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Sota Volume 45 Issue No. 30

Anpetu Iyamni, July 30, 2014

Inside this Edition –

Highlights of 147th annual Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Wacipi: Part Three

National Veterans biker organization to honor SWO akicita with feed

SWO selected for tribal parole program

Lacrosse comes (back) to our oyate youth!

SW Federal Credit Union annual meeting is August 14th

Deadline for receipt of copy for consideration is 12:00 noon Fridays

Sissetonwan Wahpetonwan Dakota Oyate!

147th annual wacipi held weekend of July 4th, Part Three

By CD Floro

Sota Editor

See photo highlights of the Wacipi taken by Sota Reporter/Photographer Bessie Genia in this week’s part three. We publish information about winners as we receive reports from the Pow Wow Committee and families hosting specials.

Part four will feature photographs coming from John Heminger.

Watch for a web photo gallery of all our pictures on the Sota website soon.

Special report –

The Methamphetamine Problem as it Concerns Me

Meth Solution Sharing Group Wednesday, July 30, 10 a.m.-noon, Tribal building

By Crystal Owen

Han Mitakuyapi, my relatives.

This is Crystal Owen and I have been working in Meth Prevention for the Oyate since December 2007.

I apologize for not being able to get rid of this drug, completely 100% gone from our community. It's a tough fight, this meth has a strong hold on members of our community that a pamphlet, a brochure, a homemade sign, education via the Sota or the radio, meth awareness walks and talks alone cannot ensure that METH will be gone from our community for good.

I felt the need to share with you what I have learned and what I have seen firsthand as I have worked with our community in Meth Prevention.

The COPS Meth Prevention Grant that I was employed under ended February 28, 2014. The funds may have ended but the work did not.

I have been under attack and have been accused of the Meth problem in our community almost as if I am the one bringing in this drug and giving or selling it to our people

The SWO Tribal Law Enforcement and SWO Health Prevention Programs began developing a meth prevention program back in 2005/2006. So it is safe to say that illegal meth use in our community has been here even prior to 2005 since on-going efforts have been made to educate our community on the dangers of this drug.

When I was hired in 2007 there was a Northeast South Dakota Community Against Meth Coalition that was already established by Tribal Council Resolution No. SWO-07-033 whereas, the Human Services Board has identified the need for a mechanism to coordinate the efforts and resources of health service providers, educators, law enforcement, youth and social educators, environmental protectionists, housing, community leaders, and policy makers to prevent and reduce Meth use on the Lake Traverse Reservation.

Throughout the past seven years this coalition has encountered struggles to stay afloat for it NEEDS full support from both tribal programs and community members and I have come to find that this is often difficult to achieve when so many of our programs all have other projects in prevention that must also be taken into consideration.

As an Oyate we have many social ills that our tribal programs attempt to address and meet the needs of. So to effectively meet the needs of Meth Abuse in our community it requires manpower, it requires all of us to be coherent about the issue of meth abuse in our community.

We must begin to educate ourselves, take the imitative to learn more.

I recently attended a meeting with the new Meth Task Force Committee, which has developed in order to address the need for protection of the unborn. It has been reported that several babies have been born addicted to methamphetamines in the past few months.

This is very disturbing, very sad news and I feel compassion for both the mother and the child because I know how horribly addictive this stuff is. Whenever meth is present I have found that it is our children and our families who suffer the most. It has also been apparent that this a hot potato issue in that it keeps getting tossed from program to program. I am happy that many others are now stepping up to assist. It takes an entire community to be involved. The finger pointing, the blame games, the I'm protecting my friends and family so they don't get in trouble type of behavior has to stop in order for all of us to work together as a TEAM in this fight to protect our children and those yet to be born.

Meth is a horrible drug to be addicted to and those of you who have family who are meth users know what I am talking about. Your son, your daughter, your mom or dad, your relative becomes a person that you do not know. They stop caring about themselves and their families so its not uncommon for a female to continue to use METH even while she is pregnant. Still I believe there is HOPE for meth users to get better but they, THEY have to WANT the help. THEY have to say when enough is enough. I look at this drug as a spirit stealer, a brain destroyer and it is very difficult for people to get away from. They need to be surrounded by a good support system once they make the choice to stop using. In order to do this real talk, heart to heart conversations must take place.

I wanted to share with you a few of the heart to heart comments that I have received over the years and I appreciate each one of them because they are feelings that have been expressed to me.

*Do something! Get these Meth users out of our community, get them out of our tribal offices, get them out of our casino's, our schools, our restaurants, our businesses, our district centers, our housing sites.

*You're the Meth Coordinator clean this place up. It's your job.

*We shouldn't even have meth users if we have meth prevention.

*Get them away from our children.

*Do Something.

*Don't go after the users go after the dealers.

*Don't be negative be Positive when dealing with meth users.

*Don't show our kids those ugly scary pictures of meth users.

*You should show those ugly pictures of meth uses to our kids, scare them to stay away from meth.

*There are no laws for meth users or dealers so get some written.

*We do have laws for meth users, don't be telling people we don't have laws because we do.

*We can't protect the unborn our hands are tied.

*Banish all the meth users and drug dealers, get them out of here.

*It's not my job. I have no say so in anything. If I did then I would say something.

*Stop all tribal financial benefits to meth users that will make them think twice about using or bringing "that stuff" around here.

*Banishment is not the Dakota way!

*My ex is lying trying to get me in trouble. I don't use meth.

*I know how to use meth. I just use a little I don't go overboard like some of them do. I'm ok. I can handle.

*You would be surprised how many are using "that stuff" at the Tribe.

*I know all their names but nope…I'm not telling. I'm not a snitch.

You see there are many who talk about all the problems meth causes, there are people who just look for a place to put the blame rather than roll up their sleeves and help to find solutions. We need people who are willing to set aside personal agendas and just offer to help in a good way. Be there to listen to your relative when they might try to talk to you about their problem. Ask questions if you see or more importantly if you FEEL that something is not right with your relative. Get help for yourself if your relative is using meth because it's a long tough road to get them away from this drug. You will have to be strong for yourself and your family and sometimes-tough love is the only card you can play.

In closing I am hopeful that you will read my letter and you would contact me and offer a helping hand, some good words of advice or encouragement and solutions. I am always looking for creative solutions. "I'm only one, I can't do everything but I will try and do something." Today is a new day we can move forward!

We are hosting a METH Solution Sharing Group set up for Wednesday July 30th from 10:00 a.m. to noon at the Tribal Office . You are all welcome to come and share, give your advice.

Wopida Tanka for reading my letter.

"From the desk of Geri Opsal, Tribal Veteran Service Officer"

GeriO@SWO-NSN.gov

Phone 605-698-3388

*"Tough times never last, but tough people do." - Robert Schuller

*Thurs. July 31st noon Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Admin Building, Agency Village, SD. Riding For Our Lives is joined in Fargo, ND by national comedian and Navy veteran PJ Walsh of GIs of Comedy and Courage Continues At Home IV, with guest Mark Riccadonna of Armed Forces Entertainment and M.C. Kim Blacklock, for a Comedy Show for the USMV MC at the Holiday Inn Aug 2nd 7:30pm. We will also be honoring US military veterans of Native Nations as we stop and gather with the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Sioux in NE South Dakota. For full details of this important cross-country effort please visit http://www.hgfairfieldarts.org/riding-for-our-lives-preventing-veteran-suicides/

*The Sioux Falls VA Health Care System and their partners will be hosting Veterans Stand Downs Aug. 22 in Sioux City, IA, Sept. 5 in Watertown, Sept. 11 in Wagner, and Sept. 19 in Sioux Falls. Call our office if you are interested in attending the Watertown event.

*Airborne hazards and open burn pit registry The United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) reports that veterans and service members who were close to burn pit smoke or exposed for longer periods may be at greater risk for health problems. Health effects from burn pit exposure will vary and depend on a number of factors such as the kind of waste being burned, pre-existing conditions, and wind direction. They note that there is not enough medical or scientific information to conclude that short or long-term health effects have occurred from exposures to smoke from burn pits or other airborne hazards during re-cent deployments. The VA continues to study the health of veterans who have deployed to recent conflicts. The VA and the Department of Defense (DoD) are working on initiatives that address clinical issues and the need for long-term studies. Who is the registry for? The Airborne Hazards and Open Burn Pit Registry is a database of health information about veterans and service members. Registry participation is open to any veteran or service member who served in: OEF/OIF/OND or in Djibouti, Africa, after September 11, 2001, or Operations Desert Shield or Desert Storm or the Southwest Asia theater of operations after August 2, 1990. The South-west Asia theater of operations includes the following locations: Iraq, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Gulf of Aden, Gulf of Oman, Oman, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, waters of the Persian Gulf, Arabian Sea, and the Red Sea, and the airspace above these locations. You may participate in the registry by completing a web-based health questionnaire at https://veteran.mobilehealth. va.gov/AHBurnPitRegistry. To access the questionnaire, you will need your Department of Defense Self-Service logon (DS Logon). You may apply for a DS Logon account at https://www.dmdc.osd.mil/appj/dsaccess if you do not already have one. The DS Logon is a secure, self-service identification that allows active-duty service members and veterans to access several websites using a single username and password. The VA will use deployment data provided by DoD to determine your eligibility for the registry.

*Please see flyers for a job fair to be held for Veterans in Sioux Falls as well as the upcoming training to be held in Spirit Lake.

*Mark your calendars: Office of Tribal Government Relations out of DC will be hosting a Veteran Conference on 7th & 8th August, 2014 at Spirit Lake Casino & resort St. Michael, ND. This 2 day conference has some very great agenda items. I will post a copy of the Agenda with all the information. This has been an ongoing collaboration between many with Peter Vicaire spearheading the group. The conference is FREE. (See attached draft agenda to give you an idea).

*Veterans: For those of you that are in the Honor Guards please make sure that your copy of the DD214 is secured here at the TVSO office. At our last UVA meeting it was asked if they were all in per previous UVA Motion. We have a locked fireproof safe and it will be guarded with the utmost confidence.

*Thank you to those of you that stop in on a regular basis. Remember Veterans stop by our Office which is located in the Post Office building next to job service Office. The address is 205 East Oak Street Suite # 121. Our telephone is 698-3388.

*TAPS: Condolences to the family of Robert Seaboy, US Army Vietnam Veteran.

*The best way for find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others. (Ghandi)

*WOMEN VETERANS CALL CENTER: 1-855-VA-WOMEN. Crisis Help Line: 1-800-273-8255, available 24/7, and tell them you are a veteran. All calls are confidential.

*Today's thought for the day: "True success is getting up in the morning and realizing you have a very good life." - Anna Quindlen

US Military Vets Motorcycle Club NY4 and H.G. Fairfield Arts –

2nd annual "Riding For Our Lives: Preventing Veteran Suicides"

Riders will honor SWO akicita with a noon community feed at the Tribal administration building Thursday, July 31st

The US Military Vets Motorcycle Club NY4 is riding out to Fargo, ND, for the USMV MC National President's Meeting, then on to Sturgis, SD, and back home – a 4,242 mile run to raise awareness, hope, and funds for veteran healing initiatives aimed at preventing veteran suicides.

Riding For Our Lives is joined in Fargo, ND by national comedian and Navy veteran PJ Walsh of GIs of Comedy and Courage Continues At Home IV, with guest Mark Riccadonna of Armed Forces Entertainment and M.C. Kim Blacklock, for a Comedy Show for the USMV MC at the Holiday Inn Aug 2nd 7:30 p.m.

The riders will also be honoring US military veterans of Native Nations as they stop and gather with the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate on the Lake Traverse Reservation.

They will be camping at Hartford Beach State Park along Big Stone Lake Wednesday night, then will ride to Agency Village the next morning.

They plan to hold an honoring ceremony and host a community feed for the Oyate veterans Thursday, July 31st, at 12:00 noon in the rotunda of the Tribal administration building.

Net proceeds from the run and Comedy Show benefit:

*Semper Fi Odyssey, a transition program for wounded or ill discharged veterans at Outdoor Odyssey in PA run by MGen T.S. Jones (USMC, RET).

*American Legion Posts’ Welfare and VFW Relief Funds for local veterans’ needs of food, clothing, shelter, & access to medical care.

*“The Road to Healing” veterans film project and the Veterans Healing Program of H. G. Fairfield Arts which partners health practitioners treating for free local veterans needing care.

See the film “The Road to Healing: NY to OK” on H. G. Fairfield Art’s YouTube channel http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCi1CarTWZNdRrWXLVkiJVjQ

The riders thank Pepsi & Enterprise & everyone for their support.

“Let’s get our veterans taken care of!” encourages USMV MC NY4 President Bill “Bomber” Barber.

Coming Soon!

Dakota Language Traveling Dictionary

When traveling to other countries, visitors sometimes use a travel dictionary to help communicate with the locals and as with any language, if there long enough, they begin to pick up on the language quickly because of the quick reference to commonly used phrases the travel dictionary provides.

That is the approach behind the concept of creating a travel Dakota language dictionary that will be soon available.

This innovative approach is being spearheaded by, Eric Dumarce, of the Dakota Language Institute and the treasured elders panel. They have been working diligently to produce a condensed version of the English-Dakota Dictionary that was authored by John P. Williamson.

Included in the traveling dictionary are the most common words used today, in both Dakotah and English. Also included will be Dakotah place names and beginning phrases. In essence, this book will be a perfect companion for any beginning student of Dakotah Language and will assist our community in making our language applicable to our daily lives by reclaiming our names for specific localities.

The Dakota Language Institute will also have the capability to print these dictionaries from their very own printing press. The anticipated publishing date is scheduled for January 9, 2015. They will also be seeking public input from the community as to what to put on the cover of the dictionary.

When asked to share some words on this project Eric Dumarce replied, "It has truly been my honor and pleasure to work with such knowledgeable and respected members of our community. I look forward to many more years of learning and guidance from this group and I hope that our work will contribute to a resurgence in Dakotah Language usage in our lives."

The elders that have contributed immensely to this project are: Orsen Bernard, Edwina Bernard, Caroline Black Thunder, Celine Buckanaga, Clifford Canku, Marcella Haug, Harvey Quinn, Gordon Redday, Phyllis Roberts, Dayton Seaboy, and Tina White.

7GOV hosts 3rd annual SWO Youth Wacipi

The SWO 7GOV Youth Council held their third annual youth wacipi Wednesday, July 23rd at the Veterans Memorial Youth Center, Agency Village, SD.

Powwow organizers were Brianna Greybull, Cante Heminger and Katlyn Canku with the help of the rest of 7GOV.

There was a great turnout with over 75 dancers and 9 drums, with Bad Nation as the host drum.

The dancers and singers participated in hand drum and two-step contests.

The winner of the hand drum contest was TJ Max and the winners of the two-step contest were Melynda High Bear and Ronald Brant.

It was a lot of fun and everybody's support was greatly appreciated.

Pidamaya.

Here are accompanying photo highlights.

From the White House office of Press Secretary –

Remarks by President Obama on Minority Enterprise Development Week

Washington, DC – July 25, 2014 – Our Nation thrives when we fulfill the promise of opportunity for all -- when each of us has the same chance to succeed, when every American can find pride and independence in their work, when our shared prosperity rests upon the broad shoulders of a rising middle class. With talent, dedication, and bold ideas, minority entrepreneurs reach for that promise. They bring jobs and services to communities across our country. They innovate and create. They open new markets to goods stamped "Made in the U.S.A." During Minority Enterprise Development Week, we celebrate their essential role in our economy and our communities.

Minority-owned businesses employ millions of Americans, and my Administration is proud to invest in their success. We have increased access to contracts and capital, reduced burdensome paperwork, and connected more minority enterprises to booming export markets. Since I took office, my Administration has made more loans to small business owners than any other. By hosting workshops and through www.Business.USA.gov, we are empowering minority entrepreneurs with the tools to help their businesses grow.

America's great strength lies in our diversity -- of people, perspectives, and ideas. We cannot succeed when a shrinking few do very well and a growing many barely make it. But if we invest in small businesses and give all our entrepreneurs a chance to compete, new opportunities will open, and we will flourish -- as individuals and as a Nation.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the

United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim July 27 through August 2, 2014, as Minority Enterprise Development Week. I call upon all Americans to celebrate this week with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities to recognize the many contributions of our Nation's minority enterprises.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-fifth day of July, in the year of our Lord two thousand fourteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-ninth.

BARACK OBAMA.

Tribal Parole Pilot Program

SWO chosen for pilot program

By Gov. Dennis Daugaard

Last year, we passed historic legislation in South Dakota to reform our criminal justice system. These reforms were enacted to improve public safety, hold offenders more accountable and reduce corrections spending.

When we met with stakeholders before drafting the legislation, tribal members brought a parole issue forward. Today, nearly 30 percent of the inmates in the state prison system are Native American. More than half of parolees who abscond from the state parole supervision are Native Americans. In many of these cases, the absconders are returning to one of the reservations, where they often have homes and families. Unfortunately, because the state lacks jurisdiction on the reservations, state parole agents can no longer supervise parolees who return to a reservation.

Under the Public Safety Improvement Act, we established the state tribal parole pilot program to allow some Native American offenders to serve their parole supervision on the reservation. After I signed the bill into law, we met with the seven tribes that expressed interest in participating in the pilot. In April the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate was selected for the first pilot program.

For the pilot program, the state will provide training and funding for a tribal parole agent to supervise parolees on the reservation. The tribal agent will use the same parole system that state agents use. This system applies swift, certain and proportionate sanctions for misbehavior, along with incentives for compliance. These evidence-based practices have been shown to reduce the risk that a parolee will return to the penitentiary. The parolees will be able to access mental health services, substance abuse treatment services and housing resources from the tribe while residing and working near their homes and families.

The Department of Corrections and the tribe plan to hire a tribal parole agent later this summer. The tribe’s wellness team is currently establishing guidelines to determine which parolees are eligible to participate, and DOC staff members have begun to inform inmates from that area about the tribal pilot. The tribe is expected to monitor its first parolees in early fall.

If the parole pilot program with Sisseton-Wahpeton proves successful, we’ll have the opportunity to expand it to other reservations. Its success would mean a smoother transition for Native American parolees, restoration of families for the tribe and reductions in prison spending for the state of South Dakota. It would be a win, win, win.

Federal funds for Workforce Training for ND Native Americans

Washington, DC – July 25, 2014 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp, a member of the Senate Indian Affairs Committee, today announced more than $900,000 in federal funding to provide low-income and struggling Native Americans with employment and training opportunities on Spirit Lake, Three Affiliated Tribes, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, and Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indian reservations, as well as United Tribes Technical College in Bismarck.

The funds will be used to help individuals develop the academic, occupational, and literacy skills to make them more competitive in the workforce and promote economic and social development in Native communities in ways that reflect the tribes’ goals and values.

“Improving the educational and employment conditions for our Native families is a must, and I’ve been working to support these goals since I was Attorney General,” said Heitkamp. “While the federal government has many programs to assist Indian Country, the unmet needs in our state are great and these funds will help tribe members develop the skills themselves to get good jobs and continue to make a positive impact on their communities for years to come.”

The grants are distributed as follows:

· Spirit Lake Sioux Tribe – will receive $126,821.

· Three Affiliated Tribes – will receive $153,347.

· Standing Rock Sioux Tribe – will receive $183,598.

· United Tribes Technical College – will receive $195,662.

· Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians – will receive $249,983.

These funds are authorized by the U.S. Department of Interior’s Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development. A total of more than $58 million was awarded to 180 Native American entities nationwide.

Since joining the Senate, Heitkamp has fought to support Native American families. The first bill Heitkamp introduced in the Senate would create a Commission on Native Children. Specifically, the bill would improve the lives of Native American children by examining and addressing high poverty rates, unemployment, child abuse, domestic violence, substance abuse, and few economic opportunities – and make tangible recommendations on how to make sure they are protected and supported. Recently, Heitkamp’s bipartisan bill passed a Senate Committee, the final step before the legislation goes to the full Senate.

Heitkamp has been advocating for more investments to help grow the local economies in Indian county. Just this month, Turtle Mountain, Sisseton-Wahpeton, Spirit Lake and the Three Affiliated tribes received a total of nearly $200,000 in federal funds to help develop economic regional strategies, grow the local economies, and create jobs. The Senate Agriculture Subcommittee on Jobs, Rural Economic Growth and Energy Innovation – which Heitkamp chairs– oversees the authorization of these funds.

Federal funds to bolster Safety, Emergency Preparedness in ND

Washington, DC – July 25, 2014 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp, a member of the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, today announced more than $7 million in federal funding to support safety and emergency preparedness programs in North Dakota. Heitkamp’s Committee has jurisdiction over these funds.

“Making sure North Dakota’s families and communities are safe is my top priority,” said Heitkamp. “With our state’s growing population and rapidly expanding economy come many rewards for North Dakota, but also a number of potential safety concerns. These grants will be instrumental in helping law enforcement and government agencies address these challenges and give them the resources they need to protect North Dakotans.”

The grants are distributed as follows:

· State Homeland Security Program – $3,733,000. The funds will be used to help implement State homeland security strategies to prevent, protect against, mitigate, respond to, and recover from acts of terrorism or other catastrophic events.

· Operation Stonegarden – $433,149. The funds will be used to improve coordination between local, tribal, territorial, State, and Federal law enforcement agencies to help secure the northern U.S. border.

· Emergency Management Performance Grant Program – $3,099,556. The funds will be used to assist State, local, and tribal governments in emergency preparedness and the protection of life and property.

Last week, Heitkamp pressed U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Deputy Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas and U.S. Customs and Border Protection Commissioner Gil Kerlikowske for additional needed resources and personnel on the northern U.S. border in North Dakota.

In June, Heitkamp visited North Dakota’s northern border with Senator Tom Carper (D-DE), Chairman of the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, to speak firsthand with local officials about security challenges they face as the state’s population has boomed.

The funding is made available through DHS’s Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), under the Fiscal Year 2014 state and local preparedness grant programs.

Black Hills Cemetery Act signed into Law

Washington, D.C. – July 25, 2014 – President Barack Obama today signed Rep. Kristi Noem’s Black Hill Cemetery Act, H.R.291, into law. The legislation, which Noem first introduced in 2012 and the House passed in 2013, would transfer the ownership of nine Black Hills cemeteries from the federal government to the caretaking communities that have managed them for generations.

“These nine cemeteries tell the story of the pioneers who transformed the Black Hills and the West,” said Rep. Noem. “This legislation honors those who have been preserving the pioneer history within these cemeteries for generations. I am incredibly proud to see my bill signed into law and the ownership of these cemeteries returned to the communities who have personally invested in maintaining these sacred grounds.”

Rep. Noem will be at the historic Silver City Cemetery on Saturday, July 26, to recognize the legislation’s passage and what it means for the caretaking communities. Learn more about the event here.

The Black Hills Cemetery Act impacts nine cemeteries in the Black Hills: Englewood Cemetery, Galena Cemetery, Hayward Cemetery, Mountain Meadow Cemetery, Roubaix Cemetery, Nemo Cemetery, Rockerville Cemetery, Silver City Cemetery, and Cold Springs Cemetery. The legislation transfers ownership of these cemeteries and up to two acres of adjacent land to the caretaking communities that have managed them for generations under special-use permits issued by the U.S. Forest Service. It also requires that the conveyed land continue to be used for the same purposes.

Rep. Noem first introduced the Black Hills Cemetery Act in February 2012 and worked through the House Natural Resources Committee, of which she was then a member, during the 112th Congress to further advance the legislation. While Noem was able to pass the legislation through the U.S. House of Representatives in both the 112th and 113th Congresses, the full Senate did not bring the provision up for a vote until last week.

DOI extends comment period on proposed federal acknowledgment reform

Proposed rule would address arbitrary, inefficient process July 24, 2014 WASHINGTON, D.C. – Assistant Secretary – Indian Affairs Kevin Washburn today announced an extension of the public comment period and additional tribal consultations and public meetings on proposed regulations to reform the process by which Interior formally and officially recognizes Indian tribes.

Due to significant public comments and interest, the comment period deadline has been extended by 60 days. Two additional tribal consultations will be held via teleconference on August 18th and 20th for tribal leaders, their representatives and staff. Two additional public meetings will be held via teleconference on September 3rd and 5th. Written comments may now be submitted through September 30, 2014.

"With this extended comment period, the Department is providing more opportunities for comment and suggestions from tribes and the public than any other rule issued by Indian Affairs during this Administration,” said Assistant Secretary Washburn. “Input from tribes, including the 17 that have been recognized under the regulations, states, local governments, the public and non-federally recognized tribes will result in a better final rule.”

The existing regulations governing federal recognition of Indian tribes were originally adopted in 1978 and updated only once 20 years ago. Prior to 1978, the Department of the Interior addressed requests for acknowledgment on a case-by-case basis. While the regulations established a structured procedure for evaluating federal acknowledgment (“the Part 83 process”), this system has been widely criticized as being too time-consuming, sometimes arbitrary and generally “broken.”

This proposed rule to reform the 35-year old process, released for public comment on May 22, 2014 would make the procedure more transparent, efficient, timely, and flexible, while maintaining the integrity of the process. Some key features of the proposed rule are that it would promote transparency by updating the Part 83 criteria to include objective standards, promote efficiency by requiring a petitioner to show community and political influence/authority from 1934 to the present rather than from as early as 1789, and eliminate the need for a petitioner to demonstrate that third parties identified the petitioner as a tribe from 1900 to the present. The proposed rule would also make changes to the petitioning process that facilitate the timely issuance of proposed findings and final determinations and allows for an administrative judge to conduct a comprehensive hearing and review of a negative proposed finding.

In recognition of the high level of interest in the acknowledgement process, the Department has used a transparent approach and significant outreach effort. The Office of the Assistant Secretary - Indian Affairs has been conducting tribal consultations and public meetings on the proposed rule in the South, Pacific, Northwest, Midwest, California and the Rocky Mountain Regions. A public meeting will be held on July 29th from 8:30 am to noon EDT and the tribal consultation will be held on July 29th from 1:00 pm to 4:30 pm EDT at the Mashpee Wampanoag Facility, Mashpee, MA.

Newly announced additional tribal consultations will be held by conference call on August 18th and 20th from 1:30 pm to 4:30 pm EDT at the following number: 1-888-323-4307. Use participant passcode 4823348. Tribal consultations are open only to representatives of federally recognized Indian tribes.

And, the new additional public meetings will be held by conference call on September 3rd and 5th from 1:30 pm to 4:30 pm EDT at the following number: 1-888-323-4307. Also use participant passcode 4823348. Public meetings are open to everyone. Transcripts of all tribal consultations and public meetings will be posted on the Indian Affairs website.

The Office of Indian Affairs has established a website, where the public can access the proposed rule, a frequently asked questions (FAQs) document, and other information at: http://www.bia.gov/WhoWeAre/AS-IA/ORM/83revise/index.htm

EPA issues policy supporting Tribal and Indigenous communities

Washington, DC – July 24, 2014 – Today, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Gina McCarthy signed the EPA Policy on Environmental Justice for Working with Federally Recognized Tribes and Indigenous Peoples, reinforcing the agency’s commitment to work with tribes on a government-to-government basis when issues of environmental justice arise.

“All tribal and indigenous communities deserve environmental and public health protection. Through this agreement, we are reinforcing our commitment to tribal communities, especially in addressing issues of Environmental Justice,” said Administrator McCarthy. “We know that tribes are uniquely impacted by a changing climate, which highlights the importance of this agreement and other agency actions, including funding research through the STAR Tribal health grants.”

Over the past 20 years, the agency has made substantial progress in developing both its tribal and environmental justice programs. Building on EPA’s Plan EJ 2014, the policy integrates 17 environmental justice and civil rights principles. The plan also identifies existing informational and resource tools to support EPA in its endeavor to make indigenous regions environmentally safe.

This policy, started in 2011, was developed through tribal government consultations, meetings with state and tribal organizations and three public comment periods engaging indigenous communities and other stakeholders.

More information on:

EPA Policy on Environmental Justice for Working with Federally Recognized Tribes and Indigenous Peoples http://www.epa.gov/environmentaljustice/resources/policy/indigenous/ej-indigenous-policy.pdf

EPA’s Plan EJ 2014 http://www.epa.gov/environmentaljustice/resources/policy/plan-ej-2014/plan-ej-2011-09.pdf

EPA funds Environmental Health Research for Tribal communities

Washington, DC – July 23, 2014 – To identify and reduce tribal health risks associated with climate change, indoor wood smoke exposure, environmental asthma, waterborne diseases, and other unique tribal concerns, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is awarding tribal environmental health research grants to six groups, including universities and tribes.?

“We're working together to help tribal communities combat the threats from climate change, and reduce environmental and public health risks,” said EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy. “After more than a decade of funding this research, which addresses the unique needs of American Indian and Alaska Native communities, we have important data, tools, products and knowledge available to help communities determine a path forward to take action on climate change."

EPA funds research focused on tribal communities through the Science to Achieve Results (STAR) program. Because many tribes rely on natural resources, it is essential for tribal-focused research to identify possible environmental health risks and the most efficient methods of avoiding or addressing these risks.

Over the last decade, EPA grants have helped tribes make significant progress in addressing health risks.  For example, the funding has resulted in the creation of fish advisory maps that have helped various tribal fishing communities avoid mercury and other contaminant-laden fish. The funding has also caused Washington and Oregon to revise their water-quality standards to offer greater protection.  In addition, a library of resources in the Mohawk language was created to enhance education about toxic substances and empower the community to protect the health of its citizens. 

For additional examples of outcomes from the Tribal Environmental Health grants, view the Tribal Synthesis Report: http://www.epa.gov/ncer/tribalresearch/news/results-impacts.pdf

The six grants total about $5 million. The recipients are:

Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, Alaska -to assess, monitor, and adapt to threats to the sustainability of food and water in remote Alaska native villages

Swinomish Indian Tribal Community, La Conner, Wash. -to examine coastal climate impacts to traditional foods, cultural sites, and tribal community health and well-being

Yurok Tribe, Klamath, Calif. -to  identify, assess, and adapt to climate change impacts to Yurok water and aquatic resources, food security and tribal health

Little Big Horn College, Crow Agency, Mont. –to research climate change adaptation and waterborne disease prevention on the Crow Reservation

University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Okla. -to improve indoor air quality and reduce environmental asthma triggers in tribal homes and schools

University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, Mass. –to measure indoor air quality in tents as related to wood smoke exposures and identify potential health risks in remote communities in North America

More information about the grants awarded: http://cfpub.epa.gov/ncer_abstracts/index.cfm/fuseaction/recipients.display/rfa_id/569/records_per_page/ALL

For more information on Tribal Environmental Health Research: http://epa.gov/ncer/tribalresearch/

Information on the American Indian Environmental Office Tribal portal: http://www.epa.gov/tribalportal/

Financial Coaching & Credit Counseling training

Rural Dynamics, Inc. (RDI) invites you to join its ever-growing group of financial coaches and credit counselors across the nation who provide culturally-competent financial counseling and education to clients who have set lifelong goals such as buying a home, starting a small business, building their credit or just repaying their debt.

Increase the financial expertise in your office, enabling you to provide up-to-date financial advice to the clients you serve. Financial security can be defined in many ways, but in a nutshell it is the ability to make ends meet, to spend less than one earns, to pay monthly expenses, repay debt owed and not have to ask for help from family and friends.

Enroll in RDI's financial training program today and you will be able to confidently give advice on topics such as prioritizing debt, understanding credit reports and scores, building/rebuilding credit, dealing with collectors and collection judgments, repossessions, foreclosures and even filing bankruptcy.

Classes start August 7, 2014!

Enroll in the Financial Coaching Training program – take part in 10 weekly live web conferences with others nationwide and in less than three months start providing financial coaching to your clients. (Cost of $450 includes study materials and exam). Enroll in the Complete Credit Counseling Training program – become a nationally certified credit counselor through the AFCPE. In less than three months your nonprofit agency will be able to provide credit counseling in addition to the other great services you provide. (Cost of $1,899 includes study materials, registration with the AFCPE and final exam).

For more details or to enroll, visit www.rdifinancialtraining.com or contact Karen Vanni at (406) 454-5710 or karenv@ruraldynamics.org.

CNAY participates in My Brother’s Keeper event

Washington, DC, July 21, 2014 -- Today, the Center for Native American Youth's (CNAY) founder, former US Senator Byron Dorgan and four Native youth Champions for Change attended an event hosted by President Obama to announce new commitments to the My Brother’s Keeper and selected four youth leaders to attend. These youth -- who make up our country's most at-risk population -- shared Native American priorities; ensuring Native youth perspectives were included in the discussion with President Obama.

"Obama's initiatives that will expand opportunities for young men of color are very important and it is critical that he continue to make tribal leaders and Native youth a part of the agenda," commented Senator Dorgan. "Young Indian men too often face some of the steepest barriers to opportunity in America."

My Brother's Keeper is a White House effort aimed at addressing persistent gaps in opportunity facing young men of color -- including American Indian and Alaska Native youth (AI/AN) -- and ensuring that all young people can reach their full potential. The initiative was announced earlier this year and the Center for Native American Youth has been working with various agencies and partner organizations to include Native American children in the President's efforts.

Dahkota Brown, a 15 year-old member of the Wilton Miwok tribe in Jackson, California shared his perspective saying "I see the difficulties and struggles that follow us every day...Native boys are affected by the devastating statistics that haunt Native Americans; we have the highest dropout rate, lowest numbers represented in college, and young Native men have the highest suicide rates among all ethnicities."

With support from the Native American Contractors Association these youth traveled from their tribal communities to attend the event and talk about the priorities they see for young men in tribal communities across the country. The Native American Contractors Association is a trade association located in Washington, DC that advocates on behalf of tribes, Alaska Native Corporations, and Native Hawaiian Organizations on issues relevant to federal contracting and economic development.

"I am beyond excited that President Obama is creating hope, success, and positive awareness for young men of color through our own personal stories," said Vance Home Gun, a 20-year old member of the Salish and Kootenai tribes in Montana.

"I want to tell the president that having this opportunity to be in the White House with him is a dream come true," remarked Keith Martinez, a youth from the Oglala Sioux Nation. "Shows other young men on my reservation that they too can do so through education."

CNAY works to shine a spotlight on Native children and prioritize their needs at all levels of government, private and public funding institutions, and within child advocacy organizations. In CNAY's outreach to over 3,500 Native youth across the country, young people and tribal authorities have identified priorities and challenges facing young Native men and women. Racism, access to quality health care, and education opportunities are serious needs experienced by youth.

CNAY continues to engage young male voices from Indian Country to ensure the nation's First Americans are included in My Brother's Keeper activities as well as other mentoring, support networks, leadership opportunities, and skills to secure educational opportunities or successful job placement.

President Obama announces key Administration posts

Washington, DC – July 22, 2014 – Today, President Barack Obama announced his intent to nominate several individuals to key Administration posts. Among the nominations was Jonodev Osceola Chaudhuri – Chairman, National Indian Gaming Commission, Department of the Interior.

President Obama said, “I am grateful that these impressive individuals have chosen to dedicate their talents to serving the American people at this important time for our country. I look forward to working with them in the months and years ahead.”

Jonodev Osceola Chaudhuri, Nominee for Chairman, National Indian Gaming Commission, Department of the Interior

Jonodev Osceola Chaudhuri is currently Vice Chairman and Associate Commissioner of the National Indian Gaming Commission (NIGC), positions he has held since 2013. He also served as Acting Chairman of the NIGC from October 2013 to April 2014. Prior to joining the NIGC, Mr. Chaudhuri was Senior Counselor to the Assistant Secretary for Indian Affairs at the Department of the Interior from 2012 to 2013. He served as an Associate Judge on the Puyallup Tribe of Nations Court from 2011 to 2012, an Appellate Judge on the San Manuel Mission Band of Indians Appeals Court from 2009 to 2012, and an Appellate Judge on the Muscogee (Creek) Nation Supreme Court from 2006 to 2012. Previously, he served as a Deputy Public Defender in the Maricopa County Public Defender’s Office from 2010 to 2011 and as Managing Attorney at the Chaudhuri Law Office, P.L.L.C. from 2006 to 2010. Mr. Chaudhuri also held Appellate Judge appointments on the Gila River Indian Community Court of Appeals from 2008 to 2010 and on the Yavapai-Apache Nation Court of Appeals from 2005 to 2009. From 2001 to 2006, he served as an Associate at Snell & Wilmer, L.L.P. Prior to this, he served as a judicial clerk for the Honorable Noel Fidel of the Arizona Court of Appeals from 2000 to 2001 and a Judicial Clerk for the Honorable James Ackerman of the Arizona Court of Appeals from 1999 to 2000. Mr. Chaudhuri received a B.A. from Dartmouth College and a J.D. from Cornell Law School.

Comments by Secretary Jewell

Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell applauded President Obama’s intent to nominate Jonodev Osceola Chaudhuri to be the chair of the National Indian Gaming Commission, the federal agency tasked with collaborating with tribes and states to regulate Indian gaming.

“Jonodev brings a wealth of legal expertise and administrative and policy experience to this position, having served on the National Indian Gaming Commission, in tribal government and private practice Indian law,” said Jewell. “His broad perspective on American Indian affairs makes him a highly qualified candidate as commission chair where he will provide strong strategic leadership as the commission tackles the complex issues associated with supporting economic opportunities for Indian nations.”

The National Indian Gaming Commission is committed to the prompt and efficient regulation of the Indian gaming industry, which spans more than 420 gaming establishments, associated with nearly 240 tribes across 28 states. The Commission’s dedication to compliance with the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act ensures the integrity of the $27 billion Indian gaming industry.

Jonodev Osceola Chaudhuri is currently Vice Chairman and Associate Commissioner of the National Indian Gaming Commission (NIGC), positions he has held since 2013. He also served as Acting Chairman of the NIGC from 2013 to April 2014. Prior to this position, Mr. Chaudhuri was Senior Counselor to the Assistant Secretary for Indian Affairs at the Department of the Interior from 2012 to 2013. He served as an Associate Judge on the Puyallup Tribe of Nations Court from 2011 to 2012, an Appellate Judge on the San Manuel Mission Band of Indians Appeals Court from 2009 to 2012 and an Appellate Judge on the Muscogee (Creek) Nation Supreme Court from 2006 to 2012.

Previously, he served as a Deputy Public Defender in the Maricopa County Public Defender’s Office from 2010 to 2011 and as Managing Attorney at the Chaudhuri Law Office, P.L.L.C. from 2006 to 2010. Mr. Chaudhuri also held Appellate Judge Appointments on the Gila River Indian Community Court of Appeals from 2008 to 2010 and on the Yavapai-Apache Nation Court of Appeals from 2005 to 2009. From 2001 to 2006, he served as an Associate at Snell & Wilmer, L.L.P. Prior to this, he served as a judicial clerk for the Honorable Noel Fidel on the Arizona Court of Appeals from 2000 to 2001 and a Judicial Clerk for the Honorable James Ackerman on the Arizona Court of Appeals from 1999 to 2000. Mr. Chaudhuri received a B.A. from Dartmouth College and a J.D. from Cornell Law School.

The NIGC was established by the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988 and comprises a chair and two commissioners, each of whom serves on a full-time basis for a three-year term. By law, at least two of the three commissioners must be enrolled members of a federally recognized Indian tribe, and no more than two members may be of the same political party. The chair is appointed by the President and must be confirmed by the Senate. The Secretary of the Interior appoints the other two commissioners. The NIGC is authorized to conduct investigations; undertake enforcement actions, including the issuance of notices of violation, assessment of civil fines and/or issuance of closure orders; conduct background investigations; conduct audits; and review and approve tribal gaming ordinances. For more information, visit www.nigc.gov.

Ho-Chunk, Inc. CEO receives award from U.S. Department of Commerce Agency

Winnebago, NE – Lance Morgan, President and CEO of Ho-Chunk, Inc., will receive the Advocate of the Year Award by the U.S. Department of Commerce's Minority Business Development Agency (MBDA) at the end of this month. Morgan will be honored during a special ceremony at the 2014 National Minority Enterprise Development (MED) Week happening July 31 to August 1, 2014 in Washington, D.C.

The Advocate of the Year Award is given annually to an organization or individual who has shown leadership and commitment in advancing the minority business community. The award pays tribute to minority entrepreneurs who have demonstrated economic impact in a global economy.

Morgan was nominated by Trisha Luna, the Federal Acquisition Advisor of the Federal Procurement Center, for his direction of Ho-Chunk, Inc. Morgan launched Ho-Chunk, Inc. in 1994 as the economic development corporation of the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska. The corporation has grown from one employee in 1995 to over 1,000 employees with operations in 16 states and 8 foreign countries. Ho-Chunk, Inc. operates 35 subsidiaries and has revenues in excess of $260 million. The Ho-Chunk, Inc. portfolio includes companies with SBA 8(a) certification that have been recipients of a wide variety of federal government contracts across 32 agencies.

As a minority-owned corporation, Ho-Chunk, Inc. has actively sought out qualified individuals of other minority races and ethnicities in addition to Native Americans. As a result, the company has been successful in its minority recruiting efforts and today its employee base includes 35.1% minorities. In the state of Nebraska, where the company is headquartered, the minority population as of the 2010 Census was 19%. Additionally, corporate executive management is 100% Native American.

Under Morgan's leadership, Ho-Chunk, Inc. has created a new community on the Winnebago Reservation named the Ho-Chunk Village. The Village is a 40-acre development that includes private homes, multi-family housing, commercial and industrial businesses. The company also maintains a scholarship and internship program for Tribal youth as a means to educate and train future Ho-Chunk, Inc. employees.

The Ho-Chunk Village is a modern futuristic planned community that includes the best practices based on the cities of the future concept. Ho-Chunk Village has underground utilities, community parks, a shopping center and a cultural park celebrating the tribal heritage. The community is also energy efficient using wind generators to make the community 99% self-sufficient for electrical power. The Village has single and multi-family homes, apartments and senior living units.

Ho-Chunk, Inc. has also been responsible for funding a down payment assistance program offering qualifying tribal members up to $65,000 toward the purchase of a home. As a result, Ho-Chunk Village has seen the growth of over 25 new homes and Tribal families are becoming homeowners for the first time. There are two large apartment complexes, several duplexes and a dozen senior living units providing a significant benefit to tribal families. The development is actually going to require more land acquisition to accommodate the housing demand. New homeowners are emerging in record levels, the community infrastructure is strengthened, and more young people are pursuing a college education.

Morgan is an adjunct professor at Arizona State University and University of Arizona. He has served as the President of Native American Contractors Association (NACA) and currently serves as a board member for several corporate entities and Liberty National Bank. He is a frequent speaker across the country on topics such as Indian law and Tribal economic development issues. He has consulted with hundreds of tribal governments on economic development and taxation initiatives.

In addition to the MBDA Award, Morgan has been selected as a "Champion of Change" by the White House, one of only 18 people across the U.S. In 2012, he was awarded the Nebraska Builder Award by Harvey Perlman, Chancellor at the University of Nebraska, and was also appointed to the Board of Trustees of the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian in 2013.

*****

The Minority Business Development Agency (MBDA) is the only Federal agency dedicated to the growth and global competitiveness of U.S. minority-owned businesses. The programs and services better equip minority-owned firms to create jobs, build scale and capacity, increase revenues and expand regionally, nationally and internationally. Services are provided through a network of MBDA Business Centers. After 45 years of service, MBDA continues to be a partner to all U.S. minority-owned businesses, committed to providing programs and services that build size, scale and capacity through access to capital, contracts and markets.

SWFCU annual meeting August 14th

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Federal Credit Union will hold its annual meeting on Thursday, August 14, 2014 at 5:00 p.m. in the SWO Tribal Elderly Center, Agency Village, SD.

Agenda

*Financial report.

*Committee reports.

*Election of two (2) Board members.

*Other business.

*Door prize drawings.

Any member of the SWFCU, 21 years of age or older with knowledge about the Credit Union or willing to learn can run for a position by filing a notice at the Credit Union office by 4:00pm on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 and must be current on any obligations at the Credit Union.

To be eligible for the door prizes, you must be a member of the Credit Union by 4:30 p.m. on August 14, 2014 and current on any obligations to the Credit Union.

Editorials –

Sota guest editorial –

Finding A Place to Go

By Rep. Kristi Noem

July 25, 2014

It seems like every few weeks I open the newspaper and my heart sinks – it’s another story about human trafficking happening right here in South Dakota. At the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally, during hunting season, in Indian Country, and on the streets behind our schools, people are preying on vulnerable South Dakotans. They are preying on our kids.

Human trafficking is an issue I’ve written about frequently. And I’ve spoken to many South Dakotans about why this issue matters so much to me and they’ve shared their own passion to end trafficking and solutions to do so. One of the most common pieces of feedback I’ve received is that we need more places for survivors to go when they want to get out.

Nationwide, there are just 200 beds for underage trafficking survivors. If you do the math, that’s only four per state. Sadly, that’s not nearly enough.

While South Dakota has a number of domestic violence shelters, most are not trained to handle the unique challenges a trafficking victim faces – namely that they are often sexually abused dozens of times per day by multiple people they do not know. We need to give kids a way out, but without a safe escape and a place to stay at night, it’s easier for them to turn back to their traffickers.

On July 23, the U.S. House of Representatives took up and passed a bill I wrote that would help address the issues I’ve spoken to so many advocates in South Dakota about. The Human Trafficking Prevention, Intervention, and Recovery Act opens existing grant programs to shelters looking to help trafficking survivors. I’m hopeful this will give advocates more resources to house trafficked children and get these young people started on their path to recovery.

In addition to helping address the shelter concerns, the legislation launches a review of all federal and state trafficking prevention activities, so policymakers can better understand what strategies are working – and which ones aren’t. My bill also requires an agency to take an inventory of existing federal anti-trafficking programs. This will help us make sure federal resources are being used where they are most needed.

The average age for a girl to enter into the commercial sex trade is 12 to 14 years old. For boys, it’s 11 to 13. My son is 12. I can’t imagine a child his age facing the kind of trauma that a trafficking victim goes through. They are just children.

These kids are not being targeted in dark allies at night. They are being approached at the mall, at school, and online. They are lured in with promises of love, gifts, and stability that many children long for. We must take every opportunity we can to end this unconscionable industry. And where we were too late to prevent it from happening, we must intervene and help survivors recover.

Each of us can play a role in intervening. I encourage you to look for red flags in your community. A trafficked individual, for instance, may appear malnourished, show signs of physical abuse, seem submissive or depressed, withdraw from family and friends, or rarely be allowed to come and go as they wish. Should you see any of these signs, contact local law enforcement or call the National Human Trafficking Hotline at 1-888-373-7888.

We all must do what we can to end trafficking.

Brief editorial comments from the editor’s desk –

On and Off the Lake Traverse Reservation

The third in a series of photo highlights from the 147th annual SWO July 4 Wacipi is in this edition of your Sota.

These pictures were taken by our Sota Reporter/Photographer Bessie Genia.

Watch for photos from John Heminger in coming weeks. Also, see reports of winners of specials from the Pow Wow Committee and families when they become available to us.

We are building a 147th annual wacipi web photo gallery. Watch for it on our website.

*****

Tribal members running for Executive and Council positions have received their certification letters.

We expect to publish the names of those certified to run for office in next week’s Sota.

Best wishes to each and every one willing to stand up for a leadership position.

*****

We all privileged and our Oyate akicita honored, by having the NY4 US Military Vets Motorcycle Club come to the Lake Traverse Reservation this week.

Please read about their plans to honor our akicita and hold a community feed in their honor at the administration building rotunda this Thursday noon.

Come and take part.

Also, we are especially grateful of the message they are carrying on this 4,000-plus ride across the American heartland. It is a message of hope and healing, especially awareness and prevention of our veteran suicides.

Pidamiya do! The riders and a very special person who has helped organize the event Kim Blacklock.

*****

Oyate, kodas, the Dakota Language Institute is publishing a Dakota-ia traveling dictionary.

Please read about the new traveling companion elsewhere in this issue of the Sota, and watch for it to become available for purchase soon.

*****

Not much news to report from the Sisseton School Board, of course all of its proceedings are published as legal advertising in the Courier.

But we continue our recent comment about the Board’s transfer of money from federal impact aid into the general treasury.

Well, at the Board’s July 14th meeting it amended a transfer out from June 30, taking the withdrawal from $300,000 to $366, 615.86.

At least this time the Board has indicated what the additional $66,615.86 will be used for: Preschool/WASP.

We’re not sure, but believe this is an after-school program, and as it is titled here must serve pre-school students in the Sisseton public schools.

Of course, the Tribe and Native American parents/guardians has had no input in deliberating how any of this money is being distributed. As mandated by federal law.

Thus, the federal lawsuit continues. And despite admonishment from the federal judge, the Sisseton School Board refuses to work cooperatively to resolve the issues … waiting instead for the suit to run through the court system.

*****

Please read our Legal notices section.

The Reservation Election Board has posted important information about the process for the primary and general elections.

You will also find information about how to make proposed amendment changes.

This week there is a link to election forms available online on the Tribe’s website:

http://www.swo-nsn.gov

Please note that for the first time, there will be automated balloting for the Tribe’s elections.

Watch for more information in coming weeks!

*****

Candidates:

Also note that the Sota is returning to a former policy of ONLY PUBLISHING PAID IN ADVANCE POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENTS.

This policy must be followed because of not being able to collect on outstanding invoices.

Because we do not accept credit cards, checks must be made at the time of ordering a political ad.

Our political ad rate is discounted at $2.50 per column inch in order to make it less painful on candidates’ pocketbooks.

Please specify size desired when ordering:

Examples –

2 columns x 5 inches, for 10 col. inches @ 2.50 = 25.00

3 columns x 11 inches [quarter page] 33 col. inches @ 2.50 = 82.50

6 columns x 11 inches [half page] 66 col. inches @ 2.50 = 165

6 columns x 22 inches [full page] 132 col. inches @ 2.50 = 330

Submit payment to the Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279

Copy may be submitted electronically to earthskyweb@cs.com

We urge you to plan accordingly so that you are not telephoning or messaging at the last minute to have an ad placed without pre-payment.

Pidamiya!

*****

Elder's Meditation:

"Let us put our minds together as one." -- Irving Powless, Sr., ONONDAGA

If we sat in a circle and put an object in the center of the circle and we all described what we saw, everyone would see different points of view from each other. Some would even see opposites because they would be sitting on opposite sides of the circle. In other words, you don't have to see what I see for you to be right. In fact, everyone in the circle is right based on their own point of view. If we are willing to listen to everyone's point of view, then we can get a more accurate description of the object in the center. This is one way to put our minds together. When we get the clarity from each other, we should give thanks and be grateful to each other. Grandfathers from the four directions, guide me today with Your wisdom from the east, from the south, from the west and from the north.

*****

Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

When a person can no longer laugh at himself, it is time for others to laugh at him. Thomas Szasz, "The Second Sin"

Liberty without learning is always in peril; learning without liberty is always in vain. John F. Kennedy (1917 - 1963)

My doctor told me to stop having intimate dinners for four. Unless there are three other people. Orson Welles (1915 - 1985)

Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790), Historical Review of Pennsylvania, 1759

At 18 our convictions are hills from which we look; At 45 they are caves in which we hide. F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896 - 1940)

The whole problem can be stated quite simply by asking, 'Is there a meaning to music?' My answer would be, 'Yes.' And 'Can you state in so many words what the meaning is?' My answer to that would be, 'No.' Aaron Copland (1900 - 1990)

Drive-in banks were established so most of the cars today could see their real owners. E. Joseph Cossman

*****

The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or “opinion” letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author’s name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor’s explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Earlier receipt of copy is always appreciated. So, if you are aware of a date or message that needs to be publicized or advertised, please let us know about it in advance of the weekly deadline.

The preferred way to submit typed articles and ads, art and photos, is by e-mail.

The editor can be reached at the following e-mail address:

earthskyweb@cs.com

For more information, leave a message on the Sota production office voicemail (605) 938-4452, or send a fax to the 24-hour dedicated line (605) 938-4676.

-- CDF

Obituaries –

Justin Bagola services held

Justin Bagola Sr., Sisseton, SD, born September 23, 1968, passed onto his spirit journey on July 19, 2014.

Funeral service for Justin Gordon Bagola Sr., 45, of Sisseton, SD was held last Wednesday afternoon,July 23, 2014 at the Tribal Community Center, Agency Village, SD with Rev. Vern Donnell, and Junior Heminger CLP officiating.

The pianist was Billy Kohl with special music by Joe White and the Big Coulee Choir.

Pallbearers were Harold, Delmar, and Lee Bernard, Lorne Lowe, Lincoln “Sonny” Wanna Jr., Darin Gill, Dustin Robertson, and Mario Bagola.

Honorary Pallbearers were “all of Justin’s co-workers at the Dakota Connection and the Dakota Sioux Casinos and all of his relatives” Interment will be in the Ascension Presbyterian Cemetery, Big Coulee, SD.

Wake services were held on Monday and Tuesday at the Community Center.

The Cahill Funeral Chapel, Sisseton, SD was in charge of arrangements.

Justin Gordon Bagola Sr. was born on the 23rd of September 1968 to George James Bagola and Juanita Mae Owen at the IHS Hospital, Sisseton, South Dakota. He grew up in the Sisseton area and went to grade school in Sisseton and transferred to Tiospa Zina Tribal School when it first opened.

Justin was one of the very first seniors to graduate there.

Justin married Mary Shaw on May 1, 1987 and to this union were born, Kalise Lynn, Justin Gordon Jr., Valentino James, Gabrielle Mae and Jocelyn Pheonix Bagola.

Justin entered the U.S. Army and served from 1988 to 1990.

He worked at Dakota Connection Casino as Associate Manager for 15 years.

Justin passed away on July 19, 2014 at the Coteau des Prairies Hospital after a short illness.

Justin is survived by his children Kalise, Justin Jr. and Jocelyn Bagola of Sisseton, SD, Gabrielle Bagola of Aberdeen, SD, and Valentino Bagola of Tucson, AZ; four grandchildren; brother Derek Bagola of Sisseton, SD; sister Stephanie Bagola of Browns Valley, MN; many cousins, nieces, nephews, aunts and uncles.

Justin was preceded in death by both of his parents and both Maternal and Paternal Grandparents.

Victor Morisch memorial service

Memorial service for Victor Morisch, 48, of Aberdeen was Friday afternoon, July 25, 2014 at St. John’s Lutheran Church in Webster, SD. The Rev. Daniel Ostercamp officiated.

Maury Victor Morisch, son of Howard and Lillian Morisch was born February 26, 1966 at Auburn, WA. This is where he was raised. He worked in Everett, WA where he did injection molding of plastic. In 1997 he moved to Aberdeen.

Victor was united in marriage to Janita Abraham on February 26, 1997 in Sisseton. He then worked several jobs in the Aberdeen area for a long period of time. From 2004-2012, he worked at BAE Systems and 3M Company.

Victor loved fishing, bowling and all sports. He bowled with a Federal Employee League. His favorite teams were the Seattle Seahawks, Seattle Mariners, Washington Gonzaga Men’s Basketball Team and the Oakland Raiders. He liked to watch television and his favorites were “Everybody Loves Raymond”, “Animal Planet” and “Through the Wormhole”.

Victor is survived by his wife, Janita Abraham-Morisch; step-children, Sunshine Abraham, Joshua Ortley and Lindsey Ortley-Hemmah; step-grandchildren, Brent Valtierra, Luci Valtierra, Jaelyn Ortley, Jessica Abraham, Janessa Hemmah and Jaquin Hemmah; mother-in-law, Caroline Abraham, brothers-in-law, Lyle Abraham, Cyril Abraham, Matthew Campbell and Eugene Campbell and sister-in-law, Debra Abraham.

Honorary Urnbearers were Lyle Abraham, Cyril Abraham, Eugene Campbell, Iver Campbell and Brady Roberts.

Urnbearer was Matthew Campbell.

Carlsen Funeral Home and Crematory of Aberdeen. www.carlsenfh.com

Funeral services for Robert Seaboy

Robert Lee Seaboy, age 64, of Summit, South Dakota journeyed to the Spirit World on Tuesday, July 22, 2014 in Summit.

He was born on September 12, 1949 in Sisseton, South Dakota the son of Ashley Brown and Jeanette Seaboy Varnes. As a young child he was raised by his mother and stepfather William Varnes.

He attended school in Sisseton and completed his GED while serving in the United States Army. While stationed at Fort Carson, Colorado he gave his life to the Lord. He came to put his faith, trust and belief in the Lord.

Upon returning to Sisseton, he married Florine Smith. He raised three step-children and to this marriage union were born five children.

During this time, he was employed at Quadee Rubber Company in Watertown, South Dakota.

After his divorce he married Debbie Bailey and raised two more step children. To this union were born two children.

After returning to Sisseton, South Dakota, he became employed at Tiospa Zina Tribal School and worked there for many years as a bus driver/custodian. He had to eventually retire because of health issues.

He divorced and married Leimomi Hargrave on June 7, 2001.

Robert is survived by his wife Lemomi of Summit, South Dakota; his children Jeanette Ellingson, Yulanda Seaboy, Shelon Seaboy, Antoinne Seaboy, Celine Seaboy, John Paul Seaboy, Simon Seaboy; step children Michelle Smith, Rhonda Smith, Robert Smith, Thomas Bailey and Jeremy Bailey; thirty grandchildren and two great grandchildren; siblings Darlene (Morgan) Redday, Delight Robertson, Joyce Crawford, Richard Varns, William Varns and John Varns; other relatives and friends.

He was preceded in death by his mother Jeanette; step father William; grandson Daniel; and by a nephew Morgan Redday Jr.

Funeral service was held on Friday afternoon, July 25th, 2014 the Sisseton Cemetery in Sisseton, South Dakota. Officiating were Reverend Wilbert Robertson and Pastor Morgan Redday.

An all-night wake was held Thursday at the Community Center, Agency Village, SD.

Honorary Casket Bearers were his family and friends. Casket Bearers were William Varns, Antoinne Seaboy, John Varns, Isiah Ellingson, David Smith, Octavius Peltier and Sebastian Seaboy.

Services for Calen Johnson

Calen Johnson, 18 of Webster, SD and formerly of Watertown, passed away Thursday July 24, 2014 at Webster.

Her funeral will be 10:30 a.m. Monday, July 28, 2014 at St. Johns Lutheran Church in Webster.

Burial will be at Sunset Memorial Gardens in Aberdeen.

Visitation was at Fiksdal Funeral in Webster Sunday evening.

Calen Ann-Scharel Johnson was born on Saturday, July 20, 1996 to Ed Johnson and Lisa Cape at Aberdeen, South Dakota. She was baptized at United Methodist Church in Webster and confirmed at Our Redeemer Lutheran Church in Watertown. She attended school in Webster through the 4th grade and then in Watertown for grades 5th through 10th before returning to Webster and graduating with honors with the class of 2014.

Calen babysat and worked at A&W and most recently at the Waubay Wildlife Refuge. She always kept busy with many sporting activities she was involved in over the years including basketball, track/cross country, soccer, and softball.

She was a very spirited person with an extremely kind heart. She had a quirky sense of humor and a laid back demeanor. She will be forever known for her smile, quick wit, and her great intelligent mind. As her brothers would say, “she is the smartest of the bunch!” She had a great passion for country music and attended many concerts. Her friends and family appreciated her artistic talents and love of nature.

Calen passed away on Thursday July 24, 2014 at Webster, South Dakota at the age of 18 years and 4 days.

She will be forever loved and never forgotten by her parents Ed Johnson and Lisa Cape of Webster, SD; maternal grandparents Burton and Ruth Rademacher of Amherst, SD; three brothers: Eddie (DeVon) Johnson Jr. of Sisseton, SD, Ryan (Cary) Cordie of Aberdeen, SD, and Tyler Cape of Britton, SD; two sisters Ericca Johnson of Sisseton, SD and Elise Johnson of Aberdeen, SD; two uncles Lane (Sherri) Rademacher of Valentine, NE and Harold Johnson of Watertown, SD; three aunts Lori (Danny) Deutsch of Watertown, SD, Sharon Johnson of Sisseton, SD, and Tracy Cooper of Sisseton, SD; nephews and niece Yamni Johnson, AJ Johnson, and Avaya Carlson; cousins Lucas, Nicole, Mackenzie, and Malorie Deutsch, Alexis and Conner Whitting, and Brooklyn Rademacher, and best friend Ashlynn Kampa of Webster, SD.

She was preceded in death by paternal grandfather Ephriam Johnson, paternal grandmother Jeanette Barker, one uncle Lance Rademacher, maternal great-grandparents Charles and Bertha Rademacher and Vern and Edna Kirshman.

Services pending

The Sota has been informed of the passing of Bella DuMarce Petersen. There are no details available at our press time.

Please watch for information on Facebook and on our website.

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor’s note: The following comes from the editor’s column and the Sota “deadlines and policies” statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or “opinion” letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author’s name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and must be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor’s explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Open letter to the Oyate

Texting while operating a motor vehicle can be dangerous to your life and others. And I can attest to that fact.

A few months ago, I experienced my near fatal accident as I was entering the Shopko entrance of Highway 10 (Sisseton).

I had my left turn signal on and waited for other cars to enter and exit the parking lot.

All of a sudden I looked in the rear view mirror and saw a white colored car coming at me.

I pulled a little forward and the car clipped my left fender on my pickup. It bounced off the left side of my pickup and bounced over to hit another car entering the parking lot.

The car did not stop.

I followed it and called 911.

I lost track of the car speeding down old Highway 81.

It all happened so fast and the Highway Patrol did not have much to go on. Another hit and run.

In early part of April this year, I experienced two near misses, both similar.

I could just imagine what would have happened if we got rear-ended. In both cases it was late at night and in both cases we were the only ones on I-29 near Summit, heading north.

It was a really scary feeling, seeing a large SUV right on my tail.

I couldn’t even see his head lights. And miraculously, he moved over and sped on north.

I found this article and thought I’d better pass it on as texting and driving is against the law as of July 1, 2014

Sincerely, Elwood J. Greybuffalo.

Article from the Watertown Public Opinion July 12, 2014 –

Breaking down distracted driving

By Kayla Potter

Prevention Specialist

Did you know that on July 1, 2014 more than 200 new laws went into effect in South Dakota? One of the more prominently discussed laws is the statewide texting while driving ban. Here is a simple breakdown of this law:

*It is a secondary offense, which means that you can only get ticketed for texting and driving if you are stopped for another traffic violation. Example: speeding, failure to yield, improper traffic signal, etc.

*There is a $100 fine if you are ticketed.

Legislators hope that the passing of this law will help to discourage drivers from texting. Texting while driving is a serious distraction. It is not only dangerous it is also now illegal. The Department of Public Safety will be running a statewide education campaign to promote the dangers of texting and driving in the coming months.

Parents can lead by example. They are the best educators when it comes to good driving habits according to Lee Axdahl, the Director of the Office of Highway Safety. Lee also believes this law will prompt drivers to put their full attention to operating their vehicle, whether you are driving on a city street or on the interstate.

In the city limits of Watertown in 2013 there were 32 motor vehicle crash-es resulting from Distracted Driving and/or Cellular/Electronic usage. That is almost 3 crashes every month that could have been easily prevented. Texting while driving takes your eyes off of the road for approximately 5 seconds. If you are traveling at 55 mph, that would be equivalent to driving the length of a football field blind folded! If you think driving the length of a football field while blind folded sounds scary or like a stupid decision, then don't text and drive!

Lately there have been many public stories regarding distracted driving in the news. Most involve the tex-ting/distracted driver injuring or taking the life of a pedestrian, bicyclist, or other driver. Those 5 seconds have the possibility to change not only your life forever, but also someone else's life. According to The Institute for Highway Safety, there are 11 teen deaths in the United States daily due to texting and driving. Distracted driving is becoming prominent in every day driving. Here are some tips that can help you from texting and driving:

*Turn off your phone or put it on silent while you are driving.

*Have a passenger text for you.

*Download an anti texting and driving app.

oAT&T Drive Mode: It is a free app that will send a text similar to an 'out of office'. You can turn it on when you get in your car, and turn it off when you get to your destination. It simply lets people know that you are currently driving, not ignoring them, and you will respond when you are done driving. This is a good app for the responsible adult!

oTextecution: This app disables texting while in a vehicle that is moving faster than 10 mph. If you are a passenger in a vehicle, there is an override that an 'administrator/parent' can perform. This app will also send a notification if the user tries to remove it from their phone. A good app for parents who want to keep their teens safe!

Remember to always buckle up, because you may be a safe driver but you never know who is in the other car!

St. Mary’s Church News

St. Mary’s Congregation gives a big thank you to the Pow Wow Committee for your generous donation for our breakfast sales!

Our thanks also go to everyone who came and enjoyed their breakfast meal with us, and thanks for all your compliments.

We also appreciate the donations to the cemetery fund and building fund at the Credit Union. It really helps with the gas and repair expenses to keep the cemetery mowed. Thank you very much for the donations!

On a sour note, we were very disappointed on how the church yard was left with so much trash, beer cans included. You would think people would show some respect for a church whether you are a member or not.

This was the responsibility of the person who contracted for the trash pick-up. This person did not do a good job.

The youth workers were out there on Tuesday, July 8th picking up trash. They should not have had to do that.

The person who contracted should have been the one to clean-up after the pow wow and ball games. He/she got big bucks to do the job.

Fr. Chan will not be at St. Mary’s for communion until August 24th. There will be morning prayer services each Sunday until August 24th with the lay readers.

Fr. Chan will be at St. Mary’s on the second Sunday of the month and Fr. Ceisel will be here on the fourth Sunday of the month instead of the third Sunday.

SD Veteran holding fundraiser in Rapid City

Rapid City, SD – Corinna Robinson, a native of South Dakota and a veteran of the U.S. Armed Forces for over 25 years, will be the guest of Rapid City family physician and community leader Dr. Nancy Babbitt this weekend for a fundraiser for Corinna for U.S. Congress.

"I've become a big believer in who represents us in Washington has a major impact on how physicians get to deliver healthcare," Dr. Babbitt said. "And as someone who is frequently called upon to give input on healthcare reform issues, healthcare legislation, and questions of how we provide quality, affordable healthcare for South Dakota seniors, children, veterans etc., I've found Corinna Robinson to be an open-minded, common-sense voice on this issue. We're excited about the event and we're honored to host it."

Major Corinna Robinson, U.S. Army, Retired, supported combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, and commanded paratroopers to secure the Pentagon after 9/11. She served as Legislative Affairs Director at the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad, and as Director of Anti-Terrorism & Force Protection at the Pentagon.

Journey to the Source - Northeast SD Art Crawl

There will be an Art Crawl in Northeast South Dakota October 3, 4 and 5, 2014.

Individual artists will display their work at designated locations and in personal studio spaces.

There will be musical entertainment, demonstrations by artists and other activities.

For more information and to be a participant contact:

Rose

rm_hanssen@hotmail.com

932-3673

Alexis 701-527-0328

Lindy 605-200-2252

Reconstructing the Highway Trust Fund

By Rep. Kristi Noem

Our state has more than 80,000 miles of highways, roads, and streets. Maintaining them is an expensive and colossal project to undertake every year that requires funding from the federal, state, county, and city governments.

Much of the federal funding comes through the Highway Trust Fund, which is an account that was set up in the 1950s to support a number of the country’s transportation projects. Over the last decade, the Trust Fund has slowly run out of money and experts believe it could drop below a key threshold in August. The good news is that Congress and the White House are working together on a solution.

More specifically, the House passed legislation on July 15 to maintain the Trust Fund through May 2015. While the Senate hasn’t taken the bill up yet, the President has already said he supports the House proposal, meaning there’s a pretty good chance our bill - or something very close to it - will become law in the next few weeks and South Dakota road repairs can continue uninterrupted.

While this legislation solves the short-term problem, it still doesn’t make the Highway Trust Fund self-sustaining over the long-run.

It’s important to know that the Highway Trust Fund is currently funded through an 18.4 cent-per-gallon tax on gas and a 24.4 cent-per-gallon tax on diesel. Over the last few years, cars have become much more fuel efficient, people are buying smaller vehicles, and Americans have begun to drive less because of increased gas prices. This has decreased the number of gallons sold by about 4 percent since 2007. With a new mandate in place that requires 54.5 miles-per-gallon cars and light-duty trucks by 2025, demand will likely continue to fall.

As a result, the Highway Trust Fund has lost a portion of its revenue stream, forcing Congress to find different ways to fund hundreds of construction projects that support about 700,000 jobs.

For more than a half-century, the U.S. has believed we should prioritize infrastructure investments. After all, farmers and manufacturers use our transit system to bring products to market while workers, tourists, and families use it to get to work, the grocery store, or Mount Rushmore. I too would agree that making these projects a priority is important.

Band-Aid fixes aren’t the most effective or efficient way forward, but I supported the recent agreement because we need to start somewhere. We need to give states and the construction industry the certainty to know that if a contract is signed, payments will be made. And everyone else deserves to know that our bridges and roads will be safe.

If legislation is enacted that keeps the Highway Trust Fund viable through May, I believe Congress has a responsibility to use this time to confront the problem and find a way forward. For now, I’m confident South Dakota will finish this road-construction season strong before the snow flies a few months from now.

Social “helper” column dedicated to young generation Oyate –

Wawokiyape

By Sherielle “Shay” DuMarce

This week i would like to bring up the topic of sexual harassment in the work place.

First, what is Sexual harassment? It’s an incident that happens in a workplace, or other professional or social situation, involving the making of unwanted sexual advances or obscene remarks. It can be initiated in many different forms such as jokes, comments on how one dresses, gestures and physical contact. In some instances, for example, a boss will do favors for an employee or let them "slide" on attendance so that later down the road he or she can use it against them. This is called Blackmail.

Though most would like to think that it’s just male employers/employees who are capable of sexual harassment, there have been many cases where female employers/employees have been responsible for such acts. One I have read about was the 2012 case of an ex-police constable from Texas who reportedly would make sexual advances towards her deputies. Luckily for the deputy he filed a lawsuit against her and won a 200,000 dollar settlement which broke the stereotype that "women aren't capable of such acts."

Furthermore, the reason I am writing this is also to bring light to something that happens right here on our reservation by some male bosses who make sexual remarks towards female employees or in some cases would pay the girls babysitters and give them money or allow them to come to work at their own hours but still get paid their full 40 hrs.

This was a letter written and sent in to me about these acts going on and I would encourage the person who sent the letter in to file a complaint on this said individual. This is wrong and if this person is a manager/supervisor doing it then it needs to be addressed so he can’t further abuse his authority.

With that being said I will close this article with this... if it makes you uncomfortable or the jokes seem way to inappropriate report it to your manager. If it’s the manager then take it to the next in command. Do not wait or think you’re over reacting because you should not feel degraded or scared at your job. God bless and I hope something is done.

Respectfully, Shay.

The Prairie Doc Perspective

Friendship Essay

By Richard P. Holm MD

What is a friend? The word comes from the German freund, which in turn originates from an Indo-European root meaning "to love," shared by "free." Thus a friend is defined as a person of mutual affection that is free of sexual or family relations.

Still there are many more definitions of friendship. Friends care, support, listen, open-up, and then in the end are loyal. It is almost like the ethics of medicine: friends try to benefit and not harm their pals, do it honestly, all while respecting the other guy's freedom to choose.

There are a lot of great quotes about the value of friendship: Some unknown author said, "A friend is someone who knows the song in your heart and can sing it back to you when you have forgotten the words." Charles Caleb Colton said, "True friendship is like sound health, the value of it is seldom known until it be lost." Emily Dickenson said, "My friends are my estate." And of course John Lennon said, "I get by with a little help from my friends."

In this era of the web and such things as Facebook and Twitter, apparently it is a sign of influence by how many one has "friended." Isn't it ironic that the technology of the Internet has instead isolated people. Several studies even indicate the Internet may be a major reason why there has been a decline in the number and quality of friendships nowadays.

Certainly humans are hardwired to have friends. Anthropologists tell us that a village is limited to the size of about 150 people because that is the maximum number of friends one can get to know when limited by only human verbal skills.

The challenge and perhaps disadvantage of friendship turns around the listening and unselfish giving, the honesty, and the freedom of choice that is required with true friendship.

But health advantages of friendship are enormous. Solid scientific studies find those with strong friendships have better mental and physical health, increased longevity, and a deeper sense of happiness. The opposite is also true: those friendless have increased risk for heart disease, more infections, and a higher incidence of cancer. Of course these illnesses come to people with friends too, but survival is longer and easier to those who are connected.

It is so true that in this tough and tumble world, "We get by with a little help from our friends."

*****

Dr. Rick Holm wrote this Prairie Doc Perspective for "On Call®," a weekly program where medical professionals discuss health concerns for the general public. "On Call®" is produced by the Healing Words Foundation in association with the South Dakota State University Journalism Department. "On Call®" airs Thursdays on South Dakota Public Broadcasting-Television at 7 p.m. Central, 6 p.m. Mountain. Visit us at OnCallTelevision.com.

Ripple Effect –

Flood Protection: It takes all three

We know it as fact. Floods are not an aberration in the Red River basin but a typical part of the basin’s normal weather fluctuations.

Finding solutions to flooding in this large basin of 25 million acres with its variety of land uses—agriculture, wetlands, forests and wildlife habitat, and urban settlements—is not easy. The situation is made even more complex by the basin’s multiple state and international jurisdictions.

In working through the complexities, it is helpful to look to guides that have whole basin perspective. The most recent of these, the 2011 study, Long Term Flood Solutions for the Red River Basin (LTFS), concludes that no single approach can adequately address flood damage in the basin. Rather, it takes cooperative planning and action around three “cornerstone” strategies: 1) maximizing nonstructural solutions, 2) providing local protection, and 3) retaining flood waters during peak flood flows.

Maximizing Nonstructural Solutions

This strategy recognizes the important role of channel banks, as well as the natural role of lands near streams and rivers of carrying excess waters during large flood events. The method would attempt to keep these areas free of uses and structures that damage channels or impede the work of transporting flood waters.

The basin’s exceptionally broad basin bottom and its history of settlements infringing into floodplain areas pose considerable challenge to the basin. Remediation, such as ‘buyouts,’ has been necessary. Today regulatory entities are taking closer looks at elevations of proposed developments to avoid repeating mistakes of the past.

Providing Local Projection

This strategy complements nonstructural measures by providing local protection to areas not feasible to relocate out of potential damage areas—from farmsteads to urban centers. Methods include ring dikes, levees and/or diversions of a type and size appropriate to potential damage in the protected area.

Local protection is not failsafe—levees in particular can fail or be overtopped. However, local protection can be put into place relatively quickly, offering timely protection for critical areas.

Retaining Flood Waters

The goal of retention is to develop sufficient detention capacity in the basin to reduce peak flow levels during floods. Achieving this capacity will take decades to achieve and is thus meant to supplement rather than replace the first two strategies.

Once achieved, modest but important positive impacts could be felt by many parts of the basin in both cities and agricultural areas. This strategy is being met with interest across the basin and has early support via the 2014 US farm bill.

Until the next Ripple Effect, The Red River Basin Commission (RRBC).

*****

The RRBC is a grassroots organization that is chartered not-for-profit corporation under the provisions of Manitoba, North Dakota, Minnesota, and South Dakota law. Our offices in Fargo, ND and Winnipeg, MB can be reached at 218-291-0422 and 204-982-7254, or you can check out our website at http://redriverbasincommision.org

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

Introducing TZTS Middle School Principal

I am Daniel Zimansky.

I will be the principal at the Middle School and the Alternative Learning Center. I come to the Tiospa Zina Tribal School from the Todd County School District in Mission, SD, where I worked as a high school Special Education Teacher for the past four years.

Prior to that, I worked for the State of Minnesota as a program manager in the Vocational Rehabilitation program serving students and adults with disabilities to obtain post-secondary education and employment.

I am excited to have the opportunity to serve the students, families and school staff of the TZTS community.

Lacrosse comes to Oyate youth

Submitted by Franky Jackson

On behalf of the following lacrosse coaches; Franky Jackson from Cansayapi, Corey Holiday from Winnebago and Kevin Decora from Rosebud we would like to extend a BIG thank you to SWO Park and Recreation Director, Derrick McCauley and Athletic Director for Tiospa Zina tribal school Mike Carlson for hosting our two day lacrosse camp.

Over 44 SWO community youth participated in a two day Basic Introduction to Lacrosse camp held at Tiospa Zina football field on July 9-10th. Camp instructors included coaches and players from the following Inter-tribal traveling lacrosse teams; Cansayapi Lightning Sticks, Winnebago WarParty and the Rosebud ThunderHawks.

The SWO Park and Recreation Department participated in the "2014 LSS Match Stick Challenge" in which the Lightning Stick Lacrosse camp will match up to 25 sticks per camp to be donated to participating youth. "We hope to grow the game by empowering Native American youth by providing basic skills and instructions necessary to understanding the game along with giving them ownership of basic lacrosse equipment so they can continue to develop personal skills once they leave camp." A total of 50 sticks were on standby and 47 of them found a home with SWO participants said coach Kevin Decora from Rosebud.

Participants were given a historical introduction which included an orientation on the cultural significance and history of lacrosse as it relevant to the Dakota Oyate. "the game of lacrosse is one of the most documented social activities of the Dakota people, many of our most noted players were either painted drawn or sketched by such recognizable artist as Seth Eastman, lacrosse was the biggest sporting event during the early 1800's and many accounts and recordings by non-natives provide a fascinating look into this social and cultural activity in addition to providing valuable information regarding individuals Dakota players.. for example we from journals kept by soldiers prior to and after the construction of Ft Snelling we know who the most distinguished players were" said Franky Jackson coach of the Cansayapi team. Danny Seaboy stopped in and shared with the coaches and kids his experience and connection to the game. Mr. Seaboy played as a young man when attending boarding school as a youth. Mr. Seaboy brought in his traditional Dakota lacrosse stick and spoke about the craftsmanship and artistry behind making the lacrosse sticks and balls associated with the game.

The LSS team will be holding lacrosse camps for Falndreau, Rosebud and Upper Sioux youth during the months of July and August. "The mentorship approach utilizing our more advanced players as instructors has worked out surprisingly well said coach Corey Holiday....if they "native youth" can picture it ...if they can see it they can become it ...we are visual learners and what better way to capture the interest of like minded youth then by having our older boys serve that role as mentors and leaders to the next generation of LAX players.

Three SWO members/brothers graduate from Haskell

All three are SWO members and brothers: Ryan Harter, BA Indigenous American Indian Studies; Justin Harter, BA Business Administration; and Derek Harter, AA Liberal Arts.

All are spring 2014 graduates from Haskell University.

Parents are Sarina and Daniel Harter and grandparents are Solomon and Louise Hill.

Summer Program for Native American Youth in Food & Agriculture

Fayetteville, Ark. – July 18, 2014 – Forty-four high school and college students will arrive at the University of Arkansas School of Law this Sunday for the inaugural Summer Leadership Summit: Native Youth in Agriculture. The students, who represent the next generation of Indian Country's food and agriculture leaders, hail from 13 states from as far away as Oregon and Hawaii, and represent 17 tribes.

The week-long program includes classes, lectures, field trips and hands-on training in risk management, finance and business, legal issues and marketing. University of Arkansas professors, professionals in the food and agriculture sector and tribal leaders will teach the courses. Highlights include presentations by Mike Vayda, dean of the Dale Bumpers College of Agricultural, Food and Life Sciences, and Stacy Leeds, dean of the School of Law, and visits to the Fayetteville Farmers' Market, the Discovery Center Food Processing and Food Development Center at Tyson Foods world headquarters and the Regional Distribution Center of Walmart and Sam's Club world headquarters.

The summit is sponsored by the School of Law and the Indigenous Food and Agriculture  Initiative in partnership with the Intertribal Agriculture Council, FFA (formerly the Future Farmers of America) and the Farm Credit Council. The program is supported by grants from the Farm Credit Council and the Risk Management Agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

A full agenda for the week is available as a PDF download.

For more information, or to support the Leadership Program, please contact Janie Hipp at jhipp@uark.edu.

Announces $2.5 million to promote Tribal Control and Operation of BIE-Funded Schools

Washington, DC – July 3, 2014 – As part of the Obama Administration’s historic commitment to ensure that all students attending Bureau of Indian Education-funded schools receive an effective education delivered to them by tribes, U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell and Assistant Secretary – Indian Affairs Kevin K. Washburn today announced that the BIE will fund $2.5 million in Sovereignty in Indian Education competitive grants. The purpose of these grants is to provide funding to federally recognized tribes and their tribal education departments to promote tribal control and operation of BIE-funded schools on their reservations.

In 2013, Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell and Secretary of Education Arne Duncan convened the American Indian Education Study Group to propose a comprehensive reform plan to ensure that all students attending BIE-funded schools receive a quality education. Based on listening sessions held throughout Indian Country, the Study Group issued a Blueprint for Reform on June 13, 2014. The Blueprint recommends that BIE support tribal nations in their efforts to assume control over BIE-funded schools.

“We believe strongly that American Indian children deserve an academically rigorous, culturally appropriate education. Beyond providing the skills to succeed economically, honoring tribal cultures and languages is vital to the longevity of tribal traditions, identity and self-confidence,” said Secretary Jewell. “Increasing tribal control over BIE schools recognizes the sovereign status of tribes, provides them with greater discretion in determining what their children should learn and helps increase accountability throughout the BIE-funded school system. This grant program is one small step towards an important process of supporting more effective anz relevant education for American Indian children, with more to come.”

“The American Indian Education Study Group made serious recommendations for improving how federal education services and resources are delivered in Indian Country, and the Sovereignty in Indian Education grant program responds to their concerns,” said Assistant Secretary Washburn.

“With greater tribal control of schools, tribes have more power to infuse schools with tribal cultural values and native languages, both of which can engage children better and help them to succeed.”

The purpose of the Sovereignty in Indian Education grants is to support tribal capacity to fully manage and operate tribally controlled, BIE-funded schools in their communities. Grant funds will support development of a tribal school reform plan with the goals of improved educational outcomes for students and improved efficiencies and effectiveness in operating the schools.

Furthermore, by unifying a collective body of tribes, this initiative will build a collaborative network to support tribal control and stronger partnerships with BIE-funded schools.

Tribal control of federally funded government programs often improves local service delivery because tribal governments understand the needs of their communities and are more likely to be held accountable for results by their constituents. The Department of the Interior fully supports tribes’ sovereign right to determine the structure of their own tribal governments and school systems, and seeks to strengthen that support by facilitating the sharing of information on efficient and successful school structures.

“As tribal control of education is a vital part of self-determination and self-governance, the Bureau of Indian Education is strongly committed to ensuring that tribal sovereignty over education is encouraged, supported and strengthened wherever and whenever possible,” said BIE Director Dr. Charles M. “Monty” Roessel. “Sovereignty in Indian Education grants will assist those tribes seeking to assume operational control over the BIE-funded schools that serve them and those working to develop and build their tribal school systems around BIE schools.”

As part of the program, BIE will provide tribes with technical assistance in planning and implementing assessment and implementation plans and in strengthening tribally controlled school processes. It also will provide a forum for tribes to work collaboratively with each other to gain insights and develop or share tribal and BIE problem-solving strategies.

Grant awards will range from $100,000 to $200,000 per fiscal year depending on the number of schools involved, number of students, complexity of creating a new tribally managed school system and a tribe’s technical approach. Eligible applicants include tribal education departments that have three or more BIE-funded schools on their reservations. The deadline for applications is Sept. 12, 2014.

Federal Funds for Research and STEM Education at NDSU, CCCC

Washington, DC – July 24, 2014 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today announced a total of more than $825,000 in federal funds to support scientific research at North Dakota State University (NDSU) and a new degree program at Cankdeska Cikana Community College (CCCC). Both programs will support research and science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education in North Dakota.

“Supporting math and science education is critical for the futures of our students and our country. And it will help propel students into interesting, needed, and innovative career paths,” said Heitkamp. “These funds will help North Dakota’s universities continue their work to spark interest in science-based careers, make sure we continue to build a strong workforce for the future, and help our country remain competitive.”

The funds will be distributed as follows:

· NDSU will receive nearly $350,000 to support research aimed to develop a suite of methods that are useful for disease diagnosis and mechanism understanding.

· CCCC will receive nearly $500,000 in federal funds to implement an associate of science degree in forensic science that will seamlessly matriculate to the University of North Dakota’s Bachelor of Science degree in Forensic Science. This program responds to the growing interest and demand by tribal college students in the field of forensic science.

The funds for NDSU were authorized through the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) which assists colleges and universities in states that typically receive limited NSF funding to provide research and development support. NSF’s Tribal Colleges and University Program (TCUP) authorized the funds for CCCC. TCUP is a competitive grant that supports improvements in STEM education programs in tribally-controlled colleges and universities.

CRP news from Roberts Co. FSA

By Sharon Rolstad, Director

CRP Seeding/Cost Share:

If you have a new CRP contract and have completed the seeding please bring the necessary information to the office. If you have completed practices on your CRP contract that are eligible for cost share, please contact the office and make an appointment to report the practice completion. This includes grass seeding, tree planting, weed control during the first year, or required mid-term management. Please bring all paid receipts for tillage, spraying, seed, seeding, drill expenses, and all seed tags, and what your personal cost was. In addition, if a practice wasn't completed that was supposed to be done in 2013 or this spring, a written request for an extension needs to be submitted for approval with the reasons why.

CRP Weed Control:

Weeds need to be controlled on your CRP acres each year. Please check your fields and if you have weeds please contact the office to request weed control measures if you haven't already. There is a lot of Canadian thistle again this year. If we spot check the CRP and the weeds have gone to seed there is a $30.00 per acre penalty that will be assessed on these acres, and possible termination.

Expiring CRP:

If you have CRP that will expire on September 30, 2014 please contact the office to Re-Enroll these acres or let the office know it will be farmed next year and who the operator will be. If you are interested in early spraying and/or planting a fall seeded crop on a NON-WETLAND practice please contact the office to apply. If you have any questions about when your CRP Contracts expire please contact the office. Please double check your expiration date prior to working the acres up after October 1st to avoid working up incorrect CRP Fields.

CRP Boundaries-Don't crowd the boundaries:

Please respect the CRP boundaries. Do not crowd the boundary by planting or haying the edges of the CRP. When you enrolled the acres in CRP there was a definite boundary established and you are being paid for these acres. It is a violation of your contract if you are not maintaining the grass according to your conservation plan. If we find that CRP acres have been hayed or cropped the County Committee could terminate the contract or assess a penalty. If you are unsure if your CRP boundary is maintained correctly please contact the office and we can stake the CRP for you at the current measurement service rate.

MANAGED HAYING/GRAZING CRP:

Managed hay/graze provisions are still available for certain CRP practices (not wetland practices). The CRP participant must file a request in this office, state who is haying/grazing, and be assessed a 25% payment reduction for the acres used. Some older CRP contracts are in a three year rotation. Contracts approved after October 2006 may be eligible to use the acres once in the first five years 50% at a time and once in the 2nd five years 50% at a time. Approved haying and grazing cannot start until August 2nd, after the nesting season.

Don't let Back-to-School tasks sneak up on you

By Jason Alderman

Parents, if this is your first time at the back-to-school rodeo, let me share a few lessons my wife and I have learned the hard way. Chances are you'll be spending the next few weeks filling out piles of pre-enrollment paperwork, lining up carpools and, of course, taking the dreaded shopping excursions for clothes and school supplies.

If you're a first-timer or simply need a back-to-school refresher course, here are a few suggestions that can help you save time, money and sanity:

Get organized. Maintain a correspondence file from your kid's school for things like registration requirements, report cards, permission slips, required vaccinations, school policies, teacher and parent contact information, etc. Ask whether the school has a website, online calendar or email list you can join. Also, create a family master calendar.

Back-to-school shopping. Between new clothes, classroom supplies and extracurricular activity fees and equipment, many parents end up spending hundreds of dollars per child. Ideally, you've been setting money aside all year. If not, you'll need to determine what you can afford to spend without blowing your overall budget.

Here are a few organizational and money-saving tips:

Before you shop, make sure you are prioritizing expenses between "needs" and "wants."

Go through your kids' closets and have them try on everything. Make an inventory of items that fit and are in good shape, and take it when shopping so you don't accidentally buy duplicates. (While you're at it, share, sell or donate unneeded items.)

Spread clothing purchases throughout the year so your kids don't outgrow everything at once. Many stores hold fall clearance sales to make room for holiday merchandise.

Review the school's dress code so you don't waste money on inappropriate clothing.

Although shopping online can save money, time and gas, don't forget to factor in shipping and return costs, which could undo any net savings. If your kids are old enough, put them in charge of online comparison shopping and coupon clipping.

Ask which school supplies you're expected to buy. Go in with other families to take advantage of volume discounts and sales.

Find out how much extracurricular activities (athletics, music, art, etc.) cost. Account for uniforms, membership dues, private lessons, field trips, snacks, etc.

Rent or buy used sporting equipment or musical instruments until you're sure they'll stick with an activity.

Know when to spend more for higher quality. Cheaper notebook paper shouldn't matter, but don't buy poorly made shoes that might hamper proper physical development.

Before buying new clothing or accessories, look for "gently used" items in the closets of your older kids and friends, at garage sales, thrift and consignment stores and online.

Clip newspaper and online coupons. Many stores will match competitors' prices even if their own items aren't on sale. Plus, many consolidation websites post downloadable coupons and sale codes for online retailers, including: CouponCabin.com, CouponCode.com, CouponCraze.com, DealHunting.com and Dealnews.com.

Mobile shopping apps let in-store smartphone and mobile browser users scan product barcodes and make on-the-spot price comparisons, read reviews, download coupons, buy products and more.

Follow your favorite retailers on Facebook and Twitter, where many post special savings for their followers.

Bottom line: If you get organized before setting out on back-to-school shopping, you can save money, time and aggravation.

*****

Jason Alderman directs Visa's financial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www.twitter.com/PracticalMoney.

Legals

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

IN TRIBAL COURT

CASE NO: D-14-433-228

 

IN THE MATTER OF:

PATRICIA RAMONA MATTERA, Plaintiff,

VS.

GRANT GARFIELD MATTERA, Defendant.

NOTICE OF HEARING

TO: GRANT GARFIELD MATTERA

Take notice that a hearing will be held at the above named Court, Agency Village, outside the city of Sisseton,

County of Roberts, South Dakota, on the of 6th day of AUGUST 2014 at the hour of 3:00 P.M or as soon

thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the Clerk will provide you with a copy of the

Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 7th day of July 2014.

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ BJ Jones     

TRIBAL COURT JUDGE

ATTEST: Eileen Pfeiffer

Clerk of Courts

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE: D-14-502-297

IN THE MATTER OF THE CHANGE

OF NAME OF:

OMARIYA DUMARCE, Minor Child,

And concerning:

NATASHA RENVILLE, Petitioner.

ORDER AND NOTICE OF HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Petitioner's request for a change of name from OMARIYA IVORY RAIN DUMARCE to OMARIYA IVORY RAIN BERNARD shall be heard before the Honorable Lenor Scheffler, Associate Judge of Tribal Court, in  the Courtroom of the Sisseton Wahpeton Tribal Court at Agency Village, South Dakota at 11:00 A.M. on the 21st day of AUGUST, 2014.

Dated this 16th day of July, 2014.

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ B.J. Jones, CHIEF JUDGE

ATTEST:

E. Pfeiffer, CLERK OF COURTS

29-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE: D-14-503-298

IN THE MATTER OF THE CHANGE

OF NAME OF:

CESELY RENVILLE, Minor Child,

ORDER AND NOTICE OF HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Petitioner's request for a change of name from CESELY NIKCOLE RENVILLE TO CESLY NICOLE DUMARCE shall be heard before the Honorable Lenor Scheffler, Associate Judge of Tribal Court, in  the Courtroom of the Sisseton Wahpeton Tribal Court at Agency Village, South Dakota at 11:30 A.M. on the 21st day of AUGUST, 2014.

Dated this 16th day of July, 2014.

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ B.J. Jones, CHIEF JUDGE

ATTEST:

E. Pfeiffer, CLERK OF COURTS

29-3tc

SWO Tribal Council proceedings for May 2014

REGULAR TRIBAL COUNCIL MEETING

Tuesday, May 6, 2014, 10:00 AM

TiWakan Tio Tipi Council Chambers

 

TRIBAL COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT:

BIG COULEE:  Lynn Halbert

BUFFALO LAKE:        Louis Johnson

ENEMY SWIM:            Dawn Eagle

HEIPA/VEBLEN:         Marc Beaudreau

LAKE TRAVERSE:       Francis Crawford

LONG HOLLOW:         Virginia Max (1:35)

OLD AGENCY: Jerome Renville, Sr.

 

TRIBAL EXECUTIVES PRESENT: Tribal Chairman Robert Shepherd, Tribal Vice-Chairman Sara Lincoln, and Tribal Secretary Robin Quinn

 

CALL TO ORDER: Tribal Chairman Robert Shepherd called the meeting to order at 10:08 AM with three (3) Executives and six (6) Council members from seven (7) Districts answering Roll Call. Opening Prayer for the Long Hollow District said by Buffalo Lake Tribal Council Member Louis Johnson.          

 

MOTION NO. 1: made by Lynn Halbert, second by Sara Lincoln, question by Jerome Renville, Sr., to approve the Regular Tribal Council Meeting Minutes of Tuesday, April 8, 2014.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 1: 15 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 2: made by Jerome Renville, Sr., second by Sara Lincoln, question by Lynn Halbert, to approve the Regular Tribal Council Meeting Minutes of Wednesday, April 9, 2014.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 2: 15 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 3: made by Lynn Halbert, second by Sara Lincoln, question by Francis Crawford, to approve the Regular Tribal Council Education Meeting Minutes of Thursday, April 24, 2014.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 3: 15 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 4: made by Marc Beaudreau, second by Sara Lincoln, question by Francis Crawford, to approve the Regular Tribal Council Meeting Minutes of Tuesday, April 29, 2014.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 4: 15 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 5: made by Francis Crawford, second by Louis Johnson, question by Sara Lincoln, to approve Executive Resolution No. 14-10, “Recognizes the SWO Transportation Safety Committee and Authorizes the committee to write a safety plan for SWO”.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 5: 15 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

     Executive Resolution No. 14-10

 

MOTION NO. 6: made by Francis Crawford, second by Louis Johnson, question by Robin Quinn, to approve Executive Resolution No. 14-11, “FY2015 Highway Safety Grant Application”.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 6: 14 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  1 Absent From Vote: Tribal Vice-Chairman (1).  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

     Executive Resolution No. 14-11

 

MOTION NO. 7: made by Francis Crawford, second by Sara Lincoln, question by Marc Beaudreau, to approve the Tribal Chairman report, as presented by Tribal Chairman Robert Shepherd.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 7: 15 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 8: made by Dawn Eagle, second by Jerome Renville, Sr., question by Marc Beaudreau, to have all SWO Administration Building suites accessible to Tribal Council with their swipe cards.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 8: 15 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 9: made by Marc Beaudreau, second by Sara Lincoln, question by Francis Crawford, to select WorthGroup Architects & Designers/Lighttowler Johnson Associates Inc. as the architect for the Dakota Magic Casino expansion project.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 9: 15 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 10: made by Marc Beaudreau, second by Jerome Renville, Sr., question by Robin Quinn, to select Norman Johnson as the EAP Counselor for DNGE, and to authorize DNGE Acting CEO Weston Quinn to execute the Employment Agreement.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 10: 8 For: Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1).  6 Opposed: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Tribal Secretary (1).  1 Abstained: Louis Johnson (1).         0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 11: made by Jerome Renville, Sr., second by Marc Beaudreau, question by Robin Quinn, to approve the Tribal Vice-Chairman report, as presented by Tribal Vice-Chairman Sara Lincoln.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 11: 14 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  1 Abstained: Tribal Vice-Chairman (1).  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 12: made by Marc Beaudreau, second by Francis Crawford, question by Louis Johnson, to approve the Tribal Secretary report, as presented by Tribal Secretary Robin Quinn.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 12: 14 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1).  0 Opposed.  1 Abstained: Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

Note:    Long Hollow Tribal Council Member Virginia Max now present at meeting.

 

MOTION NO. 13: made by Marc Beaudreau, second by Sara Lincoln, question by Francis Crawford, to approve the budget modification for FY2014 for the Gaming Commission, as presented by Budget Specialist Laura Williams.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 13: 15 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.            2 Absent From Vote: Jerome Renville, Sr. (2).  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 14: made by Marc Beaudreau, second by Robin Quinn, question by Sara Lincoln, to approve the OEP Community Clean-Up Project budget for FY2014, as presented by Budget Specialist Laura Williams.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 14: 15 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.            2 Absent From Vote: Jerome Renville, Sr. (2).  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 15: made by Marc Beaudreau, second by Sara Lincoln, question by Lynn Halbert, to approve the Dakota Language Dictionary Project budget for FY 2014, as presented by Budget Specialist Laura Williams.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 15: 15 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.            2 Absent From Vote: Jerome Renville, Sr. (2).  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 16: made by Marc Beaudreau, second by Virginia Max, question by Sara Lincoln, in resolution form, to enroll into the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate the five (5) applicants as listed in Exhibit A, as presented by Enrollment Officer Zelma Flute.

     Argueta, Makayli Dalisai     Argueta, Mercedes Mariana

     Holte, Chelseanna Marie     Johnson, Alice Darlene

     Knudson, Taigann Nicole

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 16: 15 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.            2 Absent From Vote: Jerome Renville, Sr. (2).  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

     Resolution No. SWO-14-049

 

MOTION NO. 17: made by Marc Beaudreau, second by Francis Crawford, question by Louis Johnson, in resolution form, to enroll into the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate the five (5) applicants as listed in Exhibit B, as presented by Enrollment Officer Zelma Flute.

     Bass Wilson, Shia Fills The Pipe     Bass Wilson, Naca Fills The Pipe

     Redwing-Locke, Cistina Chief          Reyes, A’Milliyano Cash

     Taylor, Casper Osiris

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 17: 15 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.            2 Absent From Vote: Jerome Renville, Sr. (2).  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

     Resolution No. SWO-14-050

 

MOTION NO. 18: made by Francis Crawford, second by Robin Quinn, question by Sara Lincoln, in resolution form, to enroll into the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate the three (3) applicants as listed in Exhibit C, as presented by Enrollment Officer Zelma Flute.

     Gonzalez, Alivia Elianna      Horne, Aatreyo Kiyan

     Shepherd, Smiley Ace

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 18: 15 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.            2 Absent From Vote: Jerome Renville, Sr. (2).  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

     Resolution No. SWO-14-051

 

MOTION NO. 19: made by Dawn Eagle, second by Sara Lincoln, question by Robin Quinn, to approve the paperless timesheet project, in the amount of $31,400.00, and the paperless purchase order project, in the amount of $27,600.00, for a total amount of $59,000.00, with the funding source to be determined by the Tribal Vice-Chairman, as presented by IT Director Dawn Burley.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 19: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 20: made by Francis Crawford, second by Sara Lincoln, question by Louis Johnson, to approve the Government Operations Department report, as presented by Program Managers/Directors: Zelma Flute – Enrollment; Derrick Redday – Payroll; Verlyn Beaudreau – Recording Secretary; Colleen Eastman – H.R.; Laura Williams – Budget Specialist; and Dawn Burley – I.T.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 20: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 21: made by Dawn Eagle, second by Robin Quinn, question by Virginia Max, to approve the Department of Commerce report, as presented by Program Managers/Directors: Diana Canku – Planning; John Cloud – LTUC, and DelRay German – TERO.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 21: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 22: made by Francis Crawford, second by Robin Quinn, question by Sara Lincoln, to approve the SWO Elderly Board report, as presented by Lorraine German, Barbara LaCroix, Teresa Peters, Zelma Flute, and Barbara Mail.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 22: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 23: made by Francis Crawford, second by Louis Johnson, question by Sara Lincoln, to approve the Pay Request from the Tribal Chairman’s Office for reimbursement of the Site Supervisor expenses, in the amount of $6,793.50, for expenses incurred for the SWO Administration Building.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 23: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 24: made by Marc Beaudreau, second by Sara Lincoln, question by Jerome Renville, Sr., to acknowledge the receipt of the Heipa District Minutes for the meeting held April 19, 2014.

Heipa District Minutes for meeting held April 19, 2014:

Bring up the grant writing and Planning office situation.

Name the Administration Building after Reverend Guy Rondell Code Talker Memorial Administration Building.

Accept Brenda Bellonger’s resignation [from Reservation Planning Commission].

Accept Youth-to-Adult Membership: Zachary Renville.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 24: 14 For: Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  3 Absent From Vote: Dawn Eagle (3).  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 25: made by Louis Johnson, second by Francis Crawford, question by Sara Lincoln, to acknowledge the receipt of the Buffalo Lake District Minutes for the meeting held April 24, 2014.

Buffalo Lake District Minutes for meeting held April 24, 2014:

Repair the SWHA site roads and have regular maintenance on these roads yearly.

Accept Adult Membership: Ashley Kelly.

Approve $1million from Section 7 funds on behalf of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Housing Authority to use as leverage for future homes on the Lake Traverse Reservation.

Purchase the trailer park by the old bowling alley site for $150,000 on behalf of the SWHA.

Request from SWO Section 7 funds a total of $150,000 with justification attached for the District business of the proposed Buffalo Lake Lanes/bowling alley.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 25: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 26: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lynn Halbert, question by Sara Lincoln, to acknowledge the receipt of the Lake Traverse District Minutes for the meeting held April 24, 2014.

Lake Traverse District Minutes for meeting held April 24, 2014:

Grant writers be qualified Tribal members and be departmentalized not excluding consulting with non-Tribal member grant writers.

Not to renew Cheryl Owen’s contact as DMC General Manager.

Suspend Tiospa Zina School Board and have Council Members take over until things are corrected, for a period of six months.

Do away with Grievance Committee, hire a law judge to handle all grievances.

Gaikowski and Swallow to follow extradition code.

Get an official report why city, county, and state law enforcement are being allowed to arrest and pick up Tribal Members on Indian Trust land.

Approve New Membership: Cheyenne Horne-Mullen, Nicholas McGraw, Emily Renville Red Bear, Connie Redearth, Harold Crawford, Americo Brown, and Austin Harwood.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 26: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 27: made by Dawn Eagle, second by Lynn Halbert, question by Marc Beaudreau, to appoint Tamara St. John to the SWO Judicial Committee as the Enemy Swim District Representative.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 27: 10 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1).  7 Opposed: Marc Beaudreau (3); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Abstained. 0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

Note:    Motion No. 27 passed, however a Tribal Council approval of two-thirds (2/3) vote is required to be appointed to the SWO Judicial Committee, so a resolution number was not assigned to this motion. (Chapter 21, 21-04-03)

 

MOTION NO. 28: made by Dawn Eagle, second by Lynn Halbert, question by Francis Crawford, to acknowledge the receipt of the Enemy Swim District Minutes for the meeting held April 24, 2014.

Enemy Swim District Minutes for meeting held April 24, 2014:

Approve New Membership: Antonio Esparza, Francisco Esparza, Shannon Erickson, and Aspen Guerrero.

Our Council Representative vote to accept the resignation of Tribal Attorney Megan LaFromboise.

Have Council Rep Dawn Eagle check if there is any money available to assist the SWO College with the budget cuts of $187,000.

Amend Chapter 21, sections pertaining to the requirements for Judicial Committee and partisan politics.

Name the new Administration Building after Rev. Guy Rondell, Code Talker.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 28: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 29: made by Jerome Renville, Sr., second by Marc Beaudreau, question by Virginia Max, to acknowledge the receipt of the Old Agency District Minutes for the meeting held May 5, 2014.

Old Agency District Minutes for meeting held May 5, 2014:

Invite Central Finance to our next district meeting to present their strategy in handling the district finances; payment process, reports, fees, etc.

Tribal Council approve the Police Commission Bylaws.

Have a public forum on the draft resolution “Opposing the Use of “Indian” Mascots” before Tribal Council acts on it.

Tribal Council encourage Tony Maestas to stay and offer him a salary increase.

Not to renew the contract of the Dakota Magic General Manager.

Remove Kathleen Woods as Clinical Director at IHS.

Support RPC/Planning to purchase a windmill for $4million to be constructed at Dakota Magic Casino, which will be paid back in five years.

Put the Tribal flag at half-mast for all Tribal members who have passed away.

All Veterans groups be placed inside the compound during the 4th of July Pow Wow.

Approve voting for princess judge: Louella Cloud.

Approve voting for District Election Board: Kathryn Adams.

Approve Adult Membership: Arlene Gay, Cody Nevitt, Lamita Moore, Donald Miller, and Annette Philips.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 29: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 30: made by Virginia Max, second by Marc Beaudreau, question by Jerome Renville, Sr., to acknowledge the receipt of the Long Hollow District Minutes for the meeting held April 17, 2014.

Long Hollow District Minutes for meeting held April 17, 2014:

Authorize the Tribe to give 1 million per year out of Section 7 funds to the SWHA.

Have the flag lowered for all members who pass away.

Approve Youth Membership: Alayah Seaboy, Tayler Seaboy, Bradley Mickey, Kimberley Mickey, and Gabriel Lovato.

Not to renew DMC GM’s contract.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 30: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 31: made by Dawn Eagle, second by Marc Beaudreau, question by Robin Quinn, to name the SWO Administration Building after Rev. Guy Rondell, Code Talker.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 31: 6 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Marc Beaudreau (3).  11 Opposed: Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION DEFEATED.

 

Note:    Big Coulee District did not have a District meeting in April 2014.

 

MOTION NO. 32: made by Francis Crawford, second by Louis Johnson, question by Lynn Halbert, to approve the District Chairman’s Association (DCA) report, as presented by DCA Members; Kenneth Johnson, Tony Barker, Justin Chanku, Sherilyn Marks, Darwin James, and Calvin Max.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 32: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 33: made by Francis Crawford, second by Robin Quinn, to adjourn.

     MEETING ADJOURNED 4:27PM.  

Respectfully Submitted, Verlyn Beaudreau, Recording Secretary

 

REGULAR TRIBAL COUNCIL MEETING

Wednesday, May 7, 2014, 10:00 AM

TiWakan Tio Tipi Council Chambers

 

TRIBAL COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT:

BIG COULEE:  Lynn Halbert

BUFFALO LAKE:        Louis Johnson

ENEMY SWIM:            Dawn Eagle

HEIPA/VEBLEN:         Marc Beaudreau

LAKE TRAVERSE:       Francis Crawford (10:16)

LONG HOLLOW:         Virginia Max

OLD AGENCY: Jerome Renville, Sr.

 

TRIBAL EXECUTIVES PRESENT: Tribal Chairman Robert Shepherd, Tribal Vice-Chairman Sara Lincoln, and Tribal Secretary Robin Quinn

 

CALL TO ORDER: Tribal Chairman Robert Shepherd called the meeting to order at 10:13 AM with three (3) Executives and six (6) Council members from seven (7) Districts answering Roll Call. Opening Prayer for the Long Hollow District said by Long Hollow Tribal Council Member Virginia Max.          

 

MOTION NO. 34: made by Francis Crawford, second by Jerome Renville, Sr., question by Virginia Max, to approve the Department of Justice report, as presented by Program Managers/Directors: Joan White – Sex Offender Registry; Vince Owen – Child Support; Gary Gaikowski – Law Enforcement; Julie Watts – Sweet Grass Shelter; BJ Jones – Tribal Court; and Tony Maestas – Public Defender.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 34: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 35: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lynn Halbert, question by Louis Johnson, to approve the Emergency Management report, as presented by Program Managers/Directors: Gary Gaikowski – Law Enforcement; John Cloud III – LTUC; and Mark Thompson – Food Distribution.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 35: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 36: made by Lynn Halbert, second by Francis Crawford, question by Sara Lincoln, to approve C&G Construction to construct four (4) new concrete pads at the wacipi grounds, in the amount of $5,940.00, and to purchase four (4) concession stands from Dakota Storage Buildings, in the amount of $15,946.80, for a total amount of $21,886.80, and to authorize Tribal Chairman Robert Shepherd to execute the contracts, as presented by Community Planner Ella Robertson. 

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 36: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 37: made by Lynn Halbert, second by Marc Beaudreau, question by Dawn Eagle, to approve the SWO Land Lease Policies, with Option C for Leasing Preferences, as presented by Realty Manager Chad Ward.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 37: 15 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  2 Opposed: Francis Crawford (2).  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 38: made by Marc Beaudreau, second by Francis Crawford, question by Robin Quinn, to authorize the Realty Office to purchase a 2009 Chevrolet 1500 pickup, in the amount of $24,500.00, and a 2009 GMC 1500 pickup, in the amount of $24,500.00, for a total amount of $49,000.00, from Main Street Motors, Inc., as requested by Realty Manager Chad Ward.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 38: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 39: made by Marc Beaudreau, second by Sara Lincoln, question by Virginia Max, to authorize the Fish & Wildlife Office to purchase a John Deere 6115D tractor from Larson’s LLC, in the amount of $50,739.28, as requested by Fish & Wildlife Manager Charlene Miller.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 39: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 40: made by Virginia Max, second by Sara Lincoln, question by Lynn Halbert, to authorize the Fish & Wildlife Office to purchase a Truax OTG 7522 drill from Truax Company, Inc., in the amount of $53,700.00, as requested by Fish & Wildlife Manager Charlene Miller.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 40: 15 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  2 Opposed: Francis Crawford (2).  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 41: made by Jerome Renville, Sr., second by Marc Beaudreau, question by Sara Lincoln, to approve the Land Management Department report, as presented by Program Managers/Directors: Mike LaBatte – GIS; Chad Ward – Realty; Charlene Miller – Fish & Wildlife; and Devon Bursheim – OEP.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 41: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 42: made by Jerome Renville, Sr., second by Francis Crawford, question by Louis Johnson, to approve the Department of Natural Resources report, as presented by Program Manager/Directors: Justin German – Natural Resources; Chad Ward – Realty; Charlene Miller – Fish & Wildlife; Devon Bursheim – OEP; and Mike LaBatte – GIS/Zoning.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 42: 15 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  2 Absent From Vote: Virginia Max (2).  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 43: made by Dawn Eagle, second by Lynn Halbert, question by Sara Lincoln, to support the IHS Sewer project, to clean and video inspect the sewer lines of Tribal Member homes in Sisseton, as presented by IHS Engineers Dave Johnson and Ross Hanson. 

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 43: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 44: made by Lynn Halbert, second by Dawn Eagle, question by Virginia Max, to conduct a forensic financial audit of the SWO Home Buyers Program and the Sisseton-Wahpeton Housing Authority, for the past three (3) years, with a do not exceed cost of $20,000.00 per program.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 44: 7 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Virginia Max (2).  10 Opposed: Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION DEFEATED.

 

MOTION NO. 45: made by Marc Beaudreau, second by Sara Lincoln, question by Virginia Max, to approve the Agreement for Services between the SWO and Sibson Gravel, LLC., and to authorize Tribal Chairman Robert Shepherd to execute the Agreement.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 45: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 46: made by Marc Beaudreau, second by Francis Crawford, question by Sara Lincoln, to approve the Housing Department report, as presented by Program Managers/Directors: Floyd Kirk Jr. – SWHA; Mike LaBatte – GIS; and David Spider – Construction Management.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 46: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 47: made by Francis Crawford, second by Sara Lincoln, question by Dawn Eagle, to approve the Youth Department report, as presented by Program Managers/Directors: Derrick McCauley – Parks & Rec; Richard Bird – Dakota Pride; Teddi LaBelle – CHE; Kristi Keeble – Youth Center; and Sara DeCoteau – Health Coordinator.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 47: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 48: made by Dawn Eagle, second by Lynn Halbert, question by Marc Beaudreau, to approve the contract for Meth Prevention services, in the amount of $12,500.00, as requested by Captain of Police Gary Gaikowski.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 48: 16 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.     1 Absent From Vote: Tribal Secretary (1).  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 49: made by Francis Crawford, second by Sara Lincoln, question by Jerome Renville, Sr., to approve the Department of Human Services report, as presented by Program Managers/Directors: Shannon White – Injury Prevention; Lenny Bernard – E/T Demo; Teddi LaBelle – CHE; Lorraine German – CHR/MCH; Sara DeCoteau – HSA; and Richard Bird – Dakota Pride.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 49: 16 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.     1 Absent From Vote: Tribal Secretary (1).  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 50: made by Lynn Halbert, second by Sara Lincoln, question by Virginia Max, to authorize the purchase of electronic voting machines/ballot counters for the upcoming Tribal elections, in the not to exceed amount of $25,000.00, as requested by Constitution Revision Committee Member Lisa RedWing.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 50: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 51: made by Marc Beaudreau, second by Sara Lincoln, question by Virginia Max, to allocate $15,000 from Section 7 funds to the Heipa District to construct a wacipi arbor.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 51: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 52: made by Dawn Eagle, second by Francis Crawford, to adjourn.

     MEETING ADJOURNED 3:47PM.  

Respectfully Submitted, Verlyn Beaudreau, Recording Secretary

 

REGULAR TRIBAL COUNCIL MEETING

Wednesday, May 28, 2014, 10:00 AM

TiWakan Tio Tipi Council Chambers

 

TRIBAL COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT:

BIG COULEE:  Lynn Halbert

BUFFALO LAKE:        Louis Johnson

ENEMY SWIM:            Dawn Eagle

HEIPA/VEBLEN:         Marc Beaudreau

LAKE TRAVERSE:       Francis Crawford

LONG HOLLOW:         Virginia Max

OLD AGENCY: Jerome Renville, Sr. (10:12)

 

TRIBAL EXECUTIVES PRESENT: Tribal Chairman Robert Shepherd, Tribal Vice-Chairman Sara Lincoln, and Tribal Secretary Robin Quinn

 

CALL TO ORDER: Tribal Chairman Robert Shepherd called the meeting to order at 10:10 AM with three (3) Executives and six (6) Council members from seven (7) Districts answering Roll Call. Opening Prayer for the Long Hollow District said by Long Hollow Tribal Council Member Virginia Max.          

 

MOTION NO. 53: made by Jerome Renville, Sr., second by Virginia Max, question by Sara Lincoln, to approve the SWO Fuel, Inc. & Agency C-Store report, as presented by General Manager Richard Wallenstein. 

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 53: 14 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  3 Opposed: Marc Beaudreau (3).  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 54: made by Lynn Halbert, second by Virginia Max, question by Dawn Eagle, to place SWO Fuel, Inc., Agency Village C-Store, Dakota Western Corporation, and SWO Plastics, Inc. under the supervision of Dakota Nation Development Corporation.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 54: 9 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Virginia Max (2); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2).  7 Opposed: Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Louis Johnson (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Abstained.         1 Absent From Vote: Tribal Vice-Chairman (1).  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 55: made by Jerome Renville, Sr., second by Virginia Max, question by Lynn Halbert, to approve the Dakota Western Corporation & SWO Plastics, Inc. report, as presented by General Manager Robert Huff.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 55: 13 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Secretary (1).  3 Opposed: Marc Beaudreau (3).  0 Abstained.             1 Absent From Vote: Tribal Vice-Chairman (1).  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 56: made by Jerome Renville, Sr., second by Dawn Eagle, question by Virginia Max, to authorize the reimbursement funds received from USDA Rural Development for the revolving loan program, in the amount of $300,000.00, to be placed back into the revolving loan program to be used for small business loans.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 56: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 57: made by Francis Crawford, second by Lynn Halbert, question by Jerome Renville, Sr., to approve the Dakota Nation Development Corporation report, as presented by Executive Director Glen Anderson.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 57: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 58: made by Lynn Halbert, second by Sara Lincoln, question by Francis Crawford, to approve the Gaming Commission report, as presented by Director Shanda Bissonette.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 58: 9 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Louis Johnson (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1).  0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  8 Absent From Vote: Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Secretary (1).  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

Note:    Tribal Vice-Chairman Sara Lincoln now chairing the meeting.

 

MOTION NO. 59: made by Marc Beaudreau, second by Robin Quinn, question by Virginia Max, to approve the Employment Agreement with Norman Johnson to serve as EAP Counselor for Dakota Nation Gaming Enterprise, with a salary of $75,000.00 per year, and to authorize Tribal Chairman Robert Shepherd to execute the Agreement. 

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 59: 15 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Secretary (1).  0 Opposed.  1 Abstained: Louis Johnson (1).  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Vice-Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

Note:    Tribal Chairman Robert Shepherd returned to chair the meeting.

 

MOTION NO. 60: made by Dawn Eagle, second by Sara Lincoln, question by Lynn Halbert, to approve the Dakota Nation Gaming Enterprise (DNGE) report, as presented by Acting CEO Weston Quinn and CMO Anthony Bertino.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 60: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 61: made by Francis Crawford, second by Sara Lincoln, question by Louis Johnson, to advertise for a Gaming Commissioner position for the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 61: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 62: made by Francis Crawford, second by Louis Johnson, question by Sara Lincoln, to extend the term of Justin German as Gaming Commissioner until June 30, 2014, to allow for advertisement and interviews for the position.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 62: 12 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  5 Opposed: Marc Beaudreau (3); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2).  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 63: made by Virginia Max, second by Marc Beaudreau, question by Jerome Renville, Sr., to advertise for the General Manager position for Dakota Magic Casino.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 63: 11 For: Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).  6 Opposed: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Louis Johnson (1).  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 64: made by Virginia Max, second by Sara Lincoln, question by Jerome Renville, Sr., to approve the Dakota Connection Casino & Bingo report, as presented by General Manager LeRoy Quinn Jr.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 64: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 65: made by Francis Crawford, second by Sara Lincoln, question by Jerome Renville, Sr., to approve the Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel report, as presented by General Manager John Rondell.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 65: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 66: made by Francis Crawford, second by Jerome Renville, Sr., question by Dawn Eagle, to approve the Dakota Magic Casino & Resort report, as presented by DNGE Acting CEO Weston Quinn.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 66: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 67: made by Marc Beaudreau, second by Francis Crawford, question by Francis Crawford, to go into Executive Session with DNGE Acting CEO Weston Quinn to discuss a personnel matter, at 2:25pm.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 67: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 68: made by Marc Beaudreau, second by Sara Lincoln, question by Virginia Max, to come out of Executive Session, at 3:05pm.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 68: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 69: made by Virginia Max, second by Sara Lincoln, question by Lynn Halbert, to approve the Consulting Contract between the SWO and Michael Swallow, to complete the NCAI Partnership for Tribal Governance Investment Initiative grant, and to authorize Tribal Chairman Robert Shepherd to execute the Contract.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 69: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 70: made by Sara Lincoln, second by Virginia Max, question by Lynn Halbert, to authorize the payment to Dacotah Bank, in the amount of $7,000.00, for loan document fees for the BIA 700 construction project, with the funds to be reimbursed to the Tribe when the TTP funds are received.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 70: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 71: made by Francis Crawford, second by Dawn Eagle, question by Jerome Renville, Sr., in resolution form, to approve the SWO Transportation Safety Plan 2014, as presented by David Spider, Shannon White, Dr. Sherry Johnson, and Cliff Eberhardt.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 71: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

     Resolution No. SWO-14-052

 

MOTION NO. 72: made by Jerome Renville, Sr., second by Sara Lincoln, question by Lynn Halbert, to approve $500 per student for the SWO Tribal Members who will be attending the Gear-Up program this summer, with the funding source to be the Youth budget.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 72: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 73: made by Francis Crawford, second by Louis Johnson, question by Jerome Renville, Sr., to allocate $25,000 to each of the seven (7) Districts to use strictly for home repair, with the stipulation that each District must submit a written report to the Tribal Vice-Chairman’s Office detailing the expenditure of these funds within thirty (30) days of distributing the funds, with the Tribal Vice-Chairman to identify a funding source for this allocation.

WEIGHTED VOTE ON MOTION NO. 73: 17 For: Dawn Eagle (3); Lynn Halbert (2); Francis Crawford (2); Marc Beaudreau (3); Virginia Max (2); Louis Johnson (1); Jerome Renville, Sr. (2); Tribal Vice-Chairman (1); Tribal Secretary (1).               0 Opposed.  0 Abstained.  0 Absent From Vote.  1 Not Voting: Tribal Chairman.

     MOTION PASSED.

 

MOTION NO. 74: made by Dawn Eagle, second by Virginia Max, to adjourn.

     MEETING ADJOURNED 3:34PM.  

Respectfully Submitted, Verlyn Beaudreau, Recording Secretary

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Psychic Spiritual Reader

Are you worried, confused, don’t know where to turn, need help. I give advice on all matters of life past, present and future . . . call today for a better tomorrow. I also offer past life readings. For appointments call (605) 271-7277. 5201 West 41st. St. Suite 1, Sioux Falls, SD 57106.

 

 

USD TRIO Vacancy

The University of South Dakota TRIO Educational Talent Search Program invites applications for a full-time Advisor. This position serves 7th-12th grade students in the Sisseton area. TRIO Educational Talent Search assists middle and high school participants with preparation for postsecondary education. Successful applicants will have a Bachelor’s degree in education, social services, counseling, or related field as well as experience teaching, tutoring, or advising. To view the full announcement or to apply, visit http://yourfuture.sdbor.edu. For assistance or accommodation, contact 605-677-5671. EEO/AA

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Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

Job Openings

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate is seeking to fill the following positions(s):

Research Specialists, Tribal Education Department

Van Driver/Janitor, Tribal Elderly

MSPI Prevention Specialist, Dakotah Pride

Teacher (6), Early Head Start

Disabilities & Special Needs Manager, Head Start

Closing Date: August 1, 2014 at 4:30 p.m.

All interested applicants may obtain application and job description information at the Human Resource Department, of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate or contact Arnold Williams at (605) 698-8238 or Denise Hill at (605) 698-8362. (Tribal preference will apply)

 

Sisseton Wahpeton College

Sisseton Wahpeton College is seeking to fill the following position:

*Vice President of Academic Affairs

The successful candidate will provide leadership for the instructional programs of the College and to oversee other functions related to instruction. Provide visionary leadership, development, and implementation of effective instructional programs, while maintaining a collegial environment. The successful candidate will have the ability to plan, organize and direct the activities of Academic programs; develop and evaluate comprehensive plans to satisfy present and future college and community needs; work effectively in a team management environment; communicate effectively both orally and in writing; work effectively with people at all levels of the college including management, faculty, staff and students.

*Master's degree in Education, Curriculum Development, or Educational leadership required

*Indian Preference will apply

Send resume to: Sisseton Wahpeton College Human Resources

Agency P.O. Box 689

Sisseton, SD 57262

Deadline: August 21st, 2014 at 8:00 AM.

For further information call (605) 742-1105

Visit our website: www.swc.tc for a full job description and application.

 

Tiospa Zina Tribal School

Employment Opportunities

2014-2015 School Year Vacancies:

Vacancy: Special Education Teacher (High School) Sign-on Bonus Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Special Education Teacher Opening Date: March 7, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Secondary Art Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Secondary Art Teacher Opening Date: July 1, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Alternative Learning Center Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Secondary Teacher Opening Date: July 1, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Kitchen Supervisor Qualifications: High School Diploma/GED, 1 year of successful supervisory experience, and willing to obtain State School Food Service Training and Certification.? Opening Date: May 16, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: School Counselor Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a School Service Specialist School Counselor Opening Date: May 23, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: School Bus Driver Qualifications: High School Diploma/GED, Current South Dakota Certified School Bus Drivers License with both passengar and air brakes endorsements, and willing to complete annual school bus training. Opening Date: May 28, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: School Social Worker Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a School Service Specialist School Social Worker Opening Date: May 28, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Dishwasher/Clerk Qualifications: High School Diploma or GED Opening Date: May 30, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

2014-2015 Extra Curricular Vacancies: Vacancy: Technology Mentor (High School) Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma with knowledge and skills to assist staff with minor technology questions and needs as needed throughout the school day. If interested please submit an application and Adviser Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School. Opening Date: April 11, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Assistant Volleyball Coach

Vacancy: Assistant Girls Basketball Coach

Qualifications for Above Listed Coaching Assignments: GED/High School Diploma, and must meet 2014-2015 SDHSAA coaching requirements at the time that your applications is submitted. Those requirements are to complete the following courses through the National Federation of High School Sports (NFHS): Fundamentals of Coaching, First Aid and Safety for Coaches, and Concussion in Sports – What you need to know. If interested please submit an application and coaching applicant questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School. Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: 7th/8th Grade Girls Basketball Coach

Vacancy: (2) 8th Grade Class Adviser

Vacancy: AISES Adviser (American Indian Science and Engineering Society)

Vacancy: Close-Up Foundation Adviser

Vacancy: Destination Imagination Adviser

Vacancy: (2) Junior Class Adviser

Vacancy: (3) Senior Class Adviser

Vacancy: Military Club Adviser

Vacancy: Middle School Student Council Adviser

Vacancy: Rodeo & Riding Club Adviser

Qualifications for the Above Listed Coaching or Adviser Assignments: GED/High School Diploma. If interested please submit an application and Coaching or Adviser Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School. Closing Date: Open until filled

If you would like to apply to be a part of the TZ tiwahe you may pick up an application from the TZTS HR office located at #2 Tiospa Zina Dr. Agency Village, SD 57262. Applications may also be printed off the HR web page by downloading from links under employment forms to the left. Completed applications may be sent to PO Box 719, Agency Village, SD 57262. Faxed to: 605-698-7686. For further information call 605-698-3953 ext. 208. Indian Preference employer. At will employer. All applicants are subject to a Background Check and Pre-Employment Drug Test, pursuant to SWSB policy.

 

Dakota Magic Casino

Job Openings

C-Store Department: Clerk (Full-Time)

Day Count Department Team Member (Full-Time) 3am to Finish

Foods Department:

Buffet Attendant (Full-Time) Day

Bus Person (2 Full-Time) Day, Swing

Cook I (2 Full-Time) Swing

Cook II (Full-Time) Swing

Cook III (Full-Time) Day

Food Purchaser (Full-Time) Day

Wait Staff (2 Full-Time) Day, Swing

Golf Course Department Bartender (Full-Time) Rotating

Hotel Department:

Night Audit Clerk (Full-Time) 12am to 8am

Room Attendant (Full-Time) 8am to finish

Housekeeping Department Porter (2 Full-Time) Rotating

Marketing Department: Bussing Coordinator (Full-Time) Day, (may need to work extra hours)

Security Department: Officer (2 Full-Time) Swing

Table Games Department: Dealer (Full-Time) Rotating

Closing Date: August 1, 2014 at 4:00 p.m.

Starting Wage: D.O.E.

High School Diploma or GED required for most positions

Two identifications documents required upon hire

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department, 16849 102nd Street SE, Hankinson ND 58041.For complete Job Description contact James Neconish 701-634-3000 ext. 2582 Indian Preference will apply / EEO. (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment). Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

SECURITY: SECURITY SERGEANT (1 Full-Time) ROTATING GENERAL FUNCTION: Supervises security personnel on shift. Safeguards company assets. Supervisor will assist Security Director in training officers. The security officer protects company assets and provides a safe environment for customers and employees. Exhibit a friendly, helpful and courteous manner when dealing with the customers and employees. Maintains security activities and performs credit transactions adhering to company, Tribal, State and Federal guidelines. Work closely with Casino & Hotel Management. REQUIREMENTS: Must have a high school diploma or G.E.D. equivalent. Must not have a felony on their record. Should have some type of law enforcement background. Supervisory experience is necessary, In-house security background will be considered. Must be physically fit and able to lift 40+ lbs. Capable of doing scheduling and administrative paperwork. Must obtain a Key Gaming License upon hire.

This position will close on July 30, 2014 at 4 pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

Cage Department: Main Bank Cashier (2) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, includes weekends & holidays. Excellent customer service skills, excellent communication skills. Appropriate dress code; the ability to work under pressure. Excellent Math Skills, Basic Computer Skills, Knowledge of basic office equipment. At least 2 years of previous experience in the cage department. Ability to lift 50 lbs. Must be at least 21 years old, must have a High school diploma or GED. Must be able to obtain a Key License.

Security Department: Officer (1) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, includes weekends & holidays. Mobility throughout the facility 45% percent of time; will be stooping, bending, walking for long periods of time, able to lift up to 40 pounds, computer skills required for report writing. Will be exposed to noise and tobacco smoke. Appropriate dress code. Must be at least 21 years old, must have High School Diploma/G.E.D. Must be able to obtain a Key License.

C-Store Department: Deli Attendant (1) part-time & (2) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, includes weekends & holidays. Ability to operate necessary equipment. Physical ability to stand for long hours, clean, lift heavy objects up to 30 lbs., and restock inventory. 6 mos. previous cooking experience preferred, 6 mos. working with the public. Knowledge of food preparation safety requirements. Must be dependable & available to work any & all shifts. Must be at least 18 years old & must have a High School diploma or GED.

Restaurant Department: Wait staff (2) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, includes weekends & holidays. Customer service skills, prior experience with waiting on tables is preferred. Must be able to multi-task. Appropriate dress code. Have the physical ability to stand for prolonged periods of time. Must be at least 18 years old & must have a High School diploma or GED.

Opening date: Thursday, July 24, 2014

Closing date: Wednesday, July 30, 2014 @ 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.