-7254, or you can check out our website at www.redriverbasincommission.org.

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

ESDS honors students of the month

Submitted by Rebecca Dargatz

School Community Director

Enemy Swim Day School honors one student from each grade for each full month that school is in session.

The Students of the Month are chosen because they demonstrate the four school wide expectations consistently or have shown great progress toward them.

The school wide expectations are: Awanicihdka, Be Safe; Waokihi, Be Responsible; Waunsida, Be Caring; and Woohoda, Be Respectful.

Home room teachers choose the Students of the Month in collaboration with the paras and other teachers who serve a particular candidate.

Students of the Month are honored during opening ceremony on the first Monday following each full month of school. Students of the Month attend dinner with two guests on the Wednesday evening following each Students of the Month honoring.

The March Students of the Month are: Kindergarten – Lorelei Gill, 1st Grade – Leighton Warhol, 2nd Grade – Lincoln Kongi, 3rd Grade – Angel Eastman, 4th Grade – Brianna Farmer, 5th Grade – Solace Owen, 6th Grade – Jade White, 7th Grade – Destiny Gill, and 8th Grade – Sammi Cooper. Not pictured: Jade White.

The April Students of the Month are: Kindergarten - Trace Lewandowski, 1st Grade - Zitkana Zetina, 2nd Grade - Bryan Twilling, 3rd Grade - Vydalia Redday, 4th Grade - Morning Star Red Eagle, 5th Grade - Korrina Fayant, 6th Grade - Jaydean DuMarce, 7th Grade - Wakanyan Inazin Bertsch, and 8th Grade - Alicia Renville.

Kid Kare –Babysitting Clinic Planned

Babysitting is not just a job – it is a responsibility. If someone you know is beginning to take on this responsibility, Kid Kare is for them.

The SDSU Extension Office in Roberts County is coordinating Kid Kare, a babysitting clinic designed for youth ages 10 to 14. It will be held on Friday, June 10th at the Grace Lutheran Church in Sisseton from 8:30 a.m. and conclude by 3:30 p.m. The workshop will include sessions on the responsibilities of child care, emergency preparedness, infant care, snacks, learning activities, behavior management and first aid/choking. The cost is $15, which includes snacks, lunch and program materials. The program material will be a good start to each participant's Babysitting Kit.

The workshop is limited to 40 participants on a first come, first serve basis. The registration form and payment must be returned to the Roberts County Extension Office (located in the basement of courthouse in Sisseton) by June 1st.

For further information, contact Tracey Lehrke, 4-H Youth Program Advisor at the SDSU Extension- Roberts County Office at 698-7627 or email at tracey.lehrke@sdstate.edu

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Attached is a picture if you would like to use: Picture Caption: The Roberts County Extension Office is coordinating Kid Kare, a babysitting clinic for any youth ages 10 to 14 on June 10th at the Grace Lutheran Church in Sisseton. Registration form and payment is due by June 1st. A variety of topics will be covered to prepare youth for this responsibility. One of the sessions will be led by the Grant Roberts Ambulance. Pictured are the 2015 participants of Kid Kare after they had learned about Emergency Preparedness and received a tour in the ambulance.

Garden Corner

Submitted by Eric Hanssen

Browns Valley, Minnesota

Fireblight is showing up across the state. This is probably the most common bacterial tree disease in our state and region. The disease can occur on many species of the Rose family, but most commonly occurs on apple, crabapple, hedge cotoneaster, mountainash and pear. The tell-tale symptoms of a shoot infection are rapidly wilting foliage that remains attached to the twigs, the shoot tips become blackened and often curl and small droplets of reddish brown bacteria ooze along the affected branch or shoot. Cankers, identified by their darker, sunken, flat appearance to the bark also may occur. The disease is transmitted from tree to tree through wind or rain and enters the plant through small natural openings in the leaves (stomata) or trunks (lenticels). Hail damage also provides an entryway into the plant and this is one reason we see a lot of fireblight in the hail-plagued communities in the Black Hills. Another avenue are vectors, organisms that carry the bacterial from host to host. The three most common vectors are bees and other pollinators, aphids and leafhoppers and people. Bees introduce the disease into a new host through their visits to flowers. This infection is called blossom blight and usually results in wilted flowers. Sometimes the disease stops there but it can move into the twigs and branches and become shoot blight. Aphids and other sucking insects can carry the bacteria as they move from tree to tree during the early summer as they seek out fast growing shoot tips as feeding sites. People can carry the disease on their handsaws or pruners as they trim trees and shrubs. Management of fireblight on homeowner trees has limited options. Infected branches can be pruned out to reduce the spread to other parts of the tree. The common recommendation is to remove the entire affected branch or shoot back to its origin (the trunk, limb, or branch it is directly attached to). However the disease may have spread further into the plant yet not expressed symptoms. Pruning is best applied in late winter as the disease spread usually stops once the summer heats up. Regardless of timing, pruning tools should be disinfected between cuts and at the end of the day to avoid spreading the disease. Lysol disinfectant is one of better products to use as it will sterilize the metal surface and is not corrosive. Copper containing fungicides are toxic to most bacteria and these are the only fungicides that have an effect on fireblight. Copper is applied just before bud break. When using a copper fungicide, read and follow label directions very carefully. Copper can also be toxic to plants if misapplied. The best means of managing fireblight is to plant cultivars that have resistance to the disease. There are many apple and crabapple cultivars that are resistant, such as "Haralson' and 'Honey Crisp' for apples and 'Camelot' for crabapples.

Information in this article comes from professor John Ball, SDSU Forestry Specialist in his Pest Update publication available online at http://sdda.sd.gov/conservation-forestry/forest-health/tree-pest-alerts/.

Legals

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE: D-16-368-242

IN THE MATTER OF THE CHANGE OF NAME OF:

FRANKIE ANN BROWN, Minor Child,

And concerning:

JESSIE NEELAND, Petitioner,

Vs.

ERIK BROWN, Respondent.

ORDER AND NOTICE OF HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Petitioner's request for a change of name from FRANKIE ANN BROWN to FRANKIE ANN NEELAND shall be heard before the Honorable Lenor Scheffler Blaeser, Judge of Tribal Court, in the Courtroom of the Sisseton Wahpeton Tribal Court at Agency Village, South Dakota at 1: 30 P.M. on the 16th day of JUNE, 2016.

Dated this 4th day of May, 2016.

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ B.J. Jones, CHIEF JUDGE

ATTEST:

E. Pfeiffer, CLERK OF COURTS

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO: D-16-360-234

IN THE MATTER OF: KALIA BLUE aka KALIA OWEN, Minor Child,

And concerning: KRISTY OWEN and, JONAH BLUE. Parents

NOTICE OF HEARING

TO: KRISTY OWEN AND JONAH BLUE

Take notice that a hearing will be held at the above named Court, Agency Village, outside the city of Sisseton, County of Roberts, South Dakota, on the of 25th day of MAY, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 P.M or as soon thereafter as possible. You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter. Dated this 28th day of April, 2016.

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ BJ Jones, TRIBAL COURT JUDGE

ATTEST: Eileen Pfeiffer, Clerk of Courts

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE: D-16-339-213

IN THE MATTER OF THE CHANGE OF NAME OF:

BRANDY JO DECOTEAU, Petitioner.

ORDER AND NOTICE OF HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Petitioner's request for a change of name from BRANDY JO DECOTEAU to BRANDY JO DECOTEAU-HEMINGER shall be heard before the Honorable B.J. Jones, Judge of Tribal Court, in the Courtroom of the Sisseton Wahpeton Tribal Court at Agency Village, South Dakota at 3:00 P.M. on the 25th day of MAY, 2016.

Dated this 27th day of April, 2016.

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ BJ Jones, TRIBAL COURT JUDGE

ATTEST: Eileen Pfeiffer, Clerk of Courts

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 16-086

SWOCSE/ Elizabeth Janisch, PLAINTIFF

VS.

WAYLAND MAESTAS, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of May, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of April, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 16-085

SWOCSE/ David Cloud, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JEWEL DEMARRIAS, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of May, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of April, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 01-128

SWOCSE/ Dawn McGrady, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JASON HULL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to amend Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of May, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of April, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 09-020

SWOCSE/ Ruth Robertson, PLAINTIFF

VS.

HEATHER DECOTEAU, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Review Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of May, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of April, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 13-050

SWOCSE/ Creighton Renville, PLAINTIFF

VS.

HEATHER DECOTEAU, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Review Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of May, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of April, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 13-062

SWOCSE/ Lynelle Robertson, PLAINTIFF

VS.

HEATHER DECOTEAU, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Review Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of May, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of April, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 06-215

SWOCSE/ Carol White, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JONATHAN ADAMS, Sr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Review Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of May, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of April, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 07-039

SWOCSE/ Robin Johnson, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JUANITA DUMARCE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Review Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of May, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of April, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 16-066

SWOCSE/ Deleno Grant, PLAINTIFF

VS.

WAMBDI SEABOY, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of May, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of April, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 14-220

SWOCSE/ Kaylene LaBelle, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CHESTER WILSON, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of May, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of April, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 16-098

SWOCSE/ Lavonne Renville, PLAINTIFF

VS.

NATASHA ST. JOHN, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of May, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of April, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 16-096

SWOCSE/ Sharae German, PLAINTIFF

VS.

TALON BERNARD, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Paternity & Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of May, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of April, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 16-092

SWOCSE/ Thomas Flute, Jr., PLAINTIFF

VS.

CAROLYN GENIA, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of May, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of April, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 16-052

SWOCSE/ Sara Farmer, PLAINTIFF

VS.

TYLER SHEPHERD, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of May, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of April, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 12-071

SWOCSE/ Jacqueline Adams, PLAINTIFF

VS.

TIFFANY BERNARD, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Amend Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of May, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of April, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 16-034

SWOCSE/ Angel Marks, PLAINTIFF

VS.

TIFFANY BERNARD, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of May, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of April, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 16-082

SWOCSE/ Beatrice Biddell, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DYLAN ST. JOHN, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of May, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of April, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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Trading Post ads

House for Rent

5 bdrm 2 bath, huge family home, great room on hobby farm with over 7+ acres. Three stall barn & chicken coop on other side with upper hay loft, 2 detached single car garages, private driveway, well and septic. Secluded but top of driveway is in the town of Summit. $750 mo. Email anytime: DakotamomX6@gmail.com. Text/call Lisa Sat-Mon 605-268-0575 Tue-Fri 7-10 pm.

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Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

Job Openings

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate is seeking to fill the following positions(s):

Family Liaison/Intervention Paraprofessional, Early Childhood Intervention

Office Manager, Planning

Cultural Art Coordinator (part-time), Planning

Legal Assistant, Public Defender's Office

Protective Service Worker, Child Protection Program

Heavy Equipment Operator/Truck Driver, Tribal Roads

Closing Date: June 3rd, 2016 @ 04:30 PM

All interested applicants may obtain application and job description information at the Human Resource Department, of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate or contact Arnold Williams at (605) 698-8238 or Denise Hill at (605) 698-8251. (Tribal preference will apply).

 

Tiospa Zina Tribal School

Job Openings

2016 Summer Program Vacancies - May 31st to June 23rd (4 days/wk):

Vacancy: (2) Elementary Teachers Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for an Elementary Teacher. Opening Date: April 22, 2016. Closing Date: May 20, 2016.

Vacancy: (1) High School Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a High School Teacher. Opening Date: April 22, 2016. Closing Date: May 20, 2016.

2016-2017 School Year Vacancies:

Vacancy: High School Science Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a High School Science Teacher Opening Date: January 29, 2016 Closing Date: open until filled.

Vacancy: High School English Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a High School English Teacher Opening Date: March 11, 2016 Closing Date: Open until filled.

Vacancy: Family and Consumer Sciences and Personal Health Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Family and Consumer Sciences and Personal Health Teacher Opening Date: March 11, 2016 Closing Date: Open until filled.

Vacancy: Career and Technical Education Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Career and Technical Education Teacher Opening Date: March 11, 2016 Closing Date: Open until filled.

Vacancy: Middle School Language Arts Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Middle School Language Arts Teacher Opening Date: April 22, 2016 Closing Date: Open until filled.

Vacancy: Middle School Social Studies Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Middle School Social Studies Teacher Opening Date: April 22, 2016 Closing Date: Open until filled.

Vacancy: High School Social Studies Teachers Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a High School Social Studies Teacher Opening Date: April 26, 2016 Closing Date: Open until filled.

Vacancy: 6th Grade Teacher (Middle School) Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a 6th Grade Teacher (Middle School) Opeing Date: April 29, 2016 Closing Date: Open until filled.

Vacancy: Custodian/Grounds Maintenance Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma, current South Dakota Drivers License, and 1 year directly related experience. Opening Date: May 13, 2016. Closing Date: May 27, 2016.

Vacancy: Special Education Teacher (High School) Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Special Education Teacher and 3+ years experience working specifically in the area of transition, including writing transition plans, accessing community resources, and collaborating with outside agencies. Opening Date: May 13, 2016. Closing Date: May 27, 2016.

2016-2017 Coaching Vacancies- Closing Date May 10, 2016:

Proof of all SDHSAA coaching requirements at the time application is submitted. Requirements are to complete the following courses through the National Federation of High School Sports (NFHS): Fundamentals of Coaching, and First Aid and Safety for Coaches. Must also submit a letter of intent that answers the questions found on form Athletics Coaching Questionnaire. **Do not need SDHSAA/NFHS Coaching Requirements.

Head Varsity Boys Basketball Coach

Head Varsity Girls Basketball Coach

Head Wrestling Coach

Head High School Track Coach

Head Volleyball Coach

**Jr. High Boys Basketball Coach

**Jr. High Girls Basketball Coach

**5/6 Grade Boys Basketball Coach

**Jr. High Football Coach

Jr. High/Assistant Track Coach

**Fall Cheerleading Adviser

**Winter Cheerleading Adviser

Assistant Varsity Boys Basketball Coach

Assistant Varsity Girls Basketball Coach

Assistant Volleyball Coach

Assistant Wrestling Coach

Assistant Track Coach (2) Assistant Varsity Football Coaches

2016-2017 Extra-Curricular Vacancies-Closing Date May 10, 2016:

Horse Club Adviser, 8th Grade Adviser, Science Club Adviser, Close-up Foundation Adviser, Speech/Drama/Oral Interp Adviser, Destination Imagination Adviser, Drum Adviser, Junior Class Adviser, Military Club Adviser, Middle School Student Council Adviser, Senior Class Adviser.

If you would like to apply to be a part of the TZ tiwahe you may pick up an application and background check form from the TZTS HR office located at #2 Tiospa Zina Dr. Agency Village, SD 57262. Applications may also be printed off the HR web page. Completed applications may be sent to PO Box 719, Agency Village, SD 57262. Faxed to: 605-698-7686. For further information call 605-698-3953 ext. 208. Indian Preference employer. At will employer. All applicants are subject to a Background Check and Pre-Employment Drug Test, pursuant to SWSB policy and United States Code Title 25 Chapter 34 - Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention.

 

Enemy Swim Day School

Enemy Swim Day School has an opening for a Para Educator for the 2016-2017 school year. Duties include assisting in the classroom, assisting teaching staff, meeting with SpEd staff, reporting and other duties. Must have post-secondary education, an AA degree or equivalent or successfully passing the ParaPro Assessment. ESDS can assist with ParaPro Assessment preparation, if needed. Wage is dependent upon experience. Visit www.esds.us for an application and job description. This position includes benefits. Call (605) 947-4605 or (888) 825-7738 and ask for Virginia to inquire about the position. Applications may also be picked up in the administration office. Indian Preference policies apply. Position is open until filled.

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Enemy Swim Day School

FACE PARENT EDUCATOR Enemy Swim Day School has an opening for a FACE Parent Educator for the 2016-2017 school year. Parent Educator for FACE Home-Based conducts personal visits with families of prenatal to 5-year old children on a weekly or bi-weekly basis to provide research-based information on how children grow and develop and how parents can foster learning and nurture development. Hours are 8:00 am to 4:00 pm, with some evening hours for scheduled events. Please visit our web site at www.esds.us for a detailed position description and application. Applications may also be picked up in the administration office. This position includes benefits. Indian Preference policies apply. If interested please call (605) 947-4605 or (888) 825-7738 for more information, ask for Virginia. Open until filled.

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Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

Cage Department:

Cashier (5 Full-Time or Part-Time) 1 Day, 2 Swing, 2 Graveyard

Foods Department:

Bus Persons (Full-Time or Part-Time) as needed

Cashiers (Full-Time & Part-Time) as needed

Dishwashers (Full-Time or Part-Time) as needed

Wait Staffs (Full-Time or Part-Time) Swing

Hotel Department:

Room/Laundry Attendant (4 Full-Time or Part-Time) 8:00am to finish

Housekeeping Department:

Porter (12 Full-Time or Part-Time) as needed

Lounge Golf Department:

Cook II (Full-Time Seasonal) Swing

Marketing Department:

VIP Ambassador (Full-Time or Part-Time) Swing

Security Department:

Officer (3 Full-Time or Part-Time) Rotating

Closing Date: May 27, 2016 at 4:00 p.m.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

FOOD SERVICE: COOK II (Line Cook) (1 FULL-TIME) GENERAL FUNCTION: The purpose for this position is to assist the Cook I, Cook III, and shift supervisor. Safely prepare quality food products for customers and employees. Maintain interpersonal communications to ensure the smooth operation of the property and promote the highest degree of customer satisfaction. REQUIREMENTS: High school diploma or G.E.D. equivalent. One year of cooking experience in operating fryers, broilers, and grills. Must have the ability to stoop, bend, and stand for long periods of time and lift up to 35 lbs. This is a swing shift position and must work weekends. A Non-Gaming License is required for this position.

Positions will close on May 25, 2016 at 4 pm

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

Cage Department: Main Bank/ Cashier/Drop Team Member (2) full-time (1) part-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, includes weekends & holidays. Excellent customer service skills, excellent communication skills. Appropriate dress code; the ability to work under pressure. Excellent Math Skills, Basic Computer Skills, Knowledge of basic office equipment. At, least 2 years of previous experience in the cage department preferred. Ability to lift 50 lbs. Must be at least 21 years old, must have a High school diploma or GED. Must be able to obtain a Key License.

Facilities/Maintenance Department: Porter (2) full-time; rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, includes weekends & holidays. Good customer service skills; ability to operate necessary equipment and the physical ability to lift heavy objects up to 20 lbs. or more. Have physical mobility throughout facility & surrounding grounds; dependable & available to work all shifts. Must be at least 18 years old.

Opening date:  Thursday, May 19, 2016

Closing date:    Wednesday, 25, 2016 @ 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 
 

 

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