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Sota Volume 45 Issue No. 15

Anpetu Iyamni, April 16, 2014

Inside this Edition –

DOI signs Land Buy-Back agreement with SWO Tribe

Feature coming next week: SWO represented at Rosebud Keystone XL protest camp

NSA presents highest honor to all Native American Codetalkers

GOTV reminder: Register to vote!

Constitutional Revision Community Forum on April 17th

First meeting of Dakotah Language Focus Group

Take Back Day for dropping off unwanted prescription drugs

“Kids Will Be Kids” – Aliive Roberts County feature

Community meeting on future of Sisseton services formerly supported by the Oblates

Next week: Winter 2013 General Council part twelve in a series

Deadline for receipt of copy for consideration is 12:00 noon Fridays

Chairman’s Corner

SWO Tribal Chairman Robert Shepherd’s April 2014 Report

Spring is right around the corner, once winter decides to let go. With spring comes yard cleaning and garden preparation. As a reminder, our tribal extension office has garden seeds applications available and also provides tilling. I encourage our families to plant gardens this year as a healthy addition to bring to your table. The garden seeds and tilling are federally funded to encourage healthy nutritious produce for families to grow themselves. In the past the districts had community gardens that encouraged gardening for families within each community.

Grocery Store

Last month I reported that a wellness center was being looked at as our next project. However, because of the pressing need of a grocery store it is in the best interest to pursue this for-profit project as our top priority. So the wellness center is put on the back-burner while we continue to look for potential grant money for this project. The Dakota Nation Development Corporation is the lead in this project.

Cobell Buy-Back

Our Cobell Buy Back Agreement has been approved by the Department of Interior. The Buy-Back program is to purchase trust land fractional interests from tribal citizens defined as more than two allottees per tract. These tracts are purchased on a volunteer basis only, so we have an application process for those that would like to sell fractionated lands. There are currently 500 tracts waiting for purchase with hundreds more anticipated. Tribal Realty can assist any individuals who would like more information. Because the program is only for 10 years, we have requested that the 10 year period commence upon the signing of the agreement, which is being seriously considered by the DOI.

SD Parolee Pilot Project

The agreement has been finalized and is ready for signature for the Parolee Pilot Project. I look forward to the new implementation of this office as it will definitely address the high recidivism rate our tribal citizens in the prison system. In addition to the Parolee Pilot Project we are working towards a Reentry Program for those who return home and need help reentering the community with housing, education, employment and other needs.

Legislative

The Tribal General Welfare Exclusion Act is gaining momentum support in both the House and Senate. While it was submitted as an amendment in the "Tax Extenders Bill" it was not allowed because it is not a current lapsed taxed that needed extension. It has gained the attention it needs and we are hopeful that it will be passed unanimously.

*****

The Constitution Revision Forums are continuing with reviewing past proposed amendments. The Constitution Revision Committee has been available to meet with tribal citizens and explain the process and assist them. Amendments will be voted on during the general elections rather than having a special election as hoped.

*****

The motor vehicle pool should be completed this spring. This has been a long awaited project and now that we are in a central location we can move ahead.

*****

If you have any further questions or concerns, feel free to contact me at extension 102.

Robert Shepherd, MBA, Tribal Chairman.

DOI signs Land Buy-Back co-op agreement with SWO Tribe

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of Lake Traverse Reservation in North & South Dakota join latest step in Nation-to-Nation Cooperation to strengthen Tribal Sovereignty

Washington, DC – April 7, 2014 – As part of President Obama’s commitment to help strengthen Native American communities, U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell today announced the latest step in the implementation of the Land Buy-Back Program for Tribal Nations (Buy-Back Program), as the Department signed its next cooperative agreement, this time with the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation located in northeastern South Dakota and in southeastern North Dakota.

This agreement provides resources to the tribal government to facilitate outreach and education, solicit interest from owners, and further support land research in the effort to consolidate fractionated lands for the beneficial uses of tribes. The Department expects to send offers to willing sellers with fractionated interests at the Lake Traverse Reservation later this year.

The Buy-Back Program was created to implement the land consolidation component of the Cobell Settlement, which provided $1.9 billion to purchase fractionated land interests from willing sellers and consolidate those interests across Indian Country. The Buy-Back Program allows interested individual owners to receive payments for voluntarily selling their land. Consolidated interests are immediately transferred to tribal governments where they stay in trust for uses benefiting the tribes and their members.

“We know that Nation-to-Nation cooperation and collaboration is the key to successfully implementing this historic opportunity to reduce fractionation and strengthen tribal sovereignty,” said Interior Secretary Sally Jewell. “We look forward to working with the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate to effectively reach landowners to communicate the importance of reducing fractionation, relay the advantages of consolidating their land for the beneficial uses of their tribe, and provide the resources available to them for more information.”

Interior holds about 56 million acres in trust for American Indians in more than 200,000 tracts. Of those, nearly 94,000 – on about 150 reservations – have multiple and in some cases numerous owners who each hold a fractional interest available for purchase by the Buy-Back Program. The fractionation of tribal lands over generations has locked away resources and prevented effective land-use decision making by tribes. Fractionation has made it increasingly difficult for tribes to manage this land for economic development and other uses.

The Buy-Back Program is now working to consolidate these fractionated lands and restore them to the tribe of jurisdiction, which helps make sure that Indian lands stay in trust. The tribe can then use this land to benefit its community – for example, to build homes, community centers or businesses, or for cultural or environmental preservation.

“The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation has been actively acquiring fractionated lands for over three decades in an effort to reduce fractionation on the reservation,” said Tribal Chairman Robert Shepherd. “The Cobell Land Buy-Back Program will further our efforts to acquire more fractionated lands, increase the tribal land base and significantly decrease further fractionation for our children and future generations. Our previous and continued efforts are made in the spirit of our inherent tribal sovereignty and as a means of self-determination.”

Approximately 90 percent of all of the fractionated lands available for purchase are in 40 of the 150 locations eligible to participate in the Buy-Back Program under the Cobell Settlement. The Program’s goal is to reach as many of these locations as possible. Since December of last year, the Program has already returned more than 30,000 acres to tribes.

Interior expects to enter into additional agreements in the coming months. Through an open solicitation from November 2013-March 2014, the Department received more than 50 letters of interest or cooperative agreement applications for participation in the Program. Outreach, mapping and mineral evaluations are already occurring at many locations.

Sellers receive fair market value for their land, in addition to a base payment of $75 per offer, regardless of the value of the land. All sales will also trigger contributions to the Cobell Education Scholarship Fund. Up to $60 million will go to this fund to provide scholarships to Native American students. These funds are in addition to purchase amounts paid to individual sellers, so contributions will not reduce the amount paid to landowners for their interests. The Scholarship Fund is administered by the American Indian College Fund in Denver, Colorado, with 20% going to the American Indian Graduate Center in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

There are a number of steps that tribal governments can take now to prepare for involvement in the Buy-Back Program, including increasing owner awareness and designating a tribal point of contact to engage with the Program. Details are online here.

Landowners with interests on the Lake Traverse Reservation can contact the Trust Beneficiary Call Center at (888) 678-6836 to get more information about the potential to sell land so that it can be returned to the tribe or to register their information. Additional information is available at doi.gov/buybackprogram/landowners.

Wac’ang’a, SWO Tribe co-sponsor annual Walk to End Domestic Violence

April is set aside as Domestic Violence and Child Abuse Awareness Month. And each year Wac’ang’a holds a community walk to support this awareness.

Head Start teachers and pre-schoolers joined with Wac’ang’a staff, Tribal employees and community members for the event.

Walkers began at the Head Start bus barn and traveled around Agency Village.

Here are photo highlights courtesy of Tom Wilson, KXSW, who covered the walk live on the radio and on Facebook,Wac’ang’a and the Heads Start Program.

NSA bestows highest honor to Native Code Talkers

Award is on display at the National Museum of the American Indian

Washington, DC –The Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C., hosted an award ceremony Tuesday morning, April 8 for the 2013 Cryptologic Hall of Honor award given by the National Security Agency/Central Security Service. One plaque will reside at NSA headquarters and a second will be on display at the museum.

This will be the first time in agency history that the award is given to a group and not an individual.

Speakers at the event included Kevin Gover, director of the National Museum of the American Indian, Tim Johnson (Mohawk), associate director of museum programs at the museum, and Trumbull D. Soule, deputy chief of staff at the NSA.

During World War I and World War II, hundreds of American Indians joined the U.S. armed forces and used words from their traditional tribal languages as weapons. Tribes that participated include the Assiniboine, Cherokee, Chippewa, Choctaw, Comanche, Hopi, Kiowa, Menominee, Muscogee (Creek), Navajo, Oneida, Pawnee, Sioux, and Sac & Fox. The U.S. military asked them to develop secret battle communications based on their languages—and America’s enemies never deciphered the coded messages they sent. “Code Talkers,” as they came to be known after World War II, are 20th-century American Indian warriors and heroes who significantly aided the victories of the U.S. and its allies.

The award, given only since 1999, is bestowed to those special few who have changed the course of war, thus securing America’s freedom and place in history. The standards are high for induction into this great hall.

From breaking the main Japanese naval operational code, in time to win the battle of Midway, the turning point in the war in the Pacific, to the outstanding cryptanalysis of the VENONA program, which identified numerous Soviet agents in the United States, to the sophisticated direction-finding helped track Soviet intentions when the Cuban Missile Crisis threatened nuclear war, to breakthrough achievements in the development of the super computer—code makers and code breakers were there. Seventy-six awards grace the Hall of Honor at NSA headquarters in Fort Meade, Md.

“Native Americans have fought for this nation in every major conflict since the Revolutionary War,” said Kevin Gover (Pawnee), director of the museum. “They have served and continue to enlist at a higher percentage than any other ethnic group. The Native American Code Talkers epitomize the strength of multiculturalism that makes America great. Their contributions saved thousands upon thousands of lives.”

The museum’s popular traveling exhibition, “Native Words, Native Warriors” will be on display during the event. The 15-banner exhibition was developed by the National Museum of the American Indian and the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES) and tells the remarkable story of soldiers from more than a dozen tribes who used their Native languages while in service in the U.S. military.

The presentation was originally scheduled for March but had to be postponed due to a severe winter storm.

(Included among the recipients, posthumously, is Guy Rondell, SWO Tribal member, who served in the Scouts as a Code Talker during WWII.)

Kids will be Kids

By Sara McGregor-Okroi

Aliive-Roberts County

"Kids will be kids."

"Thank goodness it’s just alcohol."

"Drinking is just a rite of passage of growing up."

Oftentimes this is what we hear from adults when they talk about underage drinking. Oftentimes adults think if they provide that "safe place" for kids to drink and take their keys they are doing the right thing. Prom and graduation time are a couple of those times when adults believe providing alcohol in homes is a good decision.

It was these thoughts that were in my head as I sat in the North Dakota Capital Building in Bismarck last year. It was these thoughts that were in my head while I listened to two elementary age kids stand up and tell a group of state legislators how a drunk driver changed their own and their family's lives forever. It was these thoughts that were in my head as I listened to two sets of families talk about trying to put their lives back together after unspeakable tragedy. It was these thoughts that were in my head as I sat there and listened to one of my oldest friends talk about losing her best friend, her sister.

On July 6, 2012, my friend Allison left her home in West Fargo, ND with her husband and her 18-month-old daughter. They were headed to Bismarck for a family reunion. About a week before she had posted on Facebook that they were expecting another baby.

Approximately the same time, a 29-year-old man left a bar after drinking for 2 to 3 hours. He stopped at a rest area and soon started back on Interstate 94. Unfortunately getting back on the interstate was the act that altered so many lives forever. Somehow after stopping at the rest area, he got turned around and entered back on the road heading the wrong direction.

Less than a mile down the road they were all dead. Their death the result of a head on collision with a driver who had a BAC of .25.

The driver of the vehicle going the wrong way had a history of drinking offenses, along with driving offenses: underage consumption charges, DUI's, driving without insurance, driving without a license; all within his 29 year life span. And it all started when he started drinking under the age of 21.

Kids who drink before the age of 21 are more likely to face a multitude of issues, including:

*Risky sexual behavior, including unwanted, unintended, and unprotected sexual activity, and sex with multiple partners. Such behavior increases the risk for unplanned pregnancy and for contracting sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), including infection with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS;

*Increases the risk of physical and sexual assault;

*Is associated with academic failure;

*Is associated with illicit drug use;

*Is associated with tobacco use;

*Can cause a range of physical consequences, from hangovers to death from alcohol poisoning;

*Can cause alterations in the structure and function of the developing brain, which continues to mature into the mid- to late twenties, and may have consequences reaching far beyond adolescence;

*Creates secondhand effects that can put others at risk. Loud and unruly behavior, property destruction, unintentional injuries, violence, and even death because of underage alcohol use afflict innocent parties. For example, about 45 percent of people who die in crashes involving a drinking driver under the age of 21 are people other than the driver. Such secondhand effects often strike at random, making underage alcohol use truly everybody's problem;

*In conjunction with pregnancy, may result in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, including fetal alcohol syndrome, which remains a leading cause of mental retardation; and

*Is a risk factor for heavy drinking later in life, and continued heavy use of alcohol leads to increased risk across the lifespan for acute consequences and for medical problems such as cancers of the oral cavity, larynx, pharynx, and esophagus; liver cirrhosis; pancreatitis; and hemorrhagic stroke.

Kids who drink underage may get up the day after and continue on with their lives. But they may not. Kids who drink underage may get up everyday until they are 29 years old before something goes horribly wrong. Or they may not. Kids who drink underage may get up everyday for the rest of their lives and may never face a consequence. Or they may not.

How much of a chance are you willing to take?

I used to talk to one of my closest friends, the sister of the woman that died, about what we were doing that weekend, or what our kids were into, or complaining about all the money our husband's spent on hunting. Within the past six months we have changed those conversations. We talked about whether or not the baby should be buried in the same coffin as her mom. We talked about how her family was going to survive their first Christmas without her sister and family. We talked about when the new baby was supposed to arrive. We talked about how to handle what should have been that little girl's second birthday. My daughter's dresser is now full of all the hand me down clothes that were meant for a little girl that never saw her second birthday.

"Kids will be kids."

"Thank goodness it’s just alcohol."

"Drinking is just a rite of passage of growing up."

I think I will still hear these statements from adults when they talk about underage drinking. But now I have something to say back to them. Maybe kids will be kids, and it is "just" alcohol, but nobody deserved the "rite" to grow up more than a 18 month old little girl riding in a car to a family reunion with her pregnant mom and her dad. She just wanted to go see her grandma and grandpa.

It all starts with us. Take a stand. Underage drinking should not be acceptable. Underage drinking is not safe. Don't provide. Taking their keys tonight won't keep them safe tomorrow. Talk to your teens today about your expectation about them not drinking alcohol.

Information on the consequences of underage drinking was found at www.camy.org. The story is that of my friend, Allison Mickelson Deutscher, her husband Aaron, daughter Brielle and her unborn baby.

Aliive-Roberts County, Roberts Co. Sheriff’s Office, DEA holds “Taking Back Unwanted Prescription Drugs”

Aliive-Roberts County, the Roberts County Sheriff's Office and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) will give the public an opportunity to prevent pill abuse and theft by ridding their homes of potentially dangerous expired, unused, and unwanted prescription drugs. Bring your pills for disposal to Teals Market in Sisseton on Saturday, April 26th from 10:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. (The DEA cannot accept liquids or needles or sharps, only pills or patches.) The service is free and anonymous, no questions asked.

Last October, Americans turned in 324 tons (over 647,000 pounds) of prescription drugs at over 4,114 sites operated by the DEA and its thousands of state and local law enforcement partners. When those results are combined with what was collected in its seven previous Take Back events, DEA and its partners have taken in over 3.4 million pounds-more than 1,700 tons-of pills.

This initiative addresses a vital public safety and public health issue. Medicines that languish in home cabinets are highly susceptible to diversion, misuse, and abuse. Rates of prescription drug abuse in the U.S. are alarmingly high, as are the number of accidental poisonings and overdoses due to these drugs. Studies show that a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including from the home medicine cabinet. In addition, Americans are now advised that their usual methods for disposing of unused medicines-flushing them down the toilet or throwing them in the trash-both pose potential safety and health hazards.

DEA is in the process of approving new regulations that implement the Safe and Responsible Drug Disposal Act of 2010, which amends the Controlled Substances Act to allow an "ultimate user" (that is, a patient or their family member or pet owner) of controlled substance medications to dispose of them by delivering them to entities authorized by the Attorney General to accept them. The Act also allows the Attorney General to authorize long term care facilities to dispose of their residents' controlled substances in certain instances.

From the SWO “Get Out The Vote” (GOTV) –

Reminder to Register to Vote

April  2014

Dear Sota Iya Ye Yapi Readers:

Are you registered to Vote?

It is election year, not only for tribal elections but also state and national elections.

We are not only tribal citizens but we are also state citizens who have the right to exercise the right to vote.

 Your vote is important. Your vote decides who will be elected for offices at the local, state and national level.

When do I vote?

Last day to register to vote for primary elections is May 19th.

Early voting begins April 18th. (Early voting is at the courthouse of your county.)

Primary Election Day is June 3rd.

Primary Elections will be held for:

*United States Senate

*South Dakota Governor

*District 1 House of Representatives

*Sisseton School Board

 District 1 (Roberts, Day, Marshall and Brown County) has a total of 15,480 registered active voters and 1,061 inactive voters (inactive means you haven't voted within the past 4 years).

GET OUT THE NATIVE VOTE

UPCOMING EVENTS

April 15th VOTER REGISTRATION at Tribal Elderly Nutrition Center

April 16th VOTER REGISTRATION at Easter Egg Hunt and Fitness Center

April 24th VOTER REGISTRATION at Job Fair at Dakota Connection Casino and Tribal headquarters

April 25th VOTER REGISTRATION at Dakota Magic Casino

April 28th VOTER REGISTRATION the Sisseton Wahpeton College Health Fair

Other locations will be IHS, TZTS, ESDS, dates to be announced.

NOTICE TO ALL CANDIDATES

FOR PUBLIC OFFICE

Due to being unable to collect past invoices for political advertising, the Sota is reinstating its policy of only accepting political advertising that is paid for prior to publishing. We do not accept credit cards so please pay by check with your order. We have greatly reduced prices for political advertising to help you get your message across to readers.

Per column inch rate is $2.50.

Please specify size desired when ordering:

Examples –

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Address orders to Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279.

Submit copy electronically to earthskyweb@cs.com

Future of three Sisseton community services focus of April 28 meeting

For many years, three community services - the Sisseton Food Pantry, the Kateri Thrift Store, and the War Cloud Drop-In Center - received considerable financial support from a Catholic order of priests -- the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate (OMI) - which served the Sisseton area since 1923. The Order will be ending their mission in Sisseton the end of June 2014, and with their departure more than $70,000 in annual subsidy to the three community services will be lost.

The Sisseton Ministerial Association will be hosting a "Brainstorming Session" on Monday, April 28 at 5:30 p.m. at the Sisseton City Hall Community Room to gather ideas and suggestions for continuing those three services. "There is definitely a need for all three," said Fr. Joe Hitpas, OMI, "but how they will function in the future may be very different than they are now."

The public is invited to attend the meeting to help explore new ways to provide the necessary services. The meeting will begin with a free meal for participants, provided by the Sisseton Horizons Committee.

For more information contact the Sisseton Area Chamber of Commerce at 698-7261 or visit with clergy at your local church.

"From the desk of Geri Opsal, Tribal Veteran Service Officer"

GeriO@SWO-NSN.gov

Phone 605-698-3388

*Operation Reaching All Veterans this Thursday~mark your calendars its open to All Veterans and their dependents or if you're a widow your invited as well. It will be held at Dakota Magic Casino from11 AM-3:00 PM. Please stop by we have tons of information. Please stop by we are trying to reach all Veterans that may have benefits eligible to them that they know nothing about. (See notice in this issue of the Sota.) . OUR VIEW: We owe our veterans for their service and support the tribe & state's effort to let every veteran know what benefits they are entitled to receive. We will have NADL (Native American Direct Loan~ Morgan Pontiff out of Minneapolis, MN there as well). See the notice!

*Purple up: Gov. Dennis Daugaard and SDDVA Secretary Larry Zimmerman will visit John Harris Elementary School in Sioux Falls on Tuesday, April 15, to kick off "Purple Up for Military Kids" "With over 7,500 military children in South Dakota, it is important that we honor these young heroes who have given so much," April 15th, which is this Tuesday ….wear PURPLE and show your support to our Military Kids.

*The VA has added a new PTSD Program Locator in their website. The site allows participants to Locate nearby specialized Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) programs, search by state or find specialized PTSD programs by type. (http://www.va.gov/directory/guide/ptsd_flsh.asp)

*We want to start a weekly talking circle in the near future and would like anyone interested to contact our office. It's not about anything in particular just fellow Veterans sharing stories and having that feeling of brotherhood - no meeting agenda just the time to converse together and share a cup of coffee. Please call me at 698-3388. Asking the hard questions is often the first step toward getting veterans the support they need. If you think that a veteran might be in crisis, tell him or her about the Veterans Crisis Line-or make the call yourself. Call 1-800-273-8255 and Press 1, chat online at VeteransCrisisLine.net/Chat, or text to 838255 for free, confidential support 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year. We need your help in telling all veterans and their loved ones that support is available and is only a phone call, chat, or text away. Spread the word in your community; no group or meeting is too small. Each person can make a difference in the lives of veterans in your community.

*WOMEN VETERANS CALL CENTER: 1-855-VA-WOMEN. Crisis Help Line: 1-800-273-8255, available 24/7, and tell them you are a veteran. All calls are confidential.

*American Legion Post #314 (Woodrow Wilson Keeble Medal of Honor Guard) - Delano Renville, Commander Cell#: 268-0354 / Vietnam Veterans Kit Fox Society - Dayton Seaboy, Commander Phone#: 698-3299 / Desert Era Veterans - Danielle DeCoteau, Commander Cell#: 467-9714 for GAS ASSISTANCE: Geri Opsal 698-3388.

Peace, Geri Opsal, TVSO.

We must look for the opportunity in every difficulty instead of being paralyzed at the thought of the difficulty in every opportunity." -Walter E. Cole, Korean War Hero

“Ehanna Dakota Woyakapi”

Dakotah stories feature column

By Vine T. Marks

**** IKTOMI AND THE MUSKRAT****

Beside a white lake, beneath a large grown willow tree, sat Iktomi on the bare ground. The heap of smoldering ashes told of a recent open fire. With ankles crossed together around a pot of soup, Iktomi bent over some delicious boiled fish. Fast he dipped his black horn spoon into the soup, for he was ravenous. Iktomi had no regular meal times. Often when he was hungry he went without food. Well hid between the lake and the wild rice, he looked nowhere but into the kettle of fish. Not knowing when his next meal would be he meant to eat enough now to last him some time.

"Hau, Hau, my friend!" said a voice out of the wild rice. Iktomi was startled He almost choked with his soup. He peered through the long reeds from where he sat with his long horn spoon in mid-air. "Hau, my friend !" said the voice again, this time close at his side. Iktomi turned and there stood a dripping muskrat who had just come out of the lake. "Oh, it is my friend who startled me. I wondered if among the wild rice some spirit voice was talking. Hau, Hau, my friend! "said Iktomi. The muskrat stood smiling. On his lips hung a ready, "Yes, my friend, "when Iktomi would ask, "My friend, will you sit down beside me and share my food?"

That was the custom of the plains people. Yet Iktomi sat silent. He hummed an old dance song and beat gently on the edge of the pot with his buffalo-horn spoon. The muskrat began to feel awkward before such lack of hospitality and wished himself under water. After many heart throbs Iktomi stopped drumming with his horn ladle, and looking upward into the muskrats face, he said: “My friend, let us run a race to see who shall win this pot of fish. If I win, I shall not need to share it with you. If you win, you shall have half of it." Springing to his feet, Iktomi began at once to tighten the belt about his waist.

"My friend, Ikto, I cannot run a race with you! I am not a swift runner, and you are nimble as a deer. We shall not run any race together." Answered the hungry muskrat. For a moment Iktomi stood with a hand on his long protruding chin. His eyes were fixed upon something in the air. The muskrat looked out of the corner of his eyes without moving his head. He watched the wily Iktomi concocting a plot. "Yes, Yes," said Iktomi, suddenly turning his gaze upon the unwelcome visitor; " I shall carry a large stone on my back. That will slacken my usual speed; and the race will be a fair one."

Saying this he laid a firm hand upon the muskrats shoulder and started off along the edge of the lake. When they reached the opposite side Iktomi pried about in search of a heavy stone. He found one half buried in the shallow water. Pulling it out on dry land, he wrapped it in his blanket. "Now, my friend, You shall run on the left side of the lake, and I on the other. The race is for the boiled fish in yonder kettle!" said Iktomi.

The muskrat helped to lift the heavy stone upon the Iktomi's back. Then they parted. Each took a narrow path through the tall reeds along the shore. Iktomi found his load a heavy one. Perspiration hung like beads on his brow. His chest heaved fast and hard. He looked across the lake to see how far the muskrat had gone, but nowhere did he see any sign of him. "Well, he is running low under the wild rice." He said. Yet as he scanned the tall grasses on the lake shore, he saw not one stir as if to make way for the runner. "Ah, has he gone so fast ahead that the disturbed grasses in his trail have quieted again?" exclaimed Iktomi. With that thought he quickly dropped the heavy stone. "No more of this!" he said, patting his chest with both hands.

Off with a springing bound, he ran swiftly toward the goal. Tufts of reeds and grass fell flat under his feet. Hardly had they raised their heads when Iktomi was many paces away. Soon he reached the heap of cold ashes. Iktomi halted stiff as if he had struck an invisible cliff. His black eyes showed a ring of white about them as he stared at the empty ground. There was no pot of boiled fish! There was no water-man in sight! "Oh, if only I had shared my food like a real Dakota, I would not have lost it all. Why did I not know the muskrat would run though the water? He swims faster than I could ever run! That is what he has done. He has laughed at me for carrying a weight on my back while he shot ahead like an arrow! "

Crying thus to himself, Iktomi stepped to the water's edge. He stooped forward with a hand on each bent knee and peeped far into the deep water. "There!" he exclaimed, " I see you, my friend, sitting with your ankles wound around my little pot of fish ! My friend, I am hungry. Give me a bone!" "Ha! Ha! Ha!" laughed the water-man, the muskrat. The sound did not rise up out of the lake, for it came down from overhead. With his hands still on his knees, Iktomi turned his face upward into the great willow tree. Opening wide his mouth he begged, "My friend, my friend, give me a bone to gnaw!"

"Ha! Ha! " laughed the muskrat, and leaning over the limb he sat upon, he let fall a small sharp bone which dropped right into Iktomi's throat. Iktomi almost chocked to death before he could get it out. In the tree the muskrat sat laughing load. "Next time, say to a visiting friend, ' be seated beside me my friend, and let me share this food with you.'"

This concludes the third Iktomi story, and if you have read, and listened carefully, you will have learned something from it.

Be kind to each other for we are one people.

Vine T. Marks, Sr.

Announces Listening Sessions on BIA Indian Child Welfare Act Guidelines

Washington, DC – April 10, 2014 – Assistant Secretary-Indian Affairs Kevin K. Washburn today announced that his office will hold the next set of Listening Sessions on the Bureau of Indian Affairs’ (BIA) Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) Guidelines for State Courts on Tuesday, April 15, 2014, at the National Indian Child Welfare Association annual conference in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., and on Thursday, April 24, via teleconference.

The sessions are a coordinated effort with tribal leaders and their designees to determine if the guidelines are still effective for guiding state courts in Indian child custody proceedings or if they need to be updated.

“The Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978 is seminal legislation vital to protecting the best interests of Indian children and promoting the stability and security of the federally recognized tribes and Indian families,” Assistant Secretary Washburn said. “However, the law and BIA’s guidelines for state courts on implementing the statute need re-examination. In addition to conducting these Listening Sessions, I’ve directed my staff to take another look at the Guidelines for State Courts and invited input from tribal leaders, tribal court judges, counsel, ICWA staff, social workers and tribal members on any revisions to it and to BIA ICWA regulations they think are needed.”

The first Listening Session was held at the National Congress of American Indians 2014 Executive Council Winter Meeting in Washington, D.C. The major themes were:

· State ICWA accountability including data collection and reporting to the tribes;

· Tribes and states need to build relationships and work together to increase ICWA compliance;

· Guidelines should recommend best practices including providing birth and adoption records to adoptees born prior to 1978;

· Apply ICWA to all juvenile justice cases;

· Improve clarity on ICWA abuse and neglect, qualified expert witnesses, adoption, termination of parental rights, and guardianships;

· ICWA training for state courts and strengthening families/parenting education for tribal families is needed; and

· Resources are needed to empower tribal child welfare systems to care for their children.

The April 15 session will take place at the Hyatt Regency Pier Sixty-Six at 2301 S.E. 17th Street, Fort Lauderdale, Fla., from 1:30 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. (EDT).

The April 24 teleconference will be held from 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. (EDT). To participate, dial 1-800-619-2487 and use passcode 4969328. Dialing in a few minutes prior to the start of the call is advisable.

The Assistant Secretary – Indian Affairs oversees the BIA, which is headed by a director who is responsible for managing day-to-day operations through four offices – Indian Services, Justice Services, Trust Services and Field Operations. These offices directly administer or fund tribally based infrastructure, law enforcement, social services, tribal governance, natural and energy resources, and trust management programs for the nation’s federally recognized American Indian and Alaska Native tribes and villages through 12 regional offices and 85 agencies.

Conference to discuss Tribal environmental risk issues

Biskmarck, ND – UTN – Risks to the environment in tribal areas will be the focus of a two-day conference in Bismarck offered by United Tribes Technical College.

The “State of the Environment on Tribal Lands” is set for April 15-16 at the Ramada Hotel, 1400 Interchange Avenue.

The scope of the conference is environmental risk issues on reservations in North Dakota, South Dakota and Montana.

“People living on reservations have some of the highest rates of environmentally-related health problems,” says Dr. Barbara Schmitt, UTTC Economic Development Director and conference coordinator. “These are often in isolated areas where authorities are not equipped to cope with complex environmental challenges.”

The conference includes experts in the field of environmental risk mitigation and speakers from tribes that are most affected. It is sponsored by the Upper Missouri-Tribal Environmental Risk Mitigation (UM-TERM) project coordinated by United Tribes.

The gathering is free and open to the public. Continuing education credit is available to participants.

For more information, please contact Dr. Barbara Schmitt, Economic Development Director, United Tribes Technical College, 701-255-3285 x 1436, bschmitt@uttc.edu.

AGENDA

UM-TERM Tribal Environmental Risk Mitigation Conference

Ramada Hotel (formerly Doublewood Inn)

Bismarck, North Dakota

“State of the Environment on Tribal Lands”

DAY 1: Tuesday, April 15, 2014

8:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. REGISTRATION

CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST

8:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. INVOCATION

WELCOME - Dr. Russell Swagger, Vice-President

Student and Campus Services, UTTC

INTRODUCTIONS - Project TERM staff

9:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. OVERVIEW-UM-TERM Project-Project TERM Staff

9:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. PANEL-Environmental Protection Agency Tribal Staff

Allyson Two Bears-Director/Environmental Specialist, SRST

Edmund Baker-Environmental Director, TAT

Hans Bradley-Brownfields Coordinator-SRST

10:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m. BREAK

10:45 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. PANEL-Natural Resources/Fish & Wildlife Tribal Staff

Jeff Kelly-Game & Fish Director, SRST

Antoine Fettig-Biologist, TAT

Jade Ducheneaux-Wildlife Biologist, CRST

11:45 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. LUNCH

KEYNOTE SPEAKER-Darrell Dorgan-President

Dakom Communications/Dorgan Films

2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. PRESENTATION- Missouri River Recovery Program and Projects

Cathi Warren, Missouri River Programs Native American Consultation Specialist

3:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. QUESTIONS, DISCUSSION, WRAP-UP

DAY 2 – Wednesday, April 16, 2014

8:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST/NETWORKING

8:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m. WELCOME - Interim President Phil Baird, UTTC

8:45 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. SPEAKER-Dan Svingen, USDA Forest Service, National Grasslands partnerships on Standing Rock and Cheyenne River

10:00 a.m. – 10:15 a.m. BREAK

10:15 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. OUNDTABLE DISCUSSION

11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. LUNCH-KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Ladonna Brave Bull Allard-Director of Tribal Tourism-SRST

1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. PRESENTATION – Oglala Sioux Tribe Land Buy-Back Program

Maxine Broken Nose-Director, Land Buy-Back Program-OST

2:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m. BREAK

2:15 p.m. – 3:15 pm. PANEL-Energy Tribal Staff

Carson Hood, Jr.-Energy Director-TAT-Invited

Robert Gough-Intertribal Council on Utility Policy

Ron Neiss-Tribal Utilities Company-RST

James (Joe) Dunn-District Representative-SRST

3:15 p.m. – 4:00 pm. CLOSE/EVALUATIONS

Non-Eagle Feather Repositories receive Fish & Wildlife Service grants

Albuquerque, NM - Two non-eagle feather repositories established by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s (Service) Southwest Region have been awarded Service migratory bird program grants to assist in providing legally obtained bird feathers and parts for Native American cultural, ceremonial and religious needs.

The two national non-eagle feather repositories were established in 2010 through an agreement between the Service, Oklahoma’s Comanche Nation Ethno-Ornithological Initiative (Sia), and Liberty Wildlife Rehabilitation Foundation (Liberty Wildlife) in Arizona.

Through that agreement, both Sia and Liberty Wildlife were issued permits to salvage, receive, and distribute regulated migratory bird feathers, deceased birds and parts from Service permitted zoos, falconers, rehabilitators, and other legal sources. Once the permits were put in place, requests for non-eagle feathers and parts began pouring in from federally enrolled tribal members across the country.

“We clearly had a responsibility to provide a way for Native American tribal members to access these important components of their religious and cultural practices,” said the Service’s Southwest Regional Director Benjamin Tuggle. “Once we partnered with Sia and Liberty Wildlife, we knew we could make our vision a reality.”

For hundreds of years, Native Americans have used wildlife and other natural resources for subsistence, as well as for cultural and religious purposes. Migratory birds play a unique and significant role in tribal culture, especially in American Indian spiritual and religious beliefs and ceremonies. The feathers and parts of many migratory birds are fundamental to most Native American tribes.

While eagle feathers are available to tribes and tribal members through the Service’s national eagle repository outside of Denver, that repository discontinued distribution of non-eagle feathers and parts from birds that are central to tribal ceremonial and ritual practices in the late 1990s.

“Once the National Eagle Repository discontinued providing both eagle and non-eagle feathers, there developed a tremendous unfilled need for tribes to legally obtain non-eagle feathers and parts for Native American religious and cultural practices,” Tuggle said.

Over the last several years, the Oklahoma and Arizona repositories have filled requests for 2295 feathers, parts and whole bird species to Native Americans across the country. The two non-eagle feather repositories combined have provided items for members of 265 tribes in 40 states.

“We have a long and proud tradition of working in partnership with tribes in the Southwest,” noted Tuggle. “We take our tribal trust responsibilities very seriously are committed to continually strengthening our tribal partnerships.”

Tuggle indicated that the grants to the two non-eagle feather repositories will meet both Sia and Liberty Wildlife meet the growing demands for feathers and parts to support Native American religious and cultural traditions for tribes nationwide.

Obama Administration renews $1.2 million in critical support

For 7 local homeless programs in South Dakota

Washington, DC – U.S. Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Secretary Shaun Donovan today announced $1,264,664 in grants to renew support for 7 local homeless housing and service programs in South Dakota. Provided through HUD’s Continuum of Care Program, the funding announced today will ensure these local projects remain operating in the coming year, providing critically needed housing and support services to those persons and families experiencing homelessness.

These grants support a variety of programs including street outreach, client assessment, and direct housing assistance to individuals and families with children who are experiencing homelessness. HUD will award additional grant funding to support hundreds of other local programs in the coming weeks. View a complete list of local homeless projects awarded funding.

“Whether it’s helping to rapidly re-house families with young children or finding a permanent home for an individual with serious health conditions, HUD is working with our local partners to end homelessness as we know it,” said Donovan. “Over the last few years we have changed the trajectory of homelessness in America, but we need bipartisan support from Congress to fully fund proven strategies that have created this downward trend. The evidence is clear that the cost of doing nothing far exceeds the cost of finding real housing solutions for those who might otherwise be living on our streets.”

“This renewed funding is critical to meeting our goal of eradicating homelessness across our nation,” said HUD’s Rocky Mountain Regional Administrator Rick M. Garcia. “It’s not only the right thing to do, but its smart government and fiscally prudent. It saves taxpayers money by interrupting the costly cycling through shelters, emergency rooms, detox centers, jails and even hospitals that is common among persons experiencing chronic homelessness in particular.”

HUD funding will allow local providers to continue offering permanent and transitional housing to homeless persons as well as services including job training, health care, mental health counseling, substance abuse treatment and child care. HUD is continuing to challenge local communities to reexamine their response to homelessness and give greater weight to proven strategies, from promoting “Housing First” to providing ‘rapid re-housing’ for homeless families with children and permanent supportive housing for those experiencing chronic homelessness.

Continuum of Care grants are awarded competitively to local projects to meet the needs of individuals and families experiencing homelessness in their community. The grants fund a wide variety of programs from street outreach and assessment to transitional and permanent housing for homeless persons and families. HUD funds are a critical part of the Obama Administration’s strategic plan to prevent and end homelessness.

In 2010, President Obama and 19 federal agencies and offices that form the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness (USICH) launched the nation’s first comprehensive strategy to prevent and end homelessness. Opening Doors: Federal Strategic Plan to Prevent and End Homelessness puts the country on a path to end veterans and chronic homelessness as well as to end homelessness among children, family, and youth.

Takes to Senate floor to urge passage of Paycheck Fairness Act

North Dakota Women make just 74% of what Men earn; have to work 12 years longer to make up pay gap

Washington, DC – April 8, 2014 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today – Equal Pay Day – took to the Senate floor to urge her colleagues to join her in support of legislation to close the wage gap between men and women. In North Dakota, women with full-time jobs are paid an average of $33,877 annually compared to $45,888 for men.

This pay disparity means that North Dakota women make just 74 percent of what men earn.

“Making sure women receive equal pay for equal work is a family issue and it should be treated that way,” said Heitkamp. “We have made some progress, but the fact that women have to work 12 years longer than men to just make up for the pay gap is unacceptable. By short changing women, some employers are also short-changing families that could use a full salary to feed their families or help their children get medical care. It’s long overdue that we pass the Paycheck Fairness Act so that our daughters don’t have to fight for these rights – they’ll already have them.”

The Paycheck Fairness Act builds on the promise of the Equal Pay Act, passed more than 50 years ago on June 10, 1963. It helps close the pay gap by empowering women to negotiate for equal pay, closing loopholes courts have created in the law, creating strong incentives for employers to obey the laws and strengthening federal outreach and enforcement efforts.

The legislation would require employers to demonstrate that wage gaps between men and women doing the same work have a business justification and are truly a result of factors other than gender. The bill would also prohibit employers from retaliating against employees who share salary information with their co-workers.

The Paycheck Fairness Act is also about improving the economy and decreasing the money spent on government assistance programs. If women received equal pay, the U.S. economy would have produced an additional $447.6 billion in income last year, which is 14 times the amount that Federal and State Governments spent on the Temporary Assistance to Needy Families Program in 2012 alone. This additional income would be used for purchasing things in the local economy like groceries, child care, and gas.

The Paycheck Fairness Act also would strengthen the Department of Labor's (DOL) ability to help women achieve pay equity by requiring DOL to enhance outreach and training efforts to work with employers in order to eliminate pay disparities and to continue to collect and disseminate wage information based on gender. The bill would also create a competitive grant program to provide negotiation skills training programs for girls and women.

Applaud the UN for condemning Hurtful Name of Washington’s NFL Team

Washington, DC – April 11, 2014 – Human rights expert and the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples James Anaya today called the Washington NFL team’s current R-word team name a “hurtful reminder of past suffering of Native American.” The Oneida Indian Nation and its Change the Mascot campaign, as well as the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI), are praising the UN for its powerful statement, which comes on the heels of Oneida Indian Nation Representative Ray Halbritter’s January meeting with the UN on the topic.

“The United Nations is the latest to dispel the absurd claim by Washington's football team and its owner Dan Snyder that the term ‘redskins’ honors Native Americans,” said Oneida Indian Nation Representative Ray Halbritter and NCAI Executive Director Jackie Pata. “This word is widely recognized throughout the globe as a racial slur. If the NFL wants to be a global brand that contributes to the positive image of the United States across the world, it needs to stop promoting this slur and change the name.”

“I urge the team owners to consider that the term ‘redskin’ for many is inextricably linked to a history of suffering and dispossession, and that it is understood to be a pejorative and disparaging term that fails to respect and honour the historical and cultural legacy of the Native Americans in the U.S.,” said Anaya, who also contributed to a 2012 report on the situation of indigenous peoples in the U.S. “Indigenous peoples have the right to the dignity and diversity of their cultures, traditions, histories and aspirations… Private actors also have responsibilities independently of the States’ obligation to promote and protect human rights.”

The UN has taken a strong stand globally to combat racism in sports and played an important role in highlighting the damaging impacts of racism against Indigenous peoples.

NCAI is the nation’s oldest, largest and most representative American Indian and Alaska Native organization serving the broad interests of tribal governments and communities. It has played a key role in opposing the Washington team’s continued use of the R-word racial epithet.

Since the Oneida Nation’s launch of the Change the Mascot campaign last year, the derogatory name of Washington’s NFL team has become a prominent civil rights issue garnering support from top leaders across the country and internationally. Bi-partisan Members of Congress, city councils, leading civil rights organizations, top sports icons, prominent journalists and even President Obama have all spoken out against the team’s continued use of the harmful epithet.

The growing Change the Mascot movement continues to gain support from top leaders and organizations. Following a nationwide radio campaign during the past NFL season, Change the Mascot plans to continue their push into the 2014 NFL season and beyond.

Approves HEARTH Act applications to help spur Economic Development in Tribal communities

Dry Creek Rancheria, Jamestown S’Klallam, Mohegan, and Wichita and Affiliated Tribes join eight others already cleared to process economic development leases without BIA approval

Washington, DC - April 10, 2014 - Assistant Secretary – Indian Affairs Kevin K. Washburn today approved leasing regulations submitted by four federally recognized tribes, restoring their authority to control the leasing of their trust lands and promoting their self-determination and economic development. This streamlined process for restoring tribal leasing authority is consistent with the objectives of the Helping Expedite and Advance Responsible Tribal Homeownership Act, or HEARTH Act.

“Thanks to the HEARTH Act, more tribes have been empowered to take over leasing on their lands,” Assistant Secretary Washburn said. “Tribal governments are the drivers of economic self-sufficiency and prosperity on their reservations and in their communities. The HEARTH Act restores their ability to directly control how their lands can and should be used for the good of their people, now and in the future.”

The four tribes, submitted requests for Secretarial approval of their leasing regulations, are: Dry Creek Rancheria Band of Pomo Indians in California, Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe in Washington State, Mohegan Indian Tribe of Connecticut, and Wichita and Affiliated Tribes in Oklahoma. Each tribe plans to authorize leases for general economic development.

The HEARTH Act was signed by President Obama in July 2012. It restores the authority of federally recognized tribes to develop and implement their own laws governing long-term leasing of federal Indian trust lands for residential, business, renewable energy and other purposes, which greatly expedites the approval of leases for homes and small businesses in Indian Country. Upon one-time approval of its regulations by the Department of the Interior, a tribe may process land leases without having to first gain approval from the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA).

The Assistant Secretary’s action brings to 12 the number of tribes who have had their tribal leasing regulations approved under the Act. The others are: Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, California (Feb. 1, 2013); Pueblo of Sandia, New Mexico (March 14, 2013); Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan (April 11, 2013); Ak-Chin Indian Community; California (Nov. 10, 2013); Santa Rosa Band of Cahuilla Indians, California (Nov. 10, 2013); Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma (Nov. 25, 2013); Ewiiaapaayp Band of Kumeyaay Indians, California (Dec. 10, 2013); and Kaw Nation, Oklahoma (Dec. 13, 2013).

In November 2012, the Department announced new regulations resulting from a comprehensive reform of the BIA’s antiquated regulations governing its process for approving surface leases on lands held in trust by the Federal Government for Indian tribes and individuals. As trustee, Interior manages about 56 million surface acres in Indian Country.

The new regulations streamlined the leasing approval process on Indian land, spurring increased homeownership and expediting business and commercial development, including renewable energy projects.

The Assistant Secretary – Indian Affairs oversees the BIA, which is headed by a director who is responsible for managing day-to-day operations through four offices – Indian Services, Justice Services, Trust Services and Field Operations. These offices directly administer or fund tribally based infrastructure, law enforcement, social services, tribal governance, natural and energy resources, and trust management programs for the nation’s federally recognized American Indian and Alaska Native tribes and villages through 12 regional offices and 85 agencies.

From the White House blog –

Update on the President’s My Brother’s Keeper Initiative

Broderick Johnson and Jim Shelton – Posted April 9, 2014 – “My administration’s policies—from early childhood education to job training, to minimum wages – are designed to give a hand up to everybody, every child, every American willing to work hard and take responsibility for their own success. That's the larger agenda.

But the plain fact is there are some Americans who, in the aggregate, are consistently doing worse in our society—groups that have had the odds stacked against them in unique ways that require unique solutions; groups who’ve seen fewer opportunities that have spanned generations. And by almost every measure, the group that is facing some of the most severe challenges in the 21st century in this country are boys and young men of color.”

President Obama used these words to launch My Brother’s Keeper, his initiative to help ensure that boys and young men of color in America have the opportunity to reach their full potential.

Since then, the public response has been overwhelming. We’ve heard from private philanthropies and businesses, mayors, state and local leaders, faith organizations, community based non-profits, and thousands of interested citizens, all who are committed to creating more pathways to success for these boys and young men. We will continue to engage and listen to these critical voices and those of the boys and young men this initiative focuses on, as we continue to learn from the efforts of the many stakeholders who have been committed to this cause for years. And we will do our best to live up to the optimism and incredible expectations this initiative has unleashed.

The first phase of the initiative has already begun in earnest and we want to provide an update on our progress to date and a sense of what to expect in the near future.

The Task Force has begun a 90-day process to develop the plans and infrastructure required to implement and sustain the initiative’s efforts. We are currently listening and engaging, working with stakeholders across the country to get their feedback on how we can all work together to make this initiative a success.

On the day of the launch in February, President Obama signed a Presidential Memorandum on “Creating and Expanding Ladders of Opportunity for Boys and Young Men of Color” which created a Federal Task Force to provide an assessment of and recommendations on how public and private actors can improve measurably expected educational and life outcomes and address persistent opportunity gaps. To inform that work, the President called for tools that will assess critical indicators of life outcomes for boys and young men of color and online engagement to lift up strategies, practices and programs with strong evidence of improving outcomes.

The Task Force’s work begins with identifying these critical indicators. We are focusing on five key moments that mark critical junctures on the path to healthy and productive adulthood: early learning and literacy, pathway to college and careers, ladders to jobs, mentors and support networks, and interactions with criminal justice and violent crime. Participating federal agencies are also now beginning to assess strategies, practices and programs to determine how they impact life outcomes for boys and young men of color. All of this work will inform a report by the Task Force on our progress and recommendations that we will submit to the President at the end of this 90-day listening and learning process.

At the same time, ten leading foundations have launched a private sector coalition that seeks to invest at least $200 million dollars over the next five years to find and rapidly spread solutions that have the highest potential for impact. This is on top of $150 million in current spending that these foundations have already committed toward this work. These foundations have announced they aim to put in place a strategy and infrastructure for coordination of their investments and additional commitments from a diverse array of actors from other sectors.

My Brother’s Keeper is focused on unlocking the full potential of boys and young men of color—something that will not only benefit them, but all of America. The Federal Task Force will pursue collaborative and multidisciplinary approaches to building ladders of opportunity. We are excited about the progress we are making and believe this effort has the potential to teach us a great deal about using evidence-based strategies to achieve the universal goals we have for all of our nation’s children.

*****

Broderick Johnson is Assistant to the President and White House Cabinet Secretary, and the Chair of the My Brother’s Keeper Task Force. Jim Shelton is the Deputy Secretary of Education and Executive Director of the Task Force.

Pushes to improve Public Education for Native American Students

Just 63 percent of Native American Students in ND graduate High School

Washington, DC - April 9, 2014 - U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp, a member of the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, today during a Senate hearing spoke about the importance of making sure public education programs are strengthened to better support Native American children. The hearing examined public education programs for Native children across the country and sought ideas to strengthen them.

About 93 percent of Native American students in the U.S. attend public school, including the vast majority of Native students in North Dakota. But just 63 percent of Native American students in North Dakota graduate high school, compared to 90 percent for their white peers in the state.

“Native American students should have every opportunity to succeed in the classroom. But too often we’re losing Native students who are falling behind or not graduating high school,” said Heitkamp. “We can’t accept the growing disparity between Native and white students as the norm. We need to do everything possible to raise awareness about education for Native students – as today’s hearing is doing – and seek real solutions to close this widening achievement gap. My Commission on Native Children would take a strong step toward accomplishing these goals, and I’ll continue to work with schools and tribes to make sure our country fulfills its trust responsibilities and supports public education for Native students.”

While academic performance has improved for other groups, rates have remained virtually stagnant or in some cases declined for Native students, causing them to fall further behind their peers. Studies show that severe poverty hurts children’s educational growth. According to North Dakota KIDS COUNT, half of Native children in the state live in a household with an income below the poverty line. Additionally, there is currently a 31 point gap in 8th grade math proficiency between Native American and white children in North Dakota.

Last month, the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights issued documents finding that Native students are disproportionately expelled, suspended, and held back. Heitkamp’s bipartisan bill to create a Commission on Native Children would look at such challenges facing Native students and seek to find ways to address them so Native children have every opportunity to succeed. The U.S. Secretary of Education would be part of the 11-member Commission. Additionally, the Commission would make recommendations to improve school attendance, performance, and graduation rates for Native children across all grade levels.

Heitkamp has also backed legislation to preserve and protect Native American languages and culture through education programs in Indian Country. The bill would establish a grant program to support Native language immersion instruction programs, which have been shown to improve academic performance and attendance, and equip Native youth with the tools they need to be successful into the future.

Editorials –

Sota guest editorial –

Growth for Growth's Sake Will Kill Us All

By Gar Alperovitz

(Published on Friday, April 11, 2014 by Common Dreams.)

One economic fact is held to be self-evident: that the future well-being of the United States requires economic growth — preferably, as much of it as we can muster. Despite wildly divergent policy recommendations, this basic assumption is made clear and explicit by everyone from the fiscally conservative Club for Growth to the left-leaning Center for American Progress. In the boardroom of the Federal Reserve, at the negotiating table for the Trans-Pacific Partnership and on the shale fields of North Dakota, our national economic policy is built on the unshakable conviction that the only way to grow the middle class is to grow the economy — by any means necessary.

Aside from the fact that the top 1 percent has taken most of the gains of growth, leaving the rest of society in virtual stalemate for three decades, there is a profound problem with this solution. Indeed, it’s time to face an ecological truth that makes the traditional assumption increasingly untenable, as unpopular and difficult as this conclusion might be: Growth isn’t always possible. Nor is it necessarily desirable.

Growth is good?

For the generation that came of age in the post-WWII period, the “growth is good” assumption made perfect sense. And why wouldn’t it? The period between 1946 and 1973 saw the emergence of an “American dream” that was characterized by a robust middle class and accompanied by an annual increase in real GDP that averaged close to 4 percent. But as growth began to slow in the 1970s, our national economic politics began to split in two, with the vestiges of the Keynesian liberal consensus, which favored government involvement in the economy, clashing more and more frequently with a nascent neoliberalism that supported free-market policies. The systemic problem posed by long-term stagnation has been masked by the spectacle of Washington politics, where everything seems to come down to conservatives animated by laissez-faire fantasies and the rearguard liberal defenders of a crumbling social safety net fighting each other to a perpetually dramatic stalemate.

Even if this particular ideological logjam were to suddenly and unexpectedly clear, the case for unrestricted growth is not convincing for other reasons — in particular, environmental ones, as the new report from the U.N.’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change makes clear. The heat waves, droughts, floods and other harbingers of a changing climate catalogued in the report continue to multiply, and governments are now forced to get serious about adaptations to the world our carbon-fueled economy has produced. Yet so far a serious conversation about reducing emissions remains politically impossible. Despite the head-in-the-sand antics of “skeptics,” climate change is real, and economic growth, even at today’s historically depressed levels, is a major factor.

Other studies suggest we are approaching real limits to the availability of numerous basic resources necessary to economic advancement. No technological quick fix is going to change the fact that our finite planet has definite limits. And the more we grow, the more we begin to trip over them, in an increasingly chaotic and interconnected fashion. The energy business and its deleterious impact on the environment are only the most obvious of many examples: The trajectory of the hydrocarbon industry toward costly and carbon-intensive tar-sand extraction and extreme deep-water drilling now makes “sense” from the perspective of a market that has exploited most easily available energy deposits and ignores the consequences of its actions with impunity. Meanwhile, hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is pouring more carbon into the air while depleting dwindling aquifers and destroying the very rock formations that some had hoped might be available to sequester excess carbon. The planet cannot sustain this type of growth, but the economy, we are told, commands it.

This is a problem. Our national political debate is so constrained that accelerated growth is presumed to be the necessary precondition for broad prosperity. We’re told the only way to help the 1 in 6 Americans living in poverty is to keep enlarging the pie until everyone has a big enough slice. But is this worth it if we lose Miami in the process? A rising tide used to lift all boats, but now it just drowns our cities. A genuine alternative instead of attempting to press beyond the limits we face would distribute the fruits of our technological and economic prowess away from those at the top and toward the vast majority.

Turbocharged

Moreover, it’s unclear — even if we decided the benefits of turbocharged growth outweighed the very real ecological risks — that it would be possible. As Thomas Piketty’s new book “Capital in the Twenty-First Century” amply demonstrates, the era of 4 or 5 percent growth in the developed countries was a historical exception, and we’re likely to be heading back to an era characterized by slower growth and steadily increasing income inequality. In other words, we need to rethink our political strategies for an economic situation likely to be dominated by stagnation and decay.

Traditional economic policies, both left and right, assumed that growth could drive robust progress toward a more equal society. Take the so-called Treaty of Detroit. The labor movement’s historic post-WWII compromise with capital traded the productivity of a disciplined workforce for the promise of the steady growth of a blue-collar middle class. A look at today’s Detroit, of course, shows to what extent that treaty has been definitively broken. The promise of stable, high-wage manufacturing jobs has given way to a city where unemployment is over 18 percent and 4 in 10 people live below the poverty line. Meanwhile, the new automobile manufacturing jobs being created are precarious, low-wage positions, not pathways to middle-class economic security. Consequently, what meager growth there is no longer brings with it a guarantee of broad prosperity.

Aggressive growth is impossible ecologically and implausible economically. We need economic strategies at the local, state and national levels that prioritize community benefit over corporate gain, and which presume a need for local resiliency instead of depending on uncontrolled growth. We also need to develop new strategies to democratize wealth in the face of extreme inequality. Like the programs developed in “the state and local laboratories of democracy” that led to the New Deal, numerous experiments percolating across the country in the “new economy” — building cooperative and community-owned businesses, developing locally focused supply chains at a municipal and regional level, building new forms for public ownership of essential services like banking and power generation — may just point the way. The end of growth poses a long-term systemic challenge, and such explorations suggest that a new direction may be quietly being explored in the midst of economic and ecological degradation. It is a direction that is likely to accelerate as economic and social pain of the decaying economic system continues to force Americans to explore solutions that take us beyond the tired nostrums of the past.

A version of this article also appeared on Al-Jazeera America.

*****

Gar Alperovitz is the Lionel R. Bauman Professor of Political Economy at the University of Maryland and co-founder of the Democracy Collaborative. His latest book is What Then Must We Do?: Straight Talk About the Next American Revolution. Other books include America Beyond Capitalism and (with Lew Daly) Unjust Deserts: How the Rich Are Taking Our Common Inheritance and Why We Should Take It Back.

Brief editorial comments from the editor’s desk –

On and Off the Lake Traverse Reservation

The next Community Forum for Constitutional Revision will be held on Thursday, April 17th from 1:00-3:00 p.m. at the Administration Building.

The SWO Constitutional Revision Committee will be here at the Admin Building the last two Thursdays in April to assist Tribal members with filling out proposed amendment forms and answering questions

See more information in the Legals section and also in a notice elsewhere in this edition.

*****

Last week the National Security Agency (NSA) presented its highest honor to all Native American Code Talkers.

The presentation took place in Washington, DC at the Smithsonian Institute Museum of the American Indian.

Among those honored posthumously is Guy Rondell, SWO member and WWII Code Talker.

The award is in a traveling exhibit on display now at the Museum. Another is on permanent display at the NSA headquarters.

This honoring is well deserved, giving recognition to valuable contributions that remained secret for many years. Many Code Talkers did not tell of their experiences even to their own families.

*****

Pidamiya Tom Wilson of KXSW and Sophia Renville Brown of Wac’ang’a for sharing photo highlights of last week’s Walk to End Domestic Violence.

This is an important annual reminder that all of us need to be involved in solutions for domestic violence and child abuse.

*****

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate participated in a camp last week on the Rosebud Reservation. Purpose was to protest the environmentally unfriendly Keystone XL pipeline project.

Watch for photos and news from the camp in our next week’s edition of the Sota.

*****

Please read “Kids Will Be Kids” by Sara McGregor-Okroi. And consider what is at stake in parenting our children.

Sara’s story about her friend certainly touches our hearts.

And how many more stories do each of us carry inside, of our own family members, friends and acquaintances whose lives were ended by a drunk or impaired driver?

*****

Do you have any unused old prescription drugs around the house?

Consider taking them to the “Taking Back Unwanted Prescription Drugs” event on April 26th.

Read more in this issues about this cooperative take-back sponsored by Aliive-Roberts County, Roberts County Sheriff’s Office, and the DEA.

Thanks to Erin Griffin for sharing news and photos of our SWC students who recently attended the Native American Literature Symposium

And Shannon White for reporting on our Tribal Law Enforcement checkpoints and crackdown on DUIs.

*****

Elder's Meditation:

"Spiritual matters are difficult to explain because you must live with them in order to fully understand them." -- Thomas Yellowtail, CROW

To know something we must become one with it. We cannot know what a flower smells like until we actually smell it. Close your eyes and experience the fragrance. The Elders say there are two worlds, the Seen World and the Unseen World. To experience the Seen World we need to physically pick the flower and smell it. To experience the Unseen World we need to know about principles, laws and values; and no matter what our mind or our physical senses tell us, we must decide and act on these principles. If someone does wrong to us, we must pray for that person or persons to have peace, happiness and joy in their life. We must not get even or retaliate in any way. Only by doing this can we understand spiritual matters.

Great Spirit, give me your power whenever my weakness shows so I can live by spiritual decisions.

*****

Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

He can compress the most words into the smallest ideas of any man I ever met. Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Consistency is the last refuge of the unimaginative. Oscar Wilde (1854 - 1900)

The nice part about being a pessimist is that you are constantly being either proven right or pleasantly surprised. George F. Will (1941 - )

You have no control over what the other guy does. You only have control over what you do. [info][add][mail] A. J. Kitt

We should be taught not to wait for inspiration to start a thing. Action always generates inspiration. Inspiration seldom generates action. Frank Tibolt

Change has a considerable psychological impact on the human mind. To the fearful it is threatening because it means that things may get worse. To the hopeful it is encouraging because things may get better. To the confident it is inspiring because the challenge exists to make things better. King Whitney Jr.

My friend is one... who take me for what I am. Henry David Thoreau (1817 - 1862)

*****

The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or “opinion” letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author’s name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor’s explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Earlier receipt of copy is always appreciated. So, if you are aware of a date or message that needs to be publicized or advertised, please let us know about it in advance of the weekly deadline.

The preferred way to submit typed articles and ads, art and photos, is by e-mail.

The editor can be reached at the following e-mail address:

earthskyweb@cs.com

For more information, leave a message on the Sota production office voicemail (605) 938-4452, or send a fax to the 24-hour dedicated line (605) 938-4676.

-- CDF

Obituaries –

Services held for Bertha Baker

Bertha Jane Baker, age 63, of Minneapolis, Minn. journeyed to the Spirit World on Monday, April 7th, 2014 at her residence.

She was born on December 11, 1950 in Sisseton, South Dakota the daughter of George Isaac and Sarah Goodbird.

Bertha was a homemaker. She liked spending time with her children and grandchildren. Bertha liked being at home with her family. She was a big Minnesota Twins fan.

Survived by a son Anthony Baker and Arnold Baker III; nine grandchildren; a brother Arnold Goodbird; other relatives and friends.

Preceded in death by George Isaac her father, Sarah Isaac her mother and Carol Isaac "sister."

Funeral services for Bertha Baker was held on Friday afternoon, April 11th at Long Hollow District Center.

An all-night wake was held on Thursday at the Long Hollow District Center.

Honorary Casket Bearers were Richard Isaac, Storm Blue and Dean Renville.

Casket Bearers were Roman Derby, Neal Goodbird, Andrew Hayes, Narceace Lufkins, Carlton Ross, Derrick Derby and Chipper Hopkins.

The Chilson Funeral Home in Winsted, Minnesota served the family. Online condolences may be made to www.chilsonfuneralhome.com/.

Memorial service Monday for Daniel “Skip” Spider

Memorial Service for Daniel Merle "Skip" Spider, 62, of Fargo, ND formerly of Sisseton, SD will be held on Monday, April 14, 2014 at 1:00 PM at the Tribal Community Center, Agency Village, SD with the Rev. Clifford Canku, Jr. Heminger CLP, and Pastor Nippy Owen officiating.

Pianists will be Kaye Bursheim, Billy Kohl, and Betty Jean Neilan.

Urnbearers will be Frank White and Edmond TwoStars.

Honorary Urnbearers will be Mary "Babe Ruth" Spider, Jake Blacksmith, Arlene Spider, Dusty Spider, Faith Lufkins and Andrew Hayes, Earl "Rex" Owen, Darrell and Cheryl Renville, Cheryl Spider, and Ron and Tammy DuMarce.

Wake Services were held Saturday and Sunday at the Community Center.

Interment will be in the Ascension Presbyterian Cemetery, Big Coulee, SD. The Cahill Funeral Chapel of Sisseton, SD is in charge of arrangements.

Daniel Merle "Skip" Spider was born on January 12, 1952 in Sisseton, SD to Alfred and Geraldine (Williams) Spider. He grew up in the Wilmot area attending school at Spring Grove country school and attended Wilmot Public School. After his education he worked various construction jobs in the surrounding area. Skip liked to travel, and play Bingo until his health failed. Skip resided in Rapid City, Yellow Thunder Camp, Sioux Falls, Minneapolis, MN and Fargo, ND, where he made his home for the past 17 years. He made many friends where ever he went. He liked to joke with everyone and was very easy to get along with. Skip passed away on April 8, 2014 at his home in Fargo.

Skip is survived by five brothers, Myron Williams, Gaylord Williams, Earlen Spider, and Maurice Spider all of Sisseton, SD, and Rodney Spider of Lincoln, NB, two sisters, LaVonne Spider of Watertown, SD and Lola Spider of Sisseton, SD, and numerous cousins and nieces and nephews.

Skip was preceded in death by his parents, and three sisters, Bonita, Alfreda, and Lola, one niece Melissa Spider, and one nephew, Scott Groves.

For Skip's obituary and on-line registry please visit www.cahillfuneralchapel.com/.

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor’s note: The following comes from the editor’s column and the Sota “deadlines and policies” statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or “opinion” letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author’s name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and must be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor’s explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Kurt BlueDog recognized with lifetime achievement award

The Great Plains Indian Gaming Association, consisting of 24 Tribes from 6 States held its Annual Conference and Trade Show recently at the Mystic Lake Casino Hotel in Minnesota.

At the Banquet and Awards Dinner held on March 31, 2014, Kurt Lugar the Executive Director presented the 2nd Annual Stanley R. Crooks Lifetime Achievement Award to Kurt BlueDog, SWO member from Toka Nuwan.

Kurt BlueDog was also recognized by Ernie Stevens, Chairman of the National Indian Gaming Association at the Conference. Kurt has served on the NIGA Executive Committee for 24 years.

Bowling tournament held in memory of Lola Jean Wanna

In conjunction with the Great Plains Native American Bowling Tournament held March 6-8, 2014 in memory of Lola Jean Wanna, the family sponsored prizes of a star quilt and a cash prize to the woman who bowled the highest game with handicap in the singles or doubles events.

Lola looked forward each year to bowling in the tournament with her family and friends, until her death in February of 2010, after a two-year bout with brain cancer.

The winner in 2011 was Lisa Sumner of Red Lake, Minn. Lisa bowled a scratch game of 245 which, combined with her handicap of 35 pins, totaled a 280 game. Lisa won a bowling ball and a cash prize of $200.

The winner in 2012 was Shanda Rieker of Aberedeen. Shanda bowled a scratch game of 268 which, combined with her handicap of 32 pins, totaled a 300 game. Shanda won a bowling ball and a cash prize of $150.

The winner in 2013 was Janessa Barse of New Effington. Janessa bowled a scratch game of 221 which, combined with her handicap of 65 pins, totaled a game of 286. Janessa won a bowling ball and a cash prize of $150.

The winner this year, 2014, was Anna Marie English of Red Lake, Minn. Anna is the niece of the winner in 2011, Lisa Sumner. Anna Marie bowled a game of 267 which, combined with her handicap of 33 pins, totaled a game of 300. She won the star quilt and a cash prize of $150. Congratulations, Anna Marie!

The family would like to take this opportunity to thank the Village Bowl for allowing them to sponsor the memorial, and the tournament staff for all of their assistance this year and the last three years, to enable the memorial to be successful.

Poems from the pen of Elden Hayes

Old Age

Wish me well on the journey

for everybody will take the trip

whether it's from those cigarettes

or the sour taste of that last sip

 

I'll shake your hand out of respect

as the cycle of life continues on

you will stand in a better place

but the memories are never gone

 

each of us will battle the storm

but acceptance will lessen our fears

there will be a joy in leaving

it's a release from the hurting years

 

we have grown accustomed to sadness

and we have accepted rejection

we only see the stars that fall

when we are crippled by depression

 

our life doesn't last many years

and seldom do we reach the last stage

we need to believe the future will change

that one day we will die from old age.

 

12-22-13

Freezing

The wind barely slowed as it passed him by

he traveled with a staggered gait

he thought about the house near by

and for the heat he couldn't wait

 

the wind had stolen his stocking cap

he figured it must be in the next county

the road didn't seem this full of snow

he was wondering where the farm house could be

 

he listened for a barking dog

but all that he heard was the winds roar

he thought about returning to the car

but it was not where it was before

 

all that he could see was churning snow

he realized that he was snow blind

nagging thoughts were eating at him

but he tried to push them from his mind

 

maybe this tree could be a wind break

and gather the strength to find that farm

even though the tips of his ears were bleeding

his body was starting to feel warm…………..

 

1-6-14

Feel My Pain

Sitting in darkness of this lonesome prison cell

sometimes makes a man think he

has died and gone straight to hell!

 

Where is my girlfriend, and the few

people I held close and called my friends

who I stood by through thick and thin.

 

But when you need them most

they’re gone in the wind.

 

A year and 8 months have passed

meaningless, dull and gray.

 

I try to capture the light but

it only seems to fade away.

 

When everyone you love

and hold dear

turns their back on you

even though you have done them no wrong

a person like me can only keep my head up

stand tall and be strong

 

Now that you know exactly how I feel

please don’t forget your loved ones

and friends behind these prison walls

for their pain is so real . . .

 

Elroy F. White Jr. 206054

2305 Minnesota Blvd. SE

St. Cloud, MN 56304

 

 


Who Was I

I’m a child with no direction

lost my way as a child

put in a place that was to

teach me right from wrong

many times I wake and find

I’m in the same place

 

A place that was to be lovfe

taught about how to work hard

and do it right

a leather strap laid across the

back of my legs and bottom

many times I cried and wonder

why

 

Am I that horrible child that

you can’t teach me guide me

from harm

how am I to learn what love is

I wanted to show you who I am

I am a good boy

my mind is what’s wrong with me

mom you were love, caring, protective

you couldn’t stop my beating I got

sorrow lie in your heart and eyes

you explain to me to do better

 

Mom your real love was wasted

on me to be your toy of joy

what am I doing, what is this

oral stuff you’re trying to teach

a boy with no knowledge of

what he is dong

send me and my brother

out with a buttered bread

and sugar

being told not to get into

trouble

 

My diversity is trying to

find out who am I

now my time begins behind

wire fences two man rooms

I’m taught about who I am

Native American with no real

direction

 

I see me as a warrior

as a singer, as a dancer

in my dreams

 

No culture is taught to me

behind wire fences I know

what I want, I want to

be a man with direction

new start looking at what

I can do to change to be a

better man

 

Hard heart is what I need

not to follow your ways any more

find in my own heart that

I can be a real man

 

My road is long and hard

cork in the bottle I need

no more destruction in my

wake

 

Today I go alone and I

will change and bring my

self with o0pen eyes and figure

out what I really want in life

 

A new start honesty

fear to try new things

a drum canupa and a

song to sing loud to my

Creator

 

A higher power to help

guide me on the road of

change

 

Walk with open eyes

a new heart and with

my head up

no matter what they

say

who was I

 

Roland Brant

2013

St. Mary’s Church news

On Maundy Thursday, April 17th, services will be held at Gethsemane and St. James at 7:00 p.m.

On Good Friday, April 18th, services will be held at 12:00 noon at Gethsemane. The Good Friday walk will begin at 1:00 p.m. at St. James with Fr. Cecisel.

Easter Vigil will begin at 5:00 p.m. on April 19th at St. Mary’s-Webster. This vigil is for all congregations of the Sisseton Mission.

Easter Sunday services on April 20:

St. James           7:00 a.m.          Enemy Swim

Gethsemane      9:00 a.m.          Sisseton

St. John’s          11:00 a.m.        Browns Valley

St. Mary’s         11:00 a.m.        Old Agency

Gordy Pratt in concert

Gordy Pratt of Spearfish will bring his music and comedy to the stage of the Sisseton Performing Arts Center Friday, April 25, at 7:00 p.m. Called "The Victor Borge of the Guitar," Gordy entertains and engages audiences with a concert that blends world-class guitar playing, original songs, popular favorites and his unique sense of humor. Gordy has appeared in concert venues from Vancouver to San Francisco to New York, including ABC's "Good Morning America," and numerous other television and radio shows.

His concert in Sisseton is sponsored by the Sisseton Arts Council. South Dakota Arts Council support is provided with funds from the State of South Dakota, through the Department of Tourism, and the National Endowment for the Arts. Freewill donations will be accepted.

Disenrollment leaves Natives 'culturally homeless'

As tribes gain wealth, a debate over who is "Indian enough" to be a tribal member has led to a rising tide of expulsions.

Portland, OR – Mia Mia Prickett's ancestor was a leader of the Cascade Indians along the Columbia River and was one of the chiefs who signed an 1855 treaty that helped establish the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde in Oregon.

But the Grand Ronde now wants to disenroll Prickett and 79 relatives, and possibly hundreds of other tribal members, because they no longer satisfy new enrollment requirements.

Prickett's family is fighting the effort, part of what some experts have dubbed the "disenrollment epidemic" — a rising number of dramatic clashes over tribal belonging that are sweeping through more than a dozen states, from California to Michigan.

"In my entire life, I have always known I was an Indian. I have always known my family's history, and I am so proud of that," Prickett said. She said her ancestor chief Tumulth was unjustly accused of participating in a revolt and was executed by the U.S. Army — and hence didn't make it onto the tribe's roll, which is now a membership requirement.

The prospect of losing her membership is "gut-wrenching," Prickett said.

"It's like coming home one day and having the keys taken from you," she said. "You're culturally homeless."

The enrollment battles come at a time when many tribes — long poverty-stricken and oppressed by government policies — are finally coming into their own, gaining wealth and building infrastructure with revenues from Indian casinos.

Critics of disenrollment say the rising tide of tribal expulsions is due to greed over increased gambling profits, along with political in-fighting and old family and personal feuds.

But at the core of the problem, tribes and experts agree, is a debate over identity — over who is "Indian enough" to be a tribal member.

"It ultimately comes down to the question of how we define what it means to be Native today," said David Wilkins, a political science professor at the University of Minnesota and a member of North Carolina's Lumbee Tribe. "As tribes who suffered genocidal policies, boarding school laws and now out-marriage try to recover their identity in the 20th century, some are more fractured, and they appear to lack the kind of common elements that lead to true cohesion."

Wilkins, who has tracked the recent increase in disenrollment across the nation, says tribes have kicked out thousands of people.

Historically, ceremonies and prayers — not disenrollment — were used to resolve conflicts because tribes essentially are family-based, and "you don't cast out your relatives," Wilkins said. Banishment was used in rare, egregious situations to cast out tribal members who committed crimes such as murder or incest.

Most tribes have based their membership criteria on blood quantum or on descent from someone named on a tribe's census rolls or treaty records — old documents that can be flawed.

There are 566 federally recognized tribes and determining membership has long been considered a hallmark of tribal sovereignty. A 1978 U.S. Supreme Court ruling reaffirmed that policy when it said the federal government should stay out of most tribal membership disputes.

Mass disenrollment battles started in the 1990s, just as Indian casinos were establishing a foothold. Since then, Indian gambling revenues have skyrocketed from $5.4 billion in 1995 to a record $27.9 billion in 2012, according to the National Indian Gaming Commission.

Tribes have used the money to build housing, schools and roads, and to fund tribal health care and scholarships. They also have distributed casino profits to individual tribal members.

Of the nearly 240 tribes that run more than 420 gambling establishments across 28 states, half distribute a regular per-capita payout to their members. The payout amounts vary from tribe to tribe. And membership reductions lead to increases in the payments — though tribes deny money is a factor in disenrollment and say they're simply trying to strengthen the integrity of their membership.

Disputes over money come on top of other issues for tribes. American Indians have one of the highest rates of interracial marriage in the U.S. — leading some tribes in recent years to eliminate or reduce their blood quantum requirements. Also, many Native Americans don't live on reservations, speak Native languages or "look" Indian, making others question their bloodline claims.

Across the nation, disenrollment has played out in dramatic, emotional ways that left communities reeling and cast-out members stripped of their payouts, health benefits, fishing rights, pensions and scholarships.

In Central California, the Picayune Rancheria of the Chukchansi Indians has disenrolled hundreds. Last year, the dispute over banishments became so heated that sheriff's deputies were called to break up a violent skirmish between two tribal factions that left several people injured.

In Washington, after the Nooksack Tribal Council voted to disenroll 306 members citing documentation errors, those affected sued in tribal and federal courts. They say the tribe, which has two casinos but gives no member payouts, was racially motivated because the families being cast out are part Filipino. This week, the Nooksack Court of Appeals declined to stop the disenrollments.

And in Michigan, where Saginaw Chippewa membership grew once the tribe started giving out yearly per-capita casino payments that peaked at $100,000, a recent decline in gambling profits led to disenrollment battles targeting hundreds.

The Grand Ronde, which runs Oregon's most profitable Indian gambling operation, also saw a membership boost after the casino was built in 1995, from about 3,400 members to more than 5,000 today. The tribe has since tightened membership requirements twice, and annual per-capita payments decreased from about $5,000 to just over $3,000.

Some members recently were cast out for being enrolled in two tribes, officials said, which is prohibited. But for Prickett's relatives, who were tribal members before the casino was built, the reasons were unclear.

Prickett and most of her relatives do not live on the reservation. In fact, only about 10 percent of Grand Ronde members do. Rather, they live on ancestral lands. The tribe has even used the family's ties to the river to fight another tribe's casino there.

Grand Ronde spokeswoman Siobhan Taylor said the tribe's membership pushed for an enrollment audit, with the goal of strengthening its "family tree." She declined to say how many people were tabbed for disenrollment.

But Prickett's family says it has been told that up to 1,000 could be cast out, and has filed an ethics complaint before the tribal court. They say the process has been devastating for a family active in tribal arts and events, and in teaching the language Chinuk Wawa.

"I have made a commitment to both our language and our tribe," said Eric Bernardo, one of only seven Chinuk Wawa teachers who also faces disenrollment. "And no matter what some people in the tribe decide, I will continue to honor that commitment."

Social “helper” column dedicated to young generation Oyate –

Wawokiyape

By Sherielle “Shay” DuMarce

Q: is brutal honesty considered tough love or just outright mean? I am not perfect in anyway but my cousin and her "friends" are always talking b.s. on FB and I have half a nerve left before I throw her and her friends business out there for the world to see but would this be wrong of me?

A: In some cases brutal honesty is okay but in other cases people use it just to be rude. If you’re doing it for revenge then I would say just stop. Why waste your energy? There is no written law or golden rule that says everyone has to like you or you to like them. That is just not the way this world works and in all brutal honesty it seems like drama queens having a battle in FB, which in itself is pathetic!

So in my most honest, brutal opinion I would just say let them talk, don’t stoop to that level and it may be time to put your big girl undies on and block these people. Be the adult and turn the other cheek.

A new year comes with new ways to reinvent yourself, maybe this is your opportunity...change the way you would normally respond with something positive.

Thank you for sharing.

Shay.

New resources available regarding Birth Weight

April 11, 2014 - North Dakota Compass, the new statewide social indicators website, is pleased to announce that their Low Birth Weight key measure within the Early Childhood topic area has been updated with the most current data available. An infant's birth weight indicates both the mother's health and nutritional status, and the infant's chances for growth, overall development, and long-term health. Newborns weighing less than 5 pounds, 8 ounces are considered to have a low birth weight and may be at an increased risk of disease and even of death during their early months and years of life. Working to reduce the number of low birth weight infants can improve the overall health of North Dakota.

To offer additional context to the updated data and charts, North Dakota Compass provides two new articles this month.

In April's Ask a Researcher column, Clayton Hilmert, a health psychologist at NDSU, describes the impact of stress on infants' birth weight, using research from the 2009 Red River flood. Also available is the For Discussion column. In this column, the Village Family Service Center provides some suggestions for coping with stress.

In addition to the updated data and charts provided on North Dakota Compass, our partner, North Dakota KIDS COUNT, has recently released the latest edition of Insights on Children, which focuses on low birth weight. The publication presents current and historical data on birth weight by county for our state and highlights contributing factors and preventive measures that will increase the likelihood of having a healthy weight newborn.

To read these documents in their entirety visit www.ndcompass.org and www.ndkidscount.org.

*Ask a Researcher: Stress effects on pregnancy: The impact of the 2009 Red River flood on birth weight by Clayton Hilmert, health psychologist in the NDSU Department of Psychology.

*For Discussion: Using mindfulness to calm your busy mind provided by the Village Family Service Center.

*Insights on Children publication provided by North Dakota KIDS COUNT.

***

North Dakota Compass is located at the Center for Social Research at North Dakota State University. ND Compass, sponsored by the Bush Foundation, the Otto Bremer Foundation, The Dakota Medical Foundation, and NDSU, gives everyone in our state - policymakers, business and community leaders, and concerned individuals who live and work here - a common foundation to act on issues to improve our communities by tracking and analyzing trends in areas that affect our quality of life. For more information, visit www.ndcompass.org.

Prairie Doc Perspective

How to prevent early aging

By Richard P. Holm MD

Everyone wants to find a way to prevent aging.

Let's face it, we will all grow old … that is unless we die early from a motor vehicle accident, cancer, or an early stroke or heart attack. Of course even if we took every precaution, one of those causes for early death might occur. But now-a-days don't we know how to prevent aging arteries, heart attacks, and strokes?

Not surprisingly, in a response to the call to prevent early death, there has been an effort to just look or act younger in this country. The pharmaceutical industry has developed estrogen and testosterone replacement, as well as Viagra to help sexual function; Botox and special creams to erase wrinkles; and even steroids and non-steroidals to treat arthritis.

But what have we done to find ways to protect our aging blood vessels. In the 90s researchers started blaming aging on excessive oxidation and not long after, we heard advertisers talking about antioxidant effects trying to sell this product or that supplement. We've been advised to eat this diet and buy that book each holding the secret to a long, oxidant-free healthy life. Unfortunately we have learned that the main oxidative driver is simply too much food, and there's no pill for that.

After scientific researchers found high cholesterol as a mild predictor for vascular disease, many have been focusing on cholesterol lowering medicines in an attempt to prevent aging arteries and atherosclerosis. Despite the fact that lowering cholesterol has been disappointing in the prevention of vascular disease, sales for statins, the main cholesterol-lowering group of meds has grown to be a five and a half billion dollar yearly business.

All in all, these medicinal short cuts to prevent vascular aging have too little effect, and pale in comparison to the most powerful preventative treatment.

Recently the World Health Organization (WHO) stated that three-quarters of all cardiovascular deaths and disease are connected to lifestyle. Say it another way: three-quarters of all cardiovascular deaths could be delayed by making lifestyle changes. We're talking: use of tobacco, unhealthy diet habits, psychosocial stress, and most important physical inactivity. Indeed the real fountain of youth comes from lifestyle, and not medicines. There are no short cuts.

The way to prevent premature aging is not by a pill, but by the way you live.

*****

Dr. Rick Holm wrote this Prairie Doc Perspective for "On Call®," a weekly program where medical professionals discuss health concerns for the general public. "On Call®" is produced by the Healing Words Foundation in association with the South Dakota State University Journalism Department. "On Call®" airs Thursdays on South Dakota Public Broadcasting-Television at 7 p.m. Central, 6 p.m. Mountain. Visit us at OnCallTelevision.com.

Health and Wellness –

Zani Unpi

Child Abuse Prevention

Submitted by Jodi Lutjens, RN

Maternal Child Health

Public Health Nursing

Woodrow Wilson Keeble Memorial Health Care Center

A healthy, safe and nurturing environment is essential to the well-being of children and their families.  Access to health care, good nutrition, a safe and secure home and a nurturing environment characterized by loving action and loving words, are all important in preventing child abuse. 

Child abuse can cause physical injuries.  Child abuse can also cause stress that can disrupt early brain development.  Extreme stress can harm the development of the nervous and immune systems.  Children who are abused or neglected are at higher risk for health problems as adults.  Some of these problems include alcoholism, depression, drug abuse, eating disorders, obesity, sexual promiscuity, smoking, suicide and certain chronic diseases.  (Centers for Disease Control)

Child abuse includes all types of abuse and neglect that occur to children under the age of 18.  There are four common types of abuse:

Physical abuse occurs when a child's body is injured as a result of hitting, kicking, shaking, burning or other show of force.

Sexual abuse involves engaging a child in sexual acts.  It includes fondling, rape, and exposing a child to other sexual activities.

Emotional abuse refers to behaviors that harm a child's self-worth or emotional well-being.  Name calling, shaming, rejection, withholding love and threatening are all examples of emotional abuse.

Neglect is the failure to meet a child's basic needs.  These needs include housing, food, clothing, education and access to medical care.

The risk for child abuse and neglect increases in families where there is a lot of stress.  This stress can result from a family history of violence, drug or alcohol abuse, poverty and chronic health problems.  Families that do not have the support of nearby friends and relatives are also at increased risk.  A community that has a problem with violence can also create an environment where child abuse is accepted.

Prevention of Child Abuse:

Stop child abuse before it starts.  It is important that parents learn positive parenting skills, including good communication, appropriate discipline, and how to respond to children's physical and emotional needs.  Here are some tips for parents:

Bonding with Your Baby

The brain's ability to regulate emotions and respond to stress can be damaged if a baby does not have a strong bond with a parent.  Babies who feel loved have a better chance to grow up to be adults who trust and know how to return affection.  It is very important that you respond when your baby cries.  This starts the process of your baby learning to trust that you are there for them.  Hold and touch your baby as much as possible.  Use feeding time to look into your baby's eyes, smile and talk to your baby.  Babies love to hear human voices.  Interact with your baby by playing with them as they grow.

Coping with a Crying Baby - Preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome

Crying is the primary means of communication available to a young baby.  Crying is a normal part of a baby's development.  Because evidence suggests that crying is what triggers some parents to shake their babies, it is important that parents know coping strategies that can help reduce the incidence of Shaken Baby Syndrome.

The type of crying that is often most frustrating for parents is the crying that lasts for a long period of time, and the infant is unsoothable.  The National Center on Shaken Baby Syndrome recommends that parents and other caregivers take three actions to prevent Shaken Baby Syndrome:

*First - increase their contact with the baby - such as carry, walk and talk with the baby, which will help reduce the crying but may not stop it altogether.  Holding babies and responding to their cries quickly helps them to develop their sense of security and plays an important role in developing the attachment relationship.

*Second - if the crying becomes too frustrating, put the baby in the crib and walk away for a few minutes to calm themselves.

*Never - shake or hurt their baby.

If your baby does have stomach discomfort, rocking may help.  Holding the baby over the shoulder, over the knees or cradled in your arms face down may comfort the baby.  Remember, to always place the baby on his or her back when being put to bed.

Dealing With Temper Tantrums

Temper tantrums occur most often with two and three year olds.  Toddlers are becoming independent and developing their own wants, needs and ideas.   Because they are not yet able to express their wants and feelings with words, they often have temper tantrums.  It's often easier to prevent tantrums rather than deal with them once they get going.  Some ideas are:

*If you see your child becoming agitated, try to direct their attention to something else.

*Give your child a choice in small matters.

*Stick to a daily routine that balances fun activities with enough rest and healthy food.

*Anticipate when your child will be disappointed.  ("We are not going to be having a treat when we go to the park today, but we'll eat something good when we get back home.")

*Praise your child when he or she shows self-control and expresses feelings with words.

If you cannot prevent the tantrum:

*Tell your child what you expect from them and have confidence that they will behave.

*Remain calm.  Remember, a child models what they see you do.

*Holding your child during a tantrum may help a younger child feel more secure and calm down more quickly.

*Take your child to a quiet place where he or she can calm down safely.  Speak softly or play soft music.

*Some children throw tantrums to seek attention.  Try ignoring the tantrum, but pay attention to your child after he or she calms down.

*Resist overreacting to tantrums, and try to keep your sense of humor

Setting Rules With Teens

Setting rules to keep teenagers safe are important.  As resistant as they are to rules, they need them.

*Involve teenagers in setting the rules. 

*Talk about the reasons behind the rules and what you expect from them.

*Choose your battles.  Try to provide choices in things that are less important.

*Make sure your teen understands consequences ahead of time.  Be consistent in following through with these consequences.

*Don't make consequences so harsh that you or your teen can't follow through

*Allow your teens to gradually earn more freedom.

*Get to know your teen's friends and their parents, and let them know your rules and expectations.

*Remember - teens still need to know they are loved and accepted even when they don't make perfect choices.

The Importance of Seeking Help

If a parent or caregiver is feeling overwhelmed, angry, stressed or depressed, it is important that they seek help.   These feelings can affect the way children are treated.

Some options are:

*Talk to someone.

*Get babysitting help when you need a break.

*Reach out to other parents.

*Call a help line (Childhelp runs a national 24-hour hotline (1-800-4ACHILD)

*Talk to your child's school.

*Take a class for parents.

Protect Your Children - Children are Sacred!!

Resources:  http://www.cdc.gov; http://www.childwelfare.gov/.

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

Celebration at Tiospa Zina Tribal School!

Submitted by Carrie Azure

Here is a celebration!

Sandy Schneider was honored to be Sam's Club Teacher of the month of April.

She was presented with a $10.00 gift card, a set of Dr. Suess books for her classroom library, and each student was given a Gogo squeeZe applesauce pouch to enjoy.

We are very proud of Sandy and appreciate her dedication to teaching at Tiospa Zina!

Tiospa Zina awards

Submitted by Carrie Azure

Absent 1 Day: Christopher Starbuck-St. John, Colby Crawford, Koryn LaCroix, Mckenzie Deutsch, Ronnie Eagle, Peyton Bernard, Ivy Robertson, Evany Bird, James MacConnell, D'Lena Strong and Jayden Simon.

Student of the 3rd Quarter:  Keith Hagen, Perry Lufkins Jr., Rhea Johnson, Shandy Paul, Tate Cloud.

Most Improved Award:  Shai-Lyn Gill.

5th Grade A Honor Roll:  Akisa Manning-Peters, Mckenzie Deutsch, Kenna Heminger, Jace Kirk.

4th Grade A Honor Roll:  Rhea Johnson, Kristin Nelson, Promise Eastman, Kristianna Red Bear, Perry Lufkins Jr., Raydon Brown, Marshall Goodsell, Tukan Eastman, Devin Long Crow.

A Honor Roll:

Lily Blue

Tate Cloud

Mia German

Keana Owen

Berlyn Owen-Heminger

Christa White

Evany Bird

Jeslyn Crawford

Laynee Flute

Livia Long Crow

Shihenna Neilan

Shandy Paul

Paerus Robertson

Julius Stutterheim

Eva Smokey

Raydon Brown

Promise Eastman

Marshall Goodsell

Perry Lufkins Jr.

Kristianna Red Bear

Caleb Barse

Tukan Eastman

Rhea Johnson

Devin Long Crow

Kirsten Nelson

Victoria Bernard

Shania German

Kenna Herminger

Jayce Kirk

Mckenzie Deutsch

Akisa Manning-Peters

B Honor Roll:

Jaeshaun Beaudreau

Destanie Beaudreau

Theodore Feather Jr.

Dominick Goette

TeVon Hagen

James MacConnell

Creighton Renville Jr.

Wiyaka White

Isaiah Bernard

Darrell DeMarrias Jr.

Wilson Paul Jr.

Tayonna Quinn

Shanelle Sweap-Waditaka

Joshua Shepherd

Jaylyn Bedonie

Morgan Brown

Aurora Flute

Elijah Hansen

Lakiya Johnson

Sonni Redday

Americus Ross

Elexis Sanchez

Jaelynn White

Gavin Wolfe

Lauren Fatland

Phoenix Ironheart

Ivy Robertson

Winter Thunderhawk

Eneanora Beaudreau

Courage Brown

Robin Fatland

Nicolle Feather

Zachary Flute

Elijah Hart

LaNya Keoke

Violet LaBlanc

Alexis Renville

Christopher Starbuck-St. John

Keva White

Korynn LaCroix

Cylass Wanna

Diamond Goette

Perfect Attendance:

Jeslyn Crawford

Theodore Feather Jr.

Laynee Flute

Dominick Goette

Wilson Paul

Tayonna Quinn

Shanelle Sewap-Waditaka

Joshua Shepherd

Christa White

Tukan Eastman

Perry Lufkins Jr.

Sonni Redday

America Ross

Gavin Wolfe

Nicolle Feather

Zachary Flute

Kenna Heminger

LaNya Keoke

Jayce Kirk

Cylas Wanna

Jianna Wolfe

One Day Absent:

Evany Bird

James MacConnell

Peyton Bernard

Ronnie Eagle

Ivy Robertson

Colby Crawford

Mckenzie Deutsch

Korynn LaCroix

Jayden Simon

Christopher Starbuck-St. John

D'Lena Strong

Diamond Goette

Week of April 14th –

SWO Head Start News

UPCOMING ACTIVITIES:

*Thurs., Apr. 17th: Easter Egg Hunt for students starting at 10:30 AM. Parents are welcome to come help hide the eggs and take pictures.

*Fri., Apr. 18th: Returning Student Updates are due by noon. Make sure to get your update packet completed with Danielle, Buffy, or Lolita!

*Mon., Apr. 21st: NO SCHOOL for Easter holiday.

*Tues., Apr. 22nd: Earth Day activities and walk. Everyone is invited to join us for the walk. Register before 11:00 AM at the Head Start middle building. First 50 non-Head Start students/staff will receive t-shirts. There will be a scavenger hunt for the children. OEP is sponsoring lunch and will have hands-on activities and information at the OA Community Center at the end of the walk.

SHS weekly calendar

Monday, April 14

*FBLA Spring Conference @ Pierre, Monday &Tuesday

*SMS- Smarter Balance Testing Mon-Friday

*JH-Track Milbank Invite @ Milbank -3:45, dismiss 1:35, depart 1:45.

*Girls Golf- Practice 4:00-6:00

*Track-Practice 3:40-5:30

Tuesday, April 15

*Girls Golf-Dell Rapids Invite (V/JV) @ Dell Rapids -9:00, depart at 5:45 am

*Track-Milbank Invite @ Milbank -3:30, dismiss 1:15, depart 1:30.

*Strengthening Families Program @ MPR 5:30-8:00 pm

Wednesday, April 16

*Girls Golf-Practice 4:00-6:00

*Track-Practice 3:30-5:30

Thursday, April 17

*Girls Golf @ Madison Invite @ Madison -11:00, depart at 8:00 am

*Sadd Mini Conference @ Sisseton

Friday, April 18

NO SCHOOL - Easter Break

Saturday, April 19

Upcoming events:

April 21 Monday- NO SCHOOL-Easter Break

April 22 JH Track Coteau Des Prairie @ Sisseton 4PM

April 22 JH Golf @ Webster Invite -3:00

April 23 School Organizational Pictures

April 23 PBIS Jr. Class recognition - MPR

April 24 Track Tiospa Zina Invite @ Agency Village 3PM

April 24 SHS Leadership Team- BLOOD DRIVE @ MPR 9:00am-1:30pm

April 24 New Effington Spring Concert @ New Effington 7PM

April 26 Track Coteau Des Prairie Relays @ Sisseton - 1:00pm

April 27-29 FCCLA State Convention @ Sioux Falls

April 28-May 2 Missoula Children Theatre in PAC

May 1- Drama Club Workshop @PAC 12:45-1:35

May 1-FBLA Banquet @ HS Cafeteria 6:00pm

May 3-PROM

*Please watch the District Website (Athletic Calendar) for changes/updates in school activities.

South Dakota Career Camps may be a solution to Workforce issues

“In South Dakota, we have a demand for workers in areas like engineering, information technology, health care and manufacturing,” said Gov. Daugaard. “It is important for students to have the chance to learn about the skills that are in demand before they make decisions about college and careers. By establishing this new website, the State of South Dakota hopes to spread the word about the opportunities out there.”

Put on by universities and technical institutes with help from the private sector, camps are geared toward middle school and high school students. The camps are typically daylong events where students learn about specific careers by hearing from professionals and participating in hands-on activities.

The types of camps listed on the website include agriculture, business, engineering, health care, information technology, and trade and technical.

Many communities in our region are doing a tremendous job of educating and encouraging our youth to return to the region. And as we continue to consider our workforce issues, give thought to how you can promote long-term solutions using these camps as a tool! Your community could possibly support youth by giving them a scholarship to attend one of these career camp opportunities. Work with your local employers in need of workforce to help support this opportunity as well.

To learn more about career camps, visit the new website at sd.gov/careercamps.

Registration open for STEM Kitchen & Garden Educator Workshops

Brookings, SD – This summer, SDSU Extension and the South Dakota Discovery Center is hosting S.T.E.M in the Classroom, Kitchen and Garden, a two-day training in Rapid City and Sioux Falls to demonstrate creative ways to connect science, technology, engineering and math (S.T.E.M.) with garden-based learning and food science and nutrition education.

These trainings are free.

The Kitchen training day, will focus on the food preparation with nutrition and food safety education, and the Garden training day, will provide a range of garden centered lessons for teaching youth.

The program is designed for PreK through middle school teachers, after-school program leaders, school administrators, garden-focused educators, 4-H advisors, food service staff, and wellness committees.

Participants will discuss resources available to implement programs to promote children's consumption of fruits and vegetables and to raise a school or learning garden. They will learn about S.T.E.M. focused curriculum used to enhance food and garden education programs and participate in hands-on activities involving produce preparation.

The Kitchen day attendees will learn about the Harvest of the Month program.

"This is an adaptable, easy to use program that gets kids excited about eating fruits and vegetables and has them asking for more. Through a short presentation and produce sampling, children learn about the importance of eating fruits and vegetables every day. The fun and quick presentation explains the history, peak seasons, vitamins and minerals and how to choose the produce," said Karlys Wells, SDSU Extension Nutrition Associate.

Additional topics will include food safety science, tools and tips for cooking with kids, Pick It! Try It! Like It! resources and USDA Team Nutrition curriculum activities to take back to the classroom.

The Garden education day will provide information for teachers and others who are interested in developing or enhancing their curriculum. The class will feature specific curriculum and lesson ideas to incorporate into a program. Garden to table, biodiversity, math in the garden and garden-based science experiments will be featured. Additionally, participants will tour the site of a local garden education program.

Participants can attend one or both days of the training for no charge, however on the garden training day, there will be an $8 fee to cover the lunch program.

Training dates and locations:

Rapid City, S.D. - SDSU West River Ag Center, 1905 N. Plaza Drive

June 24, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. MDT (STEM Kitchen)

June 25, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. MDT (STEM Garden)

Sioux Falls, S.D. - Sioux Falls Regional Extension Center, 2001 E. 8th St.

July 9, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. CDT (STEM Garden)

July 10, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. CDT (STEM Kitchen)

University and Continuing Education Credits available

One undergraduate or graduate credit is available through the SDSU Health and Nutritional Sciences Department, College of Education and Human Sciences for $40. Two Continuing Education Credits are also available for $5. Attendance at both training days is required and homework assignments must be completed to receive this credit.

A limited number of $100 scholarships for those traveling more than 100 miles are available to attendees who intend to implement the featured curricula.

Registration forms are available at HealthySD.gov or iGrow.org/events, under the event posting. Completed registration forms should be emailed to karlys.wells@sdstate.edu or printed and mailed to Karlys Wells, SDSU Extension, SWG 212 Box 2275A, Brookings, SD 57007. For questions, contact Karlys Wells, 605-688-4039, karlys.wells@sdstate.edu

These trainings are funded by the S.D. Dept. of Health and SDSU Extension.

American Indian Graduate Center announces Cobell Scholarship fund

The American Indian Graduate Center has announced the availability of funding from the Cobell Education Scholarship Fund, for the 2014/2015 academic year!

On April 4, 2014, the Department of the Interior announced that quarterly transfers, to the Cobell Education Scholarship Fund, are set to begin. The Scholarship Fund was authorized by the historic Cobell Settlement, approved in November 2012, to provide financial assistance through annual scholarships to American Indian and Alaska Native students wishing to pursue post-secondary education and training.

The Cobell settlement agreement provided that a qualified non-profit organization would be selected to administer the Cobell Education Scholarship Fund. The American Indian College Fund (the College Fund) was named by the U.S. Department of the Interior and the plaintiffs of Cobell v. Salazar to administer the Cobell Education Scholarship Fund. In addition, the American Indian Graduate Center (AIGC) was named by the U.S. Department of the Interior and the plaintiffs of Cobell v. Salazar to distribute graduate student scholarships. Graduate student scholarships will comprise 20% of the annual awards.

For additional information about the Cobell Education Scholarship Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org/Cobell. For detailed information about the settlement and the land buyback program that will fund the Cobell Scholarships, visit www.indiantrust.com.

If you have comments or suggestions regarding the criteria for distribution of Cobell Scholarship funds, you may submit them from April 3 to May 2, 2014 to collegefund.org/cobell.

Demystifying Credit Scores

By Jason Alderman

One of the few positive outcomes of the 2008 financial crisis was that it helped shine a light on the importance of understanding and staying on top of your credit profile. Along with that heightened visibility, however, has come a great deal of confusion and misunderstanding – particularly around the all-important credit score.

"The consequences of not maintaining a sound credit score can be very costly," says Anthony Sprauve, senior consumer credit specialist at FICO. "A low score can bar you from getting a new loan, doom you to higher interest rates and even cost you a new job or apartment."

Five factors are used to determine your credit score: payment history (usually around 35 percent of your score), amount owed (30 percent), length of credit history (15 percent), newly opened credit accounts (10 percent), and types of credit used (10 percent).

Fortunately, if your credit score has taken a hit, you can initiate several actions that will begin improving it almost immediately. Just be aware that it can take many years to recover from events like bankruptcy or foreclosure.

First, find out where you currently stand by reviewing your credit reports from each major credit bureau (Equifax, Experian and TransUnion). Look for negative actions your creditors might have reported as well as errors and fraudulent activity, which you can challenge through the bureau's dispute resolution process. You can order one free report per year from each bureau through the government-authorized site, www.AnnualCreditReport.com; otherwise you'll pay a small fee.

You might also want to order your credit score. Lenders use credit scores to supplement their own selection criteria to determine whether you are a worthy credit risk. Several types are available, including FICO® Score, VantageScore (a competing model jointly created by Equifax, Experian and TransUnion) and proprietary credit scores from each of the three bureaus, among others. Scores typically cost from $15 to $20 each.

Note: You may see offers for free credit scores, but they're usually tied to expensive ongoing credit-monitoring services you may or may not want. Read the contract carefully.

Here are a few tips for improving your credit history:

•Always pay bills on time and catch up on missed payments.

•Set up automatic payments for recurring bills and automatic minimum credit card payments if you often miss deadlines.

•Sign up for text or email alerts telling you when your balance drops or payments are due.

•Never exceed credit card limits.

•Monitor your credit utilization ratio (the percentage of available credit you're using). Try to keep your cumulative utilization ratio – and the ratios on individual cards or lines of credit – below 30 percent.

•Transferring balances to a new card for a lower rate will slightly ding your credit score – although it won't take long to recover. But be careful the transfer doesn't increase your utilization ratio on the new card.

•Make sure that card credit limits reported to the credit bureaus are accurate.

•Don't automatically close older, unused accounts; 15 percent of your score is based on credit history.

•Each time you open a new account it slightly impacts your score, so avoid doing so in the months before a major purchase.

•Pay off medical bills, as well as parking, traffic and even library fines. Once old, unpaid bills go into collection, they'll appear on your credit report.

"Bottom line, don't lose hope," says Sprauve. "The negative impact of past credit problems will gradually fade as recent good payment behavior begins to show up on your credit reports."

*****

Jason Alderman directs Visa's financial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www.twitter.com/PracticalMoney.

Horse Owners watch for Equine Herpesvirus symptoms

Brookings, SD – Cases of Equine Herpesvirus (EHV) have been identified across the United States. It is imperative that horse owners can recognize the clinical signs of EHV, understand how it transmitted, and especially how to prevent the disease.

EHV is a virus that rears its head in horse populations around the nation. There are two strains of the virus (EHV-1 and EHV-4) that account for the majority of EHV infections. EHV is easily spread among horses through close contact. The disease generally manifests through three syndromes (signs) including respiratory infection ("rhinopneumonitis"), abortion, and neurological disease.

Clinical Signs of EHV

Rhinopneumonitis. Signs may be mild or unapparent in horses that have been vaccinated. The respiratory infection is often see in younger horses such as weanlings and causes symptoms such as fever, nasal discharge, cough, and swelling of lymph nodes. This syndrome is caused by EHV-4, and is commonly followed by a secondary bacterial infection.

Abortion. Infection with EHV-1 is associated with late term abortion (7-11 months of gestation). In rare occasions exposed mares may give birth to a live foal. However, the foals are often weak with this viral infection and secondary bacterial infections and usually only live a few days.

Neurological disease. This syndrome is caused by EHV-1. Symptoms include incoordination, lameness, loss of tail and bladder function and paralysis depending on which part of the nervous system is affected.

Diagnosis of EHV

Diagnosis of EHV can be difficult and time sensitive. If you suspect EHV it is important to enlist the help of your veterinarian. Generally nasal swabs or blood samples may be collected to test for EHV.

Treatment and Outcome

In most cases treatment of EHV is supportive, meaning you treat symptoms as they arise. Unfortunately the disease can progress to the point where euthanasia is the only option.

Prevention of EHV

Vaccinations for both EHV-1 and EHV-4 are available; however, they do not prevent the neurological signs associated with EHV. Initial vaccination of foals begins at 3-4 months of age with a booster 4-8 weeks later. Subsequent boosters are recommended every 3-6 months to maintain an adequate level of protection in the horse. Your local veterinarian should be able to help you determine which EHV vaccinations to select and how often to vaccinate based on the specific risk factors for your horse. Horses that are frequently traveling and coming into contact with other horses should likely receive boosters every 90 days. Pregnant mares should be vaccinated with an EHV vaccine that is labeled for prevention of equine abortion at 3, 5, 7, and 9 months of gestation.

Additional management practices can help to limit the risk of EHV on your property. When you have a new horse arrive on your property adhere to a strict 3-4 week isolation period. If during this time no signs of illness arise in the new horse they may be introduced to your herd. Try to only attend events where health certification and vaccination requirements are enforced. Finally, cleanliness and disinfection of trailers, water buckets and other equipment will help to prevent the spread of EHV and other communicable diseases.

For more information on EHV please contact Dr. Rebecca Bott, SDSU Extension Equine Specialist Rebecca.Bott@sdstate.edu, or Dr. Russ Daly, SDSU Extension Veterinarian Russell.Daly@sdstate.edu. To report a case of EHV in South Dakota, please contact Dr. Dustin Oedekoven, State Veterinarian.

Legals

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 09-054

SWOCSE/Shobi Zetina, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SHAYNE COOK, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of April, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of March, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

15-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 09-106

SWOCSE/Linda Thompson, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SHAYNE COOK, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of April, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of March, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

15-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 02-201

SWOCSE/Lounda Stevens, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SHAYNE COOK, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of April, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of March, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

15-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 12-138

SWOCSE/SD/Angela Glomstad, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MARSHALL LONEY, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of April, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of March, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

15-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 12-128

SWOCSE/SD/Courtney Mussetter, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MARSHALL LONEY, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of April, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of March, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

15-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 13-055

SWOCSE/SD/Misty Ortley, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MARSHALL LONEY, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of April, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of March, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

15-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 14-099

SWOCSE/Sheila Lufkins, PLAINTIFF

VS.

OLIVER JACK, Sr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of April, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.   Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of March, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 07-015

SWOCSE/SD/Clarissa Franklin, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MICHAEL SIERRA, Sr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of April, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of March, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 11-093

SWOCSE/Jenny Gill, PLAINTIFF

VS.

OSCAR BARRON, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of April, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of March, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 13-162

SWOCSE/Ashley Kelly, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CHRISTIAN ROBERTSON, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Provide DNA sample and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of April, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of March, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

15-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 14-042

SWOCSE/Cheryl Campbell, PLAINTIFF

VS.

VIRGIL CHARGING HAWK, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of April, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.   Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of March, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 14-098

SWOCSE/Sheila Lufkins, PLAINTIFF

VS.

IDA JACK, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of April, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.   Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of March, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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Trading Post ads

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

Job Openings

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate is seeking to fill the following positions(s):

Site Supervisor, Head Start

Teacher, Early Head Start

Compliance Officer, Realty

Assistant Land Acquisition Clerk, Realty

Intergovernmental Case Specialist II, Office of Child Support Enforcement

Injury Prevention Coordinator, Injury Prevention Program

Prep Cook (part-time), Administration Building

Arcade Attendant (part-time), Planning

Closing Date: April 25, 2014 @ 04:30 PM.

Education Specialist, Education Department

Open Until Filled.

All interested applicants may obtain application and job description information at the Human Resource Department, of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate or contact Arnold Williams at (605) 698-8238 or Denise Hill at (605) 698-8362. (Tribal preference will apply)

 

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

Position Announcement

Education Specialist

Open until Filled.

For more information contact Dr. Sherry Johnson, Tawacin Waste Win, Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Education Director, Box 509, Agency Village, SD 57262; Phone 605-698-8298; Work Cell 605-268-9057.

Job Title:  SWO Education Specialist

Reports to: Tribal Secretary

General Supervision: Tribal Education Director

Site Based Supervision: Tiospa Zina Tribal School Superintendent & Enemy Swim Day School Principal

Summary: The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate through the Tribal Education Department (TED) will implement the education technical assistance program for Tiospa Zina Tribal School (TZTS), Enemy Swim Day School (ESDS), and the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate (SWO). The Education Specialist directly provides technical assistance to Tiospa Zina Tribal School and Enemy Swim Day School to identify needs and develop educational priorities, procedures and services for overall school improvement. The Education Specialist will serve as the technical expert in effective math and reading instruction.  The Education Specialist will stay abreast of current best practices, scientifically researched based instruction materials and instructional practices, direct instructional methodologies, assessments and assessment practices, Native Star, Common Core Standards, Accreditation, and BIE (South Dakota) Accountability Workbook and other appropriate. The Education Specialist will report to the Tribal Secretary, is under the general supervision of the Tribal Education Director and Site based Supervision is TZTS Superintendent & ESDS Principal.

Duties and Responsibilities:

Services that the technical assistance program will provide but are not limited to:

*Provide direct services to staff and students to support effective implementation of scientifically-based reading and math improvement strategies.

*Provide professional development and other trainings for school staff for focused assistance in Reading, Math and other pertinent professional development through pre-service, in-service and on-going contact with instructional staff.

*Gather and disseminate information regarding best practices in reading and math, to include the development, implementation, coordination and evaluation of Math and Reading through the utilization of the Common Core Standards.

*Research effective practices that effectively work with the children of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate to enhance retention, application and overall academic knowledge.

*Provide parent training to support improvement strategies.

*Partner and guide the development of a school improvement, to include the identification of specific areas of needs for students and staff.

*Develop strategies for technical assistance to improve academic achievement.

*Act as a liaison between SWO/TZTS/ESDS and BIE/BIA and other federal agencies and develop collaborative relationships

*Assist schools, parents and other stakeholders concerning SPED due process procedures.

*Provide Technical Assistance to schools for referrals, evaluation, identification, placement, and implementation of IEP in the least restrictive environment for children with disabilities and FAPE.

*Assist schools in the interpretation of legislation and implementation of NCLB, 107-110, NCLB, IDIEA, 108-446, Title I, II, IV, VI, VII, X and other laws related to education.

*Assist schools to collect, analyze data and to prepare reports in appropriate format and content to the Department of Education, Congress, SWO and BIE.

*Assist schools to develop a self-monitoring process and a reporting system for the school administration, school board and SWO if not already in place.

*Monitor and guide educational programs to ensure compliance with Grant School and SWO regulations.

*Provide assistance with the Native Star Program, if schools choose to use.

*Provide Federal programs (Title programs & Sped) oversight to insure that schools are in compliance and to assist with required reports.

QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENTS:

*Education degree or Specialist in Reading/Math is preferred.  MS/MA degree in Education is required.

*Verifiable knowledge and experience is required in School Improvement processes.

*Must possess five (5) years of classroom experience.

*Must possess experience or knowledge working with school improvement processes.

*Must possess excellent communication skills.

*Must pass local, state and federal background checks.

*Must be knowledgeable in Pre-K to 12th grade state and local assessments, of all education resources on and off the reservation, federal programs, Dakota language, culture and history, program applicable to the needs of the students.

*Must possess experience in curriculum development and content standards.

*Must possess valid driver's license and must be able to travel.

*Must actively works toward fluency in Dakota.

*Must possess deep knowledge of reading, writing, language development, math computation and problem solving to include research based programs.

*Must possess strong organizational skills.

*Must possess knowledge and experience with and use of computers.

*Indian preference applies.

 

Sisseton Wahpeton College

Openings for Fall 2014 semester - Full time English Instructor, Adjunct Psychology Instructor. Master's degree in related field is preferred, Bachelor's degree is required. For contact and application information visit our website at swc.tc or contact Human Resources at 605-698-3966. Closing date: open until filled.

 

Tiospa Zina Tribal School

Employment Opportunities

Current Vacancies:

Vacancy: Bus Monitor (Waubay Route; Sisseton Route; Browns Valley) $13.00/hr Qualifications: High School Diploma or General Education Degree; willing to obtain CRP and First Aid Certification. Opening Date: December 23, 2013 Closing Date: Open Until Filled

2014-2015 School Year Vacancies:

Vacancy: Middle School/Alternative School Principal Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Middle School/Alternative School Principal

Opening Date: February 25, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: High School English Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a High School English Teacher

Opening Date: February 25, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: Elementary Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for an Elementary Teacher

Opening Date: February 25, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: Special Education Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Special Education Teacher

Opening Date: March 7, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: School Counselor Qualifications: Current South Dakota School Counselor Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a School Service Specialist

Opening Date: March 13, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: High School Science Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a High School Science Teacher

Opening Date: March 21, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: High School Social Studies Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a High School Social Studies Teacher

Opening Date: March 21, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: High School Math Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a High School Math Teacher

Opening Date: March 21, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: High School Social Studies/Science Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a High School Social Studies/Science Teacher

Opening Date: March 21, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: Middle School Science Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Middle School Science Teacher

Opening Date: March 21, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: Secondary Art Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Secondary Art Teacher

Opening Date: April 10, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: (4) Cook Qualifications: High School Diploma or General Education Degree, 1 year directly related experience, and willing to complete State Nutrition Program.

Opening Date: April 4, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: Kitchen Supervisor Qualifications: High School Diploma or General Education Degree, 1 year directly related experience, and willing to obtain State School Food Service training and certification.

Opening Date: April 4, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

2014-2015 Extra Curricular Vacancies:

Vacancy: Head Volleyball Coach Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma, and Must meet and show proof of all SDHSAA coaching requirements at the time that your applications is submitted. Those requirements are to complete the following courses through the National Federation of High School Sports (NFHS): Fundamentals of Coaching, First Aid and Safety for Coaches, and Concussion in Sports – What you need to know. If interested please submit an application and coaching applicant questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School.

Opening Date: April 8, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: Head Cross Country Coach Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma, and Must meet and show proof of all SDHSAA coaching requirements at the time that your applications is submitted. Those requirements are to complete the following courses through the National Federation of High School Sports (NFHS): Fundamentals of Coaching, First Aid and Safety for Coaches, and Concussion in Sports – What you need to know. If interested please submit an application and coaching applicant questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School.

Opening Date: April 8, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: Head Football Coach Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma, and Must meet and show proof of all SDHSAA coaching requirements at the time that your applications is submitted. Those requirements are to complete the following courses through the National Federation of High School Sports (NFHS): Fundamentals of Coaching, First Aid and Safety for Coaches, and Concussion in Sports – What you need to know. If interested please submit an application and coaching applicant questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School.

Opening Date: April 8, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: Head Girls Basketball Coach Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma, and Must meet and show proof of all SDHSAA coaching requirements at the time that your applications is submitted. Those requirements are to complete the following courses through the National Federation of High School Sports (NFHS): Fundamentals of Coaching, First Aid and Safety for Coaches, and Concussion in Sports – What you need to know. If interested please submit an application and coaching applicant questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School.

Opening Date: April 8, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: Head Boys Basketball Coach Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma, and Must meet and show proof of all SDHSAA coaching requirements at the time that your applications is submitted. Those requirements are to complete the following courses through the National Federation of High School Sports (NFHS): Fundamentals of Coaching, First Aid and Safety for Coaches, and Concussion in Sports – What you need to know. If interested please submit an application and coaching applicant questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School.

Opening Date: April 8, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: Junior High Girls Basketball Coach Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma. If interested please submit an application and coaching applicant questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School.

Opening Date: April 8, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: 5th/6th Grade Girls Basketball Coach Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma. If interested please submit an application and coaching applicant questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School.

Opening Date: April 8, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: (2) 8th Grade Class Advisor Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma. If interested please submit an application and Advisor Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School.

Opening Date: April 11, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: AISES Advisor (American Indian Science and Engineering Society) Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma. If interested please submit an application and Advisor Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School.

Opening Date: April 11, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: Close-Up Foundation Advisor Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma. If interested please submit an application and Advisor Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School.

Opening Date: April 11, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: Destination Imagination Advisor Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma. If interested please submit an application and Advisor Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School.

Opening Date: April 11, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: (2) Junior Class Advisor Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma. If interested please submit an application and Advisor Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School.

Opening Date: April 11, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: New Teacher Mentor (Elementary) Qualifications: State Certified Elementary Teacher with 3 years+ experience and able to be available to new elementary teachers as needed throughout the school day. If interested please submit an application and Advisor Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School.

Opening Date: April 11, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: (3) Senior Class Advisor Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma. If interested please submit an application and Advisor Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School.

Opening Date: April 11, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: Technology Mentor (High School) Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma with knowledge and skills to assist others with minor technology questions and needs as needed throughout the school day. If interested please submit an application and Advisor Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School.

Opening Date: April 11, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

If you would like to apply to be a part of the TZ tiwahe you may pick up an application from the TZTS HR office located at #2 Tiospa Zina Dr. Agency Village, SD 57262. Applications may also be printed off the HR web page by downloading from links under employment forms to the left. Completed applications may be sent to PO Box 719, Agency Village, SD 57262. Faxed to: 605-698-7686. For further information call 605-698-3953 ext. 208. Indian Preference employer. At will employer. All applicants are subject to a Background Check and Pre-Employment Drug Test, pursuant to SWSB policy.

 

Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate

of the Lake Traverse Reservation

Dakota Nation Gaming Enterprise

Position: CEO

Occupation Summary: The direct primary responsibility of the Employee shall be the overall operation of the DNGE and shall include providing management oversight and directing the day-to-day business activities and the development and implementation of a long range business plan that includes a long range plan for strategic growth. Employee shall be subject to the supervision and direction of the Tribal Council.

Qualifications: BS/BA degree in business, management, marketing, accounting or related field of study.

Experience:

*   A minimum of 10 years of management experience with at least 5 years performing at a senior level is required at a property generating over $50 million of gaming revenue.

*   Must be capable of developing and maintaining a comprehensive business and marketing plan.

*   Must demonstrate experience in finance, accounting, marketing, procurement, HR management, policy/procedure writing, and security/surveillance compliance.

*   Experience and knowledge in Class II and Class III gaming is preferred.

*   Experience and knowledge of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act and other regulatory authorities.

*   Experience with multiple-site management is preferred.

*   Must demonstrate knowledge, skills, and ability to analyze all financial statements.

Must be able to obtain a (PMO) License with the SWO Gaming Commission

Salary Range: Negotiable based upon experience Plus an excellent benefit package

Closing Date: April 25th, 2014 at 4:00 p.m.

Submit resume to: Dakota Nation Gaming Enterprise Attn: Heather Roberts

16849 102nd Street SE

Hankinson, ND 58041

Contact information:

Phone: 701-634-3000 ext. 2426

E-mail: heatherw@dakotamagic.com (Subject: CEO Applicant)

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Dakota Nation Gaming Enterprise

Employee Assistance Provider

Job Ad

Department: Corporate Administration

Reports to: CEO

License: Primary Management Official (PMO)

Summary of duties: EAP will provide counseling, referrals and other assistance to DNGE employees that may be suffering from alcohol or other drug abuse, mental and emotional disorders, gambling indebtedness, marital, family, or other problems that may be affecting their work performance. EAP will provide trainings, mediations, and team building exercises to DNGE employees as requested by management.

Education/Experience: Bachelor's Degree in Human Services field Minimum of 5 years working in Chemical Dependency or Counseling field Must be Certified Chemical Dependency Certification (CCDC) Level I, II, III or in a trainee status

Conditions of Employment: Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission

Must maintain an active State Chemical Dependency Certification (SD and ND)

Must be willing to travel between all three DNGE properties

Must maintain an excellent working relationship with local court jurisdictions and clinical facilities

Salary: DOE

Closing Date: April 18th, 2014 at 4:00 p.m.

Please submit applications, resumes and credentials to: Heather Roberts, Corporate Executive Assistant

16849 102nd Street SE

Hankinson, ND 58041

Email: heatherw@dakotamagic.com Subject line: EAP applicant

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Dakota Magic Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Cage Department: Cashier (5 Full-Time) Rotating

Count Department: Team Member (Full-Time) 3am to finish

C-Store Department: Clerk (2 Full-Time) Rotating

Hotel Department: Room/Laundry Attendants (4 Full-Time) 8am to finish

Marketing Department: Customer Service Technician (Full-Time) Rotating VIP Ambassador (Full-Time) Rotating

Slots Department: Slot Technician (Full-Time) Rotating

Closing Date: April 18, 2014 at 4:00 p.m.

Starting Wage: D.O.E.

High School diploma or G.E.D. required for most positions. Two identification documents required upon hire.

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department, 16849 102nd Street SE, Hankinson ND 58041.

For complete Job Description contact Amanda Adams at 701-634-3000 ext. 557. Indian Preference will apply/EEO. (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment. Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission.