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Vol. 47 Issue No. 38

Anpetu Iyamni, Sept. 21, 2016

Inside this Edition –

Chairman's Corner: SWO Tribal Chairman Flute updates the Oyate

SWO Tribe awarded five-year grant to aid in addressing meth epidemic among youth

Bryan Akipa to be honored in Washington, DC ceremony; to perform at White House

Sisseton Public School Board ends homecoming mock Indian ceremony

SWO Law Enforcement teams up with county sheriff, highway patrol to clean up Sisseton Housing

Katie McKay recognized for 39 years of serving the Oyate

Next week: Buffalo Lanes bowling alley grand opening

Note to candidates: New Sota discounted rates, pre-payment policy

Deadline for receipt of copy is Friday noon

Chairman's Corner –

Updating the Oyate

My friends and relatives,

I would like to share a couple updates on some of the activities of the Tribe.

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration-SAMHSA Grant: Families and friends of challenged youth have asked previous administrations and the current administration what leadership is doing to provide adequate and alternative counseling for young people that are challenged with different types of peer pressures and social pressures.

Answering this is not easy because there are a variety of components that need to be factored in to achieve successful and effective results. However, we have listened and sought different alternatives that could be used to skirt existing resources.

This past summer a small delegation of Council and legal accompanied me to D.C. where we lobbied our congressional leadership on a few important issues that led us to learn about a grant that SAMHSA offered and encouraged us to apply.

Although the Tribe has received Meth Suicide Prevention Initiative grants the SAMHSA grant will provide another resource and complement the MSPI resource.

Tribal leadership is listening and trying to find alternative resources to join with other resources and provide our youth with adequate and quality counseling for those that seek assistance.

Please read the award announcement to get a better understanding of the purpose of this grant.

I want to thank Lee Ann Tall Bear and Sara DeCoteau for putting in the work, tolerating my insistence on getting this grant in on time, and their cooperation. Great job! (Please forgive me if I missed anyone else that contributed behind the scenes.)

On behalf of the Tribe and all our veterans I want to thank our Tribal Veteran's Service Officer Geri Opsal and her team for coordinating an on-going annual ceremony that remembers and honors our Prisoners of War. Wopida!

Although there have been some differences of opinion in regard to United Tribes of North Dakota and UTTC choosing to move forward with the annual tribal summit, I want to say publicly that I had concerns with the N.D. governor's comments towards our people at the Standing Rock camp and shared these concerns with the board long before local members voiced their concerns on social media sites.

I was going to boycott the Tribal summit and withdraw my commitment to moderating two panels and contributing on another.

I brought this issue up long before anyone else did and brought it to the attention of UTND and UTTC.

However, I was asked by the other four Chairmen of UTND and the board delegates to put my personal feelings aside and think about the impact this would have on the students and staff, which led me to consider our Tribal members that attend UTTC and work at UTTC.

The Standing Rock Tribal Chairman and the SRST Board delegate also supported the Tribal summit and encouraged me to attend; therefore, I attended and contributed to the summit.

I made time to visit the camp again and checked on some of our Tribal members that have been camped there for quite a long time; some of them have been there since we took the first large group almost two months ago. I am proud of them for representing our SWST.

The Turtle Mountain Chairman and I were asked by SRST Chairman to offer some words at the camp. I was honored to speak to a much larger group of supporters than the first time.

Our Tribal Council and Executives have been contributing to our Tribal members at the camp and we have been involved in the communications and supporting our sister tribes that are taking legal action against the Army Corps of Engineers. In a nutshell, we are doing all we can at this time to help and be part of this movement.

I also want to thank the many Tribal members and Councilmembers that have contributed their own personal time and finances to help our SWST members at the camp – wopida tanka!

Other updates of interest are the old ceremonial grounds (4th of July pow-wow grounds). We are in the process of soliciting some conceptual drawings from architects so that we can get some of the construction started this year – before the frost.

The design will resemble the arbor that was built in the 70's. It will not be the exact same but will have some of the desirable dynamics that made our arbor one of the best.

We are still working on a plan to demolish the old TZ buildings.

We hope to have a solid and approved plan by mid-October.

Briefly, the hazmat assessment was complete and all hazardous materials have been removed. The hold-up is salvaging air handling units, furnaces and other equipment that might still hold value and once all that has been identified and removed the demo can get started.

You might ask, "Why are we tearing it down? Can't it be used for something else?"

There are many reasons why it is best to demo. To share just a few: 1 It is a desirable piece of Tribal property that could be used to build a bigger and better youth center or some other preferred project; 2 In any remodeling job there is always the risk of encountering unforeseen problems that will result in higher construction costs.

The building served its purpose and right now the focus is to retire its use and prepare the site for a new project.

Dave Flute, Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe.

Federal funding to help Tribe address meth crisis in youth –

SWO Tribe awarded five-year grant to build alternative behavioral health services for youth

The SWO Tribe has been notified of being awarded a five-year grant to provide alternative mental health counseling for youth caught up in the meth epidemic and to prevent suicides.

While there is already some federal funding support for adult services, this award focuses on youth. And here is where meth and other addictions take hold. In the children.

Too often, addictions set up young Oyate for lives as adults caught in the destructive habits of continuing addiction. And all too often, lead to suicidal thoughts and committing suicide.

The award is for a Native Connection Behavioral Health Project cooperative agreement from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, an agency of the United States Department of Health and Human Services.

Purpose of the project is "to prevent and reduce suicidal behavior and substance abuse, reduce the impact of trauma, and promote mental health among American Indian young people up to and including age 24."

Over the entire project period, from Sept. 30, 2016 until Sept. 29, 2021, the Tribe to receive $997,542 in federal support to develop and implement services for youth.

The SWO plans to hire a Licensed Professional Counselor/Mental Health (LPC-MH) to lead the effort.

The funding application was prepared by grants writer Lee Ann TallBear on very short notice by special request from Tribal Chairman Dave Flute.

The funders express appreciation that Lee Ann worked over the Memorial Day Weekend to meet a June 2nd deadline.

Also, they state in their award announcement:

"We also appreciate the teamwork and support provided by the SWO Education Office, Legal Office, Chairman's staff, and SWO Health Coordinator.

This will be the very first Licensed Mental Health Clinician to be hired by the Tribe.

Advertising to fill the position will be distributed nationwide.

The new services will expand the Tribe's capacity beyond substance use disorder services already available at Dakotah Pride Center.

SWO represented at national NICOA conference

Photos courtesy of SWO Tribal Secretary Crystal Owen

The Siseton-Wahpton Oyate Tribe was represented at the nationwide National Indian Council on Aging (NICOA) conference last week in Niagara Falls, NY.

The SWO Tribal Elderly Affairs Board hosted a regional conference in June at Dakota Magic to document concerns of this, and other Great Plains tribal elders.

That two-day meeting listed the top two concerns as the crisis in health care under the IHS, and the epidemic of meth addiction.

And those two items were carried to the national conference.

SWO Tribal Secretary Crystal Owen and Rosebud Meth Prevention Coordinator Lori Walking Eagle both addressed to participants on the meth crisis in Indian country.

Last day of the conference the SWO representatives took time in Canada and ended the day sitting around the fire that burns in front of the Seneca Casino to honor youth and elders who came together for the conference.

See accompanying photos courtesy of Crystal Owen.

"From the desk of Geri Opsal, Tribal Veteran Service Officer"

GeriO@SWO-NSN.gov

Phone 605-698-3388

*VETERAN INFORMATIONAL OUTREACH: Thank all of you for showing up we had 50 Veterans & dependents show up. There were five claims filed, new pictures for cards taken and much camaraderie amongst all Veterans. We will continue to do this to reach all the Veterans that we can, there are more signing up for benefits they've earned and this is the purpose of these outreach events. Pidamaya to Dakota Connection for the meal and the set up. You all make us look good!

*POW/MIA Day September 16th, 2016: We were very honored by the people who showed up to honor the families of our five POW's: Larry Geotte, RCVSO who attended, Russell Hawkins, BIA Superintendent who said a few words. And to Chairman Flute for taking the lead and moderating the event. I stated that it was the first time in this event that we had an Executive attend, and the families were honored for the respect bestowed. To The families of Ulysses K. Abraham, Winfield Thompson, Louis Williams, Myrton Dickerson and Robert "Bud" Owen – thank you for coming and honoring the sacrifices your Father, Grandfather, Uncle, relative made and being the legacy that lives on in each and every one of you. Travis, TJ and Delmer the drum group sang some very meaningful songs and so good having them explain to -us their meaning made it more special. The Akicita for the 21-gun salute and Del Renville for the prayer and playing TAPS. We appreciate all of you for honoring the families. This falls on the 3rd Friday of every September. I want to Thank KORBYN BERTSCH for bringing this to our attention. See photo highlights accompanying this article.

*VETERANS SEEKING EMPLOYMENT: GO TO JOB SERVICE ON Wednesday, Sept. 21, 9:30 a.m. - 3 p.m. CDT, Sisseton, - at 10 E. Hickory St., Suite 3. For more information, call 605-698-3964 or visit www.sdjobs.org

*FAMILIES: of Veterans no matter what ERA from WWI, WWII, Korean, Vietnam Veteran, Gulf on to present … please contact our office as we want to make sure each and every one of our TRIBAL MEMBERS have an existing file in our office. I know sometimes we have had calls and we didn't have any information on your loved ones and we need your assistance to help us continue to build up our files in the office. We honor each of our Veterans and with your help some day we will have complete files!

*VETERANS DAY WACIPI: The Veterans Day Pow- Wow will be held on Friday November 11-13, 2016. It will be held at Ben Reifel Gym Auditorium in Sisseton, SD. The first grand entry will be held on Friday November 11, 2016 at 7PM, Saturday November 12, 2016 at 1PM and 7PM and Sunday, November 13, 2016 at 7 PM. Justin Chanku, Commander DEV, Delano Renville, Commander American Legion, Jesse Chanku, Vice Commander, DEV secured the building this past week. If you have any questions: Justin Chanku (268-0977) and Danielle DeCoteau: (467-1206) are the coordinators for the event. Please watch the Sota for the flyer in coming editions! Thank you.

*SWO Veterans Cemetery progress: Please see the accompanying photo showing progress of the cemetery!

*VETERANS: PLEASE CALL OUR OFFICE IF YOU NEED ASSITANCE; WE ARE HERE TO SERVE! 698-3388.

*WOMEN VETERANS CALL CENTER: 1-855-VA-WOMEN. Crisis Help Line: 1-800-273-8255, available 24/7, and tell them you are a veteran. All calls are confidential.

*REMEMBER: We are here to serve you our fellow Veteran, widows, dependents. And also you see a Veteran shake their hand – that small gesture means a great deal to them! Call us at 698-3388 or cell 268-0502.

*American Legion Post #314- Delano Renville, Commander Cell: # 268-0354 / Vietnam Veterans Kit Fox Society - Phone: # 698-3901 ask for Doc/Desert Era Veterans – Justin Chanku, Commander 1-605-268-0977. For GAS ASSISTANCE: Geri Opsal 698-3388.

Have a good week. Geri Opsal, Tribal VSO.

Bryan Akipa among master artists to be honored in Washington, DC

Breaking news: In addition to being honored by the NEA Bryan has been asked to perform at the White House; watch for details next week

By Carrie McDermott

Wahpeton Daily News

Wahpeton, ND – Sept. 6, 2016 – Dakota flute craftsman and player Bryan Akipa, Sisseton, South Dakota, will be honored later this month in Washington, D.C., as a 2016 National Endowment of the Arts National Heritage Fellow. The fellowships are the nation's highest honor in the folk and traditional arts.

He is one of nine artists chosen for the National Heritage Fellowship this year.

An awards ceremony will be held Sept. 28 with NEA Chairman Jane Chu, who recently visited Wahpeton, and members of Congress at the Library of Congress Thomas Jefferson Building in Washington, D.C. Akipa will also perform and be interviewed on stage as part of the NEA National Heritage Fellowships Concert on Friday, Sept. 30. The concert will be streamed live at arts.gov and be hosted by cultural heritage advocate Dan Sheehy, recipient of the 2015 NEA National Heritage Fellowship.

Akipa grew up on the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Lake Traveerse Reservation in South Dakota. He was inspired to learn how to create wooden flutes after seeing a mallard-head flute made by Lakota artist Richard Fool Bull. He spent many hours studying and drawing the instrument, to figure out how it was made.

He then reached out to tribal elders who knew the flute tradition and remembered the songs. Today he both makes flutes and performs on them and has won several Native American Music Awards and was nominated for a Grammy. Akipa is also a traditional dancer, visual artist and digital media artist.

"For me, the red cedar flute and its aria are my cultural tradition," he said in a bio on the NEA website, about the path that brought him to where he is today.

He has carried on the flute tradition by teaching his son, friends and relatives.

In addition to Akipa, the other 2016 NEA National Heritage Fellows are Joseph Pierre "Big Chief Monk" Boudreaux, a Mardi Gras Indian craftsman and musician from New Orleans; Billy McComiskey, an Irish Button accordionist from Baltimore; Artemio Posadas, a Master Huastecan Son (Mexican Musical Tradition) musician and advocate, from San Jose, California; Clarissa Rizal, a Tlingit Ceremonial Regalia maker from Juneau, Alaska; Theresa Secord, a Penobscot Nation ash/sweetgrass basketmaker from Waterville, Maine; Bounxeung Synanonh, a Loatian Khaen (free-reed mouth organ) player from Fresno, California; Michael Vlahovich, a master shipwright from Tacoma, Washington/St. Michaels, Maryland; and Leona Waddel, a white oak basketmaker from Cecilia, Kentucky.

Free tickets are available for the concert and can be reserved online at Lisner.gwu.edu.

The 2016 National Heritage Fellows will also be spotlighted in an episode of public radio's "American Routes" during Thanksgiving week. The episode will feature performances from the concert and interviews with the artists.

Army Corps grants special use permit for SRST camp

Omaha, NE – September 16, 2016 – Today the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) issued a Special Use Permit to the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe to use Federal lands managed by the Corps near Lake Oahe.

Omaha District Commander, Col. John W. Henderson, informed Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Chairman Dave Archambault II, that the Tribe's Spiritual gathering, located south of the Cannonball River, has been granted a Special Use Permit, which allows the Tribe to gather to engage in a lawful free speech demonstration on Federal lands designated in the permit.

The Tribe's Special Use Permit application requested use of lands to the north and south of the mouth of the Cannonball River; however, because the northern property is subject to an existing grazing lease, this portion of the application is not being acted on at this time.

The Special Use Permit allows the Tribe to use Federal lands subject to Federal rules and regulations including Title 36 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 327, Title 33 of the United States Code, Section 408, and applicable Federal, state and local regulations. Per Title 36, several activities require written permission from the District Commander. Additional permission will be required for activities identified in Title 36 such as construction, either temporary or permanent, of any structures within areas identified in the Special Use Permit.

"Among our many diverse missions is managing and conserving our natural resources. I want to encourage those who are using the permitted area to be good stewards and help us to protect these valuable resources," said Henderson.

The purpose for requesting and granting a Special Use Permit under Title 36 is to provide applicants temporary use of federal lands for lawful purposes. In turn, the applicant assumes responsibility for maintenance, damage and restoration costs, ensures the health, welfare, safety, supervision, and security of participants and spectators, and provides liability insurance. This permit requires that the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe work with its supporters to ensure that the land is restored to its previous state so that others may benefit from use in the future.

"Thousands of people have peacefully gathered in prayer and solidarity against the Dakota Access Pipeline," said Dave Archambault II, Chairman of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. "We appreciate the cooperation of the Corps in protecting the First Amendment rights of all water protectors."

"The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has a deep respect for the traditions, culture, and concerns of all Native American Tribes, and we are committed to strengthening our enduring partnership with the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe," said Henderson.

SWO Tribal Law Enforcement, Roberts Co. Sheriff's office, SD Highway Patrol conduct joint project –

Clean-up at Sisseton Housing

SWO Tribal Law Enforcement officers worked alongside the Roberts County Sheriff and deputies, as local SD Highway Patrol to cleanup Tribal housing at Sisseton.

An area of overgrown trees and bushes was cleared, and the basketball court again made useable.

Here are photos and commentary by photographer John Heminger.

Addressing the remaining trees at Snake Hill:

"PLEASE DO NOT CLEAR CUT THESE TREES WHEN YOU CLEAN THEM UP. TRIM THE BRANCHES AND THIN OUT THE OVERGROWTH."

RESPECT Act passes Senate Indian Affairs Committee unanimously

Act would repeal outdated statutes related to the federal government's treatment of Native American citizens

Washington, DC – Sept. 14, 2016 – U.S. Senator Mike Rounds (R-S.D.) today praised the Senate Indian Affairs Committee's unanimous passage of his Repealing Existing Substandard Provisions Encouraging Conciliation with Tribes Act (RESPECT Act).

This legislation would repeal several outdated, offensive federal laws against Native Americans, including laws that allow for the forced removal of Native American children from their homes to be sent to boarding schools and laws subjecting Native Americans to forced labor.

"The laws that would be repealed under the RESPECT Act are a sad reminder of the hostile aggression and overt racism displayed by the early federal government toward Native Americans," said Rounds.

"The idea that these laws were ever considered is disturbing, but the fact that they remain part of our legal code today is, at best, an oversight. I thank Senate Indian Affairs Committee Chairman John Barrasso (R-Wyo.), and all the members of the committee, for moving the RESPECT Act forward today."

SWO Tribal Chairman Dave Flute testified before the Committee this past summer encouraging support for the RESPECT Act.

Funding to fight crime, sexual violence in Indian country

Washington, DC – Sept. 16, 2016 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today announced $376,287 in federal funding to fight sexual violence against children on the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indian reservation and fund needed resources for Standing Rock Sioux tribal law enforcement.

"Every child must have the opportunity to grow-up free from violence and abuse," said Heitkamp. "We must have the resources in place that will assist law enforcement to do their jobs protecting our children from abuse and crime, which is what I have been working to do in the Senate. Whether this is through taking a comprehensive look at what we need to do in addressing emerging crime challenges in our state or pushing for a better future for Native American children, we must do our jobs and build upon what we have done to protect children and communities. These federal funds will assist tribal governments in our state to enhance the sex offender registry and provide the support and information needed to reduce crime."

These federal funds are distributed as follows:

· Turtle Mountain Band Of Chippewa Indians: $355,000 in federal funding to continue to support the efforts of the sex offender registry to make sure offenders are in compliance and keep children safe from violence. This federal funding is made available through the U.S. Department of Justice's Adam Walsh Act Implementation Grant Program that is used to support state and tribal government efforts to enhance the sex offender registry that protects the public from sexual predators.

· Standing Rock Sioux Tribe: $21,287 in federal funding to support community crime prevention programs based on the local needs of the tribal government. These funds are made available through the U.S. Department of Justice's Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistant Grant Program that assists local governments in training and technical assistance, equipment and supplies, and information systems for criminal justice. Specifically these funds will be used by Standing Rock to administer the Tribal Court's Adult and Juvenile SCRAMs Alcohol Ankle Monitoring Program.

SWO co-workers honor Katie McKay for years of service

Fellow Tribal employees came together last week to honor Katie McKay for her many years of service to Tribal members. She was presented with a star quilt and gifts, hugs, and words of appreciation.

Here is the text of a talk given by Amada Quinn during the honoring:

I would like to start out by saying "thank you" Katie McKay for your 39 years of dedicated, loyal service to the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate.

While I only had the privilege of working with you in the Accounts Payable department for the last three years  I did work in the Finance department with Katie since 2005 and during those years developed a friendship along with a working relationship.

I was honored to be able to learn from Katie within the Accounts Payable department as for her many years, she had knowledge of our Tribe that could not be learned on the computer or through a book. I always had respect and looked up to her as a mentor.

In '76 Katie started in Property and Supply department as a Clerk/Typist then in '79 moved to Finance as a Bookkeeper.

In 1982 Katie became the Purchasing Agent for the Accounts Payable Department then in '89 had the added duty of the Purchase Order Clerk.

In 1995 she had her last duty added as Accounts Payable Clerk.

Through her many years Katie has done many different jobs for the Tribe and for the length of time that I had the opportunity of working with her she was always reliable and dedicated and is definitely an irreplaceable asset to the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate.

So again thank you Katie McKay for not only the length of service but allowing me to learn from you.

See accompanying photos courtesy of Robin Quinn.

Tekakwitha Living Center announces new administrator

Tekakwitha Living Center has appointed Mary Beth Grape as Administrator. Grape most recently served as administrator at Benet Place Assisted Living and Senior Apartments in Watertown, SD.

"We are excited to welcome Mary Beth to our team and know that under her leadership will be able to advance our mission of providing quality care with a person all touch close to home," said Michael Coyle, Chief Executive Officer of CDP Health Care System. Mary Beth has knowledge and experience leading long term care facilities and her commitment to delivering high quality care will help guide the center as it continues to explore ways to enhance patient care."

Grape earned her bachelor degree in social work from SDSU in Brookings. Prior role working as a Licensed Social Worker has contribute to her passion for the elderly and patient advocate for those in need.

Grape currently reside in Watertown with her husband, Bob and two dogs, Molly and Joe. She has three step children and four grandchildren.

President Obama announces key appointments

Washington, DC - Sept. 16, 2016 - Today, President Barack Obama announced his intent to nominate several individuals to key Administration posts.

Among them is: Shannon Keller O'Loughlin, Appointee for Member, Cultural Property Advisory Committee.

Shannon Keller O'Loughlin is Chief of Staff at the National Indian Gaming Commission, a position she has held since 2015.

Ms. O'Loughlin was Partner and Chair of the Indian Nations Practice Group at Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith LLP from 2013 to 2015. She was a Solo Practitioner from 2005 to 2013, during which time she worked on the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) Civil Penalties program from 2011 to 2013.

Ms. O'Loughlin was an Associate Attorney for Dreyer Boyajian LLP from 2005 to 2006, Squire Sanders & Dempsey LLP from 2004 to 2005, and Galbut & Hunter, P.C. from 2002 to 2004.

She was a Law Clerk for the Arizona Court of Appeals from 2001 to 2002.

Ms. O'Loughlin is a member of the National Native American Bar Association and the Lawyers Committee for Cultural Heritage Preservation.

She was a member of the NAGPRA Review Committee from 2013 to 2015.

Ms. O'Loughlin received a B.A. from California State University, Long Beach and an M.A. and J.D. from the University of Arizona.

Awards for housing, community development in tribal communities

Washington, DC – Sept. 12, 2016 – Today, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) awarded $56.5 million to 77 Native American communities throughout the country to improve housing conditions and stimulate community development for residents, including funding construction projects and local jobs. The grants are part of HUD's Indian Community Development Block Grant (ICDBG) Program, which supports a wide range of community development and affordable housing activities. See a list of award winners below, and read individual project summaries here.

"This investment will expand affordable housing and economic opportunities for families in Native American communities across the country." said HUD Principal Deputy Secretary for Public and Indian Housing, Lourdes Castro Ramírez. "We are proud to continue collaborating with tribal leaders to improve housing conditions and to lift up neighborhoods with vital new infrastructure and vibrant community spaces."

The ICDBG program was established in 1977 to help Indian tribes and Alaska Native villages meet their community development needs. Federally recognized Indian tribes, bands, groups or nations (including Alaska Indian, Aleuts and Eskimos,) Alaska Native villages, and eligible tribal organizations compete for this funding each year.

The goal of the program is to develop viable Indian and Alaska Native communities, including neighborhoods with decent housing, suitable living environments, and economic opportunities. Communities can use the grants to rehab or build new housing; to buy land for housing; for infrastructure projects such as roads, water and sewer facilities; and to spur economic development including jobs.

This year's projects include building or fixing homes for many of the awardees. Other uses include the All Mission Indian Housing Authority of the La Jolla Reservation in California using $605,000 to provide the west side of its community with much needed water. To address the effects of the ongoing drought in California, the tribe has three water infrastructure improvements planned. Near Auburn, Washington, the Muckleshoot Housing Authority will use its $500,000 grant to improve 10 housing units, making them more energy-efficient and creating three jobs in the process. Near the City of El Reno, Oklahoma, the Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribe will use its $800,000 grant to construct the Concho Head Start Center which will include five classrooms and a large multi-purpose room to serve 57 low-income children and their families with programming to address their educational, emotional, social, cultural, health, nutritional, and psychological needs.

HUD administers seven programs that are specifically targeted to American Indian, Alaska Native, or Native Hawaiian individuals and families, and federally recognized tribal governments. HUD will provide $798 million in FY 2017 to fund programs that support housing and development initiatives in American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian communities. Through innovative programming, American Indian and Alaska Native tribal governments have created sustainable and community-driven solutions to their housing and community development challenges.

South Dakota

Oglala Sioux (Lakota) Housing Authority, Pine Ridge, $1,000,000.

Federal funding to improve Juvenile justice

Washington, DC – Sept. 12, 2016 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today announced $400,279 in federal funds to the North Dakota Department of Corrections Division of Juvenile Services to support state and local prevention and intervention programs, make improvements and maintain compliance in the juvenile justice system.

"We need to make sure that when young people in North Dakota find themselves involved with the criminal justice system, we provide opportunities to change the path they are on so they can avoid a revolving door with the criminal justice system and become productive and responsible citizens," said Heitkamp. "Today's federal funding will support North Dakota's juvenile justice system by allowing for young people, who do not require housing in a secure facility, to have alternatives to detention to rehabilitate and work toward a brighter path forward."

These federal funds are made available through the U.S. Department of Justice under the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act. Specifically, the funds will be used by North Dakota to continue the Attendant Care Program which is non-secure supervision of delinquent juveniles who do not require to be held in a secure setting.

Heitkamp has been an outspoken advocate for North Dakota's youth since her time as the state's Attorney General. In July 2015, Heitkamp convened law enforcement, educators, and social service professionals to discuss ways we can address the needs of young people who find themselves in the juvenile justice system and how to prevent them from lifelong contact with the criminal justice system. In a Senate Committee on Indian Affairs hearing that same month, Heitkamp pushed for needed changes to the Native juvenile justice system that both bolster holistic prevention efforts and better support Native minors already in the criminal justice system by helping break the cycle of re-offending.

Henry Red Cloud and the Treaty Pipe

Henry Red Cloud is the Democratic Party's candidate for the Public Utilities Commission and he has a very long history in South Dakota. He is a fifth generation direct descendant of Chief Red Cloud (Mahpiya Luta), the great Lakota leader and military genius who was one of the most well known and photographed Native Americans in history.

It was Chief Red Cloud who signed the Fort Laramie Treaty of 1868 which ended the Red Cloud War. In each culture, such formal decisions are sanctified in different ways. For the Lakota, it involves the smoking of a pipe together. This last weekend, the pipe Red Cloud smoked at that historic 1868 Peace Treaty meeting was brought out to the Sacred Stone Camp at Standing Rock by Wendell Yellow Bull Jr., the ninth Keeper of Mahpiya Luta's pipe in a procession that was led by Henry Red Cloud, who also brought it into the Council Tipi where high level discussions went on among the assembled Lakota headsmen.

Following the ceremony and discussions, Henry spoke on behalf of Mahpiya Luta to the many hundreds of people who had gathered near the Council Tipi. He spoke about the need for unity to protect Mother Earth, but also the necessity of always acting in a peaceful non-violent manner. He also talked about the need to take political action, which includes voting in the upcoming election.

He emphatically made his point - You can't change the past, but we can change the future!

Afterwards, Henry talked specifically about his PUC candidacy: "The Public Utilities Commission has been approving pipelines without much concern for South Dakota's farmers, ranchers, tribes and us regular citizens. The Dakota Access Pipeline should have never been approved."

The PUC approves or disapproves many aspects relating to the permitting of pipelines among its energy related duties. The head of the PUC, Chris Nelson, lead the effort to get the Dakota Access Pipeline approved despite much negative testimony and many objections.

"The PUC doesn't press the oil companies for Environmental Impact Statements and doesn't even require them to show what liability insurance they have. Other states get the oil and they leave the rest of us with fouled water, destroyed farms and all the headaches that come with a spill. I am not sure who my opponent Chris Nelson is working for, but he sure isn't looking out for the interests of the people of South Dakota!"

Henry wants to see a significant investment in renewable energy infrastructure and education. He knows that South Dakota has huge solar and wind resources and could become the renewable energy state if there was a major investment in teaching people about solar and wind power and how to install and maintain the equipment.

Henry states: "Many of the current oil workers could find much better, healthier jobs in this newer, safer, energy approach and we need to provide them with the necessary training and transition help."

Henry has a long history in working with and teaching about renewable energy including running his business, Lakota Solar Enterprises and co-managing the Red Cloud Renewable Energy Center.

"I have trained many of our youth and veterans, both men and women, about renewable energy and how to live a more sustainable life. In learning to work with the sun and wind, we find a good path forward and a healthier one too that is a new way that honors the old way."

Grant to support Native American small business

Washington, DC – Sept. 12, 2016 – The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) today announced seven awardees of $700,000 in new grant funding for continued projects to promote the development, success, and long-term survival of Native American firms eligible for assistance under the SBA's 7(j) Management and Technical Assistance Program.

The SBA's 7(j) Program helps provide specialized management and technical assistance to underserved markets and small business owners who are socially and economically disadvantaged. The program emphasizes entrepreneurial education, counseling, and training resources to help these firms succeed in federal, state, and local government markets for goods and services, and also as subcontractors to government prime contractors.

In making the announcement, Assistant Administrator for SBA's Native American Affairs David Sanborn said: "We're excited to be able to help fund these organizations to engage with Native American entrepreneurs across the county and strengthen the SBA's support network to provide more boots on the ground in local communities. This fiscal year was a great success and made it possible to help continue the support of small business job creation and growth for Native small business owners."

These projects were initially funded for fiscal year 2016 and are being continued in fiscal year 2017, to help ensure the delivery of vital business development services, and management and technical assistance to Native American business communities across the country. Project funding for each of the seven $100,000 Native American Micro Enterprise Business Services grants is provided by the SBA's Office of Native American Affairs.

The SBA grant program announcement for the second round of funding also sought unique and innovative proposals to provide specialized training, executive education, and tools to promote business development of Native American small businesses. The continued funding will help to address some of the challenges Native American firms and other 7(j) eligible firms face, including teaming with other businesses; mastering the process of federal contracting; and reversing declines and re-energizing small businesses.

Functional areas of assistance regularly include strategic and operational planning and management; marketing, business development, and identification and capture of opportunities; accounting, bookkeeping, and financial analysis; contract management and compliance; information technology and systems development; and industry-specific requirements.

The selected awardees, who also received grant funding for fiscal year 2016, have demonstrated substantive experience dealing with issues relating to Native American small businesses and have also demonstrated they have the capacity to provide a variety of management and technical assistance services to micro enterprise small businesses. These service providers will continue to assist the SBA's Native American customers as they create jobs and develop economic opportunities to enhance the quality of life in their communities.

The seven grant awardees represent a range of diverse geographic tribal areas and industries. They will focus on helping to narrow the gap in business development services provided by the SBA to Native American firms.

On the list are the following regional enterprises:

The Native American Development Corporation (NADC), North Billings, Montana Funding amount: $100,000 NADC will provide pre and post technical assistance to Native-owned small businesses in preparation for success in government contracting through the SBA's 8(a) procurement program and other federal and state programs. NADC will also promote business relationships with private sector companies through matchmaking activities associated with NADC conferences and workshops to enhance their ability to attract more commercial contracting opportunities. Strategic training will be provided throughout the pre and post nine-year 8(a) program participation utilizing NADC distance learning technology, such as webinars and curriculum developed and provided through NADC satellite centers and tribal colleges. Collaborations with other NADC programs, such as the Procurement Technical Assistance Center, Community Development Financial Institution, and Department of Transportation will be essential to the resources to support the growth and success of the native businesses.)

Central Plains Foundation, Inc. (GROW Nebraska), Holbrook, Nebraska Funding amount: $100,000 GROW Nebraska will work with partners Lakota Hope and the University of Nebraska at Lincoln (UNL) Extension to capitalize on the talents and interests of entrepreneurs on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation and in the Whiteclay, Neb., area to create a group of entrepreneurs who work together and support each other as they build scalable small businesses that will generate a livable income for the business owner and his/her family, create jobs, and have a positive impact on Reservation residents. With this grant, GROW Nebraska, Lakota Hope and UNL Extension will create an innovative, entrepreneur-focused program that builds and supports a powerful business strategy for each participant involved in the program.

To learn more about assistance provided to Native American small businesses and SBA's Office of Native American Affairs, please visit www.sba.gov/naa.

Custer State Park annual Buffalo roundup, arts festival

Pierre, S.D. - The South Dakota Department of Game, Fish and Parks (GFP) will host the 51st annual Buffalo Roundup and 23rd annual Arts Festival in Custer State Park later this month. The Buffalo Roundup begins at 9:30 a.m. MDT on Friday, Sept. 30. The Arts Festival will run from Thursday, Sept. 29, through Saturday, Oct. 1.

"Each year, the Buffalo Roundup brings more than 10,000 spectators from around the world to Custer State Park to view the park's 1,300 buffalo and watch the Old West come alive," said Katie Ceroll, director of the Division of Parks and Recreation. "To have an arts festival with more than 125 arts and craft exhibitors means that there will be no shortage of entertainment this year for the entire family."

The parking areas for the Roundup, located near the corrals along the Wildlife Loop Road, open at 6:15 a.m. MDT and close at 9 a.m. MDT on Sept. 30. For safety reasons, spectators need to remain in the viewing areas until all the buffalo are corralled which typically occurs around noon.

The annual Arts Festival runs from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. MDT on Thursday and Friday and from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 1. The Arts Festival takes place near the State Game Lodge.

"The Buffalo Roundup serves the purpose of herd management, but it also provides our visitors an experience that is unique in all the world," said Jim Hagen, Secretary of the Department of Tourism. "We hear from visitors around the globe about how incredible it is to watch the bison thunder over the prairie. It's something they never forget."

A state park entrance license is required on Thursday and Saturday, but there is no cost to attend the Buffalo Roundup or Arts Festival on Friday. Share this year's event photos with us and let others who cannot attend take in the experience with you by using #FindYourPark and #BuffaloRoundup when posting images to Facebook, Twitter or Instagram.

Next year's Buffalo Roundup will be held Friday, Sept. 29, 2017.

Senator Rounds staff changes in NE South Dakota

Washington, DC – U.S. Senator Mike Rounds (R-S.D.) has announced the promotion of Josh Haeder to Regional Director in Northeast South Dakota. Additionally, Katie Murray, a Constituent Services Representative, is relocating to Brookings and will be based out of Rounds' Sioux Falls office.

"Josh knows South Dakota, particularly the James River Valley," said Rounds. "He has excelled by focusing on developing strong relationships with residents and communities throughout the region. Some of the best legislative efforts start at the local level. Josh understands the big picture and has been critical in that effort." Haeder has served as Senior Field Manager since January 2015. Haeder will continue to focus on constituent services and outreach in the James River Valley. He is based out of Huron with a satellite office in Aberdeen. Prior to joining Senator Rounds' office, Haeder was the Chief Operating Officer of a credit counseling agency. His past experience also includes business and ag banking.

"Katie is a lifelong South Dakotan with a passion for serving and helping others," said Rounds. "She has been an asset to my team since the day I took office. In the past 20 months, she has gained valuable knowledge by helping South Dakotans who may be having trouble with a federal agency. I look forward to having a stronger presence in the Brookings area as she and her husband relocate."

Katie has served as a Constituent Services Representative in Rounds' Rapid City office since January 2015. She is a graduate of Black Hills State University.

Funding for Richland County Drug Court

Washington, DC – Sept. 13, 2016 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today announced $218,547 in federal funding to Richland County to support drug court services that integrate drug treatment, drug testing, and assist in transition services.

"The impact of drug abuse has devastating effects not only on the person using, but their family, friends, and the community," said Heitkamp. "As part of the way to address drug addiction we must have effective criminal justice efforts. Drug courts play a critical role in combating addiction and abuse by not only addressing criminal activity, but also pushing for better treatment and support services that will get individuals addicted to drugs the help they need to return to the community and help prevent relapse."

These federal funds are made available through the U.S. Department of Justice's Adult Drug Court Discretionary Grant Program. This federal grant program will support currently unserved populations in enhancing existing court operations, and improve physical and mental health care, education, job training, and housing.

Heitkamp has been pushing for legislation and working with folks on the ground to address the opioid epidemic in North Dakota. In August, Heitkamp held a series of discussions in Grand Forks, Fargo, and Jamestown with health care professionals, law enforcement, treatment specialists, and educators on how the communities have dealt with opioid abuse and to identify ways to mitigate the spread of this drug epidemic.

Fighting domestic and sexual violence at resource center

Washington, DC – Sept. 13, 2016 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today announced $401,611 in federal funds for the Abused Adult Resource Center in Bismarck to increase the organization's ability to respond to and reduce incidents of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, and to focus on improving services to Native American victims in Mandan.

"Implementing the Violence Against Women Act while I served as North Dakota's Attorney General in the late 1990s gave me a firsthand look at the impact comprehensive services and support had on helping victims of domestic violence, their families, and their communities," said Heitkamp. "That's why one of the first bills I helped pass in the Senate was the reauthorization of VAWA – including a provision that better protects victims in Indian Country. These federal funds will build on the great work already being done by the Abused Adult Resource Center to further their services in Mandan by supporting victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking, improving community coordination, providing additional resources to law enforcement, and helping make sure the most vulnerable North Dakotans have a safe place to turn to and the resources to meet their needs."

Specifically, these new federal funds will be used to support one full-time lead advocate to provide project oversight; develop a multidisciplinary team to reduce crimes of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking, with a focus on domestic and dating violence homicides; support one full-time detective from the Mandan Police Department who will investigate related crimes; provide training to project staff on providing culturally sensitive services for Native American victims; and maintain and enhance the current Sexual Assault Response Team (SART) in offering services to sexual assault victims within the City of Mandan.

Since joining the Senate, Heitkamp has built on her work as Attorney General to combat domestic violence and stop those who seek to harm adults and children. The first bill she cosponsored was the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) which she then played a key role in pushing through Congress. Heitkamp authored a key provision in VAWA to address the continuing crisis of violence against women in tribal communities. The provision strengthens the existing programs and provides tribal governments with the force they need to prosecute non-Indian perpetrators who commit these crimes on tribal land. It is through the provisions Heitkamp pushed for that these funds were made available to more tribal organizations that work to combat domestic violence.

These federal funds are made available through the U.S. Department of Justice's Office on Violence Against Women.

Bill to stand up for Native children

Washington, DC – Sept. 13, 2016 – U.S. Senators Heidi Heitkamp (D-ND) and Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) today announced that their bipartisan bill to improve the lives of Native American children unanimously passed in the U.S. House of Representatives – bringing their legislation one step closer to reaching the president's desk for his signature. Their bill passed in the U.S. Senate last year.

In July, Heitkamp and Murkowski's bill unanimously passed in the U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources. The vote followed Heitkamp's testimony before the Committee in May about the urgent need to pass their bill to implement solutions that would address the overwhelming obstacles Native children face – including experiencing levels of post-traumatic stress similar to newly returning veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan dramatically increased risks of suicide, and lower high school graduation rates than any racial or ethnic demographic in the country. Heitkamp and Murkowski's bill would work to address these and other challenges to promote better outcomes for Native youth.

Specifically, Heitkamp and Murkowski's bill would create a Commission on Native Children to identify the complex challenges facing Native children in North Dakota, Alaska, and across the United States by conducting an intensive study on these issues – including high rates of poverty, staggering unemployment, child abuse, domestic violence, crime, substance abuse, and dire economic opportunities – and making recommendations on how to make sure Native children get the protections, as well as economic and educational tools they need to thrive.

"Every day, children across Indian Country wake up with the odds stacked against them – but the U.S. Congress spoke with one resounding voice to change that," said Heitkamp. "For generations, young people living on tribal lands have been exposed to some of the most insurmountable barriers to their success – from living in dilapidated homes, to experiencing abuse and severe lack of educational and economic opportunity. Our Native youth have had much to overcome without much help from the federal government. But by unanimously passing our bipartisan bill, the U.S. House of Representatives and U.S. Senate have united to change course – and to help light a better path for our Native young people. It's been my priority since before I came to the Senate to work to urgently improve outcomes for our Native youth – that's why this legislation was the first I introduced as a U.S. Senator. I'll keep fighting to make sure our Native young people are heard, and given the opportunities that every American child deserves."

"I can cite many examples of young Native people who are living healthy lives and doing great things for their people. Yet far too have found themselves in a world of despair," said Murkowski. "There is an urgent need for a broad range of stakeholders to come to the table and formulate plans to give every young Native person a fighting chance at a productive life. This 'high energy' commission, established in memory of the late Dr. Walter Soboleff, a treasured Alaska Native elder and culture bearer and a champion for Native youth moves the needle in a new and badly needed direction."

The Alyce Spotted Bear and Walter Soboleff Commission on Native Children, named for the former Chairwoman of Mandan, Hidatsa & Arikara Nation in North Dakota, and Alaska Native Elder and statesman, respectively, has gained widespread praise by a cross-section of tribal leaders and organizations from North Dakota, Alaska, and around the country. It has been lauded by former Chairman of the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs Byron Dorgan, the National Congress of American Indians, and the National Indian Education Association, among others.

Background:

Conditions for young people in Indian Country are tragic. For example:

· More than one in three American Indian and Alaska Native children live in poverty.

· Suicide rates for Native children ages 15-24 years old are 2.5 times the national average and is the second-leading cause of death in that age group.

· While the overall rate of child mortality in the U.S. has decreased since 2000, the rate for Native children has increased 15 percent.

· At 67 percent, American Indian and Alaska Native students had the lowest four year high school graduation rate of any racial or ethnic group in the 2011-2012 school year.

· 60 percent of American Indian schools do not have adequate high-speed internet or digital technology to meet the requirements of college and career ready standards.

Tribal governments face numerous obstacles in responding to the needs of Native children. Existing programmatic rules and the volume of resources required to access grant opportunities stymie efforts of tribes to tackle these issues. At the same time, federal agencies lack clear guidance about the direction that should be taken to best address the needs of Native children to fulfill our trust responsibility to tribal nations.

To help reverse these impacts, the Commission on Native Children would conduct a comprehensive study on the programs, grants, and supports available for Native children, both at government agencies and on the ground in Native communities, with the goal of developing a sustainable system that delivers wrap-around services to Native children. Then, the 11-member Commission would issue a report to address a series of challenges currently facing Native children. A Native Children Subcommittee would also provide advice to the Commission. The Commission's report would address how to achieve:

· Better Use of Existing Resources – The Commission will identify ways to streamline current federal, state, and local programs to be more effective and give tribes greater flexibility to devise programs for their communities in the spirit of self-determination and allow government agencies to redirect resources to the areas of most need.

· Increased Coordination – The Commission will seek to improve coordination of existing programs benefitting Native children. The federal government houses programs across numerous different agencies, yet these programs too often do not work together.

· Measurable Outcomes – The Commission will recommend measures to determine the wellbeing of Native children, and use these measurements to propose short-term, mid-term, and long-term national policy goals.

· Stronger Data – The Commission will seek to develop better data collection methods. Too often Native children are left out of the conversation because existing data collection, reporting, and analysis practices exclude them.

· Stronger Private Sector Partnerships – The Commission will seek to identify obstacles to public-private partnerships in Native communities.

· Implementation of Best Practices – The Commission will identify and highlight successful models that can be adopted in Native communities.

Editorials –

Sota guest editorial –

Why the Dakota Access pipeline fight may be a turning point in U.S. environmental politics

By Ron Meador

EARTH JOURNAL – MINNPOST – Sept. 16, 2016 – In about two weeks' time, Indian-led opposition to the Dakota Access oil pipeline has grown in stature from a somewhat local, perhaps desperate struggle to what may well prove a watershed event in modern American history, marking significant shifts in environmental politics and  pipeline policy.

Given the Obama administration's newfound willingness to give it more federal review, announced last Friday, it seems at least possible that the 1,172-mile pipeline, said by its owners to be 60 percent complete already, may seriously falter and even fail.

It also appears probable that the unity of tribes across the U.S. in support of the Standing Rock Sioux will persist long beyond their ad hoc collaboration of the moment, regularly described as exceeding in size and power the alliance preceding the Battle of the Greasy Grass 140 years ago. (And we know how that one — aka the Battle of the Little Bighorn — turned out.)

But the fight over the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) is also over issues beyond saving tribal burial grounds from the bulldozer or protecting reservation rights to clean water from the Missouri River. White farmers and other landowners also have opposed the project along its route from the Bakken formation in North Dakota through South Dakota, Iowa and Illinois, though with little success and less coverage so far.

There were 18 arrests on Saturday in Boone County, bringing the Iowa total to nearly 50, which doesn't rival the tally over many weeks at the Standing Rock protests but isn't trivial, either.

In addition to local environmental concerns, or simply wanting the pipeline routed away from their own properties, many in Iowa and elsewhere resent the four states' grants of eminent domain to the project, which enable Energy Transfer Partners to take by legal force any easements for its pipeline that it can't obtain by writing a check.

Eminent domain is typically reserved for the taking of private property for a public purpose, like highways and power lines.  Speaking of power lines, we now come to perhaps the most far-reaching way in which the DAPL battle may change national policy — by focusing attention and ire on the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' decision to authorize the pipeline without environmental review under its Nationwide Permit 12 program, aka NWP 12.

Normally a four-state pipeline built to carry petroleum products across the landscape, like every other project with significant potential impact on the surrounding environment, would require federal review under the National Environmental Policy Act. The requirement is obvious and until recently it was routinely met.

But in the last several years, in a shift most commentators trace to the Obama White House, several large pipeline projects have gotten federal signoff under NWP 12, which is administered by the Corps as part of its authority to protect the nation's surface waters and wetlands.

Fast track for pipeline permits

Designed for power lines, substations and similar public utility projects, this permit assumes minimal impact from, say, a tower or building whose surface disturbance would be less than a half-acre in size. By approving DAPL under NWP 12, the Corps essentially decided to treat it as a series of small wetland crossings instead of a four-state infrastructure project that will transport perhaps a half-million barrels of petroleum products per day, with high risks for spills and a huge contribution to global warming.

(As some may remember, this is the authority under which President Obama announced with pride that his administration would fast-track a TransCanada pipeline that had been part of Keystone XL, before eventually deciding to reject the remainder.  For a good discussion of this history, you could do worse than Steve Horn's Desmog Blog post of last Thursday.)

And though many national environmental groups have opposed DAPL — with special emphasis on the NWP 12 issues — mainstream media attention has been fairly light across the country and perhaps especially so in the Twin Cities. As Bill Richardson, the former congressman, governor, ambassador and energy secretary from New Mexico, wrote on Wednesday in The Hill:

As someone who regularly appears on television to discuss the day's top stories, I've been fielding calls lately to give my thoughts on Secretary Clinton's health, Donald Trump's health, Secretary Clinton's foundation, Donald Trump's foundation, and so on. Yet, I have not received a single call from the media asking about the most important and quintessentially American story that is playing out on the banks of the Missouri River in North Dakota right now.

Clashes at the protest site

Interest has grown dramatically, however, since a flurry of activity that began Sept. 3, when bulldozers flanked by private security guards began digging near the Standing Rock protesters' encampment, at a spot the tribe had just identified in a court filing as containing old burial sites.

Guards and protesters clashed.

Pepper spray and guard dogs were deployed; reports indicate at least several protesters were bitten, at least one of them a child. In remarks that have echoed for many our southern civil rights struggles of the 1960s, local cops have consistently accused the protesters of starting all the trouble by throwing rocks, using flags as weapons and brandishing "pipe bombs" (later corrected to "peace pipes.")

The authorities have not helped their worldwide image by holding one protest organizer, arrested on a misdemeanor trespassing charge, without bail and issuing arrest warrants for a nationally known broadcast journalist (Amy Goodman of "Democracy Now," accused of stepping onto private land) as well as presidential candidate (Jill Stein, who admits spray-painting a bulldozer with the tag, "I approve this message.")

To my mind, however, the best parallel here is not Selma but Pine Ridge and all the other places in the Dakotas where authorities fought the American Indian Movement in a series of skirmishes and sieges so well documented by Peter Matthiessen's "In the Spirit of Crazy Horse." How I wish he were still with us to add his perspective on what's unfolding there today.

And I think the sometimes embarrassing conduct of Morton County Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier and the officers he commands shouldn't shift all the focus away from the behavior of Energy Transfer Partners, which by most accounts has muscled its way through state-level project reviews and is suing protest leaders in a clear attempt at intimidating them into silence.

Meanwhile, the Standing Rock protest has set off like-minded demonstrations in Detroit, St. Louis, Toronto and, of course, at the White House; according to The Nation, more than 100 protests were planned worldwide for Tuesday.

It has also inspired a Michigan tribe to withdraw its approval of a settlement between the Environmental Protection Agency and the Enbridge pipeline company over damage from the big spill at Kalamazoo in 2010. Echoing the Standing Rock Sioux, the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa says its treaty rights to consultation on matters affecting the Straits of Mackinac, which are crossed by an Enbridge line, were ignored in drafting the deal.

Where do we go from here?

Most of the DAPL project can go forward despite the administration's decision to temporarily block construction on Corps-controlled land on or under the Missouri River at Lake Oahe until it resolves "important issues [of consultation] raised by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and other tribal nations and their members regarding the Dakota Access pipeline specifically, and pipeline-related decision-making generally."

The announcement said the Corps will "move expeditiously" to reach this resolution and asked Energy Transfer Partners to voluntarily suspend DAPL work elsewhere until that's done; to nobody's surprise, the company declined.

At the same time, the Corps' NWP 12 is heading for expiration next May unless it is renewed; public comments on renewal were collected during the summer but no decision has been made. Given the level of controversy that has arisen from the DAPL example, it seems fair to wonder if there might not be significant changes, at the least, in store for the permit or the ways it is applied.

Especially given this paragraph from the announcement:

Furthermore, this case has highlighted the need for a serious discussion on whether there should be nationwide reform with respect to considering tribes' views on these types of infrastructure projects. Therefore, this fall, we will invite tribes to formal, government-to-government consultations on two questions: (1) within the existing statutory framework, what should the federal government do to better ensure meaningful tribal input into infrastructure-related reviews and decisions and the protection of tribal lands, resources, and treaty rights; and (2) should new legislation be proposed to Congress to alter that statutory framework and promote those goals.

Brief editorial comments from the editor's desk –

On and Off the Lake Traverse Reservation

There is a profound conflict at the core of how our tribes relate to the federal government.

It is not simply a love-hate relationship.

Not that simple.

Nor as simple as the often-heard lament, "We're as sovereign as they let us be."

Its roots are in the old War Department and a campaign of genocide, and while millions were killed, ultimately the shift went to targeted destruction of the root of cultural identity. Destroying the cultural essence of who the First Nations people are in their DNA, the knowledge of their ancestors.

This is what Marlin Farley talked about here on the Lake Traverse Reservation in his Resiliency conferences.

Today, we have our lawmakers – most of them – conniving with a monstrous corporate lobby to destroy water and land that is sacred to our First Nations peoples, and ought to be sacred to non-Natives as well. Actually, more and more hundreds and thousands and perhaps hundreds of thousands are embracing that sacred call to defend earth's resources.

"No DAPL" is not about relocating a pipeline a few miles from where plans have it going underneath the Missouri River at Lake Oahe. No.

It is much more.

This movement is about calling an end to the hydraulic fracking, the entire obscene raping of earth's resources for greed.

And so here we are.

Defending the health and wellness of the environment and all living things from those who we are supposed to work with cooperatively, nation-to-nation.

These are the same people tribal officials must come to, asking for support for much-needed projects on our reservations.

We only point out the paradox and have no easy answer.

Yet we will say that in protecting the sacredness of all life, there must be no standing down.

In this matter, to compromise would allow the unnecessary destruction to continue.

"Keep in All in the Ground" before it is too late.

And perhaps … it already is too late.

*****

Make sure to read Chairman Flute's Chairman's Corner on page one.

And while we just vented, we say thank you to our South Dakota Congressional delegation for supporting the Tribe's request for funds to aid in responding to the meth epidemic among our youth.

And thank you to the Chairman and others who lobbied in Washington and in Maryland for this important assistance.

*****

Please see the article on Katie McKay, who was honored last week for many years working for her Tribe and its members.

Thank you so very much for your 39 years of dedicated service.

Thanks to Robin Quinn for sharing text of Amanda's talk and photos of the event.

*****

Please read the new Sota policy concerning political advertising.

The rates reflect a greater discount rate for full, half and quarter page advertisements – as much as 70 percent off the commercial rate, depending upon size of the ad.

Full page: $180.

Half page: $100.

Quarter page: $50

Smaller sizes will still be discounted, but will be charged $2.50 per column inch: for example, 2 col. x 10" ad (20 col. inches) would cost $50, the same as a quarter page; another example, 2 col. x 5" ad (10 col. inches) would cost $25.

The policy is a re-statement that all political advertising must be pre-paid. No exceptions.

Advertising copy can be mailed with an accompanying check or money order to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279; or placed in the Sota mailbox at Tribal headquarters (no postage required).

If an advertisement is sent electronically, by e-mail or fax, then a check must be mailed to the Sota, either at headquarters or through the postal service.

There can be no exceptions.

*****

Elder's Meditation:

"Follow the Old One's advice." –Tom Porter, MOHAWK

The Old One is called by many different names – Grandfather, The Four directions, Father Sky, Mother Earth. We should seek the advice of the Old One to help us build our vision. He will put inside of our mind and heart the vision that we are to follow. This vision is recognizable by the feeling that it has with it. This feeling is hard to describe. It feels right, it feels calm, it feels joyful, it feels warm, it feels sacred. The Old One has a way of letting us know it really is His advice. Listen carefully!

Grandfather, I'm listening.

*****

Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. Douglas Adams (1952 - 2001)

The more I study religions the more I am convinced that man never worshipped anything but himself. Sir Richard Francis Burton (1821 - 1890)

Never be afraid to laugh at yourself, after all, you could be missing out on the joke of the century. Dame Edna Everage (1934 - ), In a television interview with Joan Rivers

Be careful about reading health books. You may die of a misprint. Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)

Brain: an apparatus with which we think we think. Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914), The Devil's Dictionary

People demand freedom of speech as a compensation for the freedom of thought which they seldom use. Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

I have a rock garden. Last week three of them died. Richard Diran

*****

The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Earlier receipt of copy is always appreciated. So, if you are aware of a date or message that needs to be publicized or advertised, please let us know about it in advance of the weekly deadline.

The preferred way to submit typed articles and ads, art and photos, is by e-mail.

The editor can be reached at the following e-mail address:

earthskyweb@cs.com

For more information, leave a message on the Sota production office voicemail (605) 938-4452, or send a fax to the 24-hour dedicated line (605) 938-4676.

-- CDF

Obituaries –

Services held for Nicholas Tchida

Funeral service for Nicholas Lee Tchida, 25 of Sisseton, SD was held last Wednesday afternoon, Sept. 14, 2016 at Augustana Lutheran Church, Langford, SD with Lay Leader Diane Hoines officiating and organist Vicky Hoines, with special music by Cody Swanson.

Pallbearers were Josh Cunningham, Aaron Henning, Diego Nelson, Jay Knight, Curt Desjarlait, and Anthony Huntington.

Honorary pallbearers were all of Nicholas' friends, family, nieces, and nephews.

Interment was in the Goodwill Lutheran Cemetery, Sisseton, SD.

Visitation was held Tuesday at Cahill Funeral Chapel, Sisseton.

The Cahill Funeral Chapel was in charge of arrangements.

Nicholas Lee Tchida was born on October 30, 1990 in Graceville, MN to Richard (Rick) and Sharon (Arbach) Tchida.

Nick grew up in Sisseton and attended Sisseton School and Sisseton High School.

Nick enjoyed spending time with his son Noah. He was the love of his life. They spent time playing X-Box, ps4 and play station games. They enjoyed watching movies together and listening to music. They spent hours on the couch watching cartoons together. Noah's favorite cartoon is Sponge Bob.

Nick would take Noah to the park and the swimming pool. Noah got a new bike and Nick taught him how to ride it.

Nick loved to cook variety of foods for him and Noah. They would bake cakes, and Noah was in charge of the frosting.

He enjoyed having cook outs and spending the day at the lake.

He had many friends that he spent his time driving around and visiting in the neighborhood.

Nick stayed with his dad in Langford and helped him with construction. He also helped his brother, John, with contract work.

He was a seasonal worker at Schiltz Foods in Sisseton.

When he was younger he helped Leo Hull cut trees and helped Dan Brown with part-time work.

Nicholas passed away on September 6, 2016 in Sioux Falls, S.D.

Nicholas is survived by his father Richard Tchida of Langford, SD; his mother, Sharon Tchida of Sisseton, SD; one son, Noah Tchida of Sisseton, SD; special friend Lori Owen of Sisseton, SD; seven brothers, John Tchida of Sisseton, SD, Mike and Kristi Tchida of Sisseton, SD, Chad Tchida of Sisseton, SD, Jamie Tchida of Sisseton, SD, Robin and Kermittee Tchida of Huron, SD, Austin Tchida and Cody Tchida of Sisseton, SD; five sisters, Monique Duarte of Lakewood, CA, Kelly Tchida of Veblen, SD, Kari and Jorge Soto of Veblen, SD, Carissa Tchida of Sisseton, SD, and Kayla Tchida and husband, Frank of Veblen, SD; his grandmother, Ardelle Arbach of Sisseton, SD. Twenty three nieces and nephews.

Nicholas was preceded in death by his paternal grandparents, John and Olga Tchida and maternal grandfather, Howard Arbach, and two brothers Nathan and Christopher Tchida.

For Nicholas' obituary and on-line registry please visit www.cahillfuneralchapel.com

Services held for William Peck

Wakangli Olowan Hoksila" (Lightning Song Boy), William Michael Anthony Peck, age 23, unexpectedly went to our Creator's World on Friday, September 9, 2016.

He was born on October 19th, 1992 in Watertown, South Dakota to Effie Blackthunder Peck. William was employed as a certified Nurse's Aide.

He enjoyed fishing, hunting, listening to music, video games, playing cards, football, LaCrosse, going to the casino and spending time with all his nieces and nephews.

Survived by his sisters and their families: Katherine Dawn Melchert of Green Bay, Wisconsin and Elijah & Josaphene Thundercloud, Tina Marie Peck of Sisseton, South Dakota and Trenton, Robert, Maliyah & Deray Richotte and Jennifer Sue Peck of Bismarck, North Dakota and Arianna & Rosemond Hart and Emanuel Hayes; fiancé: Danielle Rose Ortley of Brown Valley, Minnesota; other relatives and friends.

Preceded in death by his Ina Tuwin Kunshi Hunkasi and Unkanna Deski.

Wake services were held last Thursday through Sunday at the Community Center at Agency Village, SD.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon, Sept. 18, 2016 at the traditional repatriation burial grounds.

Funeral services for William Michael Anthony Peck will be held on Sunday, September 18th at 2:00 P.M. at The Community Center in Old Agency Village, South Dakota.

Everett Blackthunder officiated. The drum group was Red Storm.

Honorary Casket Bearers were Michael Dorsch, Desirae Ortley, Michael "Sonny" Dorsch Jr, Jer-Bear Dorsch, Cyprian Dorsch, E-Bay Quinn, Georgie Dumarce, Stevie Marie Dorsch, Zach White, Adam Renville, Ronnie Keeble, TyRay Keeble, Corey Bucklin Jr., Silas Ortley, Twyla, Jeremy, Jarrod Mousseau, Scottland LaFromboise, Buffalo Lake Sundancers, and all his friends and relatives.

Casket Bearers were Arlington Arcoren, Zach Ortley, Everett Blackthunder Jr., Kip Cartier, Adam Melchert, Daniel Melchert and Julius Dorsch.

The Chilson Funeral Home in Winsted, Minnesota served the family. Online condolences may be made to www.chilsonfuneralhome.com

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor's note: The following comes from the editor's column and the Sota "deadlines and policies" statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and must be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Open letter to the Oyate

Part One.

On Wednesday, September 7, 2016, while hundreds of tribes gathered in solidarity at Standing Rock to protest the pipeline back on the Lake Traverse Reservation the SWO tribal clowncil voted to disenroll another member from the tribe for the "crime" of dual enrolling.

Chairman Dave Flute was not in attendance, Vice-Chairman Garryl Rousseau chaired the meeting. Veblen clowncilman Marc "Warming House" Beaudreau made the motion to disenroll Robin Renville. Secretary Crystal Owen seconded the motion. Big Coulee, Jerry Eastman, Lake Traverse Francis Crawford, Enemy Swim Kevin Roberts, Veblin, Marc Beaudreau and Crystal Owen voted to disenroll Robin.

Long Hollow Virginia Max, Old Agency Eddie Johnson, and Buffalo Lake Dicky Johnson did not vote for the disenrollment. Apparently the clowncil was attempting to disenroll Robin by a mere council motion, however, Dicky Johnson reminded them that Robin is entitled to Due Process.

There is a "Hearing Guideline" to address the issue of a member being dual enrolled. The accused is given a opportunity to choose which tribe they want to be a member of. In other words, you are given an ultimatum to choose which relatives you want to claim.

Having to choose one relative over other relatives or relations is in direct contradiction to the Dakota concept of Mitakuye Owasin, which means "all my relations/relatives.

The motion to disenroll Robin came 68 months after tribal attorney Shaun Eastman told Robin at my disenrollment hearing in December 2010, that: "Your Next!"

Why 68 months later? I honestly don't know. It could have came from tribal enrollment officer Zelma Flute. She claims she sent Robin five letters. Robin denies he received any letters. Why is Robin being the only one considered for disenrollment? I do not know the answer to that question. Surely, Zelma must know that hundreds of other members are dual enrolled. A couple years ago I wrote to the SWO tribe asking them to do an enrollment audit. It is a fairly well know fact that hundreds of other tribal members are dual enrolled. My request was ignored.

I can only speculate that the motion maker Marc Beaudreau is canze (mad) at me for making fun of the "Warming House" on Facebook. As you know Marc used his position as a clowncilman to sell a run down, condemned building to the tribe for $30,0000 dollars. Using your position to sell a piece of cesdi (s***) property to the tribe is in violation of SWO Code of Ethics. Sadly, the other nine clowncil haven't had the guts or sense to charge/prosecute him. However, other tribal members have reported this to the FBI. He could be in violation of 18 U.S. Code § 1163 - Embezzlement and Theft from Indian Tribal Organizations.

If the Tribal Clowncil and its stooges only go after Robin and me, then they are in violation of the SWO Code of Ethics. Malfeasance in Office, Gross Partiality.

Big words for picking and choosing who to punish.

The disenrollment letter I received in December 2010, stated that it "was the duty of the tribal council to uphold the SWO Constitution." That being the case, this SWO clowncil will need to do an immediate dual enrollment audit and start the disenrollment process of the hundreds of other members dual enroll. If you disenroll one dual enrollee you must disenroll ALL dual enrollees.

Another option is to simply repeal the dumb wisicu concept of having a dual enrollment policy (Article II, Membership, Section 2) in the SWO Constitution, either repeal the law or shut up about "We are all Relatives."

I will continue this discussion next week. As I use to say, "It Ain't Being An Indian." Mitakuye Owasin and I really mean it.

Grady Renville, gradymazaska@yahoo.com.

Open letter to the Oyate

Deplorable means bad people.

Hillary says Trump followers half of them are deplorable well I say 3/4 of them are deplorable, the other quarter hide their feelings when they're home with their children.

They call blacks "niggers" call Indians dirty lazy drunks call Mexicans drug dealing killers.

When people, Oyate people, voice their opinion about these KKK white devils, let's put it in your newspaper or are you scared you'll hurt these white peoples' feelings. They don't give a damn about Oyate people. Put the truth of what people think in your paper. Don't kiss white butt.

The white devils hate us. We all know this. Don't act dumb!

My opinion.

Larry Nerison, Oyate, Sisseton, SD.

Sioux Falls VA offers Flu shots for enrolled Veterans

The Sioux Falls VA Health Care System has scheduled the annual walk-in seasonal flu shot clinics at the medical center at 2501 W. 22nd Street on the following days. All clinics will take place on the ground floor, Rm. A-53, X-ray Dept.

Sept. 29, 8:00 AM-4:00 PM

Oct. 5, 7:00 AM-4:00 PM

Oct. 13, 8:00 AM-4:00 PM

Oct. 20, 8:00 AM-4:00 PM

Oct. 25, 3:00-6:00 PM

Nov. 4, 8:00 AM-4:00 PM

Nov. 14, 8:00 AM-4:00 PM

Dec. 1, 8:00 AM-4:00 PM

Dec. 14, 8:00 AM-12N

There is no charge to VA-enrolled Veterans for this immunization. Veterans may also request a flu shot during their regularly scheduled VA appointments.

For eligibility questions, please call 1-800-3316-8387, Ext. 9-4196 or 605-373-4196.

Sioux San Hospital closes ER; changes urgent care services

As part of the Indian Health Service's broader consultation process with tribal leaders in the Great Plains Area on plans for new construction and services at the existing Sioux San Hospital in Rapid City, South Dakota, to serve patients in the safest and most efficient manner, IHS has notified area tribes that Sioux San Hospital will begin focusing its services on outpatient and urgent care starting September 20. IHS will continue to consult with tribes on what services would be of most use to the Sioux San patient population.

Sioux San Hospital will continue to treat patients in need of urgent care services 24 hours a day, seven days a week, in addition to providing outpatient care services. Due to a number of factors, including the age of the Sioux San facility, we have concluded that the emergency department has certain limitations and many emergency cases must currently be transferred to another emergency department in Rapid City. To help focus services on the majority of patients seen at the hospital and ensure that all individuals receive the best possible care as quickly as possible, IHS is announcing that it has notified area tribes of the planned temporary closure of the Sioux San Hospital Emergency Department effective as of September 20 at 8:00 AM MT.

The change in emergency department service means that all IHS patients needing emergency services will be transferred to appropriate facilities to provide the emergency services they need. Patients requiring emergency department care will be transferred to nearby facilities for care. The nearest emergency department is located four miles from Sioux San, in Rapid City, South Dakota. Urgent care services serve the immediate needs of the vast majority of patients who come to the Sioux San emergency department, and these services will continue to be available at Sioux San 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Beginning September 20, patients experiencing a medical emergency such as a heart attack, severe wound or amputation, or car accident should call 911 or go to the nearest 24-hour emergency department, also located in Rapid City, South Dakota. Patients will continue to receive care at Sioux San Hospital for urgent care needs such as non-complicated splinting of broken bones; wound care; nausea, vomiting and diarrhea; and non-life-threatening allergic reactions.

"This action is one in a series of steps to focus on improving the patient care provided at Sioux San Hospital to better meet the needs of the patients we see and to enhance their quality of care.

This is consistent with IHS' commitment to provide timely, safe, reliable, effective quality care to this large patient population, commensurate with their medical needs, and to improve the patient experience at all IHS facilities," said Capt. Chris Buchanan, IHS Great Plains Area Acting Director. "Sioux San Hospital has a strong commitment to urgent care and will continue to provide urgent care services and all other current non-emergency care hospital services to patients in the Rapid City region. By shifting the focus of our clinicians to the services the vast majority of our patients require, we will be able to serve those patient populations more efficiently and effectively."

Many patients who were previously seen in the Sioux San Hospital Emergency Department for urgent care needs will still be able to use the urgent care services available at Sioux San. The IHS will be reaching out to patients regarding the planned temporary closure of emergency services, and providing educational materials and outreach to ensure that the community is aware that Sioux San will remain open for services and urgent care services will be provided 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

The Great Plains Indian Health Service Area is continuing to work on strengthening the availability of quality health services in greatest need by American Indians in the Rapid City area. This change in hospital services will allow Sioux San to focus on providing timely and quality urgent care and other services that the majority of the patient population depends on. With funding from Congress approved in fiscal year 2016, planning for new construction at the Sioux San facility, in consultation with tribal leadership, is underway with the aim of awarding a design contract in the first half of 2017.

IHS has initiated tribal consultation with tribal leaders on the transition of services at Sioux San Hospital, and will continue to engage and collaborate with tribal organizations, state and local government agencies, historic preservation groups and local health facilities on plans for a proposed new facility. The Sioux San Hospital is located at 3200 Canyon Lake Drive, Rapid City, South Dakota 57702.

The IHS Great Plains Area serves 130,000 patients in Iowa, Nebraska, South Dakota and North Dakota by operating 15 federal government facilities and funding the operations of 18 tribally operated health facilities.

The IHS, an agency in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, provides a comprehensive health service delivery system for approximately 2.2 million American Indians and Alaska Natives.

Stand up to, or run from bullies

By Richard P. Holm, MD

We have all had to deal with bullies throughout our lives, and I have had my share. One fall day, coming home from school, I saw two guys from my third-grade class beating up on a smaller kid and was moved to step in to help. Well, the victim ran home, and I became the new target. The beating I took that day was minimal, however, the sense that I did the right thing that day by standing up against bullies has propped up my self-worth my whole lifetime.

Bullies and abuse are everywhere. While in medical school, I was in an Atlanta Emergency Room when a woman came in with a broken nose and other broken bones and bruises that were explained away as the result of a fall, when we knew full well they were inflicted by her spouse. Since coming to this prairie town 35 years ago, I have seen several cases of parents who physically and emotionally abused their children, and of adult children who physically and emotionally abused their parents. I remember numerous cases where women came into my office, explained their husbands were physically beating them, and despite my recommendation to escape and seek shelter, they stayed married to the scoundrels.

The American Psychiatric Association defines domestic violence and abuse as control by one person over another in any relationship. Control is the operative word. The means of this control can result from physical, sexual, emotional and economic abuse, including threats of isolation.

The number of American troops killed in Afghanistan and Iraq from 2001 through 2012 was greater than 6,000, and the number of American women murdered by male partners during that time was about 12,000. The Center for Disease Control estimates that in the U.S., one out of every four women and one out of every seven men will have experienced severe physical violence from a bully in their lifetimes.

The National Coalition for the Homeless estimates ten million children are exposed to domestic violence every year, and that people exposed to such hostility as children are three to four times more likely to become abusive or be abused than people raised in families without it.

Sometimes it's right to stand up to a bully, and when there is danger, it's right to escape and get help. And it's always right to save your children from a lifetime of abuse by not allowing it in your family.

See well for a lifetime: Care for your eyes

Aging is a process that brings about many opportunities and changes, from major transformations such as becoming a grandparent or going back to school, to simple lifestyle changes like starting a new exercise program. Don't miss out on any of these opportunities. Take stock of your eye health to make sure your eyes are healthy and you are seeing your best.

While vision loss and blindness are not a normal part of aging, some vision changes such as losing focus, having trouble distinguishing between colors such as blue and black, and needing more light to see well are common. These changes can often be corrected with contact lenses or glasses and improved lighting.

People are also at higher risk for vision loss from certain eye diseases and conditions as they age, including the following:

· Age-related macular degeneration, which gradually destroys the macula (the part of the eye that provides sharp, central vision)

· Cataract, a clouding of the lens in the eye

· Diabetic retinopathy, a complication of diabetes that damages blood vessels in the retina (the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye)

· Glaucoma, a group of diseases that can cause fluid and pressure to build up in the eye and damage the optic nerve

· Low vision, a visual impairment that cannot be corrected by regular glasses, contact lenses, medication, or surgery that interferes with the ability to perform everyday activities

· Dry eye, a condition that occurs when the eye does not produce tears properly or when tears evaporate too quickly

There are many things you can do to reduce your risk of vision loss from eye disease and make sure your eyes are healthy. Follow these simple steps to continue to look forward to the future.

HAVE A COMPREHENSIVE DILATED EYE EXAM. You might think your vision is fine or that your eyes are healthy, but getting a comprehensive dilated eye exam is the only way to really be sure. During this exam, your eye care professional places drops in your eyes to dilate, or widen, the pupil to allow more light to enter the eye the same way an open door lets more light into a dark room. This enables your eye care professional to get a good look at the back of your eyes and examine them for any signs of damage or disease. Your eye care professional can also let you know if your vision can benefit from glasses or contact lenses.

KNOW YOUR RISK FACTORS. As you get older, you are at higher risk of developing age-related eye diseases and conditions such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), cataract, diabetic eye disease, dry eye, and glaucoma. Having a family history of eye disease also puts you at higher risk. And being overweight or obese increases your risk of developing diabetes and other systemic conditions that can lead to vision loss. If you are having trouble maintaining a healthy weight, talk to your doctor.

EAT RIGHT TO PROTECT YOUR SIGHT. You've heard carrots are good for your eyes, but eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables—particularly dark leafy greens such as spinach, kale, or collard greens—is important for keeping your eyes healthy, too. Research has also shown that there are eye health benefits from eating fish high in omega-3 fatty acids, such as salmon, tuna, and halibut. A healthy diet can also help you maintain a healthy weight, which can help protect your vision.

WEAR YOUR SHADES AND A BRIMMED HAT. Sunglasses and a brimmed hat are great fashion accessories, but their most important job is to protect your eyes from the sun's harmful rays. When purchasing sunglasses, look for ones that block out 99 to 100 percent of both UV-A and UV-B radiation. Prolonged sun exposure is associated with developing cataract and AMD.

DON'T SMOKE. Smoking is as bad for your eyes as it is for the rest of your body. Research has linked smoking to an increased risk of developing AMD, cataract, and optic nerve damage, all of which can lead to vision loss and blindness.

USE PROTECTIVE EYEWEAR. Wear protective eyewear such as goggles, safety glasses, face shields, and eye guards when playing sports or doing activities around the home and encourage your family and friends to do the same. Most protective eyewear lenses are made of polycarbonate, which is 10 times stronger than other plastics. Many eye care providers sell protective eyewear, as do some sporting goods stores.

*****

The National Eye Institute, one of the National Institutes of Health and the federal government's principal agency for vision research, offers additional eye health information and tips for people to protect their vision as they age. Visit http://www.nei.nih.gov/agingeye.

Ripple Effect –

Hello Autumn!

The fall season is here. With fall comes the spectacular colors of leaves at every turn. What happens to these picture perfect leaves when they turn brown and fall to the ground and blanket our yards, streets and parks? Well, that is up to you.

It is difficult to quantify the amount of leaves that go into US landfills each year as this amount can vary significantly depending the on the season. The EPA says that 10 percent of municipal waste volume nation-wide is from lawns, parks and other growing spaces. Eight million tons of leaves went into landfills in 2005. Thankfully, today this is less as many states now ban leaves and other yard materials from landfills and burning facilities.

Planet Natural.com offers some simple, fun facts to consider when disposing of or utilizing leaves in your yard:

1. Leaves are at their nutrient best shortly after they have fallen from the tree. Once they have fallen their nutrient value quickly begins to disappear.

2. Leaves that are left on lawns or in piles over the winter lose much of their nutrient value to leaching.

3. Leaves that are composted but not shredded and mixed with a green source of nitrogen may sit for years before decomposing. But there are benefits to this as well. If leaves are not mixed with a nitrogen source they will become leaf mold instead of compost. Leaf mold is a valuable soil addition in terms of drainage and water-holding capacity.

4. However, if you add a green source of nitrogen to your leaves, you will receive one of the many gifts that a tree has to offer which is a valuable mineral-rich compost.

Despite the technical sounding nature of "green sources of nitrogen", these sources are quite easily found in your home and yard and do not require an extra trip to the store. Here are some great nitrogen sources you can add to your leaves to create compost: Kitchen scraps - Coffee grounds and used filters, Condiments and sauces, Corncobs, Cut flowers, Eggshells, Fruit rinds and cores, Stale or moldy bread and grain products, Tea and tea bags, Vegetables (raw or cooked)

Grass Clippings

Weeds – Foliage Only

Manure

So get outside in your car, on your bike or take a nice walk and take in the beauty and wonder of this time of the year. Once you have done that, take action. Raking is a great source of exercise and composting is a great exercise in making smart decisions on disposing and recycling yard waste. Keep in mind that leaf season will last several weeks so you have plenty of time to enjoy the colors and the work that comes along with fall.

For more information on enjoying the fall foliage and learning more on leaf disposal and recycling, please visit the following websites:

Minnesota DNR Fall Color Finder: http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/fall_colors/index.html University of Minnesota Extension – Options for disposing of leaves: www.extension-umn.edu Planet Natural: www.planetnatural.com The RRBC is a grassroots organization that is a chartered not-for-profit corporation under the provisions of Manitoba, North Dakota, Minnesota, and South Dakota law. Our offices in Fargo, ND and Winnipeg, MB can be reached at 701-356-3183 and 204-982-7254, or you can check out our website at www.redriverbasincommission.org.

*****

The RRBC is a grassroots organization that is a chartered not-for-profit corporation under the provisions of Manitoba, North Dakota, Minnesota, and South Dakota law. Our offices in Fargo, ND and Winnipeg, MB can be reached at 701-356-3183 and 204-982-7254, or you can check out our website at www.redriverbasincommission.org.

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

Sisseton School Board drops mock Indian costumes, ceremony

At the eleventh hour before the 2016 Sisseton High School homecoming, the board voted last Monday night, September 12th, to scrap use of fake costumes and feathers. But the customary Indian ceremony died hard.

Students who had been planning this year's event came to the meeting to protest an end to their traditional homecoming.

And clearly, according to Oyate who attended, some Board members found making the change very difficult.

Here are insightful comments about the decision by Darren Renville:

The Sisseton School Board voted tonight to replace its Native American themed homecoming with a more conventional and respectful semi-formal theme.

This change has been at least two decades in the making, with many people, both non-Native and Native alike, contributing to the cause, some of the most recent being the members and supporters of the Damakota Youth Group.

Many Natives and non-Natives alike won't be happy about the change, but it was inevitable, as will be the retirement of the name Redmen itself.

Some years ago, in the late 90's, I was invited to speak about Native American sports mascots at the University of South Dakota in Vermillion.

As I presented my case against their use, I could tell at least one person in attendance was growing increasingly upset. It was obvious by his body language.

And then I made a mistake.

Though I was careful to avoid loaded words like "racist," I did end my presentation by quoting Corinthians: "When I was a child, I spake as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child: but when I became a man, I put away childish things."

At the time, I thought this was the perfect way to end my presentation, but really, I think I was just trying to be clever, whether I was aware of it or not.

And I'm certain now this compromised my message, particularly with respect to this individual.

His hand shot up during the Q&A session, and he said, "Are you saying we're racist?"

As it turned out, he was from Sisseton. I quickly restated what I had taken 45 minutes to say, but I'm sure I had lost him.

Even though he hadn't verbalized anything, I still had failed to listen to him.

I strongly believe that we affect authentic change through our ability not only to effectively verbalize the issues we take up, but through our ability to effectively listen to others on the other side.

It has to be both.

We have to be able to know where others are coming from, not necessarily to fall into sympathy with their views, but to better understand and articulate our own views.

I hope it is through an authentic dialogue that changes continue to come to Sisseton High School.

Adult Learning Center available

By Renee Kwasniewski

The Enemy Swim Day School Adult Learning Center is ready and waiting for you to come on in and get started on completing those educational goals.

GED, Career Planning, Basic Computer Skills all are available here … plus lunch at no charge for ALC students.

Set your educational goal for the time you have available.

We will make it work!

Our friendly, cheerful atmosphere is a welcoming place to work.

The coffee pot is always on and there is always a snack on the counter.

I'm Renee Kwasniewski the Adult Learning Center Teacher. My number is 605-947-4605 ext. 3080 or email at rkwasniewski@esds.us.

Call me. Let's get started today.

Outdoor corner

By Dean E. Shultz Jr.

Roberts County Conservation Officer

Well, hello again! I would like to take this time to remind everyone about a couple of things that are happening in the field of wildlife and fisheries.

It seems like a new season is starting just about every weekend, so make sure to pick up the 2016 Hunting and Trapping Handbook to stay on top of opening dates. Be sure to grab the 2016 Hunting Atlas at the same time.

The duck season opener is September 24 and runs through December 6. The daily limit may be comprised of no more than: five mallards, which may include no more than two hens, three wood ducks, three scaup, two redheads, two pintails, two canvasbacks, and for the first 16 days (only) of the season you can have two bonus blue-winged teal. Mergansers daily limit is five, which may include no more than two hooded mergansers. The coot daily limit is fifteen. The possession limit is three times the daily limit; taken in accordance to the daily limit. Shooting hours are one-half hour before sunrise to sunset. Non-toxic shot is required for shooting waterfowl. Approved non-toxic shot includes steel shot, bismuth-tin, tungsten-polymer, tungsten-matrix, and any tungsten-iron-nickel-tin-copper-bismuth. Coated lead does NOT qualify as non-toxic shot.

The Canada goose season opened on September 3rd in unit 1. Shooting hours are one-half hour before sunrise to sunset. The daily limit from September 3rd through September 30th is 15 Canada geese. Starting October 1st through the December 18th, the daily limit drops to 8 Canada geese. Possession limit is three times the daily limit. The white-fronted goose season runs September 24th through December 18th, statewide. The daily limit is 2 and the possession limit is three times the daily. The light goose season, which includes snow geese, blue gees, Ross' geese, runs September 24th through December 6th, statewide. The daily limit is 50 with an unlimited possession limit.

After the hunt is completed, additional rules need to be followed. No person shall put or leave any migratory game birds at any place (other than his/her personal abode), or in the custody of another person for purposes of picking, cleaning, processing, shipping, transportation or storage (including temporary storage), or for the purpose of having taxidermy services performed, unless such birds have a tag attached, signed by the hunter, stating his address, the total number and species of birds, and the date such birds were killed. Migratory birds being transported in any vehicle as the personal baggage of the possessor shall not be considered as being in storage or temporary storage.

No game bird, including a wild turkey, may be possessed, placed in public storage, transported, or accepted for shipment unless the following minimum requirements are met for each listed species: (1) Waterfowl shall include an attached fully feathered wing or an attached head; and conform to federal requirements; (2) Pheasants and grouse, unless processed at a wildlife processing facility and accompanied by the receipt, or at the domicile of the possessor, shall include at least one of the following attached: the head, a fully feathered wing, or a foot. The term, grouse, includes sharp-tailed grouse, ruffed grouse, and prairie chicken; (3) Wild turkeys, unless processed at a wildlife processing facility and accompanied by the receipt, or at the domicile of the possessor, shall include the attached leg and foot bearing the tag issued with the license. Any wild turkey without spurs lawfully taken under a male turkey license shall also have the visible beard attached. The leg and foot, and beard if required, shall remain naturally attached to the carcass at all times while being transported from the place where taken until the carcass has arrived at the permanent residence of the possessor; (4) All other game birds, unless processed at a wildlife processing facility and accompanied by the receipt, or at the domicile of the possessor, shall include the attached head or an attached fully feathered wing. If the head or wing is used for identification, it shall have sufficient plumage attached to allow for prompt identification of the game bird. Game birds, if frozen, shall be packaged no more than two per package in order to facilitate identification and count of species. Persons with a valid license may carry or transport only THEIR OWN lawfully possessed game birds as personal baggage. Game birds may not be transported by unlicensed individuals, unless accompanied by a valid transportation permit issued by South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks. If transported without this documentation, the game will be added to the carrier's possession limit and penalties will be applied if this puts the carrier over the legal limit. However, at the conclusion of hunting, a licensed hunter may transport game birds, except wild turkey, legally taken by another person to a South Dakota wildlife processing facility provided the birds are tagged with the name of the hunter, the hunter's address, the total number and species of birds taken, the date such birds were killed and the signature of the hunter.

If you have any questions about the information in this article or any other topic please feel free to give me a call at 605-881-3773.

Good luck, on your next outdoor adventure, and remember to take a kid outdoors.

Classroom to Career

By Rep. Kristi Noem

September 16, 2016

Every few months, I have the opportunity to welcome a new business to the state. Almost every time, I hear versions of the following: "We started in (or expanded to) this area, because South Dakotans have the skills needed to do the job right – and the work ethic to do it right now." This is not by accident. In addition to smart economic policies that create opportunities for employers to grow, South Dakota has a strong tradition of starting careers in the classroom.

Much of this job-ready teaching is done through Career and Technical Education (or CTE) programs in high school. Shop and home-ec were the CTE classes of my generation (and maybe yours), but today, South Dakota's young people have access to courses that offer job-ready training in everything from IT and healthcare to skilled trades, like plumbing and welding. Organizations like FFA, DECA, FCCLA, and FBLA also offer CTE opportunities, giving young people hands-on experiences in leadership, problem solving, and communication – translatable skills that students can take with them regardless of where the job market may lead.

In addition to offering opportunities for young people to pursue good-paying jobs in industries that are critical to our economy, a strong CTE program equips employers with a skilled workforce, ready to fill the jobs that are available.

Earlier this month, I helped the House pass the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act, which improves the federal programs that support many CTE opportunities in South Dakota and across the country.

It's been more than a decade since Congress weighed in on how federal investments into these programs are made. As a result, they no longer reflect the realities and challenges facing today's students and workers.

Among other things, our legislation offers states and localities more flexibility, so the programs implemented can better target the community's needs. Additionally, it encourages stronger engagement with local employers and meaningful credentialing so students are prepared to enter the workforce prepared for success.

Additionally, the legislation helps link high school curriculum to postsecondary education, investing equally in both areas. That's especially beneficial to South Dakota, which has some of the nation's top community colleges. In fact, Lake Area Technical Institute (LATI) near Watertown was just recognized as one of ten finalists for the 2017 Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence – a distinction that could come with a $1 million prize if LATI comes out on top. The final winner will be announced in March of next year, but regardless of the outcome, a spot in the finals is an incredible distinction.

I'm always proud to represent people with the work ethic of South Dakotans. Investing in CTE programs means we're investing into that work ethic and equipping young people in the classroom with the skills needed to be successful in the career of their choosing.

Daly SWO scholarship offered

The Leo A Daly Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Architecture/Engineering Scholarship is offered. Here are the criteria:

*Applicants must provide Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Enrollment Verification.

*Must be Third or Fourth year undergraduate students with a declared major in Architecture or Engineering.

*Must have a cumulative GPA of 2.5

Application Deadline for the fall term: September 23.

For more information and application request please contact Janell Williams, SWO Higher Education Program at (605)-742-0150 ext. 8211 or via email janellb@swo-nsn.gov

Brian Meyer Scholarships available for 2017 spring semester

(PIERRE) The South Dakota Telecommunications Association (SDTA) is now accepting applications for the Brian Meyer Memorial Scholarship. Two scholarships in the amounts of $1,250 and $500 will be awarded for the 2017 spring semester.

The scholarship is available to applicants who have completed at least two semesters of course work at an accredited post-secondary school in South Dakota and reside in an SDTA member company service area. The scholarship can be used at any post-secondary educational institution in South Dakota including public and private universities as well as technical schools.

Applicants must complete an application, write a short outline of their career plans following completion of their post-secondary education, and submit a brief essay on the future of small town South Dakota and what can be done to enhance the quality of life in rural areas through the use of technology. Also needed are a copy of the applicant's most recent transcript and at least two letters of recommendation. The deadline to submit an application for the Brian Meyer Memorial Scholarship is October 31.

For more information on the Brian Meyer Memorial Scholarship, contact any post-secondary institution financial aid office, the South Dakota Telecommunications Association at 605-224-7629 or admin@sdtaonline.com. The application is also available online at www.sdtaonline.com/resources/scholarships.

SDTA membership is composed of the state's member-owned cooperatives, privately-owned, municipal and tribal telecommunications companies which collectively serve almost 75% of the state. Members of the South Dakota Telecommunications Association are: Alliance Communications (Garretson); Beresford Municipal Telephone (Beresford); Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe Telephone Authority (Eagle Butte); Faith Municipal Telephone; Fort Randall Telephone (Wagner); Golden West Telecommunications Companies (Wall); Interstate Telecommunications (Clear Lake); James Valley Telecommunications (Groton); Kennebec Telephone Company (Kennebec); Long Lines (Jefferson); Midstate Communications (Kimball); RC Telecommunications (New Effington); Santel Communications (Woonsocket); Swiftel Communications (Brookings); TrioTel Communications (Salem); Valley Telecommunications (Herreid); Venture Communications (Highmore); West River Cooperative Telephone (Bison); and West River Telecommunications Cooperative (Hazen, ND).

Champions honored at "Tribes' Pow Wow"

Bismarck, ND – The 47th Annual United Tribes Technical College International Powwow was held September 9 to 11 at UTTC's powwow dance arena on the campus in Bismarck.

CONTEST ACTION

In contest competition, the drum group Young Bear from the M/H/A Nation won the singing contest, followed in order by: Showtime, MNX, High Noon and Battle Horse. Twenty-three drums rendered their best songs during five grand entries, intertribals, contest competitions, specials and honorings. Six-hundred, eighteen dancers and singers participated in 27 different contest categories.

POWWOW HIGHLIGHTS

On closing-day the powwow crowd observed the 15th anniversary of 9-11. During the Grand Entry Flag Song veterans raised a new Stars and Stripes on the UTTC flagpole, lowering it to half-staff for the duration of the event. Military Veterans were also honored with a participatory special dance in the arbor.

A rain shower on day-one gave way to sunny days with temps reaching into the 70s and 80s. Overnight lows dipping into the mid-40s made for good camping and dancing weather. Lone Star Arena offered well-cushioned grass, courtesy of UTTC's groundskeepers.

Tribal radio station KMHA, New Town, ND, carried the action live to the M/H/A Nation and across western North Dakota. Townsquare Media announcer Dolly Dakota (Standing Rock) reported live during Youth Day, welcoming local spectators.

Receiving permission from the powwow committee to record portions of the event were video producers from Washington, DC; Los Angeles, CA; Baltimore, MD; Harpers Ferry, WV; Berlin, Germany; and Vienna, Austria; along with in-state and local media groups. Canadian producers from the online "Powwow Times" made recordings of the dance contests for YouTube.

On powwow's closing day 35 volunteers, including staffers and local friends of the college, served a free roast buffalo meal presented by the college cafeteria staff and A 'viands Foods for over 2,000 visitors, singers and dancers. The buffalo was donated by the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate, one of the college's governing tribes. The M/H/A Nation hosted a feed for about 1,000 on the Saturday of powwow, demonstrating the tribe's generosity and respect for tradition. Fifty-two craft vendors ringed the powwow dance arbor and 14 food vendors populated the powwow food court.

A blanket-dance raised over $1,000 in cash for the ongoing gathering of water and culture protectors encamped along the Cannonball River in southern Morton County, ND. Representatives of the camp addressed the powwow assembly, providing a status report on their challenge against a planned oil pipeline crossing of the Missouri River immediately north of the Standing Rock Dakota/Lakota Nation.

HEAD STAFF

The dynamic duo, announcers Lawrence Baker and Vince Beyl, brought energy and humor to the event. Other powwow head staff were: Arena Director Rusty Gillette; Head Singing Judge Frankie Graves; Head Women's Dance Judge Cassie Lasley; and Head Men's Dance Judge Wylee Bearstail. Powwow sound provided by Frank K. Jamerson, REZ JAM Sound, McLaughlin, SD.

All first place dance category and singing contest winners received cash and a jacket adorned with the 2016 powwow logo, the artwork of Wallace "Butch" Thunderhawk Jr., United Tribes Professor Emeritus in the Arts. Second through fourth place winners received cash.

The United Tribes International Powwow Committee thanks all participants, spectators, donors, college staff and volunteers for making the 47th annual event a success.

UTTC is a tribal college that provides academic, career and technical education and training to Native and non-Native students from across the nation. During the 2016-17 academic year, tuition is waived for students who are enrolled members of federally-recognized tribes. The college is governed by the tribal nations in North Dakota: Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate, Spirit Lake Tribe, Standing Rock Tribe, Three Affiliated Tribes of the Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara Nation and Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa.

Legals

SWO Health Plan grants writer

Request for proposals

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Health Programs seek contract grant writing services to support implementation of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Health Plan 2016-2020. This project will begin October 1, 2016 and be renewed at the end of each calendar year, beginning in 2017 and ending December 31, 2020.

Potential applicants interested in performing the services described below should submit proposals to the attention of "SWO Health Plan 2016-2020 Grant Writer," Francine Tease, Procurement/Contracting Officer, Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation, P.O. Box 509, Agency Village, South Dakota 57262. To be considered the proposal must be received no later than September 30, 2016 at 4:00 p.m.

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation is a sovereign and federally recognized Indian Tribe. All proposals must include recognition that contractual agreements and work shall be governed by and construed in accordance with the laws and courts of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate. Irrespective of any language to the contrary in the RFP, subsequent agreements or elsewhere, no right to arbitration of any controversy or claim arising out of or related to the Agreement will be authorized. A Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Business License will be required before execution of the contract.

For more information contact Sara DeCoteau, Health Coordinator, sara.decoteau@ihs.gov or by phone 605/742-3697 or Fran Tease, Procurement / Contracting Officer, FranT@swo-nsn.gov or by phone 605/698-8408.

37-2tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 07-156

SWOCSE/Dianna Keeble, PLAINTIFF

VS.

STEVEN SHARPFISH, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Amend Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 21st day of September, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of August, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 09-089

SWOCSE/Shirley Bird, PLAINTIFF

VS.

STEVEN SHARPFISH, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Amend Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 21st day of September, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of August, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 13-076

SWOCSE/Irene Renville, PLAINTIFF

VS.

STEVEN SHARPFISH, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Amend Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 21st day of September, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of August, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 16-002

SWOCSE/Danise Hanson, PLAINTIFF

VS.

VANCE THOMPSON, Sr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Amend Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 21st day of September, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of August, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 14-120

SWOCSE/Nicole Renville, PLAINTIFF

VS.

VANCE THOMPSON, Sr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Paternity and Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 21st day of September, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of August, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 08-290

SWOCSE/Kim Young, PLAINTIFF

VS.

KEVIN LAFONTAINE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Amend Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 21st day of September, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of August, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 03-258

SWOCSE/Elizabeth Owen, PLAINTIFF

VS.

GABRIELLE BLUE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Amend Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 21st day of September, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of August, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 00-102

SWOCSE/Kimberly Kohl, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DENNIS OWEN, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Amend Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 21st day of September, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of August, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 09-031

SWOCSE/Ursula Eagle, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JESSICA LABELLE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Review Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 21st day of September, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of August, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 10-031

SWOCSE/ Ione Eagle, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JESSICA LABELLE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 21st day of September, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of August, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 16-143

SWOCSE/Kacie Neilan, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LEONEL PINEADA, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of September, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of August, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 16-129

SWOCSE/Cheryl Long Feather, PLAINTIFF

VS.

THOMASINA LONG FEATHER, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of September, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of August, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 16-149

SWOCSE/Todd Anderson, PLAINTIFF

VS.

PAMELA WHITE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of September, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of August, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 12-080

SWOCSE/Chalsea Cady, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DUSTIN ROBERTSON, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of September, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of August, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 16-142

SWOCSE/Leslie Greybuffalo, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LORI GREYBUFFALO, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of September, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of August, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 16-156

SWOCSE/Wicangpi DuMarce, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DEVON LONG, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of September, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of August, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 13-110

SWOCSE/ Sharon Hare, PLAINTIFF

VS.

RODNEY DERBY, Sr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of September, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of August, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 07-147

SWOCSE/ Ann German, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ISIAH HORNE, Sr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of September, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of August, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 16-166

SWOCSE/Melanie Renville, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CORRI BIRDSBILL-RENVILLE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of September, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 16-164

SWOCSE/Melanie Renville, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ROBERT RENVILLE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Paternity and Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of September, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of August, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

36-3tc

Sota is waiting for approved

July and August 2016 SWO

Tribal Council Proceedings

For publication

Trading Post ads

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

Job Openings

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate is seeking to fill the following positions(s):

Generalist, CHR

Special Needs Assistant/Family Service Worker, Head Start

Disabilities Assistant/Literacy Coordinator, Head Start

Dakotah Language Teacher, Head Start

Delivery/Inventory Clerk, Property & Supply

Dispatcher, Law Enforcement

Closing Date: September 30th, 2016 @ 04:30 PM

Native Connection Behavioral Health Project Director, Health & Social Services

Closing Date: October 7th, 2016 @ 04:30 PM

All interested applicants may obtain application and job description information at the Human Resource Department, of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate or contact Arnold Williams at (605) 698-8238 or Denise Hill at (605) 698-8251. (Tribal preference will apply)

 

Vacancy Announcement

Native Connection Behavioral Health Project Director: The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation in northeast South Dakota is seeking a Licensed Professional Counselor/Mental Health (LPC-MH) who can commit five years of work that will make a difference in the lives of American Indian young people up to and including age 24. This position will develop and then manage a new behavioral health component that aims to prevent and reduce suicidal behavior and substance abuse, reduce the impact of trauma, and promote mental health. This position is funded through a Native Connection cooperative agreement awarded by Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration for the project period 09/30/2016 - 09/29/2021. For more information, contact Sara DeCoteau, Health Coordinator at sara.decotea@ihs.gov or call 605/742-3696. Closing Date is Oct. 7, 2016 at 3:30 p.m.

 

Tiospa Zina Tribal School

Job Openings

Current Vacancies:

Substitutes needed for custodial, kitchen, teaching, and transportation - starting at $10/hr, varies per position Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma (please contact the HR office for more information) Applications are accepted on an on-going basis

2016-2017 School Year Vacancies:

Vacancy: High School Science Teacher ($2,000.00 Sign-on Bonus) Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a High School Science Teacher Opening Date: January 29, 2016 Closing Date: open until filled

Vacancy: Career and Technical Education Teacher ($2,000.00 Sign-on Bonus) Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Career and Technical Education Teacher Opening Date: March 11, 2016 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Middle School Social Studies Teacher ($2,000.00 Sign-on Bonus) Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Middle School Social Studies Teacher Opening Date: April 22, 2016 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Middle School 6th Grade Classroom Teacher ($2,000.00 Sign-on Bonus) Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Middle School 6th Grade Classroom Teacher Opening Date: June 21, 2016 Closind Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Gear-Up School Based Coordinator Qualifications: Current South Dakota Teaching Certificate and possess a valid South Dakota drivers license Opening Date: May 23, 2016 Closing Date: Open until filled

2016-2017 Coaching Vacancies- Closing Date: Open until filled

Proof of all SDHSAA coaching requirements at the time application is submitted. Requirements are to complete the following courses through the National Federation of High School Sports (NFHS): Fundamentals of Coaching, and First Aid and Safety for Coaches. Must also submit a letter of intent that answers the questions found on form Athletics Coaching Questionnaire (see TZ website or contact HR office). **Do not need SDHSAA/NFHS Coaching Requirements.

Head Wrestling Coach Head Girls Basketball Coach

**Jr. High Boys Basketball Coach

**5/6 Grade Boys Basketball Coach

Jr. High/Assistant Track Coach Assistant Varsity Boys Basketball Coach

Assistant Varsity Girls Basketball Coach

Assistant Wrestling Coach

Assistant Track Coach Weight Room Monitor

2016-2017 Extra-Curricular Vacancies-Closing Date: Open until filled.

Horse Club Adviser

Science Club Adviser

Close-up Foundation Adviser

Destination Imagination Coach

Drum Adviser

Military Club Adviser

National Honors Society Adviser

Senior Class Adviser

If you would like to apply to be a part of the TZ tiwahe you may pick up an application and background check form from the TZTS HR office located at #2 Tiospa Zina Dr. Agency Village, SD 57262. Applications may also be printed off the HR web page. Completed applications may be sent to PO Box 719, Agency Village, SD 57262. Faxed to: 605-698-7686. For further information call 605-698-3953 ext. 208. Indian Preference employer. At will employer. All applicants are subject to a Background Check and Pre-Employment Drug Test, pursuant to SWSB policy and United States Code Title 25 Chapter 34 - Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention.

 

Dakota Magic Casino

Job Openings

Accounting Department:

Revenue Audit Clerk (Full-Time or Part-Time) Day

C-Store Department:

Clerk (4 Full-Time or Part-Time) Swing, Graveyard

Foods Department:

Bus Person (2 Full-Time 1 Part-Time) Swing

Cashier (2 Full-Time 1 Part-Time) Swing

Wait Staff ( 2 Full-Time, 1 Part-Time) Swing

Kitchen Cleaning Services Technician (5 Full-Time or Part-Time) Graveyard

Hotel Department:

Front Desk Clerk (Full-Time or Part-Time) Rotating

Room/Laundry Attendant (2 Full-Time or Part-Time) 8:00 am to finish

Support Services Department:

Electrician (Full-Time or Part-Time) Rotating

Closing Date: September 23, 2016 at 4:00 p.m.

Starting Wage: D.O.E.

High School Diploma or GED required for most positions

Two identifications documents required upon hire

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department, 16849 102nd Street SE, Hankinson ND 58041.For complete Job Description contact James Neconish 701-634-3000 ext. 2582 Indian Preference will apply / EEO. (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment). Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

SECURITY: SECURITY OFFICER (FULL-TIME) ROTATING SHIFTS GENERAL FUNCTION: The security officer protects company assets and provides a safe environment for customers and employees. Exhibit a friendly, helpful and courteous manner when dealing with the customers and employees. Maintains security activities and performs credit transactions adhering to company, Tribal, State and Federal guidelines. Work closely with Casino & Hotel Management. REQUIREMENTS: High School Diploma or GED equivalent. Must have basic computer skills. Ongoing training through Dakota Nation Gaming Enterprise and respective security department policy and procedures. Complete departmental training program including CPR, first aid, and TAM. Must complete a 90 day probation period. Must be licensable by SWO Gaming Commission. Must be able to work irregular hours. Must be dependable, punctual, some knowledge in handheld radios, and writing reports. Law Enforcement, Military, Security experience preferred. Must not have a felony on your record. Must be physically fit and able to lift 40+ lbs. Must complete all security certifications within a year of hire in accordance with the Gaming Commissions rules and regulations.

This position will close on September 22, 2016 at 4 p.m.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

Position: Motor Pool Manager

Qualifications:  Must have a high school diploma/GED. Prior 6 months required working on/with tire changer, wheel balance and related equipment and tools, 3 years' experience preferred. Ability to maintain inventory control & ordering. Basic computer skills required working with excel, word. Good communications skills, ability to handle diverse situations and/or people. Must have a telephone within 30 days of hire and must be able to obtain a Non-Gaming License upon hire.

Opening Date: Thursday, September 08, 2016

Closing Date: Wednesday, September 21, 2016 @ 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

Position: Restaurant Manager

Qualifications: Must have a high school diploma/GED a graduate of Culinary Arts School is preferred. At least 5 years previous supervisory experience, 5 years cooking experience and 3 years food supervisory experience is required. Applicants should have excellent leadership, organizational and motivational skills, communications skills (oral and written), customer service skills, and comprehensive knowledge of food products and cost of sales, conflict resolution skills, computer program skills, the ability to work closely with other departments and the ability to work flexible hours. Must have a telephone within 30 days of hire and must be able to obtain a Non-Gaming License upon hire.

Opening Date: Thursday, September 08, 2016

Closing Date: Wednesday, September 21, 2016 @ 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

C-Store Department: Clerk/Cashier (1) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, includes weekends & holidays. Excellent customer service skills; math skills essential; ability to operate necessary equipment; physical ability to lift moderate amounts of weight; previous experience working with money preferred; strong organizational skills managing various functions; dependable & available to work any & all shifts. Must be at least 21 years old & have a High School diploma or GED.

Opening date: Thursday, September 15, 2016

Closing date: Wednesday, September 21, 2016 @ 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 
 

 

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