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TZTS Summer 2017 Film Camp videos online on YouTube

 

Search YouTube for:

TiospaZinaTribalSchool@gmail.com

 

Film Camp behind the scenes:

https://youtu.be/pEc83D_s2Hk

 

Ivy:

https://youtu.be/7lH27IOsRNo

 

Dylan:

https://youtu.be/nJYfMAlYee4

 

 

Mystic Fight Scene:

https://youtu.be/CxZQo2FOf3U

 

 

Anhother behind the scenes look at camp:

https://youtu.be/y7_0YiFFhTE

 

 

Redwing:

https://youtu.be/N-uKyMAiDhM

 

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate: Want to re-read the Self-Governance articles from past issues of your Sota Iya Ye Yapi?

Whether or not the Tribe assumes administrative authority over your health services is a BIG DEAL. What do you know about it?

Here they are:

Self-Governance Articles from past Sotas

  Obituaries Editorials Editor's column Education
Legals
Trading post

 

 

Vol. 49 Issue No. 8

Anpetu Iyamni, Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2018

Inside this Edition –

Special election to fill Old Agency District Council seat March 27th

Ribbon-cutting held for phase I of Dakota Magic renovation

Tribal radio station KXSW off the air temporarily

Sisseton public schools placed on "alert" briefly last Thursday

Highlights of MMIW gatherings, marches

Results of SWO annual Ice Fishing Derby

SWC Mustangs basketball season wrap-up

Tom Wilson, voice of the Wambdi, retires from announcing TZ games

This Sota mailed on Tuesday due to Monday federal holiday

Coming: Honoring ceremony held for SWST WWII veterans

Coming: Sisseton-Wahpeton Treaty Day Wacipi last weekend

Reminder: Deadline to submit copy for consideration in the Sota is Friday noon

Notice

SWST Chairman Dave Flute will give a public address at 9:00 a.m. this Wednesday, Feb. 21st, live over KXSW-Radio and on Facebook.

Purpose is to provide information to the Oyate on the recently signed joint powers agreement, and to give other updates.

Ribbon-cutting, soft opening last week for Dakota Magic phase I completion

The first phase of Dakota Magic Casino's renovation project has been completed. And last Monday, February 12, Tribal leadership and gaming management held a ribbon-cutting ceremony to mark the milestone.

Tribal Council spent the morning listening to gaming reports and taking action on related corporate spending matters.

The ribbon-cutting was held following a noon luncheon.

See accompanying photos by John Heminger.

Also, please see the weekly updates by PCL – general contractor – provided by the Sota. This week's photo collage shows extent of the work with 52 weeks remaining until completion of all phases.

Special election for Old Agency District Council post

The Reservation Election Board announced in a public notice in last week's Sota that a special election will be held on March 27, 2018, to fill the unexpired term of Old Agency District Councilman Eddie Johnson Jr. He ran for Tribal Secretary and upon winning now leaves his seat open on Tribal Council.

Deadline to file was this past Friday, Feb. 16.

To qualify, a candidate must settle debts with Tribal entities. Deadline for candidate proof of payment to all Tribal entities is Wednesday, Feb. 21.

Names of certified candidates will be announced on March 12.

The special election will be held Tuesday, March 27th at the Old Agency District Center. (Alternative polling site: Tribal administration building.)

Hours will be from 7:00 a.m. until 7:00 p.m., with ballot counting to follow in the administration building.

For more information, contact REB members (available by phone from 4:30-9:00 p.m.):

Angela Johnson – 605-467-9737

Josie Bertsch – 5t0-237-4067

Marjory Bissonette – 605-467-1539

Dustin Opsal – 605-268-9006; fax 605-698-3055

Vanessa Carlson – 605-742-4035

Email – REB@swo-nsn.gov

Milton "Nippy" Owen tapped as Interim Old Agency District Councilman

Acting during its regular meeting on February 6th, Tribal Council had Milton "Nippy" Owen take the oath of office.

He is serving as Interim Old Agency District Councilman, filling the seat vacated by Eddie Johnson Jr., who won the special election for Tribal Secretary.

He will serve on Council until the upcoming special election to fill Eddie Johnson's unexpired term, which is set for Tuesday, March 27, 2018.

(Please see the official REB notice elsewhere in this issue of the Sota.)

Tamara St. John seeks District I State House seat

Sisseton, SD – Tamara St. John, a life-long resident of South Dakota, today announced her intention to seek a legislative seat for District of the South Dakota House of Representatives.

"I am looking forward to running for this opportunity to be a conservative and inclusive voice for District 1." St. John said. "Being a woman, a tribal member and a believer in fiscal responsibility, I truly feel like I can add a unique voice to the SD legislature. One size doesn't always fit all. I am looking forward to going out this year and earning the vote of the hard working and diverse people of District 1."

St. John, born and raised in northeastern South Dakota, is also a member of the Sisseton Wahpeton Sioux Tribe. St. John works as a historian, genealogist and has spent many years in the area of historic preservation, along with currently serving as the archivist for the Sisseton Wahpeton Tribal Archives and Collections. In this role, she has specialized in community outreach and education. St. John also has experience working with local, state and federal governments on historic preservation and cultural projects.

St. John serves on the South Dakota Humanities Council as a member of the Board of Directors and recently received a certificate in cultural heritage tourism from George Washington University. St. John is the mother of 4 children and currently resides in Sisseton, South Dakota.

About District 1: District 1 of the SD State Legislature includes the entire counties of Day, Marshall, Roberts and northern part of Brown County in South Dakota.

Tribal radio station KXSW off the air temporarily

Automation PC was hacked with ransomware

Agency Village, SD – Feb. 15, 2018 – You may have heard of "ransomware" attacking computer networks belonging to large corporations. Yes.

Hackers find a way through firewalls to grab important corporate files, steal them and leave heavily encrypted files behind.

Then the data in those files are held for ransom, and if a web-attacked company wants access to the data, they must pay money in "bitcoin" currency – digital form of monetary exchange not connected to the banking industry.

If the bitcoin "ransom" is paid, then that company receives a code to unlock their own files.

That's how it works.

It looks as though not only "big" companies can be targeted, as last week SWST radio station KXSW was the target of a successful ransomware attack.

The hacker(s) got into important files used to run the station, from inside a networked "Automation" PC.

According to Station Manager/Announcer Tom Wilson, the decision was made to remove the computer from the system, take it to a computer tech office, and have it "wiped" completely clean.

Then, all the automated features of the station will be reconstructed – piece by piece.

It is expected to take a while, perhaps this week and into next week.

In the meantime, KXSW-FM is off the air.

Listeners are advised to watch for updates on Facebook.

Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women awareness day observed

Rallies, marches held in unity across the country

SWST Chairman, Veterans honor guard participate at Fargo

Sisseton Wahpeton College hosts walk at Agency Village

Fargo, ND – Feb. 14, 2018 –The Fargo Native American Commission hosted a community event, "Remember the Hearts of Our Women" in recognition of Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women Awareness Day last Wednesday, February 14, 2018, at the Fargo City Commission Chambers, downtown Fargo.

Jingle dress dancers came to dance, to bring healing in their dancing.

Guest speakers included SWST Chairman Dave Flute and Spirit Lake Chairwoman Myra Pearson.

In his remarks, Chairman Flute said these cases "have been going on for decades, for decades."

He criticized the initial police response when Savanna Greywind went missing, and said more training is needed.

 "As First Nation people we need to see action, which is more swift than before," he said.

"We also need to have that cultural training so no one disrespects us Indigenous people."

A march through downtown Fargo followed the talks, and a meal was provided afterwards.

The Sisseton-Wahpeton veterans organizations served in the honor guard during the march, and Tiospa Zina Tribal School students were bussed so they could attend.

In 2015, the cities of Moorhead, Dilworth, Fargo and West Fargo joined efforts to spur awareness in the region for Murdered and Missing Indigenous women through a proclamation designating February 14 as Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women Awareness Day. This effort calls upon citizens to observe this day with appropriate programs and activities.

Mission of the Fargo Native American Commission is to "strengthen the Native American community to promote understanding, recognition and respect for cultures and to enrich the community as a whole."

The event in Fargo was part of a unified observance across the country to foster awareness of the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women (MMIW), promoted by the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) and the National Indian Education Association (NIEA).

Tribal colleges participated, including the Sisseton Wahpeton College, which sponsored a walk during the noon hour, ending with a meal at the rotunda in the administration building.

The five sitting Presidents of each of the Tribal colleges extended support from Washington D.C., while advocating on Capitol Hill for tribally driven education and parity at the American Indian Higher Education Consortium winter meetings.

In a prepared statement, the presidents stated "these marches and events are intended to commemorate and raise awareness about violence against Indigenous women and girls in our communities."

Comment about the event by Sarah Sunshine Manning:

"Valentine's Day, what? In Fargo, North Dakota, the city declared February 14, 'Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women's Awareness Day.' People in Fargo marched in solidarity with countless other marches across the US and Canada in remembrance of our missing and murdered sisters."

"As a communal people, we know that love is an action, and so I was so happy to be surrounded by so much beautiful and thoughtful action brought about by devoted change makers on such an important day. Responsible, revolutionary optimism wins the day."

MMIW-Fargo firsthand account

By Sierra Wolcott

Sota Assistant Editor

On Wednesday, February 14, there were walks and events around Indian country to remember missing and murdered indigenous women, one of which was held in Fargo, ND at the City Hall. This event was hosted by Proud Happy Indigenous Women. The SWO veterans groups provided a color guard for the event and led the march.

Chairman Dave Flute and Tokan Nuwan Councilwoman Lois Anderson spoke at the event.

In attendance were approximately 200 people including two classes of Tiospa Zina fifth graders.

Their teachers, Camille Sine and Jasmine Zetina, felt that this was an opportunity for their students to be a part of something important and meaningful. Before attending the event both classes held discussions about MMIW. The students sat respectfully and listened attentively to all of the speakers.

Fargo Mayor, Tim Mahoney spoke about the importance of becoming one community, that no one in Fargo should feel excluded or less than.

He said, "We need to embrace everybody and be a healing community; And that is going to be my quest for the year."

When Chairman Flute spoke, he addressed the issue of law enforcement all to often not taking cases of missing indigenous women seriously.

He said there needs to be change, "We (Tribes of North Dakota) will provide training to law enforcement."

MMIW-Minneapolis march

By Angela TwoStars Papenfuss

Minneapolis, MN – Feb. 14, 2018 – Here are a few pictures of the MMIW march in Minneapolis today and community workshop yesterday.

It was the first one I have had the opportunity to participate.

I even got to help carry the banner during the march!

Tom Wilson, voice of the Wambdi, retires from announcing TZTS games

After several decades of serving as voice of the Wambdi for Tiospa Zina Tribal School sports games, Tom Wilson has retired.

He made it official at the final game of the season last Thursday evening, February 15, in the TZ gym. It was parents night, and besides recognizing the parents, the Tiospa Zina school board honored Tom for his commitment to the school and community.

School Board ex Officio Arnold White, Long Hollow District School Board member Patrick Deutsch, School Board Chairman, Lake Traverse District, Tommy Dean Flute, and Athletic Director Mike Carlson presented Tom with a star quilt.

Here is a statement from Tom, after the presentation:

"Thank you Tiospa Zina and Mike Carlson for the star quilt."

"Tonight was my last night as the P.A. Announcer and DJ for all Tiospa Zina homegames, (football, volleyball, and basketball). I will be focusing on producing the games on tv and livestream and radio next season."

"Kind of a sad night for me."

Pidamiya, Tom, for all many ways you serve the community so well!

(Editor's note: While he doesn't plan to announce the games, Tom will be live-streaming games through KXSW and cable television.)

Sisseton public school district alert

Statement issued to public

Sisseton, SD – Feb. 15, 2018 – Sisseton Public School buildings were placed on "Alert" status for a period of time today.

Alert status is used in a situation where there is no direct threat to the school, but precautions are requested by local law enforcement agencies.

Classes resume as normal, but extra precautions are taken as individuals enter and leave the school buildings.

Student safety is a priority concern, and we thank you for your support when we are asked to take these precautions.

(Editor's note: No further information has been released.)

Results of 2018 annual Sisseton-Wahpeton Ice Fishing Derby

Submitted by Charlene Miller

Manager, SWO Fish & Wildlife Dept.

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Fish & Wildlife Department's annual Ice Fishing Derby held on Saturday, February 10th, was well-attended, despite the weather being extremely cold. The thermometer was at a frigid minus 15 degrees at the start of the derby. But the cold didn't deter the participants from attending.

There were 200 adults registered and 80 youth.

Lots of door prizes were given away throughout the event for both the adults and kids.

Youth ticket winners were: Blake Steiner - Otter Sled; and and Evelyn Fisher - Ice House/Sled Combo.

Raffle Ticket winners were: Jim Pearson of Sisseton, the Otter Ice house; Jonathan Gill of Sisseton Vexilar camera; and Chuck Dolney of Grenville, the Ion Lithium ice auger.

The cash prize winners were:

Northern Category: 1st place Darrell Amos, 2nd place Dave Luchessi, 3rd place Tim Hanson

Walleye Category: 1st place Jared Kriz, 2nd Rick Oien, 3rd Jonathan Halfaday

Perch Category: 1st place Parker Hanson 2nd place Kenzi Wegleitner, 3rd Parker Hanson

Bass Category: 1st Place Hilary Priebe, 2nd Derek Locke, 3rd Dennis Fisher

Other Category: 1st place Kris Kohl, 2nd place Carlos Kitto, 3rd place Alex Halfaday

We would like to give a big thank you to those that made donations for the derby: SWO Human Resource Dept., Veterans Service Office, Tribal Chairman's office, Vice Chairman's office, Early Childhood Intervention, Kibble Equipment, Old Agency Financial Services, Dakota Western and Oien Electric.

And last but not least thank you so much to the staff for another awesome derby!

Deputy AG Rod J. Rosenstein delivers remarks at NCAI

Washington, DC – Feb. 13, 2018 – Early in this administration, Attorney General Sessions made it a point to recognize an alarming upturn in violent crime in American communities, and we have set out in earnest to try to reverse that trend.

Approximately 85 percent of our pending Indian country investigations relate to violent crime. The most investigated crimes include child sexual abuse, violent assaults, and adult sexual assaults, followed by homicide, other forms of child abuse, drug, and property crimes.

Native women and girls suffer a high rate of violence, including murder. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that American Indian and Alaska Native women experienced some of the highest rates of homicide based on an analysis from 18 states.

We will continue to vigorously investigate and prosecute crime in Tribal areas. And we need to be proactive, rather than just merely reactive, when it comes to combating crime. The Attorney General instructed our U.S. Attorneys to study the crime problems in their districts; to partner with state, local, and Tribal law enforcement; and to find solutions to reduce crime.

Remarks as prepared for delivery

Good Morning. I want to thank President Keel and all of the Tribal leaders and representatives who are here today. I appreciate the opportunity to speak with you.

The Department of Justice plays a unique role in the government-to-government relationship between the United States and Tribal Nations. Our work in Indian country covers a massive legal landscape and involves almost every function of our Department.

Our U.S. Attorney's offices and law enforcement components, such as the FBI and the DEA, are responsible for investigations, prosecutions, and victim services in the 49 judicial districts across the nation that include Indian country. Federal prosecutors have primary criminal jurisdiction for 70 million acres of Indian lands. That spans 200 Indian country territories.

The Department also has concurrent jurisdiction over 50 additional areas of land.

Our law enforcement work requires strong partnerships with Tribal law enforcement, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and state and local law enforcement.

The Justice Department also handles a large caseload of civil litigation. Our civil cases include litigating environmental and natural resource issues, protecting Tribal treaty rights, and enforcing the civil rights of Native Americans.

Our grant making components provided over $134 million to Tribes in Fiscal Year 2017. Those components include the Office of Justice Programs, the Office for Victims of Crime, the Office on Violence Against Women, and the Office on Community Oriented Policing Services. The grants support police, serve victims, help Tribes address domestic violence and sexual abuse, and strengthen tribal justice systems.

It is imperative that we maintain a strong government-to-government working relationship, rooted in mutual respect and shared purpose. As the first point of contact for Tribes at the Department of Justice, our Office of Tribal Justice was made a permanent fixture by the Tribal Law and Order Act of 2010. Many of you know its director, Tracy Toulou. I first met Tracy 25 years ago. He has devoted most of his career to this important work, and he is an ideal person for the job.

Our United States Attorney's Offices are a crucial part of our engagement with Tribes. Each U.S. Attorney with Indian country responsibility has at least one Tribal Liaison who serves as the primary point of contact with Tribes located in the district. In addition to their duties as prosecutors, Tribal Liaisons often coordinate with and train Tribal law enforcement officers.

We are fortunate to have talented United States Attorneys and Assistant United States Attorneys who are committed to enhancing public safety in native communities.

Trent Shores was nominated by President Trump, and confirmed by the Senate, to serve as the U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Oklahoma. Trent is a proud member of the Choctaw Nation, and he is invested in Tribal issues and committed to making Indian country safer. I'm pleased that Trent will help lead the Department of Justice's efforts to fight crime in Indian country, as the new Chair of the Native American Issues Subcommittee of the Attorney General's Advisory Committee.

Kurt Alme, the U.S. Attorney for the District of Montana, will serve as the Subcommittee Vice Chair. Trent and Kurt will work together with the 47 other U.S. Attorneys who serve Indian country to develop smart policies and craft solutions to problems.

We know from experience that the best way to understand our challenges and respond to them is through relationships built upon trust and respect. That's why our administration held a series of listening sessions with Tribes concerning law enforcement in May and June of last year. And this past December, the Attorney General's Tribal Nations Leadership Council had a series of meetings here in Washington with leaders throughout the Department of Justice. The Council consists of Tribal leaders who represent regions across the country. Representatives traveled from Alaska, the Four Corners, Washington, and elsewhere.

I met with the Council during their last visit to Washington. I learned a lot, and I really enjoyed the dialogue. They shared concerns about crime, the drug epidemic, and the need to leverage resources and amass better data and technology to tackle these and other problems.

One particularly memorable conversation was with Chief Michael Stickman of the Nulato Village in Alaska. Chief Stickman explained the unique challenges faced by tribal members living in rural areas. His Tribe wants the same thing that everyone else does: public safety.

We know that violent crime in Indian country is far too common. Violence in Indian country, particularly domestic and sexual violence against women and children, is pervasive in many places. But it is not a reality that we are willing to accept.

Early in this administration, Attorney General Sessions made it a point to recognize an alarming upturn in violent crime in American communities, and we have set out in earnest to try to reverse that trend.

Approximately 85 percent of our pending Indian country investigations relate to violent crime. The most investigated crimes include child sexual abuse, violent assaults, and adult sexual assaults, followed by homicide, other forms of child abuse, drug, and property crimes.

As just one example, Eli Sloan was convicted after a two-week jury trial in federal court for his brutal attack on his estranged wife. Sloan kidnapped, beat, strangled, and sexually assaulted the victim. After a jury trial resulting in a conviction on six counts, Sloan was sentenced to more than 27 years in prison.

Native women and girls suffer a high rate of violence, including murder. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that American Indian and Alaska Native women experienced some of the highest rates of homicide based on an analysis from 18 states.

We will continue to vigorously investigate and prosecute crime in Tribal areas. And we need to be proactive, rather than just merely reactive, when it comes to combating crime. The Attorney General instructed our U.S. Attorneys to study the crime problems in their districts; to partner with state, local, and Tribal law enforcement; and to find solutions to reduce crime.

It will not be easy, but I know that they are up to the challenge. We will also continue to look for partnerships to help us combat these crimes.

In November 2017, our Associate Attorney General attended a trilateral summit on violence against indigenous women and girls. The summit took place in Ottawa, Canada and featured delegations from the United States, Canada, and Mexico. They discussed ways to work more effectively across international borders to address violent crime against indigenous women and girls, including human trafficking.

As is true throughout the country, substance abuse and drug trafficking are major challenges in Tribal areas. Methamphetamine continues to be a menace in many areas, and the opioid epidemic has also reached Indian country, with devastating impact. Fentanyl, heroin, oxycodone and other opioid drugs are destroying many lives.

There were about 8,000 overdose deaths in America in 1990. But in 2016, an estimated 64,000 Americans died of drug overdoses. To put that total into perspective, our country lost more Americans in 2016 to overdoses than in battle during the entire Vietnam War. And opioids such as fentanyl are fueling this epidemic. Drug overdose is now the leading cause of death for Americans under the age of 50.

Native American communities have been hit particularly hard by this epidemic. According to the CDC, American Indian and Alaska Native people had the highest drug overdose death rate in 2015.

The opioid epidemic is a top priority for the President and the Attorney General. Last year, we announced the formation of the Justice Department's Opioid Fraud and Detection Unit. The prosecutors use data to identify and prosecute health care fraud related to the diversion of prescription opioids.

In 2017, the Justice Department awarded nearly $59 million in Tribal grants to strengthen drug court programs. The Bureau of Justice Assistance runs our Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Program, which aims to reduce opioid misuse and the number of overdose deaths. The program uses prescription drug monitoring to prevent the misuse and diversion of controlled substances.

Last year, the Drug Enforcement Administration held its annual take back day. A total of 115 collection sites were set up on Tribal lands. Nationwide, we collected a record-setting total of almost one million pounds of prescription drugs.

Fighting crime requires partnerships that develop targeted solutions tailored to local areas. Last year, the Attorney General announced the reinvigoration of our Project Safe Neighborhoods program, which empowers our U.S. Attorneys to form comprehensive collaborations with state, local, and Tribal law enforcement to fight crime.

We are helping to train investigators and assist in the cross-deputization of Tribal law enforcement. Better investigations lead to better cases, more prosecutions, and more convictions that remove bad actors and increase public safety and confidence in law enforcement.

One initiative that we are particularly proud of is the Tribal Access Program. That program, coordinated by our Office of Tribal Justice, provides Tribes with a kiosk that gives them access to federal crime databases. The access goes both ways. Tribal law enforcement can access offender data, and also can upload information to share with other agencies.

This program has been tremendously successful. Tribes have entered more than 300 sex offender registrations into the system. In dozens of instances, data entered by a Tribe prevented the illegal purchase of firearms. More than 350 protection orders have been entered or modified. And Tribes have conducted more than 2,000 fingerprint-based record checks for civil purposes, including employment.

In one case, a sergeant of the Suquamish Tribal Police Department was investigating the kidnapping of an elderly man. The man suffered from dementia and didn't have his medication with him, so time was of the essence. The only clue the detective had was the partial name of a suspect who may have driven off the reservation with the victim.

Because the Suquamish Tribe participates in the program, the sergeant was able to log into an FBI database. He found a phone number and a police report from another county with a full name and date of birth of the suspect. He also learned that there was an active protection order against the suspect. From this, the detective was able to obtain a description of the car. As a result, he located the suspect and rescued the elderly victim.

A few years ago, that success story would not have been possible.

So far, we have deployed kiosks to 33 Tribes across the country. We plan to deploy 14 more this year.

Those are just a few examples of federal law enforcement support for Tribal communities.

The Department of Justice's partnerships with Tribal nations are rooted in respect, tradition, and history. But our partnerships are really about the future.

In conclusion, I want to thank you again for the opportunity to be here. I look forward to continuing to work with you.

Together, we will make Tribal communities safer.

Thank you.

Panel rejects requirement to teach state's Native history

By Bob Mercer

Rapid City Journal correspondent

Pierre, SD – Feb. 13, 2018 – A state lawmaker wanted the Legislature to require public schools provide instruction on South Dakota's Native American history, culture and government.

But the House Education Committee rejected the idea Monday after a state Department of Education official spoke against it. The panel voted 8-4 to kill HB 1253.

Deputy Secretary Mary Stadick Smith reminded the panel of the fable in which the tortoise beat the hare. She asked the panel to let the department go forward "slowly but surely."

Rep. Shawn Bordeaux, D-Mission, said tribal people from Sinte Gleska University and K-12 schools in his area contributed to the department's Oceti Sakowin teachings.

Bordeaux said he was told years ago a statewide mandate wasn't necessary because the standards already were being taught.

"I kind of feel like things are going, but maybe not fast enough," he said.

Native American students in the Rapid City school district are dropping out at a 50 percent rate, according to Bordeaux. He noted that Gov. Dennis Daugaard, a Republican, talked in his State of the State speech Jan. 9 about the need for South Dakota to invest more in students.

Stadick Smith said the department has an Oceti Sakowin website and a state government board aligned tribal standards and social studies standards. The department assigned another group last year to coordinate tribal standards and science standards, she said.

That proved more difficult and the group decided lesson plans would be a better approach, she said. "We're already in the process," Stadick Smith said. "We recognize it will take time to weave these standards into our classrooms."

"I'm not really sure what weaving is," Bordeaux said.

Rep. Timothy Johns asked Stadick Smith if statewide exams would be adjusted to reflect the tribal content. She told him there hadn't been any discussion.

"We do not test in the area of social studies right now," she said.

Rep. Julie Frye-Mueller, Rapid City, asked what would come next if the Legislature adopted the requirement. Frye-Mueller said South Dakota students as a whole have scored only in the high 40s, of a possible 100, on their reading and math proficiency assessments.

"Maybe there's the basics kids need to be learning first," Frye-Mueller said.

Rep. Jamie Smith, D-Sioux Falls, said he wouldn't dismiss social studies or tribal studies as unimportant.

Frye-Mueller agreed tribal studies could be an asset, but she again noted that "the basics are what we really need to be focused on."

Oil pipeline moratorium bill killed during hearing

By Shannon Marvel

Farm Forum – February 6, 2018 – A bill that aimed to halt the construction of oil pipelines in South Dakota was killed during a hearing Monday morning.

Lawmakers on the House Commerce and Energy Committee Prime voted 8-4 to defer House Bill 1223 to the 41st day of legislation.

Had it been passed, House Bill 1223 would've prevented the construction of oil pipelines in the state after July 1.

Proponents of the bill aired their concerns over the safety of oil pipelines, citing recent spills and deficiencies within the leak detection technology used by pipeline operators such as TransCanada and Energy Transfer Partners.

Rep. Shawn Bordeaux, D-Mission, one of the bill's sponsors, said the pipeline moratorium would serve as a pause to allow time for pipeline safety technologies to improve.

Bordeaux cited the recent Keystone Pipeline spill in Marshall County near Amherst that was discovered Nov. 16, where 210,000 gallons of crude oil spilled in a field enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Program.

"The thing that really gets me about this one here is (TransCanada officials) were bragging about how they were able to identify the leak with their leak detection system and were able to start the process of containment through their procedures within 15 minutes," Bordeaux said.

"But to me, if 15 minutes amounts to almost of quarter of a million gallons, that's pretty risky."

Bordeaux said without vast improvements to the pipeline leak detection systems used today, there's too much risk involved to allow another pipeline in the state.

Oil pipeline lobbyists and company representatives testified against the bill during the hearing, saying that crude oil pipelines are crucial to economic development within the state.

Sen. Troy Heinert, D-Mission, one of the bill's sponsors, began by saying the bill would need to be amended to place a moratorium on all crude oil pipelines, as opposed to all oil pipelines.

"We need to make sure we are putting South Dakota and its natural resources ahead of companies that risk our way of life," Heinert said.

"I'm not saying no pipelines ever, but we have to get to a spot where we look at this technology. How can we do this better? What are these routes? How do we keep it out of our river? It's time we step up and say we're going to pause and we don't want anything else right now. Lets move forward together in a safe productive way," he said.

Heinert noted that the opponents of the bill continue to use the same arguments used in past legislation involving the safety of pipelines.

"Maybe if they would've worked with us, we wouldn't have this bill today," Heinert said.

"The tax revenue for the school — if one of those breaks in one of those communities, you're not going to have a school because who wants to live in an area that's completely polluted," he said.

Heinert said that without access to clean, drinking water the economic benefits of an oil pipeline become obsolete.

"These pipelines are very close to those rural water systems, and we also have wells for when the flow out of the river isn't what we need, we're adding extra to it. The Oglala Aquifer — the cleanest source of water in the U.S. — you don't get a do over when you pollute that aquifer. This isn't about us versus them. This is about all of us," Heinert said.

Harding County Commissioner Dean Wagner said preventing the construction of crude oil pipelines would lead to budget deficiencies and poor quality roads in Harding County.

"In our county they're are going to be producing oil well drills. Harding County alone has seven new wells that are planned to be drilled," Wagner said.

He added that trucks would have to be used to transport the crude oil without the ability to construct feed lines that connect the wells to oil pipelines.

"This will destroy county roads and cause a great financial burden on all producing towns. We are already having a hard time keeping county roads in good conditions," Wagner said.

Rebecca Terk, a lobbyist for Dakota Rural Action, said oil pipelines pose a greater threat to the state's agriculture economy.

"Pipelines leak. They can cause massive damage to land and water, as we heard and saw with the Amherst spill," Turk said.

She said there are ag producers in the state whose drainage systems, land quality and water sources have been damaged due to oil pipeline development and failures.

"There's no real bonding in place for these projects and that's a concern. We take a break, sit down, really consider all of our framework for looking at these projects," Turk said.

Rep. Elizabeth May, R-Kyle, asked Drew Duncan, a representative for TransCanada, whether the company has consulted with area tribes when planning and developing plans for an oil pipeline in the state.

Duncan said tribes are considered their own government during the federal permitting process and are to be consulted by the federal government, not the company responsible for developing the pipeline.

He explained that if TransCanada were to consult with tribal governments, the permitting process wouldn't work.

"So you're telling me the federal government does not allow your company to go in and have a consultation process with the tribes?" May asked Duncan.

Duncan answered "yes", which didn't sit well with May.

"I'm an oil person, I'm all about oil," May said. "What I am against is ramming and jamming and not having a consultation with the tribes. They need some kind of benefit."

May noted that there will be no reconciliation between those for and against oil pipelines if TransCanada and other oil pipeline companies continue to develop projects in the state without consulting tribal governments.

"I know this bill isn't going anywhere, but I think it's a heads up. Because if I'm getting tired of it. I'm sure a lot of other people are getting tired of it," May said.

Heinert echoed May's sentiment, saying this bill isn't about undervaluing the importance of fossil fuels.

"I get it. I use fuel. I know we need oil," Heinert said. "But these pipelines aren't carrying Rotella 15-40. This is crude oil that is going to a refinery for whatever purpose. It's not as simple as everyone makes it out to be."

Sen. Kevin Killer, D-Pine Ridge, said the bill is a result of lawmakers' frustrations when trying to resolve oil pipeline issues.

"That frustration is there isn't that consultation piece in a lot of these conversations. How do we actually go about that and have a constructive conversation to where we're having dwindling natural resources. And we really need to think about that, especially since we're an ag economy. We don't want to endanger our greatest revenue driver," Killer said.

(Editor's note: Yes, it's disappointing the bill did not pass must by our South Dakota lawmakers. But there is good news in that merits of a moratorium have been shared; they should continue to be heard in future debates over unnecessary and dangerous fossil fuel projects.)

Company hoping for 'another Homestake' as gold drilling starts near Rochford

By Seth Tupper

Rapid City Journal – Feb. 12, 2018 – A Canadian company that is hoping for "another Homestake Mine" has begun exploratory drilling for gold near Rochford.

Mineral Mountain Resources announced Monday that drilling began last week. During the first phase of drilling operations, the company plans to drill at least 12 holes ranging in diameter from 2 to 4 inches and ranging in depth from about 1,000 to 1,300 feet.

The drilling is being conducted on privately owned land parcels about a half-mile southeast of Rochford, which is a small, unincorporated community in the north-central Black Hills that was a gold-mining hub during the late 1800s.

The private land where the company is drilling is covered by an exploration notice that was approved in June by the state Department of Environment and Natural Resources.

Mineral Mountain also hopes to drill on some public land in the Rochford area, but the U.S. Forest Service is still considering the company's operating plan for those additional drilling sites in the Black Hills National Forest.

In a news release, Mineral Mountain said the current drilling area is about 16 miles south of the former Homestake Mine, which produced about 40 million ounces of gold from 1876 to 2001.

The company also recently released a slideshow presentation about its drilling plans.

"The Target: Another Homestake Mine," says one of the slides.

Although Mineral Mountain is based in Vancouver, British Columbia, the company's president and CEO is Nelson Baker, whose corporate biography says he earned a geological engineering degree in 1968 from the South Dakota School of Mines & Technology in Rapid City.

The drilling project is opposed by some neighboring landowners, environmentalists and others who fear negative impacts from a potential large-scale gold mine. Some Native Americans have called the project a desecration of the Black Hills, which are spiritually significant to several Native American tribes, and Native Americans have also voiced concerns about the project's proximity to Pe Sla, a large mountain meadow about 7 miles west of the drilling area that is spiritually significant to Sioux people.

In a letter circulated by a group called Save Rochford & Rapid Creek From Gold Mining, Rapid City resident George Kruse cited the example of the Gilt Edge Mine, a 360-acre site 6.5 miles east of Lead. It became an EPA Superfund Site after Brohm Mining Company abandoned it in 1999 and left behind 150 million gallons of acidic heavy-metal-laden water in three open pits and millions of cubic yards of acid-generating waste rock.

Kruse warned of the environmental disaster that could result from contamination of Rapid Creek by a gold mine.

"Everybody along Rapid Creek and Rapid City that drinks water should be concerned about this potential disaster," Kruse wrote.

For now, Mineral Mountain is only exploring, rather than mining, for gold. The company's notice of intent, filed with the state DENR, says drilling could eventually include up to 120 exploratory holes within 12 approved drilling areas on private land. No hole will exceed 4,000 feet in depth, and no contact with underground water sources — known as aquifers — is anticipated.

Water for use by the drilling rigs will be pumped from Rapid Creek, which flows alongside Rochford Road. Used water will be stored in a tank where the cuttings will settle out so the water can be reused. At the end of drilling, the water will be disposed pursuant to state regulations, possibly at a sewage treatment plant.

After a hole is drilled and core samples are removed, each hole must be filled with bentonite, or with concrete if an aquifer is encountered. The disturbed area on the surface must be restored to a natural-looking state.

Mineral Mountain paid $250 for an exploratory permit and must maintain a $20,000 bond with state government, which is the maximum statewide bond imposed for exploratory drilling. The bond money is available for use by state regulators if Mineral Mountain abandons the project without fully reclaiming it.

Mineral Mountain previously explored for gold in the mountains at Keystone, another historical Black Hills mining community, from 2012 to 2015. The Keystone project received negative publicity in late 2012 when some drilling water and bentonite leaked into Battle Creek. Drilling was shut down for a week, but DENR officials said the milky substance in the creek did not pose a hazard to people or fish.

Gold mining has been a major industry in the Black Hills since the 1870s. The biggest current player is Wharf Resources, which reported production of 109,175 ounces of gold and 105,144 ounces of silver in 2016 from its mining operation west of Lead in the northern Black Hills.

Trump's pick to run IHS, cited for business savvy, had financial struggles

Review of Robert Weaver's past shows he left latest employer in state of financial disarray

By Dan Frosch and Christopher Weaver

Wall Street Journal – Feb. 13, 2018 – President Donald Trump's nominee to lead the troubled Indian Health Service left his latest employer in a state of financial disarray, filed for personal bankruptcy and had liens imposed on one of his own businesses for failing to pay federal taxes, according to public documents and interviews.

The nominee, Robert Weaver, a member of the Quapaw tribe of Oklahoma, has cited his private-sector business acumen and leadership of several small businesses as key qualifications to lead the agency and its roughly $6 billion budget.

A review of Mr. Weaver's business and financial history by The Wall Street Journal shows he has sometimes struggled in those areas.

The Journal sent questions to Mr. Weaver and the Department of Health and Human Services, which oversees the IHS. A spokesman for the department said the nominee is "a highly qualified candidate to lead" the Indian Health Service. Mr. Weaver didn't respond to requests for comment.

The IHS runs a network of hospitals and clinics, and serves about 2.2 million Native Americans around the country. In recent years, the agency has faced a cavalcade of problems, including unsafe care at some hospitals, a shortage of medical providers and regulatory sanctions that have cut off key funding sources.

Supporters of Mr. Weaver, 39 years old, say he will bring a much needed outside perspective to the beleaguered agency. In a document provided to the Senate Indian Affairs Committee, which must approve his nomination, Mr. Weaver, in additional to citing his business savvy, has pointed to his "track record of 'getting things done.' "

Mr. Weaver's latest employer said he neglected important financial tasks, eventually leaving the firm in financial trouble when he quit to pursue his own business ventures.

While Mr. Weaver was working as the practice manager at Herndon Snider & Associates, a small Joplin, Mo., psychology office from 2004 to 2008, he fell far behind on billing insurance companies and collecting payments, said Herndon Snider, the practice's founder.

"It was a major problem," said Dr. Snider, a psychologist, referring to the clinic's collections of payments during Mr. Weaver's tenure. Dr. Snider said if a potential employer had asked for a reference, he wouldn't have recommended Mr. Weaver for another position unless he was closely supervised.

When asked about Mr. Weaver's tenure at the firm, the HHS spokesman said "Mr. Weaver had a good working relationship with the owners, and left on good terms."

No hearing has been scheduled on Mr. Weaver's nomination, and lawmakers told the Journal they are reviewing his qualifications.

In addition to his private-sector work, Mr. Weaver cited in his publicly available résumé and statements to lawmakers his "leadership roles" at a hospital, St. John's Regional Medical Center in Joplin, where he said he had responsibility for areas such as "all accounts receivable" and the budget.

The Journal previously reported that longtime employees in those departments said they didn't remember him. Since that article was published in January, former co-workers and supervisors told the Journal that Mr. Weaver held a series of low-level jobs as a patient-registration clerk from 1997 to 2004 and didn't oversee all accounts receivable or work in budgeting.

"Mr. Weaver had many responsibilities during his time at St. John's and looks forward to discussing those further with all involved in the confirmation process," the HHS spokesman said.

Mr. Weaver struggled to make ends meet while working at St. John's, filing for personal bankruptcy in May 2001, court records show. He was on track to earn $26,062.32 that year, according to his bankruptcy petition, which stated his monthly pay. The filing said he was about $25,000 in debt. The bankruptcy was discharged later that year.

The HHS spokesman said Mr. Weaver has since gone on to become a successful entrepreneur with several businesses.

Mr. Weaver didn't mention his four years working at the psychology clinic on his public résumé. He did disclose his practice-manager job there to the committee.

The HHS spokesman declined to comment on that discrepancy in his résumé.

Dr. Snider said billing, collecting payments and managing expenses fell so far behind under Mr. Weaver that Dr. Snider had to return to the practice full-time to help his daughter, who had taken it over, right the clinic's finances.

When Sen. Tom Udall, (D., N.M.), a committee member, asked Mr. Weaver in a meeting about his tenure there, Mr. Weaver "responded with a long and rambling explanation about a dispute over $100,000 that he had had with Mr. Snider and his daughter" after notifying them that he was leaving, according to Jennifer Talhelm, a spokeswoman for the lawmaker.

Ms. Talhelm said Sen. Udall had requested further explanation about his departure, but Mr. Weaver hasn't provided it.

"Mr. Weaver worked for us as an officer manager during the time period he reported," said Jan Snider Kent, Dr. Snider's daughter. "I have no further comment."

The HHS spokesman declined to comment on Mr. Weaver's conversation with Mr. Udall.

In 2007, Mr. Weaver started the first of a series of businesses and began selling Aflac insurance products while still working at the psychology practice, associates recalled. Dr. Snider said he believed that venture distracted Mr. Weaver from his practice duties.

In response to the Journal's questions, the HHS spokesman said Mr. Weaver rejected Dr. Snider's characterization of his tenure at the firm.

Later in 2007, Mr. Weaver's business got a boost from his own tribe. The HHS spokesman said he became the broker for the tribe's Downstream Casino, in the northeast corner of Oklahoma.

He soon fell behind on his taxes by the middle of 2010: Two federal lien notices filed the next year show the business, RWI Benefits LLC, owed more than $120,000 in unpaid taxes.

In February 2012, the Internal Revenue Service released both tax liens, saying Mr. Weaver had satisfied the outstanding taxes, according to IRS filings.

The HHS spokesman said Mr. Weaver didn't need to disclose the liens to government ethics officials because they were released more than a year ago, citing what he said was a federal ethics-disclosure policy.

Legislative reports

2018 Week 6 Legislative Report

Senator Jason Frerichs

Committee discussion and action on the various bills introduced to the 2018 Legislature continue to be the focus of our days working in Pierre. The three committees I serve on have been busy with public testimony and committee debate on the pending legislation. I enjoy the committee process and always appreciate it when rank and file South Dakotans make the trip to Pierre to participate in the committee process as well.

I brought SB 188 to require our state department of environment and natural resources (DENR) to have observation wells installed at oil pipeline spill sites. This requirement would be paid for by the pipeline operator and the information on the sampling from these groundwater wells would be posted on the DENR website. Unfortunately the Secretary for DENR opposed SB 188 because he felt it would require observation wells each time an oil pipeline leak happens. The reason I brought SB 188 was due to the fact that Transcanada has incurred two large oil pipeline leaks within that last two years. The first leak happened in the Freeman area and there were no observation wells installed. The Marshall County leak had the presence of groundwater so observation wells are installed at the site. Transcanada and its environmental team are in charge of the twelve wells on site and not the state DENR. SB 188 failed on a party-line vote in the Senate Agriculture and Natural Resources committee. If we would make SB 188 the law the state DENR would be in charge of the observation wells and not the oil pipeline company.

SB 159 is a bill aimed at providing food tax relief and making South Dakota's tax system less regressive. SB 159 decreases the tax on food by 1% for every $20 million of additional sales tax revenue collected, presumably from online sellers. The bill still allows for the taxation of pop and candy to incentivize healthy eating and keep some of our tax base. According to the National Conference of State Legislators (NCSL), food exemptions lessen the regressivity of a tax structure, but food exemptions in other states have produced revenue losses. With SB 159, South Dakota can get the best of both worlds. Because SB 159 is financed with new revenue that will trigger a sales tax cut anyway, food tax relief will not create a revenue shortage. SB 159 will provide tax relief to South Dakotans, all of whom are currently at an increased risk of being food insecure, without threatening the financial stability of our state. I serve on the taxation committee where we debated SB 159 and I supported the bill. Unfortunately SB 159 was defeated in the committee.

With the recent good news of increased revenue projections I am hopeful we will be able to give a 1% increase to the community support providers including the nursing homes and mental health facilities. I appreciate many of you contacting me in support of these providers and I completely agree on the need for more funding. The 1% is only a small step in the right direction but it will be helpful. I also would expect additional financial support for K12 education and the state employees salaries.

I brought SB 137 this year as a bill to remove the minimum age for mentor hunting. Currently the law requires the youth to be at least 10 in order to participate in a mentored hunt. I realize some are concerned about making this change; but I contend that the mentor can decide when they feel a young person is ready to hunt. The current laws requiring the mentor to be a parent/guardian or someone with written consent will stay in place. SB 137 received just a few votes against it in the Senate and is now on the House side for further debate.

HB 1199 would remove the ability for collective bargaining of employees at the regent all institutions. The bill was passed on the House side and will be up for debate in the senate state affairs committee soon. I am opposed to HB 1199 because I feel employees should have the right to organize for salary and benefits. The administration at regental institutions are not asking for this change. I worry that if this right to collective bargaining is taken away at the university level that the next step will be to remove this option for school district employees.

I welcome your input on HB 1184 which would allow the placement of manure pipes in the township right of way. This bill passed the House and will be up for debate in the transportation committee where I am a member. I understand that it is best to move the liquid manure in hoses rather than trucking it. Working with landowners along the roads and the township government should be the first goal when these pipes and hoses are installed.

In these closing weeks of session I will continue to work diligently on the proposed precision agriculture facility at our land grant university. With the increased revenue projections there is the possibility that some one-time money will be available for the precision agriculture building but we will also have to identify non-general fund ongoing revenue to pay the bonding for the building.

I want to thank the Summit and Langford Area senior government classes for making the trip to Pierre to visit the Capitol. Please join us on February 24th in Aberdeen at the NSU student union and on March 2nd at With the Wind Winery near Rosholt for crackerbarrel updates on the legislative issues.

Thank you for contacting me on the issues important to you and please continue to let me know your opinions. I can be reached at 949-2204 and Jason.Frerichs@sdlegislature.gov.

SD Rep. Steve McCleery

The 6th week at the Capitol has proved to be one swimming with a number of bills that cause a lot of conversation, and while many of them have not made it past the legislature, it has been an incredibly educational experience for us, and I hope that some of the bills that I sponsor have been able to educate as well. Bills that I have sponsored include House Bill 1169, which has its stakes in city government, and revises the role of commissioner in that respect. Another bill that I sponsor has to do with the International Building Code, and keeping up with its standards as we enter the new year. Along with those, I sponsor a bill that helps convention centers with their on-sale licenses to sell alcohol, and another to modify the removal of security freezes for consumer agencies. Lastly, I sponsored a bill that allows passengers of a vehicle operated by a licensed alcohol carrier to bring their own alcohol onto said vehicle, if the beverage is unopened and purchased in South Dakota. It has been great to co-sponsor these bills and a joy to see them move through the legislature relatively easily. Here's hoping they become law soon enough!

Now onto a heavier topic. Suicide is the 2nd leading cause of death in youth and adults ages 10-44, and too many schools are operating without preventative policies. Upwards of 90% of people who die by suicide were living with a diagnosable mental health condition at the time of their death. These facts combined with the fact that there are many schools operating without preventative policies are chilling. While there are currently suicide prevention operations in statute, we can be doing even more to protect South Dakota's children, and to mandate that schools have a policy in place to prevent these actions would be a big win for the citizens of South Dakota.

I'd also like to commend the School Nutrition Association of SD for the outstanding number of children they have served in the 2016-2017 school year. 17.3 Million school lunches served in all, with 209 participants in the School Lunch Program. Healthy lunches for our students are being implemented, with all meals including ½ cup of fruits or vegetables. I love to see our students being fed healthy meals regularly!

In terms of economic development, it is easy to see growth in the SD wine industry. 1 million gallons of South Dakota wine being produced and sold in the state for the past 10 years, and bringing in $4,062,500 in revenue to our great state! With the first farm winery production in 1997, we can see the growing industry as SD currently has 33 active farm wineries. I'd like to thank Jeremy Kline of With the Wind Vineyard and Winery in Rosholt for not only this information, but information on all of the alcohol bills this session. His input has been invaluable and incredibly helpful.

I'd like to end my column today on a topic I feel particularly strong about. Representative Lana Greenfield had a bill in front of the House Committee on Appropriations, and I had the honor of co-sponsoring it. Unfortunately, it was killed in committee. The workforce crisis continues to worsen and intellectual and developmental disability services have taken a hit. Community support provider operational costs are continuing an increase, and their ability to offset for reduced funding is incredibly limited. This bill was to increase wages for employees of community support providers and nursing facilities. It is incredibly disappointing to see that this bill was killed so early, as the system of community support providers is incredibly fragile! The system is likely to fall apart in the next few years if nothing is done- and where does that leave our elderly and disabled? I am exceedingly disappointed in the priorities of our legislature in how they chose to handle this issue, and I remain hopeful that something will be done soon to aide this delicate system.

As always, I thank my district for allowing me to represent them, and so feel free to contact me with any comments or concerns at Steven.McCleerey@sdlegislature.gov or by phone at or by phone at (605)742-3112.

Minority leadership (from week 5)

The fifth week of this legislative session has been an especially busy one for me. Five of my bills were heard in committee this week, the bulk of which pertained to my Integrity in Government and Campaigns legislative package. This has been a focus of mine all session, and I think it's important to remember just how far we have to go as a state in order to become more open and transparent. In 2015, the Center for Public Integrity, a Pulitzer Prize winning organization, investigated all state governments and gave each a grade on the integrity of their governments. South Dakota received an F. Ranked 47th overall, South Dakota scored among the bottom ten states in the following categories: electoral oversight, executive accountability, legislative accountability, state civil service management, lobbying disclosure, and ethics enforcement agencies.

I recognize the need to address this flaw in our otherwise upstanding state, and I've seen other certain legislators of both parties bring legislation to address the issue of integrity and openness too. The voters have acknowledged the problem and weighed in as well, showing their resounding support for a more ethical government in 2016 with the passage of IM 22. However, even with attention on the problem and solutions on the table, nearly every open government measure proposed this session has been pushed aside by the establishment. For instance, I proposed three open government bills: SB 129, SB 133, and SB 192. My campaign finance reform bill, SB 129, simply reinstated the contribution limits that were imposed by the voters in IM 22. On a nine-person committee, only myself and assistant minority leader Troy Heinert, supported this measure to restore voter-approved campaign finance limits that help combat the influence of money in politics. We are sent to Pierre to represent the people, and this body's unwillingness to respect the will of the voters continues to do significant damage to trust in state government.

My open records bill, SB 192, would have shined light on state agencies and opened correspondence, memoranda, calendars or logs of appointments, working papers, and phone records of state agency officials and employees for public view. The Rapid City Journal found that South Dakota is one of just 14 states that doesn't consider government emails part of the public record. This kind of access would have helped substantially in the Gear Up investigation, and members of the press have expressed the need for this kind of access for their own investigations into state government mismanagement. Yet despite wide bipartisan co-sponsorship of this bill, it met a similar fate in committee with only two voices in support.

Other open government measures like HB 1267, HB 1239, HB 1178, and especially SB 116 which would have made legislators' voting and attendance records readily accessible to the public have all been defeated. Instead of making efforts to earn back the people's trust, vote after vote has been cast this week against government transparency. I think this blatant disrespect for the will of South Dakotans in unacceptable, and I hope you will join with me to demand better from our elected officials.

I'll keep fighting to earn back the trust of South Dakota voters, and I encourage anyone to reach out to me with ideas and/or concerns you might have. All my work stems from the concerns folks have shared with me. I believe the most important part of this job is to listen. I'm honored to serve you, and I'll keep working to make our government as honest and hardworking as the people of South Dakota.

State Senate Minority Leader, Billie H. Sutton.

Minority leadership (from week 6)

Another week of this 93rd Legislative Session has passed. The last couple weeks have been full of bill testimony and close votes on the floor, as well as full caucus galleries with numerous students and organizations in attendance. I always appreciate seeing citizens taking part in the legislative process, and I thank the teachers who take the time to show our future leaders the process firsthand by visiting the state Capitol.

One of the best ways to invest in South Dakota's future is by investing in our students. We can do a better job of supporting our students by giving them a head start with early childhood education, so I've proposed the creation of an Early Childhood Education Advisory Council. Another way we can support our students is with needs-based scholarships. In all of the US, only two states give less to their students in need than we do. We struggle even to begin to compete with our neighbors: Iowa gives almost $700 to each undergraduate receiving a Pell Grant, Minnesota gives $1,600, and Wyoming gives over $2,200. South Dakota, however, gives a dismal $11.85 per Pell grant eligible student. Before we fall even further behind and lose our students to other states, we need to make efforts to ensure our students can afford an education in South Dakota. This is why I proposed, with the Board of Regent's support, we use $3.5 million from the Future Fund to back needs-based scholarships for our students who will, in turn, strengthen our workforce and economy.

One more way I've proposed to invest in students is by creating a career and technical education (CTE) consortium grant program. This idea is a particularly efficient way to encourage creative and innovative collaboration between schools, optimizing opportunity for students. To be eligible to win one of these grants, a group of at least three school districts would team up to design new career and technical education opportunities for students in their districts. This kind of innovation is already happening in South Dakota. For example, my hometown of Burke-in collaboration with Gregory, Colome, and South Central School Districts-purchased four mobile units to instruct building construction, engineering, biomedical, and welding. The units rotate between the schools each year, so throughout high school, each student in all four schools has the opportunity to take any and all of the courses. This clever partnership truly maximizes resources and opportunity, and I can't think of a better use of a fund meant to brighten South Dakota's future.

Unfortunately, many of these measures did not pass through committee despite bipartisan support. Regardless, I will continue to fight for the future of South Dakota education and it's impact on workforce development and our economic success. If you have more ideas for how we can invest in South Dakota's future to build a stronger South Dakota, I'd love to hear from you. We need to keep investing in our best resource-our people-and keep working together to find solutions that benefit people across the state.

State Senate Minority Leader, Billie H. Sutton.

Editorials –

Sota guest editorial –

Support for "9littlegirls" mounts in SD state legislature; Not enough to get enough votes this time

By Jencie Dahlen

In 2004 the 9littlegirls joined a civil suit ultimately known as Bernie vs Blue Cloud Abby. In 2010, the civil suit was 7 days away from going to trial when SD voted into law essentially a ban on anyone over the age of 40 to pursue claims of childhood sexual abuse against the Native American boarding school run by the Catholic Church. This law was applied retroactively to their case and 8 other cases, which threw them out of court. The Supreme Court later in effect upheld this decision.

Last Tuesday, Feb. 13th, #9littlegirls made the journey to Pierre, SD in support of SB196. The bill was an amendment to address the statute of limitations issue and to repeal the ban on those childhood sex abuse survivors over the age of 40 from seeking a civil suit against entities.

The testimony for SB196 started at 9 o'clock and we were instructed by Senator Russell, chairman of the judicial committee, we had until 9:15 to present testimony. There were over 10 people who wanted to speak. Senator Killer who presented the bill spoke first followed by the lawyer Michelle Dauphinais Echols.

Afterwards, there was only time to allow three survivors of childhood sexual abuse to speak. The opponents had 3 people who spoke against the bill.

After 45 minutes the Sen. Brock Greenfield made a motion to defer the vote until later that day.

At approximately 4 pm the Committee resumed.

Debate from the Senate Judiciary Committee resumed, yet did not ask for further information from attorney Michelle Dauphinais Echols or Senator Killer, who sponsored the bill.

But further testimony was made by Sen. Art Rusch and an opponent of the bill with misleading legalese that was not allowed to be rebutted by the bill's proponents.

A motion to kill the amendment was made.

A Committee vote of 4-3 stopped the bill from proceeding.

The bill was supported by Senator Killer (who is not a member of the Committee), Senator Stace Nelson, Senator Craig Kennedy and Senator Jenna Netherton.

The Committee members that voted against the bill were Senator Brock Greenfield, Kris Langer (Republican Majority Whip), Lance Russell, and Arthur Rusch.

The boarding school survivors were dealt another blow and the devastation is overwhelming.

However, the campaign is committed to move forward to correct a wrong imposed by the state of South Dakota.

We will continue to fight for all victims of childhood abuse.

*****

Please contact Jencie Kay via Facebook for continued updates. Also, the campaign encourages Indian country to get out and vote for candidates who will support the movement.

Brief editorial comments from the editor's desk –

On and Off the Lake Traverse Reservation

Please see the coverage we have available to share of the unified Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women (WWIM) gatherings and marches around the country last week.

Valentine's Day has been set aside to bring awareness of the many murdered and missing women of our Indigenous peoples.

Last Wednesday, Tribal Chairman Dave Flute, Sisseton-Wahpeton veterans, TZTS students, and other Tribal members participated in the MMIW event in downtown Fargo.

Here at Agency Village, the Sisseton Wahpeton College sponsored a walk, which was held in conjunction with similar walks at all the tribal colleges.

Thank you to those who shared photo highlights.

Angela TwoStars Papenfuss shares comments and pictures from the Minneapolis march.

*****

The Tribal Veterans Service Office organized a ceremony last week, to honor our surviving Sisseton-Wahpeton World War II veterans:

The event was held at noon on Thursday in the administration building rotunda.

We have photos of the honoring taken by John Heminger, but plan to run a feature in next week's Sota.

One of the four veterans – Michael Schreiner, US Army; Sampson Hill, US Army; Basil Robertson, US Army; and Ken Stuart, US Air Force – was unable to be present.

Basil Robertson was ill and could not attend.

VSO Geri Opsal this week will be presenting Basil with the same certificate, plaque, and SWST Pendleton that was given to the others.

Watch next week's Sota for Geri's report and the pictures.

*****

Phase I of the Dakota Magic expansion is now complete, and DNGE and last week Tribal Council held a ribbon-cutting and "soft" opening of the part of the casino renovated during this phase.

See our photos from the event, taken by photographer John Heminger.

Each week we provide PCL (general contractor) and Dakota Magic space to update readers on the Magic expansion.

Keep watching at the overall project continues.

*****

We are pleased to report that Tamara St. John is running for a seat in the South Dakota House of Representatives.

Please see Tamara's announcement in this week's Sota.

We wish her the very best, and are sure that hers will be a strong voice not only for the Oyate but for everyone in District 1.

Hopefully, she will be able to bring a much-needed perspective to the legislature in Pierre.

*****

We thank Jencie Kay Dahlen for submitting this week's guest editorial.

The victims/survivors did not realize their hope of getting legislation in Pierre, but they plan to continue lobbying.

The central issue is the statute of limitations which serves to protect the accused/perpetrators.

*****

Please see the contact information for our Tribal Elderly Protection Team.

Members' phone numbers are being posted in the Sota.

Please clip and save these telephone numbers, keep them available by your phone.

And be sure to notify the Team if and when you observe any of our elders being mistreated – in any way.

Thank you.

*****

Note that the date for this summer's grand opening of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Veterans Cemetery has been corrected.

Please write down Thursday, July 12, 2018, for its opening ceremony.

And watch for more information in coming editions.

*****

The approved November, December 2017, and January 2018 Tribal Council proceedings are not prepared for release.

The Sota will publish approved minutes as soon as they are provided.

*****

Elder's Meditation:

"A wee child toddling in a wonder world, I prefer to their dogma my excursions into the natural gardens where the voice of the Great Spirit is heard in the twittering of birds, the rippling of mighty waters, and the sweet breathing of flowers. If this is Paganism, then at present, at least, I am a Pagan."

– Zitkala-Sa

*****

Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

Politics is perhaps the only profession for which no preparation is thought necessary. Robert Louis Stevenson (1850 - 1894)

If you would be a real seeker after truth, it is necessary that at least once in your life you doubt, as far as possible, all things. Rene Descartes (1596 - 1650)

Nobody realizes that some people expend tremendous energy merely to be normal. Albert Camus (1913 - 1960)

Exercise relieves stress. Nothing relieves exercise. Takayuki Ikkaku, Arisa Hosaka and Toshihiro Kawabata, Animal Crossing: Wild World, 2005

The wages of sin are unreported. Unknown

If man does find the solution for world peace it will be the most revolutionary reversal of his record we have ever known. George C. Marshall (1880 - 1959)

A fact is a simple statement that everyone believes. It is innocent, unless found guilty. A hypothesis is a novel suggestion that no one wants to believe. It is guilty, until found effective. Edward Teller (1908 - 2003)

It's kind of fun to do the impossible. Walt Disney (1901 - 1966)

I have left orders to be awakened at any time in case of national emergency, even if I'm in a cabinet meeting. Ronald Reagan (1911 - 2004)

I've wrestled with reality for 35 years, Doctor, and I'm happy to state I finally won out over it. Mary Chase (1887 - 1973), Jimmy Stewart in "Harvey", 1950

*****

The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Earlier receipt of copy is always appreciated. So, if you are aware of a date or message that needs to be publicized or advertised, please let us know about it in advance of the weekly deadline.

The preferred way to submit typed articles and ads, art and photos, is by e-mail.

The editor can be reached at the following e-mail address:

earthskyweb@cs.com

For more information, leave a message on the Sota production office voicemail (605) 938-4452, or send a fax to the 24-hour dedicated line (605) 938-4676.

-- CDF

Obituaries –

Services planned for Tawny Rockwood

Tawny Rockwood, 25, of Andover, SD died on Friday, February 9, 2018, at her residence.

A wake service is planned on Friday, February 23, 2018, at 7:30 p.m. at the Enemy Swim Community Center.

Funeral service is at the Community Center at 10:00 a.m. Saturday, February 24.

The Coester Funeral Home, Webster, is in charge of arrangements.

Services held for Mary Ortley

Mary Margaret Ortley, 73, of Browns Valley, SD passed away on February 11, 2018 at Coteau Des Prairies Hospital in Sisseton, SD.

Memorial services were held on Friday afternoon, February 16, 2018 at the SWO Community Center in Agency Village, SD, with Jr. Heminger officiating and Kaye Bursheim as the pianist.

Honorary pallbearers were all of Mary's nieces, nephews, family and friends.

Inurnment will be held at a later date.

The Cahill Funeral Chapel of Sisseton, SD was in charge of arrangements.

Mary Margaret Ortley, who passed rather unexpectedly, was born in the Summer of 1944 to her parents Silas Ortley Sr., and Rosalie (Burke) Ortley near Sisseton, SD. She lived almost all her life at her parent's property, near Browns Valley, MN.

For a brief while, as a young child, she had stayed with her great-grandmother Mrs. Simon, whom she loved very deeply, near the Dry Wood Lake area.

Her education included attending a small one room country school roughly a mile and a half from her rural home, and the Lutheran sponsored Concordia Teachers College located in Nebraska, where she earned both her high school and college education. The latter is where she began her studies in Special Education, which she later practiced in earnest and integrity within the Browns Valley school system.

Mary worked in a variety of jobs, mostly in the Sisseton, Browns Valley and Peever locations.

These included at a quilt/blanket company, an elementary/high school, and a gas/convenience store located near interstate 29.

The Browns Valley school system is where she practiced for roughly 20 years (during the 1970s and 1980s) her expertise as a special needs para-educator. While there, she was devoted to many wonderful students, actively engaging with them in a way that highlighted each student's individual strengths and inherent skills.

Mary delighted in sharing with close family fond memories of these children, especially noteworthy was the joy in working with a young student with a neuro-developmental condition called Autism. Although, not much was known about this condition in those days, Mary sought out the best she could any relevant information about it, and as always, with upmost professionalism applied what she had discovered in a carefully tailored manner to best support this young student's educational growth.

Mary finished her employment career at a local gas/convenience store called Buck's Trailside, located just west of Peever, SD (now known as I-29 Food and Fuel, but still operated by Kenny Buck and his family). She enjoyed the store in many ways, including working for kind owners, meeting interesting tourists, seeing friends and visiting relatives who stopped by to make purchases.

Mary had no children, but considered many in this way, including four who she helped raise to adulthood. These include Roger Ortley who lives in Sisseton, SD, Julia Ortley who lives in Wheaton, MN, John Ortley who lives in Lawrence, KS, and Rose Ortley who lives in Minneapolis, MN.

Brothers and sisters include, Edmund Two Stars, Silas Ortley, Jr., Gary Ortley, LaVonne Ortley (deceased), Felicia Ortley (deceased), and Kenneth Ortley (deceased).

Her many nieces and nephews, whom she adored include, Jason Ortley, Jordan Ortley, Jeff Ortley, Janet Ortley, Adam Ortley, Scott Ortley, Misty Fryer, Summer Ortley, Eric Ortley, Zachary Ortley, Danielle Ortley, Joshua, Lindsey, Kenneth Ortley Jr., Elias, Silas, Theresa, Cari Rose, Trish, Martin Ortley, and Jennifer Ortley. Her love also includes family members who have passed, including, Jay Ortley, J. Ortley, Lisa Ortley, Jeremy James Ortley, Gary Ortley Jr., Cale Bendickson, and Desirae Ortley.

Her friends are numerous, treasured all of them, and often spoke fondly of Betty Ward, whom she has known a long time, chatted often with up to the present, sharing many good-natured stories with each other.

For Mary's obituary and on-line registry please visit www.cahillfuneralchapel.com

Services for Tillie Faye Walker

Tillie Fay Walker, age 88 of Mandaree, ND, passed away on Saturday, February 3, 2018 at Sanford Health, Bismarck, ND. Her funeral arrangements are with Fulkerson Stevenson Funeral Home of Watford City.

Tillie Faye Walker, named Hishua Adesh (Blossoming Mint), was born at home in the Independence community on the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation on July 11, 1928. Tillie was born a member of the Ma'xohxadi or Alkalai Lodge clan, and was a child of the Apuhga Wigaa or Low Cap Clan. Tillie's mother, Mercy Baker Walker was the daughter of Louis Baker and Emma Taylor, but was raised by her grandmother First Sprout and grandfather Two Chief. Her father Hans Walker Sr. was the son of Joseph and Susie Walker Youngbird, who were both Hidatsa from the Lucky Mound community.

Tillie and her siblings grew up in a world centered on traditional Mandan and Hidatsa values and culture, a bi- and tri-lingual world where most community members spoke or could communicate in English, Hidatsa, and Mandan. They lived in a log house built by their father, and ate the delicious food their mother prepared from her extensive gardens. Both parents enjoyed visiting their extended family, and made sure their children knew their relatives and the traditional values embedded in those relationship norms – from respect and dedication to helping your family, to teasing.

Tillie began her education in the local Independence school, and moved to the mission school in Elbowoods when she was a few years older. She finished her high school degree at Sanish High School, then continued on to work toward her postsecondary degree at Haskell and Willamette University before finishing her BA in Business Administration at the University of Nebraska. This was a time period in which it was unusual for tribal members to complete a college degree, especially so for women. Tillie's father wanted his daughters to have the same opportunities his sons did – this in an era in which educational opportunities were constrained for women, and when many believed that women would not benefit from or use a higher education degree.

While in college she constantly worked to help fund her education, from driving a pea truck to working for the Nebraska Legislature. After graduation, Tillie and two of her friends took a train to Philadelphia – without a job or a place lined up to live – and she approached the American Friends Service Committee and asked for a job. They hired her on the spot, and eventually that position led to the creation of the United Scholarship Service, an organization conceptualized, organized, and driven by Tillie that brought promising Native youth to fully funded slots in elite private boarding schools. She recruited students from all over Indian Country, and many national and community leaders and activists who came of age during the 1960s and 70s were those she had identified, cultivated, and supported during their studies through her organization – or who she had employed as staff.

"She was incredibly independent, even when we were little," her sister Reba recalls. This independence, her energy and hardworking nature cultivated by her parents, and her natural charisma and sense of fun made her a force to be reckoned with. She mentored and was a role model to many of the original red power activists involved in the National Indian Youth Council, including Clyde Warrior, Mel Thom, and Hank Adams. Tillie and others began to question the status quo power structures of how federal power was exerted on tribal lands, from staffing of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, to land use rights, to issues of leasing and resource extraction.

Her work on the national level caught the attention of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. as he began to organize for the Poor People's Campaign, and she met him shortly before his assassination when he brought her into the campaign organizing. Tillie served as one of the key Native organizers for the campaign, and recruited tribal members and leaders from across the country to participate. She made sure to include elders such as George Crow Flies High and Mattie Grinnell, who made the trip to Washington, DC to participate in the marches, sit ins, and testimonies as part of the Campaign. She also gave fiery and memorable testimony to the Secretary of the Interior and the Commissioner of Indian Affairs during the Campaign, as detailed in several academic histories of red power activism. Through these decades of work on the national scene, Tillie influenced the very direction of activism and federal Indian policy. She considered the implementation of Indian Preference hiring in Indian Health Service and the Bureau of Indian Affairs to be her biggest professional accomplishment.

Those guided and mentored by her remember her as a mixture of being highly educated and very traditional, during a time period in which many saw those qualities as in conflict. She lived and worked off-reservation in Denver, but she had a constant stream of older and younger relatives and friends visiting her. They remember that almost her entire record collection was powwow music, and that she always had corn in various stages of drying in her apartment. Her family remembers that she had knowledge of traditional medicines – likely cultivated in her by her mother Mercy, who held a traditional medicine bundle and helped care for the Lone Man Shrine – and would tell her niece and nephews bedtime stories that included traditional origins stories.

After Tillie's mother Mercy suffered a stroke, she eventually moved back to Fort Berthold to help take care of her mom. She moved back to her family's house in what remained of the Independence district (vastly changed due to the land loss associated with the Garrison Dam), near Mandaree. She helped her mom and continued her extensive gardens, and ran for and won a tribal council seat in the 1980s. While on council she worked on the Garrison Unit Joint Tribal Advisory Committee (JTAC), that advocated for a fuller accounting of and compensation for the land taking associated with the Garrison Dam. The work she and others did secured an additional $143M in federal compensation for the eminent domain taking of the heart of the Fort Berthold land base.

After retiring, Tillie continued to work for her tribal community. She enjoyed visiting, organizing, and rabble rousing with her close friends Celeste Witham, Rosemarie Mandan, Wanda Fox, and Phyllis Cross. She picked and preserved juneberries and bullberries, made beautiful star quilts, and never missed Mandaree Powwow. She had a longstanding love affair with chocolate (especially Godiva chocolate) and enjoyed watching the Letterman Show, often closing her evening with "Mudakua" and a crossword puzzle. She was a role model, a confidante, a supporter, and a mentor to many of her lucky nieces, nephews, and grandchildren.

Tillie lived in the country outside Mandaree for decades, in the house her parents built during the relocation process due to the Garrison Dam flooding. When her mobility required her to be closer to services, she lived in New Town for several years, and eventually settled in Bismarck to be close to her younger sister Reba. In 2014 Tillie and Reba bought and donated lands associated with a historical Hidatsa village site to the Three Affiliated Tribes. Tillie gave a substantial donation to the Three Affiliated Tribes Museum, with no strings attached to how the money would be spent. In 2016 Tillie was successful in her two-decade effort to have the Independence Congregational Church designated as a historic place on the National Register of Historic Places. Despite her accomplishments and substantial service to her tribe and Indian Country, she never talked about herself and all the work she did – a reflection of the traditional values modeled by her parents. Although affected by Alzheimer's, Tillie remained true to her character – independent, fun-loving, and generous to her relatives to the last of her days.

Tillie passed away on February 3, 2018, and is survived by her younger sister, Reba Walker, niece Leah Ann Walker, and nephews Tom Walker, Carey Walker, and Reid Walker. She was preceded in death by her father Hans Walker, Sr., her mother Mercy Baker Walker, and her two brothers Melvin Walker and Hans Walker, Jr. Everyone who was lucky enough to know Tillie will miss the light and generosity she brought to our lives.

Cecilia Martin: Lakota Matriarch, AIM grandmother, passes at 98

(Independent Lakota Nation) ILN Press – Feb. 15, 2018 – On the morning of February 12, 2018, Oyate Wyokb Win (Lakota) or Lorraine Cecilia Martin (English), the fierce matriarch of the Tetuwan Lakota Oyate on Pine Ridge Reservation and last living Grandmother of the American Indian Movement (AIM), passed over into the Spirit World near Custer, South Dakota in Lakota Territory.

She had recently told her grandchildren she was tired and it was her time to go. She was at least 98 years old but was thought to be considerably older since records were not kept at the time of her birth.

She left behind many grandchildren and great-grandchildren and touched the lives of many more Lakota people.

Two wakes will be held for Cecilia. A wake in Pine Ridge will start at 10:00am on February 18th at Billy Mills Hall. The following day on February 19th, a wake will start at 10:00am at Our Lady of Lords parish hall in Porcupine Community. Her burial will occur the following day next to her home in Porcupine. Oyate Wyokb Win was the matriarch of the Lakota Cante Tenza or Strong Heart Warrior Society and the warrior society will be handling the memorial events.

EARLY LIFE

Oyate Wyokb Win was born in Porcupine Community to mother Grace Little Crow, descendent to Fort Laramie treaty signer Little Crow, as well as Crazy Horse's wife Black Shaw.

Her father Paul Moose was descended from the fierce warrior No Ears, who was killed in the 1890 Wounded Knee Massacre and lies buried at the Wounded Knee Memorial.

Cecilia lived her early years in Porcupine but in 1929 was stolen from her home in Porcupine and placed in the Holy Rosary Mission Boarding School where she faced heinous abuse by Catholic missionary nuns. She struggled with the legacy of boarding school abuse throughout her life but never gave up Wolakota - the Lakota language and way of life.

She had three brothers and four sisters including her brother Bill who drove for the infamous bank robber John Dillinger, and brother Charlie who was a well-known horse jockey.

Following her marriage to Roy Martin, she lived in Slim Buttes on Pine Ridge. In addition to raising three of her own children, she raised children from other families. She also worked with Roy to help bring customary Lakota justice to the reservation. During this time she was recorded as an expert marksman and still holds the record for longest bull's-eye with a snub-nose 38 revolver in the state of Nebraska.

ACTIVISM

Like many of those traditional Lakota born during the late 1800s and early 1900s, she was active in resistance to white racism and colonialism in Lakota Territory.

In 1969, Cecilia and her family joined Bob Yellow Bird and other Lakota elders in Crawford, Nebraska to protest the threatened desecration and destruction of Crazy Horse's burial site by a cement corporation. This protest was among the first in the series of increasing militancy and activism by Lakota and other Indigenous activists following years or discrimination and mistreatment at the hands of white America.

In 1970, she and many in her family were part of the group led by Lehman Brightman, Minnie Two Shoes, Archie Fire, and Dennis Banks in a three month takeover of Mount Rushmore to protest treaties broken by the United States Government and the takeover by the U.S. Park Service of sacred Lakota land.

Following the 1972 take-over of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation by Dickie Wilson and his private militia known as Guardians of the Oglala Nation (GOON Squads), in February 1973, Cecilia joined Russell Means, Frank Fools Crow, Dennis Banks, and about 200 AIM and grassroots Lakota in the 71 day occupation of Wounded Knee community.

In the years following Wounded Knee, Cecilia became known for her fiery attacks on the discrimination faced by traditional and grassroots Lakota Oyate and the corruption by the Bureau of Indian Affairs supported Oglala Sioux Tribe (OST).

In 2000, she helped lead the occupation of the Red Cloud Administrative Building in attempts to uncover evidence of mass fraud and embezzlement that was impoverishing poor Lakota Oyate in the outer districts.

Again in 2011, she helped lead the 34 day occupation of the Porcupine Elderly Meals Building to protest mistreatment by program staff, unsafe building conditions, and food served to elders that contained insects and mouse droppings. Promises to replace the condemned building by the OST were never honored and Cecilia openly questioned what it would take for the elders in Porcupine to be treated with dignity and respect.

In 2012, she joined other Lakota grandmothers in formally charging the Oglala Sioux Tribe Tribal Council with elder abuse, neglect, and chronic mistreatment due to lack of food, housing, and support. Their complaint was illegally rejected and tribal laws against elder abuse were ignored to protect tribal officials.

Despite the lawless and corrupt nature of OST government and the inhuman conditions it created, Oyate Wyokb Win continued to call tribal offices and attend Tribal Council meetings in support of the grassroots Oyate. She provided inspiration to younger grandmothers and grassroots Lakota people and could offer a wry laugh and twinkling eye when amused.

APPEARANCE IN MOVIES

As a well-known and steely activist of the people, Cecilia was featured in the documentaries 500 Nations (1995), Battle for White Clay (2008), Pine Ridge: Beauty and Despair (2011), and Red Cry (2013). During Red Cry, Cecilia described the inhumane conditions faced by traditional and grassroots elders on Pine Ridge, "It's like we are living in hell, the way things are."

Cecilia also appeared in the dramatic mystery film Thunderheart (1992), a fictional, loosely based portrayal of events relating to the Wounded Knee incident in 1973.

LATER YEARS

Repeated mistreatment and neglect of elders by the Oglala Sioux Tribe took its toll and Oyate Wyokb Win's health waned during her last few years. Never comfortable speaking the english language, she said before she died, " I want to be remembered as someone who held on to language and tradition."

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor's note: The following comes from the editor's column and the Sota "deadlines and policies" statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and must be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Woman identified in Andover fire; Aberdeen man arrested

Andover, SD (KSFY) - Feb. 12, 2018 - Authorities have identified the woman who died in a house fire in Andover last week.

According to the Attorney General's Office, the victim was 25-year-old Tawny Rockwood of Andover.

The fire happened at Rockwood's apartment near Main Street and 2nd Avenue around 1:30 a.m. Friday, February 9. A passerby saw smoke and flames coming from the four-unit apartment building and called police.

Authorities said they have also arrested 36-year-old Jose Quinones Rodriguez of Aberdeen for domestic aggravated assault in connection to the investigation for conduct that happened prior to the fire.

He is being held on a $50,000 cash only bond.

According to court documents, Rockwood and Quinones Rodriguez had a sexual relationship for four months. There had been a history of verbal arguments between the two, and he once allegedly pointed a handgun at her.

Authorities said Rockwood confided in people who spoke with police that she had been threatened or was in fear of Quinones Rodriguez.

He recently went to Texas on warrants or charges and, according to court documents, Rockwood repeatedly called a hotline number to make sure Quinones Rodriguez was still in custody in fear he would return to South Dakota.

Rockwood worked at a strip club. Co-workers told police she was nervous about Quinones Rodriguez coming to the club and did not go into work the entire week of February 5-8.

Quinones Rodriguez confirmed to authorities that he was at Rockwood's apartment on February 7-8. According to court documents, his daughter received a call from Rockwood's phone from Quinones Rodriguez. The daughter could hear Rockwood crying in the background.

The case is being investigated by the Day County Sheriff's Office, the Aberdeen Police Department, the South Dakota Highway Patrol, the State Fire Marshall's Office, the ATF and the Division of Criminal Investigation.

Musicians score Sisseton-area residents' memoirs

Sisseton, SD – Four Sisseton-area community members will share stories set to a score performed by the South Dakota Symphony Orchestra's Dakota Wind Quintet, Dakota flutist Bryan Akipa, and the Tiospa Zina Drum Group this Thursday, Feb. 22, at 7 p.m. at the Sisseton High School Performing Arts Center.

"Memoirs - Voices from the Coteau," created by Darrel Fickbohm and the South Dakota Symphony Orchestra with support from the Sisseton Arts Council, will paint an elaborate picture of the rich diversity of cultures in the Sisseton area.

Residents Mona Groseth, Lillian Owen, Truman Nelson and Vine Marks will share moving narratives as the musicians help the audience deeply experience the imagery and emotion behind each story.

The narrators will share stories on a wealth of topics including farming and hunting, faith, telling stories through word and music, serving in the military, helping and receiving aid from neighbors and sharing the Dakota language.

Free will donations will be taken at the door.

About the South Dakota Symphony Orchestra

The South Dakota Symphony Orchestra (SDSO) is based in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, a vibrant and growing community serving a 125-mile region that touches five states. Known for innovative programming and statewide outreach, the SDSO has a strong heritage upon which to build an even stronger future. SDSO was the 2016 winner of the Bush Prize for Community Innovation, which is given by the St. Paul, Minnesota-based Bush Foundation and recognizes organizations for their innovative work in community engagement.

SDSO is the region's premiere performing arts organization with the Washington Pavilion as its home. Artistically, SDSO is led by Maestro Delta David Gier, who has guided the orchestra to new musical heights. The core of SDSO is comprised of nine full-time professional musicians that make up the Dakota String Quartet and the Dakota Wind Quintet. Musically, SDSO performs well above its $2.3 million budget.

Invitation to prisoners' pow wow

Our Oceti Sakowin prisoners in the main prison in Sioux Falls invite all dancers, singers, liaisons, veterans, and cultural artists to come to our pow wow on March 10, 2018.

We ask everyone to bring their dance outfits, drums, flags, and spiritual items.

We request to have lots of Sistunwan and Wahpetunwan people come and unite with us.

Journey down through the miles. Empower us with the right to be strong. Tell us about your homelands. Talk about life.

Our food and coffee are the best in the world.

Prison is a permanent reality of steel bars, brick walls, concrete enclosures, and fences.

To get on our guest list call 605-347-5008 and ask to have the access approval forms faxed to you.

These forms have to be returned by February 23, 2018, which is the deadline.

George Blue Bird, Sioux Falls, SD.

Cesdi Happens: Get Yours Tested

(For colorectal cancer)

By Gypsy Wanna

SWO Wellness Coordinator

According to the American Indian Cancer Foundation, the Northern Plains Native Americans experience some of the highest cancer diagnoses and death rates in the United States!

The most common cancers for women in the Northern Plains are: #1 Breast Cancer, #2 Lung Cancer, #3 Colorectal Cancer.

The most common cancers for men in the Northern Plains are: #1 Prostate Cancer, #2 Lung Cancer, #3 Colorectal Cancer.

It doesn't have to be this way.

Help us reduce the colon cancer rates by completing your colon cancer screening using the iFOB kit.

Once completed you will be eligible to receive a Cenex gas card.

Requirements:

1. Must be IHS eligible

2. Must be aged 50-75 years old

3. Must be due for a screening (if a person recently had a colonoscopy, they would not be eligible)

Call 742-3651 or 742-3826 for more information.

The Community Health Education Program will be in the IHS rotunda on Tuesday, February 20, 2018 from 10 am-2 pm with the Public Health Nurse and the inflatable colon. Stop by our booth to learn more.

SHARING RESULTS FROM THE SWO PREGNANCY HEALTH SURVEY ON CIGARETTE SMOKING DURING PREGNANCY

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate is sharing key findings from the Pregnancy Health Survey for Parents of Newborns on the Lake Traverse Reservation through a series of articles and infographics. Important information was learned from SWO mothers and fathers about cigarette smoking before, during and after pregnancy. SWO parents are making many positive choices for the health of their newborns.

*The majority of SWO mothers quit smoking when they found out they were pregnant or during pregnancy

*91% of mothers and 97% of fathers stated "no one is allowed to smoke anywhere inside my home"

*Nearly 90% of mothers & fathers agreed that baby is never in the same room or vehicle with someone who smokes

Although similar surveys have been done before throughout the United States, this was the first time EVER that fathers were invited to complete a pregnancy-related survey! This survey confirmed what a dramatic influence and support SWO fathers are in promoting healthy practices for their babies. TOGETHER, mothers and fathers are making important behavior choices that will positively affect baby's health.

The purpose of the Pregnancy Health Survey was to help understand why some babies are born healthier than others. Moms and dads of babies born between April 1 and December 31, 2015 whose mother's residence was Roberts, Day, Marshall, and Codington counties when the baby was born were invited to take the survey. There were 149 total American Indian infants born on the Lake Traverse Reservation during this nine month period. Ninety-two mothers and sixty-four fathers participated!

The theme for sharing Pregnancy Health Survey results is summed up by the Dakotah word for pregnancy - Ihdus'aka "To Strengthen Oneself" (Source: English to Dakota Dictionary, As Spoken by the People of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate, Copyright© 2015 by SWO Publishing). The decision not to expose your baby to cigarette smoke can reduce the risk of premature and low birthweight births, miscarriage or stillbirth, birth defects, nicotine withdrawal as a newborn, early childhood health problems including asthma, earaches, and allergies, and infant death. Help is available through the SWO Community Health Education Program, Indian Health Service, and the South Dakota Department of help for people who want to quit.

Please view the infographics adjacent to this article developed in collaboration with the Collaborative Research Center for American Indian Health at Sanford Research in Sioux Falls. You are also invited to visit the SWO First 1,000 Days Initiative website at http://swofirst1000days.com/home/pregnancy-health-survey-results for more information about findings of the survey or to download the infographics that have been completed so far.

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

Dakotah Iapi Yukini

By Sierra Wolcott

Sota Assistant Editor

Dakotah Iapi Yukini: Collaboration between Dakota Language Institute, SWO Education Department, and Sisseton Wahpeton College. All three have specific goals within the project.

It has been mathematically projected that we we no longer have speakers past 2028.

We are hoping we still do.

This is an intense project.

We estimate that by 2028 we can create 300 at least conversationally fluent speakers.

We have 63 known speakers in SWO.

And to our knowledge we have more known speakers on this reservation than all other nine Dakotah speaking Dakota tribes combined in the US. in Canadian communities there are a long number of Dakota speaking elders, but very few under the age of 45.

Some US Dakota tribes have zero Dakotah speakers.

Another situation that we are combatting is that learners today are technologically advanced, so we need to keep up with that. While still maintaining the cultural teachings that are intertwined with language learning.

Staying relevant to the basis of our culture while staying relevant in this electronic age is a barrier.

Our historical experiences with language since the coming of the non-Indians has been a bad experience. It is only this last generation that have learned Dakotah in school and come out with some language knowledge; this next generation is showing increased desire to learn their language and be able to teach their children someday.

There is a drastically increased sense of hope for our language.

This project is important for not only our Tribe, but for all Dakota people.

Dakotah Language Institute' goal through this grant is to preserve the language.

Sisseton Wahpeton College's goal is to create new Dakotah speakers who become teachers.

The Education Department's goal is to create curriculum for right now and then write curriculum for the immersion school and to search for grants to sustain this project for the next ten years and for the eventual immersion school.

Overall goal is to establish an immersion school by 2028.

Obstacle for current teachers is that there is no curriculum; scope and sequence is also a barrier as there is none for Dakotah so as to continually advance learner skills until they reach a level of fluency.

SWC to host Science Fair

Sisseton Wahpeton College will host middle- and senior-high students from area schools for its 2018 Science Fair on Tuesday, March 6. (Alternative date is: Wednesday, March 7.)

Organizers are hoping for a successful Science Fair this year; last year, readers may recall, the Science Fair was cancelled due to extreme winter weather.

SWC has sent letters to the area schools, inviting them to come and bring their students to compete and enjoy seeing what others are doing.

"To see the experiments of each person and the mind that created it … what a student can come up with is a joy in itself," according to the invitation.

Last year only one contestant could be named winner of Best in Show.

But this year SWSC has arranged to pay for a second student winner, to attend the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair May 13-19, 2018 at Pittsburgh, PA.

Both will attend as observers.

There will also be an adult attending the ISEF.

There will be a late start, at noon, at SWC the day of the Science Fair.

The Categories:

Biology

Physical Sciences

The Divisions:

*Junior Selection - 5th, 6th, 7th, & 8th Grades

*Senior Selection - 9th, 10th, 11th, & 12th Grades

The Classification:

*Individual

*Group

BEST IN SHOW

One individual or team in the 8th-10th grade will be awarded BEST IN SHOW based on OVERALL STATUS.

See the Science Fair poster accompanying this article in the Sota.

Note for participants: the SWC culinary arts class is planning a special dinner for you the day of the fair!

Letter from University of Nebraska

Submitted by Lisa Forcier

TZTS HS Science

On behalf of the University of Nebraska at Omaha (UNO) College of Information Science and Technology's Women in IT Initiative and the Women in IT Community Task Force, we'd like to thank you for your effort and interest in CodeCrush.

The interest in our program has been exciting: Over 70 applicants from Nebraska, South Dakota and Iowa. With only 32 spots available, our community task force had the difficult charge of selecting the Spring 2018 class.

We are excited to inform you that your nominee, Amelia, has been selected for our 2018 class! From March 7th - 9th, you and your student will be immersed in the world of IT at UNO - and we hope to spark a larger movement across the Midwest for more young girls who have interest in considering IT as their career of choice.

Amanda Rucker will be following up to give you details, including a preliminary schedule, what you'll need to bring, and everything else CodeCrush. If you have any immediate questions, please email her at arucker@unomaha.edu.

Thank you again for your interest, and we cannot wait to see you in March!

Sincerely, Sue Thaden.

Women in IT Task Force Chair

President and CEO of CRi

*****

The above is the letter received on behalf of the application sent in for Amelia Garman to participate in CodeCrush March 2018. Amelia will be the fourth student who has had the opportunity to participate in CodeCrush in Omaha since TZTS has been asked to nominate students. Jacquelyn LittleBoy was the first, Kaylin Wanna and then Jianna Wolfe. Lisa Forcier has been the nominating teacher for all the students.

Congratulations to all the students who have participated and to Amelia for winning a coveted place in the March 2018.

-- Lisa Forcier.

What ESDS 8th graders did for Valentine's Day

Submitted by Dr. Nadine Eastman

Our 8th grade students chose to deliver candy grams to elders at the Tekakwitha Nursing Home instead of having a class valentines party!

They loved it and learned a lot.

I am so proud of them!

ESDS recognizes students of the month

By Rebecca Dargatz

School Community Director

Enemy Swim Day School honors one student from each grade for each full month that school is in session.

The Students of the Month are chosen because they demonstrate the four school wide expectations consistently or have shown great progress toward them.

The school wide expectations are:

*Awanicihdka: Be Safe.

*Waokihi: Be Responsible.

*Waunsida: Be Caring.

*Woohoda: Be Respectful.

Home room teachers choose the Students of the Month in collaboration with the paras and other teachers who serve a particular candidate.

Students of the Month are honored during opening ceremony on the first Monday following each full month of school.

Students of the Month receive a jacket embroidered with their name and the month.

The January 2018 Students of the Month are: Kindergarten - Aubrey Grant (not pictured), 1st Grade - Ian Danley, 2nd Grade - Lorelei Gill, 3rd Grade - Brandon Redday, 4th Grade - LeiAuna Bugg, 5th Grade - Tabawa'ni Manning-Peters, 6th Grade - Kenzie Marks, 7th Grade - Raelon Grant, and 8th Grade - Maili Marks.

Legals

Universal Telephone Services

Under the Telecommunications Act of 1996, "Universal Telephone Service" means basic telephone service is available to all consumers. Universal telephone service is voice grade access to the telecommunications network, including local usage, touch tone calling, single party service, access to emergency 911 services, access to operator services, access to directory assistance, access to long distance telephone service and discounted services to qualifying low-income consumers.

Venture's current charges for the Universal Telephone Service are:

*Basic Monthly local residential service, no time limit on calls: $18.00

*Touch tone calling service-No additional charge

*Access to emergency service-No additional charge

(Note: where applicable, County 911 tax collected by Venture Communications)

*Access to operator services-No additional charge

*Access to directory assistance-per call $.85.

(Note: If you call a long distance company for assistance, there may be a charge from that carrier)

*Access to long distance telephone companies-$6.50

(Note: Monthly flat rate mandated by the FCC)

*Residential access recovery charge- $3.00

(Note: Monthly flat rate mandated by the FCC)

*Low income monthly discounts to qualifying consumers-$9.25; Enhanced Lifeline is also available

(Note: Toll blocking is available upon request.)

*If you have any questions on Universal Services, please call Venture toll free by dialing 1-800-824-7282.

8-1tc

 

Request for Bids

Requesting sealed proposals for: SWO Research Codes

Develop and Prepare for submittals to the judicial committee, districts, and public hearings:

a) A marked up copy of the Research codes showing the requested changes.

b) Reformat the Research Codes to follow the current formatting that is being utilized by the Legal Department.

c) A Historical document that shows and explains the reasons for all of the changes since the original Research Codes were enacted.

d) Power Point presentation regarding the changes.

Contact the Procurement Office for specifications: FranT@SWO-NSN.GOV

All bids MUST have the following attached:

Bio-sketch of academic and professional credentials, technical competence, experience, and expertise.

Statement of qualifications, competence, and capacity to perform the scope of work.

SWO Business License

General Liability/Workman's Comp Insurance

Please submit sealed proposals to:

SWO Procurement Office

Attn: Fran Tease

PO Box 509

Agency Village, SD 57262

By 4:00 pm on Friday March 2, 2018

All interested parties acknowledge that any Agreement executed and performed within the Tribe's exclusive jurisdiction is subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of the Tribal Court of Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation. All interested parties acknowledge that they must comply with the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Ordinances: TERO Chapter 59 Requirements, Wage Rates & Compliance Plan; Business License Ordinance Chapter 53 and Tax Ordinance Chapter 67; and Chapter 75 Sex Offender Registration.

7-2tc

 

Request for Bids

Requesting sealed proposals for:

SWO Tribal Education Department Wiyukcan ka Ecunpi Project

Provide monthly support of the Sisseton Wahpeton Tribal Education Department Wiyukcan ka Ecunpi Project via telephone, email or other:

a) Provide evaluation, assessment, monitoring and guidance services.

b) Reviews all work task team reports and other reports to provide written feedback for continuing improvement for each of the staff and their respective areas of- College and Career Readiness, Suicide prevention, Culture and Language, Early Childhood, Improvement in Math And Reading.

c) Provides monthly written analysis and guidance in the areas of the implementation plan.

d) Provides at least one site visit and a written report.

e) Reviews expenditure reports, cuff accounts, budget reports and provides feedback in accordance with the OMB federal regulations

f) Monthly reports are required with progress measurements according to the implementation plan.

g) Leads the staff in strategic plan development.

h) Assists with the Annual Report plan submittal.

i) Work to begin August 1, 2018.

Contact the Procurement Office for specifications: FranT@SWO-NSN.GOV

All bids MUST have the following attached:

Bio-sketch of academic and professional credentials, technical competence, experience, and expertise.

Statement of qualifications, competence, and capacity to perform the scope of work.

SWO Business License

General Liability/Workman's Comp Insurance

Please submit sealed proposals to:

SWO Procurement Office

Attn: Fran Tease.

PO Box 509

Agency Village, SD 57262

By 4:00 pm on Friday March 30, 2018

All interested parties acknowledge that any Agreement executed and performed within the Tribe's exclusive jurisdiction is subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of the Tribal Court of Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation. All interested parties acknowledge that they must comply with the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Ordinances: TERO Chapter 59 Requirements, Wage. Rates & Compliance Plan; Business License Ordinance Chapter 53 and Tax Ordinance Chapter 67; and Chapter 75 Sex Offender. Registration.

7-2tc

 

Request for Proposals

Requesting sealed proposals for:

SWO Renewable Energy Based Tribal Electric utility Formation & Financing

*Prepare a boundary map of the proposed service area.

*Prepare projections of potential electrical load and number of customers.

*Determine which facilities would likely need to be acquired and/or constructed as part of the establishment of a tribally owned utility.

*Identify potential severance issues, both physical and financial, at the boundaries of the acquisition area to be served by the Tribal Utility.

*Provide a general assessment of the existing distribution facilities.

*Present/provide options and sources for financing solar and other renewables on a project by project basis.

Contact the Procurement Office for specifications: FranT@SWO-NSN.GOV.

All bids MUST have the following attached: Statement of qualifications, competence, and capacity to perform the scope of work. SWO Business License. General Liability/Workman's Comp Insurance.

Please submit sealed proposals to:

SWO Procurement Office

Attn: Fran Tease

PO Box 509

Agency Village, SD 57262

By 4:00 pm on March 5, 2018

Notification of pre-selection and interviews March 12, 2018

Final Contract notices: March 19, 2018

All interested parties acknowledge that any Agreement executed and performed within the Tribe's exclusive jurisdiction is subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of the Tribal Court of Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation. All interested parties acknowledge that they must comply with the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Ordinances: TERO Chapter 59 Requirements, Wage Rates & Compliance Plan; Business License Ordinance Chapter 53 and Tax Ordinance Chapter 67; and Chapter 75 Sex Offender Registration.

8-2tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS-18-056

SWOCSE/ Estelle Hopkins, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DANIEL CAMPBELL, III, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of February, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of January, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

6-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 14-156

SWOCSE/ Julie Watts, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DERRICK FLUTE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of February, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of January, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

6-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I-17-115

SWOCSE/ State of ND, PLAINTIFF

VS.

THURSTON OWEN, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of February, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of January, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

6-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 07-059

SWOCSE/ Whitney DuMarce, PLAINTIFF

VS.

THURSTON OWEN, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Amend Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of February, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of January, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

6-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I- 06-038

SWOCSE/ Victoria Seaboy, PLAINTIFF

VS.

THURSTON OWEN, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of February, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of January, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

6-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I- 16-053

SWOCSE/ Lydia Spider, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MARGARET HOPKINS, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 1st day of March, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of January, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

6-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I- 18-025

SWOCSE/ Annie Bowen, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JAYCE WANNA, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Recognize Foreign Order and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 1st day of March, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of January, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

6-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I- 18-027

SWOCSE/ Tara Lake, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JAYCE WANNA, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Recognize Foreign Order and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 1st day of March, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of January, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

6-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 18-066

SWOCSE/ Charnell Gill, PLAINTIFF

VS.

TESSA CRAWFORD, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 1st day of March, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of January, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

6-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 02-292

SWOCSE/ Melissa Renville-Abraham, PLAINTIFF

VS.

KENNETH ABRAHAM, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Dismiss Child Support and Establish TANF Arrears and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 1st day of March, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of January, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

6-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 09-045

SWOCSE/ Toni Heminger, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JESSICA ANDERSON, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Dismiss Child Support and Establish Arrears and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 1st day of March, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of January, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

6-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 16-028

SWOCSE/ Amanda Gill, PLAINTIFF

VS.

VIJAY CRAWFORD, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 1st day of March, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of January, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

6-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 02-088

SWOCSE/ Jane Barse, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DENNIS GILL, II, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 1st day of March, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of January, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

6-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 11-014

SWOCSE/ Joleen Fayant, PLAINTIFF

VS.

RONALD GOODSELL, II, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 1st day of March, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of January, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

6-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 18-070

SWOCSE/ Ashley Haug, PLAINTIFF

VS.

AMANDA HAUG-HANSON, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 1st day of March, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of January, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

6-3tc

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 18-050

SWOCSE/ Jennifer DuMarce, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ELIZABETH HANSON, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 1st day of March, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of January, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

6-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 18-028

SWOCSE/ Donovan White, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LORETTA KOHL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 1st day of March, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of January, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

6-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 16-052

SWOCSE/ Sara Farmer, PLAINTIFF

VS.

TYLER SHEPHERD, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Dismiss Child Support and Establish Arrears and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 1st day of March, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of January, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

6-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS-18-052

SWOCSE/ Jennifer DuMarce, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CARLTON CRAWFORD, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 2nd day of March, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of January, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

6-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS-18-064

SWOCSE/ Devonna Goodteacher, PLAINTIFF

VS.

BRUCE DEMARRIAS, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 2nd day of March, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of January, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

6-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS-18-054

SWOCSE/ Estella Hopkins, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CHRISTOPHER FAYANT, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 2nd day of March, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of January, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

6-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 06-106

SWOCSE/ Amanda Haug-Hanson, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LUKE HANSON, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Dismiss Child Support and Establish Arrears and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 2nd day of March, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of January, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

6-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 17-204

SWOCSE/ Gabrielle Tiomanipi, PLAINTIFF

VS.

RICHARD KOPAS, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 2nd day of March, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of January, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

6-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 18-026

SWOCSE/ Josie Bertsch, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CALVIN MAX, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 2nd day of March, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of January, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

6-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 16-024

SWOCSE/ Rachel LaBatte, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JONATHAN NELSON, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 2nd day of March, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of January, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

6-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 18-076

SWOCSE/ Donette Red Bear, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JASON SMOKEY, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 2nd day of March, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of January, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

6-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS- 17-026

SWOCSE/ Chantel Eagle, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JASON SMOKEY, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Dismiss Child Support and Establish Arrears and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 2nd day of March, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of January, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

6-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I- 18-009

SWOCSE/ Jerrica Shepherd, PLAINTIFF

VS.

AUSTIN SHEPHERD, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 2nd day of March, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of January, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

6-3tc

Trading Post ads

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate is seeking to fill the following position(s):

Resident Assistant (part-time), Wacinyana Tipi

Tribal Ranger, Fish & Wildlife

Closing Date: February 23rd, 2018 @ 04:30 PM

Application and job description information can be seen at SWO Human Resources Office or http://www.swo-nsn.gov/contact/employment. Application can be downloaded from "Apply Now" and emailed to ArnoldW@SWO-NSN.GOV or DeniseH@SWO-NSN.GOV. Contact can also be at Arnold Williams 698-8238 or Denise Hill 698-8251 with questions. (Tribal preference will apply).

 

Sisseton Wahpeton College

… is seeking proposals for RFV Tested large round bales, of both high quality prairie hay & alfalfa, along with 5 tons of feed mix (1/3 corn and 2/3 oats). SWC reserves the right to refuse inferior quality and/or non-RFV Tested bales.

For additional information contact Lauren LeBeau at (605)742-1105.

Closing Date will be Friday March 9th, 2018 at noon.

All bids will be accepted by Lauren LeBeau, Executive Administrative Assistant.

All TERO standards will apply. All taxes will be contractor responsibility. For additional information contact the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate TERO:

DelRay D German, Director

Agency Village, SD 57262

(605)698-3549

8-3tc

 

Dakota Nation Industries, Inc.

Job Title: Human Resource

Tribal Preference: Yes

Department: Corporate Administration

Posting Date: 01-31-2018

Deadline for applications: March 2, 2018

Salary: $44,620

General Function:

Plan, develop, and administer policies and programs designed to make expeditious use of an organization's human resources. It is that part of management which is concerned with the people at work and with their relationship within an enterprise.

Reporting Relations:

Direct Reports: Chief Executive Officer

Accountable to: All for-profit Managers

Primary Duties and Responsibilities:

1. Recruitment: Search for new employees by posting job listings, attending career fairs and visiting colleges and universities.

2. Hiring: Manage the hiring of new employees. Create job descriptions advertise the positions, collect & review applications, work with managers and others to conduct the interview process, perform background checks on applicants and check their references.

3. Providing Job Details: Ensure that employees understand the responsibilities of their job, including their duties, working hours, organizational chart, policies, wages, compensation and benefits through orientation sessions, communications and individual meetings.

4. Administration:

a. Maintain employment policies, knowledgeable about human resources laws and government regulations, maintain and keep records on all employees, compile reports, advise managers on organizational policy matters and develop recommendations for improvement of organization's personnel policies and practices.

b. Communicating with people outside the organization, representing the organization to customers, the public, government, and other external sources. This information can be exchanged in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail.

5. Employee Relations:

a. Handling complaints by investigating and resolving workplace issues, responsible for preserving the employer-employee relationship during disputes, grievances and conflicts through effective employee relations strategies, contact legal counsel in risk mitigation activities and litigation pertaining to employee relations matters.

b. Follow through by providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

c. Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships

6. Compensation and Benefits:

a. Assists with the monitoring and setting of the company wage and salary structure (wage matrix) and the variable pay systems within the company including bonuses and raises.

b. Promoting and conducting open enrollment periods when workers can make changes to health care plans and other benefits options, monitoring Family and Medical Leave Act compliance, and adherence to confidentiality provisions for employee medical files.

7. Development:

a. Employee training and development includes new hire orientation, leadership training and professional development, examine employee performance records to identify areas where employees could improve through job skills training or employee development, such as seminars or workshops on leadership techniques.

b. Conduct exit interviews to identify reasons for employee termination.

Secondary Duties and Responsibilities:

Other job duties as requested by CEO or For-Profit Board

Supervisory Responsibilities:

Oversee/supervise over orientations and training

Education and Experience:

Bachelor's Degree/Master's Degree preferred or

Associates Degree with 5 year experience

Knowledge, Skills, Abilities and Worker Characteristics:

Personnel and Human Resources -- Knowledge of principles and procedures for personnel recruitment, selection, training, compensation and benefits, labor relations and negotiation, and personnel information systems.

Law and Government -- Knowledge of laws, legal codes, court procedures, precedents, government regulations, executive orders, agency rules, and the democratic political process.

Clerical -- Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word, excel and Great Plains, managing files and records, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.

Working Conditions:

Office setting environment. Must be willing to travel for recruitment.

Equipment Used to Perform Job:

General office equipment: Computer, copy/fax, shredder…

Contacts:

Daily contact with CEO, Managers, Employees, Federal/State government, and the general public

Confidentiality:

High confidentiality agreement required due to employee information being processed and stored.

8-2tc

 

SISSETON WAHPETON OYATE

TRIBAL EMPOYMENT RIGHTS OFFICE

JOB DESCRIPTION

POSITION TITLE: TERO Compliance Officer

LOCATION: TRIBAL EMPLOYMENT RIGHTS OFFICE (TERO)

MAJOR DUTIES:

The TERO Compliance Officer has the general authority to enforce compliance with the TERO Ordinance of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate, and any and all supplementary ordinances, and any and all rules, regulations, and/or guidelines promulgated by the TERO Commission within the Lake Traverse Indian Reservation, home of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

1. Monitors hiring of personnel to ensure compliance with TERO.

2. Enforces Indian preference for contractors and/or applicants.

3. Establishes working relationships with outside agencies to enhance the employment and training of tribal employees and tribal members.

4. Assists in maintaining skills bank and identifies potential individual's skills/experience and general qualifications. Also develop and implement application procedures.

5. Seeks, schedules, and conducts training for TERO-targeted beneficiaries. Monitors training for effectiveness.

6. Perform compliance checks to insure adherence to the TERO Ordinance.

7. Travel to job sites to verify equitable working conditions for all employees.

8. Shall be the impartial investigating agent responsible for investigating, researching, reporting and documenting any information required to ensure compliance. Gathers, and analyzes factual data for investigations.

9. Attend TERO hearings. Bring actions in Tribal court and other jurisdiction as necessary to carry out the intent of TERO ordinance.

10. Monitors the labor/workforce market to provide information to employers and tribal members.

11. Write, develop and type letters, proposals, brochures, reports, and other items as may be required.

12. Travel to attend meetings and/or training workshops.

13. Other duties as assigned.

Closes March 9, 2018 at 1:00 pm

8-3tc

 

Dakota Nation Gaming Enterprise

Dakota Nation Gaming Enterprise

JOB TITLE: Office Assistant/Training Assistant

SUPERVISOR: Employee Assistance Provider

DEPARTMENT: Corporate Administration

SUPERVISORY RESPONSIBILITIES: None.

SUMMARY: Responsible for clerical and administrative duties for the Employee Assistance Provider. Assists in training with current and prospective team members to enhance their skills. Schedules training events, coordinates with department managers, obtains and distributes required instructional materials. Enters data and produces reports on training statistics.

KNOWLEDGE AND CERTIFICATION, SKILLS AND ABILITIES

Required:

o High school diploma or GED required

o Must have clerical experience in a professional setting.

o Good organizational skills.

o Must possess a positive and motivating attitude.

o Must have excellent written and verbal communication skills.

o Must be able to articulate and have public speaking skills.

o Must have the ability to perform multiple tasks at one time.

o Knowledge of customer service principles and practices.

o Ability to accurately relay and/or interpret information.

o Must be able to maintain strict confidentiality.

Preferred:

o Experience in facilitating, organizing and creating events, meetings, trainings and presentations.

o Extensive knowledge of computers and software applications used for data entry, report writing, training presentations, etc.

ESSENTIAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

1. Basic clerical and administrative duties for the Employee Assistance Provider (i.e. scheduling, filing, data entry, report writing, etc.).

2. Provides callers with basic information relating to team member trainings and assists in scheduling trainings for the DNGE properties.

3. Maintains log for all incoming and outgoing mail.

4. Assists in the modification and development of trainings or programs.

5. Help with the research and scout of training videos, speakers, workshops, programs and events.

6. Assist with the development and help organize structured learning experiences.

7. Assist in training (Development the Productive Employee, Leadership Development, Customer Service, etc.) with current and prospective team members to improve or enhance their skills.

8. Assist in evaluating the training effectiveness and modifying trainings or programs.

9. Assist in creating interactive presentations, problem solving scenarios and simulations.

Closing date: February 26th, 2018 at 4:00 p.m. (CST)

Send resume by email to: heatherw@dakotamagic.com

Any questions or for complete job description contact Heather at 701-634-3000 ext. 2426

 

Dakota Magic Casino

Job Openings

Lounge Department:

Bar Back (Full-Time) Swing

Slots Department:

Technician (Full-Time) where needed

Table Games Department:

Dealer (6 Full-Time or Part-Time) as needed

Closing Date: February 23, 2018 at 4:00 p.m.

Starting Wage: D.O.E.

High School Diploma or GED required for most positions

Two identifications documents required upon hire

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department 16849 102nd Street SE Hankinson ND 58041 For complete Job Description contact James Neconish 701-634-3000 ext. 2582 Indian Preference will apply / EEO (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment) Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

C-Store Department:

Clerk/Cashier (1) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, includes weekends & holidays. Excellent customer service skills; math skills essential; ability to operate necessary equipment; physical ability to lift moderate amounts of weight; previous experience working with money preferred; strong organizational skills managing various functions; dependable & available to work any & all shifts. Must be at least 21 years old & have a High School diploma or GED.

Deli Attendant (2) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, includes weekends & holidays.

Ability to operate necessary equipment. Physical ability to stand for long hours, clean, lift heavy objects up to 30 lbs., and restock inventory; 6 mos. Previous cooking experience preferred, 6 mos. working with the public. Knowledge of food preparation safety requirements. Must be dependable & available to work any and all shifts. Must be at least 18 years old and have a High School Diploma or GED.

Opening date: Thursday, February 15, 2018

Closing date: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 @ 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 
 

 

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