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Volume 49 Issue No. 25

Anpetu Iyamni, Wednesday, June 13, 2018

Inside this Edition –

151st Sisseton-Wahpeton Wacipi July 6-8, 2018

General Council of 2018 called next week

Long-time SWST legal counsel, Bert Hirsch, visits Lake Traverse Reservation

TZTS to close Alternative Learning Center for 2018-19 school year; cites lack of funding

Reminder: Deadline to submit copy for consideration in the Sota is Friday noon

Agenda set for first General Council of 2018

Each year the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribe (Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe) holds two main General Council sessions: the first, in June, is set aside for members to hear financial reports from the Tribe and its for-profit businesses; the second, in December, provides for program reports. The office of Tribal Vice-Chairman Floyd Kirk Jr. has released the agenda for the June 2018 General Council, which will be held next week – on Thursday and Friday, June 28 and 29.

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate General Council Meeting

Thursday, June 28, 2018

9:00                 Flag Song, Wahpekute

9:05                 Posting of Colors, Desert Era Veterans

9:15                 Roll Call, Recording Secretary

9:15                 Opening Prayer

9:25                 Opening Remarks by Dave Flute, Tribal Chairman

9:40                 Russell Hawkins, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Sisseton Agency

10:00               Vice-Chairman Report by Floyd Kirk Jr.

10:15               Lexi Fancher, Budget Office

10:30               Greg Benidt, CFO

10:45               Open Mic/Drawings

11:00               FY17 Audit Report

11:15               DNDC Board Introductions

11:30               Dakota Nation Industries Report, Josh Flute

                        Dakota Crossings Grocery Store, Josh Flute

                        Dakota Western/SWO Plastics, Robert Huff

                        Fuel Inc., Josh Flute

12:00 noon       Lunch provided by Dakota Magic Convention Center & Dakota Connection Casino

                        Sisseton-Wahpeton College Dakota Language Learners Presentation

1:00                 Dakota Nation Community Development Report, Fran Tease, Acting Manager

1:20                 General Council Open Discussion

2:50                 Drawings

3:00                 Retreat of Colors

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate General Council Meeting

Friday, June 29, 2018

9:00                 Flag Song, Wahpekute

9:05                 Posting of Colors, American Legion Post #314 /Woodrow Wilson Keeble Honor Guard

9:15                 Roll Call, Recording Secretary

9:20                 Opening Prayer

9:25                 Opening Remarks by Dave Flute, Tribal Chairman.

9:45                 Dakota Nation Gaming Enterprise Report, Weston Quinn, CFO, Acting CEO

10:00               Dakota Magic Casino Report, Michael Schrader, General Manager

10:15               Dakota Sioux Casino Report, Garret Renville, General Manager

10:30               Dakota Connection Casino Report, Garret Renville, Acting General Manager

11:00               Open Microphone/Drawings

11:50               Retreat of Colors

12:00 noon       Lunch provided by Dakota Sioux Casino & Dakota Connection Casino

An evening with Bert Hirsch

By CD Floro

Sota Editor

In the late 1960s, early 1970s, Bert Hirsch was one of fewer than 100 attorneys specializing in tribal law. And many of those – about half, we are told – were working for the government, not on behalf of tribes. Bert Hirsch has always worked to benefit American Indian tribes, with a special long-time record of serving as counsel for the Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe. Last Tuesday evening at the Tribal elderly nutrition center, he spoke to an intimate group of friends, about his relationship with this Tribe.

Chairman Dave Flute had arranged for a traditional meal of soup and frybread and this opportunity to honor the man who has written Indian law (the Indian Child Welfare Act of 1977 and Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act – NAGPRA) and has argued in courts including the Supreme Court to help tribes assert their "retained sovereignty."

The Chairman had invited Mr. Hirsch to visit with Tribal Council members, legal team, and other programs last week, to discuss legal issues.

In introducing Bert at the elderly center, the Chairman said he feels it is important to have included in the history of the Tribe, "work that Bert has done with leadership that goes back to Moses Gill."

Chairman Flute recognized former Tribal Chairmen, his father Jerry Flute, and Russell Hawkins; also Lillian Owen, former Council member.

Russell Hawkins spoke about the personal relationship that Bert has had with the Tribe over the years.

Speaking directly to the guest, Russell said, "A lot of people don't realize how much you have done for the Tribe … many of the things we have today."

He called Bert the "legal mastermind when we developed our gaming."

The SWST developed gaming in 1981 – years before the Indian Gaming Act was passed in 1988.

It didn't happen without difficulty.

Russell described "tense gaming confrontations" with threats of prosecution and prison time.

"He (Bert) was there with us and got us through it," he said.

Russell described Bert as "a powerhouse" for the Tribe. He echoed what Dave Flute had said, that more Tribal members should know the history and the part played by Bert Hirsch.

Jerry Flute spoke next, opening with a humorous story from earlier times, about taking Bert hunting along Lake Traverse. It had something to do about not having the proper attire, or shoes, for the occasion.

"There are a lot of things I could say about Bert, but they are all embarrassing … so…."

He described working with Bert on factionalized land.

"Bert came up with a draft (inheritance) bill and took it to Washington."

"It was introduced by Tom Daschle and became law."

Jerry said the law was a "great benefit to Tribal members inheriting land … also provides that if there is no will, then the land goes to the Tribe."

He said that "our Tribe's bill" stands while other, similar bills enacted by other tribes "were ruled unconstitutional" and failed to give others the same protection as SWST.

"There are a lot of issues like that, that people don't know about … since 1972," he said, referring to behind-the-scenes work Bert Hirsch has done as legal counsel for them.

Jerry described Bert as "a great guy and lawyer," and added, talking directing to Ber, "I'm glad Dave's doing this (honoring) for you."

Dave Flute took back the microphone and said, "I'd like to recognize my mom (Wendy Flute) for putting up with these guys (over the years)."

He asked Bert to come up and speak.

"Thank you, Dave, for your remarks," Bert said.

He said his involvement in tribal law had begun in the late 1960s.

Bert was a staff attorney for the Association on American Indian Affairs (AAIA) until hanging out his own shingle in the 70s.

Since the 1950s AAIA had been working on behalf of Dakota and Lakota tribes in South Dakota and North Dakota, primarily on health legislation due to the epidemic of Tuberculosis (TB) on the reservations.

With the blessing of AAIA, Bert began working directly with, and for the SWST, at first mostly on health advocacy.

Bert recalled working with the late Chairman Moses Gill, and with members of the Tribe's Health Board including the late Dorothy Gill.

He said he has had "a special relationship with the Tribe (as its legal counsel) since the 1970s."

First, while working for AAIA, and then after 1977, through his own private law practice.

Bert said he appreciated AAIA for allowing "me to help the SWST."

He went into some detail recounting the ups and downs of helping the Tribe establish its early foray into Indian gaming.

One of the hurdles was the federal government attempt to shut it down using the Organized Crime Control Act of 1955.

But, ultimately, the US Supreme Court ruled in 1987 that "state law would not prevent tribal gaming."

He said that "a lot of our work went into the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act," which was passed by Congress in 1988.

(The public is most likely to know Bert for his work authoring the Indian Child Welfare Act, but read below a litany of other institutions and projects which has his imprint as legal counsel.)

Bert briefly touched on the following issues and projects, for which he provided legal assistance:

*Head Start program.

*Indian housing.

*Tribal Court.

*Tiospa Zina Tribal School.

*Sisseton Wahpeton Community College.

In each instance of "wanting to do something … we were told, it's a gamble … and I said let's go for it."

He describes "things sometimes getting dicey … messy."

Bert wrapped his talk by saying, "Thank you … to a lot of friends out here."

He said the recognition has been "heart-warming … amazing after all these years."

Working as legal counsel for the SWST has been what he says is "a privilege."

After leaving the microphone Bert was engaged in questions from Tribal Planner Lee Ann TallBear and others, including Angie Marshall of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Housing Authority.

Lee Ann brought up questions of sovereignty.

While unable to hear most of the conversations, we note part of Bert's response concerning the meaning of tribal sovereignty.

The US Supreme Court has ruled that tribes can assert "retained sovereignty" based upon their treaties; however, there is no such thing as unlimited sovereignty. For example, due to Supreme Court rulings, tribes are not accorded the same rights as nation states and do not have authority to negotiate or enter into treaties with other nations.

(This is an over-simplification. We will attempt to get a full report as tribal sovereignty is at the core of everything this Tribe, and other tribes, need and want for their people.)

More about AAIA

The Association on American Indian Affairs (AAIA) is a non-profit organization promoting the welfare of American Indians and Alaska Natives. AAIA is among the oldest Native American Indian advocacy groups in the United States, and has helped create the Indian Child Welfare Act, helped preserve Native American lands, and continues to improve the quality of life for Native Americans in the United States.

Mission statement: The mission of AAIA is to promote the welfare of American Indians and Alaska Natives by supporting efforts to sustain and perpetuate their cultures and languages; to protect their sovereignty, constitution, law and human rights and natural resources; and to improve their health, education, and economic development and community development.

The AAIA has defended the rights and promoted the welfare of Native Americans and, in this process, has shaped the views of their fellow citizens. The Association on American Indian Affairs was started in New York in 1922 as the Eastern Association on Indian Affairs while trying to assist a group of Pueblo people who were fighting efforts to dismantle their pueblos. In 1946, the name was changed to the Association on American Indian Affairs. In 1957, the organization was granted non-profit, 501(c)(3) status for federal tax purposes. The AAIA has waged innumerable battles over the years, touching on the material and spiritual well-being of Indians in all 50 United States states: from the right of Native Americans to control their resources to their right to worship freely; from their right to federal trusteeship to their right to self-determination.

Former SWST Chairman Jerry Flute is a past Director of AAIA. The Association has maintained an office here and grant support for Dakota Language and culture revitalization on the Lake Traverse Reservation.

DOI, Blackfeet Nation sign Blackfeet Water Rights settlement and compact

Senators tester and Daines, Rep. Gianforte, Tribal and State officials join signing ceremony cementing historic partnership

Washington, DC – June 12, 2018 – U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke and Blackfeet Nation Chairman Harry Barnes today signed documents implementing the Blackfeet Water Rights Settlement of 2016 and the accompanying Blackfeet Water Compact, which resolve a decades-long battle by the Blackfeet Tribe of Montana to protect its water rights while also accommodating state and federal water requirements. Secretary Zinke has worked on the issue as a State Senator in the Montana State Legislature, as the U.S. Representative from Montana, and now as Secretary of the Interior.

The parties signed the Blackfeet Tribe-Montana-United States Compact as required by the Blackfeet Water Rights Settlement Act. The Secretary and the Chairman also executed certain Waivers and Releases of Claims, an Execution Statement, and a Process Agreement. After the Compact is executed, the parties will file the Compact with the Montana Water Court, beginning the process for issuing a final decree of the Tribe's water rights as part of Montana's state-wide adjudication. Issuance of the final decree is one of several events that must occur for the Settlement to become final and enforceable.

"The Blackfeet are one of Montana's great warrior Nations, and? like true warriors, they fought every step of the way for their people to get this settlement over the finish line.? I was proud to stand by them as a State Senator, Congressman and now Secretary of the Interior," said Secretary Zinke. "The Blackfeet have given up so much during this long process. Water is more than a drinking source to the Blackfeet, it's their life source and we must respect and honor their culture and rights. I'm grateful for the work of many tireless officials and public servants over the years from the Tribe, State, Congress, and Federal government who have made this day a reality."

"This journey for justice and empowerment for the Blackfeet people with respect to one of our most vital resources has taken well over a century and a half," said Blackfeet Tribe Chairman Harry Barnes. "Now, we start on a new path to realizing what our ancestors had always valued: the preservation of our culture, our people, and our opportunities to make real the treaty promise of a homeland for the Blackfeet people and our right to control our destiny."

"It is my pleasure to extend my congratulations to Chairman Barnes and members of the Blackfeet Tribe on this important milestone for their community," said Governor Steve Bullock of Montana. "Today's agreement reflects many years of dedication and hard work on behalf of state, federal and tribal partners and our congressional delegation. I'm pleased that together we are able to celebrate and affirm the sovereign rights of the Blackfeet Nation to their water resources."

"The Blackfeet Tribe has been waiting a long time for this day," said Senator Steve Daines. "Today's ceremony marks an important step toward the Blackfeet Tribe and surrounding communities having access to reliable water and seeing improvements to water infrastructure projects critical to farmers, ranchers and the local economy."

"The Blackfeet Water Compact reaffirms water rights, saves taxpayers from costly litigation, and invests in critical water infrastructure in northwest Montana," Senator Jon Tester said. "I was proud to have introduced and fought for this bill in Congress and will continue to hold Congress accountable to the Blackfeet Nation to secure the funding needed to carry out this historic agreement. I want to congratulate Chairman Barnes and the Blackfeet people on the culmination of years of hard work."

"Today is a great day for Chairman Barnes and the Blackfeet Tribe, who have waited far too long for this agreement," said Congressman Greg Gianforte. "The settlement is the direct result of the hard work and dedication of the Tribe, the Department of Interior, and other key stakeholders. I will continue working with the Tribe and my colleagues to implement the full settlement in a timely manner."

The Blackfeet Water Rights Settlement is found at Title III, Subsection G of the Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation, or WIIN, Act. That legislation was signed on December 16, 2016. The Settlement:

Recognizes the Blackfeet Tribe's religious and cultural uses of water.

Resolves all outstanding Blackfeet water claims, quantifies a tribal water right to more than 750,000 acre-feet of surface water and nearly all groundwater on the Reservation, and funds the construction and rehabilitation of water related infrastructure on the Reservation for the benefit of the tribal community.

Includes an allocation of 45,000 acre-feet of water from Lake Elwell located behind Tiber Dam, a U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) facility.

Confirms tribal instream flow water rights on ceded lands that now are a part of the Lewis and Clark National Forest and Glacier National Park.

Grants the Tribe the exclusive right to develop hydropower within the St. Mary Unit of the Milk River Project, a BOR project.

Funds not only water-related construction projects, but fisheries, recreation, and energy programs as well. Such programs are designed to promote economic development and develop long term employment opportunities for Blackfeet tribal members.

Resolves age-old disputes among the Tribe and its neighbors, as well as with the state and the federal government, and encourages long-term harmony and cooperation among all parties.

The Blackfeet Tribe's water rights were reserved by treaty with the United States in 1855. Starting in the 1970s, the Tribe more vigorously worked to defend and define its rights in the face of demands by other users to the water resources covered by the treaty agreement.

On April 20, 2017, Blackfeet Tribe members voted in a referendum to accept the Blackfeet Water Compact and Settlement Act, which had been negotiated between the Tribe and the state and approved by the Montana legislature in 2009.

The tribal members' approval of the compact confirmed the Blackfeet Tribe's waters rights and jurisdiction over its water, and provided more than $470 million - $422 million from the federal government and $49 million from the state – for water-related projects.

Congress included initial funding for the Blackfeet Water Rights Settlement Act at the level of $800,000 in its enacted spending bill for Interior for Fiscal Year 2017.

While serving as a Montana state senator, Secretary Zinke began working to resolve the Tribe's water rights issue. He continued to do so when he was elected to Congress as the state's single House member and then to his current post.

On March 9, 2018, Secretary Zinke signed the first authorization of funds for the Blackfeet Tribe under its expenditure plan. The authorization transfers the $800,000 to the Blackfeet Settlement Trust Fund set up under the act.

The funds will be used for the following purposes:

Budget Item 1 - $230,000: Establish Water Compact Implementation Oversight Committee

Budget Item 2 - $250,000: Hire staff

Budget Item 3 - $120,000: Hire an engineering consultant

Budget Item 4 - $200,000: Contract for legal services

The Blackfeet Water Rights Settlement is a crucial and long-awaited step towards achieving the permanent tribal homeland promised to the Blackfeet Tribe in the treaties and agreements ratified by Congress between 1855 and 1896 that serve as the foundation of the relationship between the Tribe and the United States: Treaty with the Blackfeet, 1855, Oct. 17, 1855, 11 Stat., 657, Ratified Apr. 15, 1856, Proclaimed Apr. 25, 1856, Act of April 15, 1874 (18 Stat. 28, chapter 96), Agreement of 1888, ratified by the Act approved May 1, 1888 (25 Stat. 113), Agreement of 1895, dated September 26, 1895, ratified by the Act approved June 10, 1896 (29 Stat. 321, 353).

(Editor's note: Those interested in efforts for the SWO Tribe to assert claims on the surface and ground water on its ancestral homeland need to pay attention to the pros and cons of water rights negotiations and settlements being undertaken by other tribes.)

Rounds delivers opening statement at EPW Subcommittee Hearing on Surplus Water Rule

Washington, DC – June 13, 2018 – U.S. Sen. Mike Rounds (R-S.D.), chairman of the Environment and Public Works (EPW) Subcommittee on Superfund, Waste Management and Regulatory Oversight, today delivered opening remarks at a hearing entitled "Oversight of the Army Corps' Regulation of Surplus Water and the Role of States' Rights."

Rounds' opening statement, as prepared for delivery:

The Environment and Public Works Subcommittee on Superfund, Waste Management and Regulatory Oversight is meeting today to conduct a hearing entitled "Oversight of the Army Corps' Regulation of Surplus Water and the Role of States' Rights."

Today, we are meeting to hear directly from stakeholders impacted by the regulatory decisions made by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Their testimony will provide the Subcommittee an opportunity to consider legislative changes available to Congress as well as the on-the-ground, real world consequences of decisions made by the Army Corps and their effect on states and municipalities.

Section 6 of the Flood Control Act of 1944 authorizes the Army Corps to make available to states, municipalities and other entities surplus water stored in Army Corps reservoirs for municipal and industrial uses.

The Flood Control Act also highlights the preeminent role of states and localities with regard to water rights, going so far as to state that it is the policy of the Congress to recognize the primary responsibilities of states and local interests with regard to water supply.

In December 2016, in the waning days of the previous administration, the Army Corps published in the Federal Register a notice of proposed rulemaking entitled "Use of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Reservoir Projects for Domestic, Municipal & Industrial Water Supply."

This rulemaking sought to define "key terms" in the Flood Control Act of 1944 and the Water Supply Act of 1958.

One of the key terms targeted by the proposed rule is "surplus water."

Surplus water appears undefined in Section 6 of the Flood Control Act.

In the multi-decade period since the passage of the Flood Control Act, with the exception of the previous administration, the Corps has declined to define "surplus water."

In formulating the proposed rule, the Army Corps failed to take into account natural flows of the river system when defining surplus water.

Congress clearly intended to recognize and reaffirm the constitutionally protected rights of states to the natural flow of water through these river systems.

The proposed rule is an attack on these states' rights and the states' ability to access these natural flows.

In the case of my home state of South Dakota, we live with a permanent flood as thousands of acres of productive farmland have been inundated to create the mainstem dams of the Missouri River.

Last month, I was joined in a letter by South Dakota Governor Daugaard, Senator Thune, and Representative Noem in which we stated that 500,000 acres of our most fertile river bottomlands were permanently flooded as the reservoirs filled following construction of these dams.

South Dakota's citizens and tribal members were forced from their homes and communities.

No one doubts the benefits of multi-use Army Corps projects, but they need to be taken into the proper historical context.

In taking such an expansive view of what constitutes surplus water, and thus subject to federal control, the Army Corps clearly does not recognize the constitutionally protected rights of the states to the natural flows of the river system.

Instead, the Army Corps is attempting to produce a system in which legitimate municipal and industrial projects cannot gain access to the water passing through the states by refusing to grant easements to gain access to these water resources.

The Army Corps is currently creating barriers to legitimate water uses.

Earlier this year, when South Dakota's Game Fish and Parks Department requested access to an exceptionally small quantity of water from the Missouri River to construct a parking lot on government property adjacent to a reservoir, the Army Corps denied the request on the basis that this deeply flawed rulemaking had yet to be finalized.

We all agree that the Army Corps has a legal right to regulate the use of water for authorized purposes such as flood control and hydropower generation.

I am not seeking to divert any water away from congressionally authorized purposes.

What I am concerned with, however, is the notion that the people do not have a right to access the water passing through their states outside of well-defined purposes authorized by Congress.

Blocking access to such an important resource is in direct conflict with congressional intent.

Preventing states from accessing the water they are entitled to is an attack on our federalist system of government.

Let me be clear: it was never the intention of Congress to federalize all of the water in our country's major rivers.

Any rulemaking to the contrary is an attack on states' rights and an unlawful taking by the federal government.

My hope is that today's hearing will shed light on this issue and motivate the Army Corps to consider promulgating rules more consistent with Congressional intent and the water rights of states.

This also includes a review and discussion of the existing practice of the Army Corps denying access across their Take Land for legitimate purposes by the states and other approved users.

Thune: Soldiers must be equipped to defeat 21st-Century threats

"If we want our nation to be secure, if we want to promote peace and stability around the world, then we need to ensure that our military is the strongest, best-equipped fighting force in the world."

Washington, DC – June 14, 2018 – U.S. Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.) this week discussed the importance of passing the National Defense Authorization Act, legislation that would ensure that our men and women in uniform will be equipped to meet 21st-century threats, including those posed by major powers. Thune also discussed the positive news that continues to be announced as a result of tax reform.

Thune's remarks (as prepared for delivery):

"Mr. President, when we took up tax reform, we had one goal: make life better for hardworking Americans.

"And that involved a couple of things.

"For starters, it involved putting more money in Americans' pockets, right away, by cutting their taxes.

"And Americans are already seeing the tax relief we passed in their paychecks.

"But we knew that tax cuts, as helpful as they are, weren't enough.

"We wanted to make sure that we created the kind of economy that would give American workers access to the jobs, wages, and opportunities that would set them up for security and prosperity for the long term.

"And since jobs and opportunities are created by businesses, that meant reforming our tax code to improve the playing field for businesses so that they could improve the playing field for workers.

"And that's what we did.

"And I'm proud to report that it's working.

"Since tax reform was passed, business after business has announced good news for workers.

"Pay increases.

"Bonuses.

"And better benefits, including increased retirement benefits, new and better education benefits, and enhanced parental leave benefits.

"A recent survey from the National Association of Manufacturers reported that 77 percent of manufacturers plan to increase hiring as a result of tax reform.

"72 percent plan to increase wages or benefits.

"And 86 percent report they plan to increase investments – which means new jobs and opportunities for workers.

"Meanwhile, a recent survey from the National Federation of Independent Business reports that 75 percent of small business owners think that the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act will have a positive effect on their businesses.

"And the number of small businesses increasing wages recently hit a record high of 35 percent.

"In April, for the first time since the Bureau of Labor Statistics began tracking the data, the number of job openings outnumbered the number of job seekers.

"Meanwhile, in May, unemployment dropped to its lowest level in 18 years.

"And wage growth increased at the fastest pace since July 2009.

"In other words, it's a good day for American workers.

"Mr. President, there's nothing better than seeing opportunities improve for hardworking Americans.

"I'm proud of the benefits the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act is delivering for American workers.

"And I look forward to seeing this law produce even more benefits for workers in the future.

"Mr. President, if there's one thing we tend to automatically rely on, it's the strength of our military.

"We're accustomed to having the best fighting force in the world and assuming we can meet every threat.

"But military strength doesn't just spring up automatically.

"It has to be developed.

"And once developed, it has to be maintained.

"But in recent years, we haven't met this responsibility.

"While we have the very finest soldiers in the world, they don't always have all the tools they need to defend our nation.

"Budgetary impasses, paired with increased operational demands, have left our armed forces with manpower deficits and delayed the acquisition of 21st century weapons and equipment.

"Meanwhile, other major powers hostile to the United States have been building up their militaries.

"And as a result, Mr. President, our military advantage has been steadily eroding.

"In a 1793 address to Congress, President George Washington said:

"'There is a rank due to the United States among nations which will be withheld, if not absolutely lost, by the reputation of weakness. If we desire to avoid insult, we must be able to repel it; if we desire to secure peace, one of the most powerful instruments of our rising prosperity, it must be known that we are at all times ready for war.'

"Or as Ronald Reagan put it, 'Well, to those who think strength provokes conflict, Will Rogers had his own answer. He said of the world heavyweight champion of his day: 'I've never seen anyone insult Jack Dempsey.''

"Mr. President, there is no better way to secure peace than to make sure the U.S. military is the strongest, best-equipped, most capable fighting force in the world.

"If we want to protect our nation and promote peace around the world, it is imperative that we rebuild our military.

"Since President Trump's election, Republicans have been working to reverse the underfunding of our military and restore our nation's fighting force.

"In March of this year, we arrived at a budget agreement that contained the largest year-to-year increase in defense spending in 15 years.

"The fiscal year 2019 National Defense Authorization Act, which we're considering this week, is the next step in rebuilding our military.

"This bill invests in research and modernization to ensure that our men and women in uniform will be equipped to meet 21st century threats, including those posed by major powers.

"It reforms the outdated officer personnel management system to improve career flexibility and merit-based advancement.

"It makes reforms to the civilian leadership structure at the Department of Defense to make it more agile, especially for hiring technical talent.

"It implements measures to deter additional aggression from Russia and China, two of the biggest threats to the security and stability of the world in the 21st century.

"And it provides a 2.6 percent pay increase for our men and women in uniform – the largest pay increase for our service members in nearly 10 years.

"I have offered a number of amendments to further the bill's mission, including one to expedite the backlog of foreign military sales.

"This will support the administration's efforts to balance trade deficits, support domestic industry, and permit America's security partners to make greater investments in their own capabilities.

"I am also working on an amendment to allow the Air Force to incorporate the B-21 bomber when determining criteria for training airspace requirements.

"This will build off a report I secured in last year's NDAA on how to optimize training airspaces.

"My amendment will enable the Air Force to formally incorporate this future aircraft into its planning.

"I know the bill managers have a host of amendments before them, and I am hopeful the Senate can come to an agreement and include many of them.

"Mr. President, if we want our nation to be secure, if we want to promote peace and stability around the world, then we need to ensure that our military is the strongest, best-equipped fighting force in the world.

"This year's National Defense Authorization Act will help our military regain its competitive edge and equip our men and women in uniform with the tools they need to meet and defeat the threats of the 21st century.

"I'm grateful to Senator Inhofe for his leadership, and to Senator McCain, who can't be with us here today but whose tireless work is reflected throughout this bill.

"I look forward to working with my colleagues to pass this legislation this week and ultimately get this bill to the president."

US Attorney General Sessions announces 311 new Assistant US Attorney General positions

Largest Increase in AUSAs in Decades Allocates Prosecutors to Focus on Violent Crime, Civil Enforcement, and Immigration Crimes

Sioux Falls, SD – Attorney General Jeff Sessions and U.S. Attorney for the District of South Dakota Ron Parsons announced that the Department of Justice is taking a dramatic step to increase resources to combat violent crime, enforce our immigration laws, and help roll back the devastating opioid crisis. The official announcement was made on June 4, 2018, the 500th day of the Trump Administration.

In the largest increase in decades, the Department of Justice is allocating 311 new Assistant United States Attorneys to assist in priority areas. Those allocations are as follows: 190 violent crime prosecutors, 86 civil enforcement prosecutors, and 35 additional immigration prosecutors. Many of the civil enforcement AUSA's will support the newly created Prescription Interdiction & Litigation Task Force which targets the opioid crisis at every level of the distribution system.

"Under President Trump's strong leadership, the Department of Justice is going on offense against violent crime, illegal immigration, and the opioid crisis—and today we are sending in reinforcements," said Attorney General Jeff Sessions. "We have a saying in my office that a new federal prosecutor is 'the coin of the realm.' When we can eliminate wasteful spending, one of my first questions to my staff is if we can deploy more prosecutors to where they are needed. I have personally worked to re-purpose existing funds to support this critical mission, and as a former federal prosecutor myself, my expectations could not be higher. These exceptional and talented prosecutors are key leaders in our crime fighting partnership. This addition of new Assistant U.S. Attorney positions represents the largest increase in decades."

In the District of South Dakota, one of these additional AUSAs will focus on violent crime and one on civil enforcement of laws regulating the use and distribution of prescription opioids. In addition to these newly created positions, the District of South Dakota has already added two AUSAs to its Pierre office this year who will focus on prosecuting crimes committed in Indian Country, and is in the process of hiring an AUSA for its Rapid City office to prosecute drug crime.

"We are grateful to the Administration for this demonstrated commitment to reducing violence, drug trafficking, and overdose deaths," said U.S. Attorney Parsons. "Under the leadership of Attorney General Sessions, we are working as hard as we can every day to help make every community in South Dakota a safer place to live."

(Editor's note: SWST Attorney Deb Flute has already been appointed to serve as an Assistant US Attorney, to help prosecute federal crime on the Lake Traverse Reservation.)

Tribes, landowners, environmental groups expand campaign to build solar inside Keystone XL pipeline route

Lower Brule, South Dakota – Last week, an Indigenous-led coalition of pipeline fighters launched the next phase of their campaign, called "Solar XL," to install solar panels along the route of TransCanada's Keystone XL pipeline.

The solar panels, to be installed in Nebraska and South Dakota, will help power the homes, farms, and Indigenous spirit camps of communities resisting the pipeline.

This clean and renewable energy project stands in contrast to the threat posed by Keystone XL to land and water, Indigenous rights, and the climate.

The coalition behind the Solar XL campaign includes the Indigenous Environmental Network, Native Organizers Alliance, Brave Heart Society, Dakota Rural Action, Bold Nebraska, and 350.org. The campaign will be supported through crowdfunding.

View the fundraising campaign online: https://nokxlpromise.org/solarxl/

This effort builds upon the Solar XL campaign that supported solar installations in Nebraska last summer, on land that farmers and ranchers in the state would've been forced to give up to TransCanada.

Shortly after in November of last year, Nebraska's Public Service Commission (PSC) approved an alternate route for Keystone XL, which tribes, farmers, and ranchers continue to challenge in court.

These new solar installations along the pipeline's alternate route will include additional solar arrays on Nebraska farmland and mobile solar units built on unceded Indigenous territory near the Yankton Sioux and Cheyenne River Sioux Reservations in South Dakota.

The Keystone XL pipeline continues to face challenges in court, including an appeal filed by Nebraska tribes and landowners against the PSC decision and a federal lawsuit against Trump's "presidential permit" for the project.

Nearly 17,000 people have also signed the "Promise to Protect" and committed to join future action along the Keystone XL pipeline route when called upon by Indigenous leaders.

Though TransCanada has yet to announce a final investor decision on Keystone XL, the pipeline company is expected to begin clear-cutting this Fall to prepare for construction in 2019.

The Keystone XL pipeline would carry 830,000 barrels a day of tar sands oil.

The solar arrays and mobile solar units built through Solar XL will not only provide renewable energy and demonstrate the fossil-free world we need, they will be part of resistance efforts as signers of the "Promise to Protect" rise up to defend them if necessary.

Solar energy has been a powerful tool in Native-led efforts to put renewable energy solutions in the path of the problem, from the Lubicon Solar Project near Alberta's tar sands, to the solar-powered 'tiny homes' in the path of the Trans Mountain pipeline in British Columbia, to the Lakota Solar Enterprise bringing clean energy sovereignty to Indian country.

If TransCanada moves forward with construction of Keystone XL, thousands of people are ready to defend the renewable solar energy built in its path.

Quotes

Dallas Goldtooth, Keep it in the Ground Campaigner for the Indigenous Environmental Network:

"In the fight against dirty tar sands oil from crossing Indigenous treaty lands, we must also take moments to highlight the things we are fighting for. That is what SolarXL is about. We will not only build renewable energy in America's breadbasket, on Indigenous lands for Indigenous people, demonstrating the goals of a just transition towards sustainable energy, but we will build it in the face of the Keystone XL pipeline. Now's the time to look ahead to a sustainable planet."

Joye Braun, leader of the Wakpa Waste Camp at the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation in South Dakota:

"Building Solar XL is about showing what is possible. This partnership between the tribes and many different grassroots organizations is a powerful statement. It shows the unity we have built to go up against this evil zombie of a pipeline that threatens our water, land and our very lives. We've seen the devastation TransCanada has caused, from our relatives living near Alberta's tar sands to the recent pipeline explosion in West Virginia. Now we're showing the world what is possible through a project creating real solutions."

Judith LeBlanc (Caddo), Director, Native Organizers Alliance, a national Native organizing and training network:

"Our future depends on if we choose to live in harmony and balance with Mother Earth. Projects like Solar XL, built with grassroots financial support and owned by Indigenous communities and family farmers, are our best hope for a future of sustainable energy that delivers us from dependence on fossil fuels and the harm caused by extractive industries."

Mark Hefflinger, Communications Director for Bold Alliance:

"We're excited to launch the next phase of Solar XL, and continue to build our clean energy future while standing together to protect our water and land. The new Solar XL installations in Nebraska and South Dakota add to the existing resistance in the path of KXL that also includes the Ponca sacred corn planted inside the route along the historic "Trail of Tears," the #NoKXL Solar Energy Barn, and Rosebud Sioux Spirit Camp in South Dakota."

Lewis Grassrope, Wiconi un Tipi Camp in Lower Brule, South Dakota:

"As caretakers of this world, maintaining balance for the generations to come is our responsibility. Solar XL is an effort to support that balance, protecting the land and water by building renewable energy alternatives to dirty fossil fuels. It's time to start looking at and preparing for the future, rather than destroying the only world we have."

Rick Bell, chair of Dakota Rural Action's Black Hills Chapter and the Community Energy Development Committee:

"The KXL pipeline represents our persistent reliance on fossil fuels that we know is bad for the environment as well as people's health, etc. It doesn't even make economic sense when the full long-term negative effects are taken into account. Therefore DRA is participating in this effort to install solar systems along the path of the KXL pipeline as a way of demonstrating our commitment to renewable energy and showing that it is a viable alternative rather than continuing to depend on fossil fuels for our energy needs."

Faith Spotted Eagle, member of the Yankton Sioux Nation and Brave Heart Society:

"The powerful thing about alliances for mother earth is when they create a space to unlearn fear and to relearn leadership. This was true at Standing Rock, and Solar XL is another chance to learn and build a shining example of the future we want. Solar energy is one of the great powers of the universe -- it is constantly present, with a low carbon footprint that respects the earth. Because each of us are players in the survival our planet, our efforts to fight Keystone XL combines the power of solar with the power of the people."

May Boeve, 350.org Executive Director:

"The fight against Keystone XL has always been about more than one pipeline -- we're demanding a world free of dirty fossil fuels. Putting solar in the path of this pipeline models the massive overhaul our energy system needs to stop the worst of climate change. While Trump and fossil fuel executives continue to deny the writing on the wall, our resistance must grow stronger. We already know the just way forward is with renewable energy solutions like solar and wind, now we need the will."

Chumash return ancient remains to the Channel Islands

National Park Service – June 13, 2018 – The Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians (Chumash Tribe) has returned the ancient remains of a Native American man who died 10,000 years ago, known as Tuqan Man, to a burial site on San Miguel Island.

Tuqan Man was discovered inadvertently in 2005 by archeologists from the University of Oregon who were surveying an archeological site on the island. The ancient remains were found exposed and eroding into a gully within the site.

Following the discovery, the National Park Service (NPS) consulted with the Chumash Tribe and together they decided to excavate the unprotected burial of Tuqan Man to prevent it from eroding from the cliff and being lost to the sea.

A full scientific study was conducted due to the cultural and scientific significance of the prehistoric remains.

Federal law, the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), required that the NPS determine if the remains of Tuqan Man were Native American, and if so, whether they could be transferred to a Native American tribe.

The Chumash Tribe supported the scientific process as necessary, and worked closely with the NPS to ensure the remains were treated respectfully throughout the process. The Chumash Tribe firmly believe that Tuqan Man is their ancestor.

"Protecting the final resting places of our ancestors is of paramount importance to the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians," said Kenneth Kahn, Tribal Chairman for the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians. "When our tribe learned of the discovery made by archeologists on San Miguel Island, we made it a priority to ensure that our ancestor was laid to rest with a proper burial. Thanks to years of cooperation with the National Park Service, we were granted that opportunity."

After careful analysis and consideration the NPS determined that Tuqan Man is Native American. Tuqan Man was found to have a significant cultural relationship to American Indian groups and to the maritime culture found on the northern Channel Islands for over 13,000 years.

The Chumash Tribe requested custody of Tuqan Man and was granted custody by NPS per NAGPRA regulations. Recently, the Chumash Tribe returned Tuqan Man to his resting place on San Miguel Island.

Thune Bills to target Substance Use Disorder pass Finance committee

"Although we still have work ahead of us in combatting opioid and substance abuse, the committee's passage of the HEAL Substance Use Disorder Act is an important step forward."

Washington, DC – June 12, 2018 – U.S. Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.), a member of the Senate Finance Committee, which has jurisdiction over Medicare and Medicaid, today applauded the committee's bipartisan passage of the Helping to End Addiction and Lessen (HEAL) Substance Use Disorder Act, which included his Expanding Telehealth Response to Ensure Addiction Treatment (e-TREAT) Act, bipartisan legislation that would increase access to substance use disorder (SUD) treatment through telehealth technology under Medicare. The bill is expected to be included in a larger package that incorporates legislation from other committees, including Thune's Commerce Committee-passed Fighting Opioid Abuse in Transportation Act, aimed at combating substance use disorder.

"Although we still have work ahead of us in combatting opioid and substance abuse, the committee's passage of the HEAL Substance Use Disorder Act is an important step forward," said Thune. "I am glad that the e-TREAT Act's inclusion will expand access to services, and I appreciate the committee's effort to promote awareness for non-opioid pain management alternatives across South Dakota and the rest of the country."

Thune has long advocated for the use of telehealth as a means to increase access to health care services in rural communities, like those throughout South Dakota. In addition to the e-TREAT Act, several other Thune co-sponsored, bipartisan provisions were wrapped into the final bill, including the Medicaid SUD Treatment via Telehealth Act, the Telehealth for Children's Access to Services and Treatment (TeleCAST) Act, the Enhancing Patient Access to Non-Opioid Treatment Options Act, and the Comprehensive Screenings for Seniors Act.

U.S. Senate Committee passes bipartisan Bill to counter UAS threats

Would allow DHS and DOJ officials to monitor, identify, & intercept threatening unmanned aircraft

Committee also approved amendment to improve Illegal Drug Detection Technology

Washington, DC – June 13, 2018 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp announced that bipartisan legislation she helped introduce to provide federal law enforcement authorities the ability to counter misuse of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) that threatens national security passed unanimously today in the U.S. Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) currently have very limited authority to intercept UAS-related threats along U.S. borders or to vital facilities such as federal prisons, courthouses, and airports. Heitkamp's bill would authorize both DHS and DOJ to detect, identify, and counter unmanned aircraft posing a threat to security personnel, infrastructure, and operations.

"As UAS technology has rapidly improved, we've seen North Dakota become a nationally recognized leader in unmanned aircraft research, training, and innovation. But we've also seen a rise in potential threats as it becomes easier for bad actors to use drone technology for nefarious purposes," said Heitkamp. "With the release of yesterday's new Northern Border Strategy, it's clear that DHS needs to address gaps in its capabilities— including when it comes to mitigating the potentially dangerous effects of illegitimate drone use. I've continued to push for more ways to take advantage of our state's strong commercial UAS sector, and North Dakota is well-positioned to play a central role in building new technologies that effectively detect and interdict UAS that could be used to traffic narcotics, commit acts of terrorism, or target border security operations. By passing our bipartisan bill out of Committee today, we are one step closer to giving our federal law enforcement the tools and training they need to stage critical counter-UAS operations and keep our communities strong and safe."

The Committee also approved a Heitkamp amendment to legislation—called the Opioid Act— that would improve technology available at ports of entry and international mail facilities regarding the detection of illegal drugs— including opioids, methamphetamine and heroin. Heitkamp's amendment would improve private sector outreach on technology development and make sure the U.S. Postal Service has a specific role reporting to Congress on research coordination.

The passage of the Counter-UAS bill comes one day after DHS released a new strategy— which Heitkamp pushed for and builds on her bill that became law to secure the Northern Border — to tackle chronic and emerging security issues along the Northern Border, including ways to deploy technology to expand domain awareness and surveillance capabilities. The Counter UAS bill would provide a clearer authorization for DHS to assess UAS-related threats and track or intercept any dangerous unmanned aircraft activities, including those posing a threat to North Dakotans' public safety.

And during a hearing on the bipartisan bill last week, Heitkamp pressed DHS, DOJ, and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) officials about what steps their agencies need to take to develop the technology and techniques to thwart illegal UAS uses that pose a threat to public safety.

Heitkamp, a member of the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, introduced the legislation with U.S. Senators Ron Johnson (R-WI), Claire McCaskill (D-MO), Tom Cotton (R-AR), and John Hoeven (R-ND).

Specifically, the Preventing Emerging Threats Act would provide leaders at DHS and DOJ the authorization they need to develop and use advanced UAS detection and interdiction technology to protect federal buildings and operations. The bill contains important privacy protections, and requires DHS to conduct several assessments to evaluate future threats malicious UAS activity may pose to domestic infrastructure and the general public.

Heitkamp has consistently supported U.S. Customs and Border Protection's (CBP) UAS training and border enforcement operations in North Dakota. The CBP's Air and Marine Operations (AMO) operates a National Air Security Operations Center at Grand Forks Air Force Base, which serves as the primary training ground for the CBP's UAS pilots and crews. From Grand Forks, AMO also conducts border enforcement efforts at the Northern, Southwestern, and Coastal Borders, assists federal, state, local and tribal partners, and has been critical in addressing flooding in the Red River Valley.

Last September, Heitkamp announced a new CBP AMO pilot training program at the University of North Dakota to help address a nationwide shortage of AMO pilots.

Background

This legislation builds on Heitkamp's efforts to boost cutting-edge UAS research in North Dakota and across the country. Last month, Heitkamp joined U.S. Secretary of Transportation Elaine Chao to announce that the U.S. Department of Transportation and the FAA selected the North Dakota Department of Transportation as one of 10 entities nationwide to help implement a pilot program to test the further integration of UAS into the national airspace, which Heitkamp helped push. North Dakota's participation in the program will leverage the unique expertise of the Northern Plains UAS Test Site in Grand Forks. In 2016, Heitkamp played a critical role in successfully pushing the FAA to authorize the Northern Plains UAS Test Site as the first site in the country to conduct beyond-visual-line-of-sight operations.

Heitkamp has long worked to advance North Dakota's UAS and border security priorities, including the Northern Plains Test Site, Grand Sky, and Grand Forks Air Force Base, including:

· Securing long-term Northern Border UAS efforts at Grand Forks Air Force Base. Heitkamp pushed DHS to secure a long-term AMO presence at the Grand Forks Airforce Base, and in September 2017, DHS and Customs and Border protection heeded her call to maintain the their presence on the base.

· Promoting the strengths of Grand Sky business and aviation park. In February, Heitkamp toured Grand Sky — which conducts UAS flights in partnership with Northern Plains— to tout its role in diversifying local jobs, growing North Dakota's economy, and strengthening U.S. national security efforts. During her tours of Northrop Grumman and General Atomics facilities, Heitkamp reinforced the critical role Northrop Grumman plays in advancing the Grand Forks Air Force Base's Global Hawk mission – helping provide intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance for global operations. She also stressed the need to build out UAS training efforts that General Atomics has spearheaded to support international counterterrorism efforts and U.S. Customs & Border Protection surveillance along the Northern Border.

· Boosting support for Grand Forks' Global Hawk mission. Heitkamp pushed to secure funding and long-term support for the RQ-4 Global Hawks in the defense authorization bill passed in December 2017. In September 2017, Heitkamp met with Colonel Benjamin W. Spencer, Commander of the 319th Air Base Wing at Grand Forks, to discuss efforts to strengthen the base's role in protecting the United States' national security, including pioneering new uses for UAS technology. And Heitkamp also welcomed General Lori J. Robinson, Commander of North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) and U.S. Northern Command (USNORTHCOM) as she made a rare visit to see the base's remotely piloted aircraft innovation up close.

· Removing barriers to UAS technology development and investments in North Dakota. Heitkamp successfully pressed then-FAA Administrator Michael Huerta on his agency's efforts to improve the integration of UAS into the nation's airspace, urging his agency in 2014 to avoid delays that could hinder the growth of the industry. Just three months later, the FAA heeded her call – announcing the UAS rule proposals she had asked for.

Sen. Heitkamp: U.S. House must pass bipartisan resolution to reinstate Net Neutrality

Internet Freedom is no longer legally protected; Consumers could now see  higher prices, pay-to-play internet traffic, and blocked streaming websites

Washington, DC – June 11, 2018 – As the Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) repeal of net neutrality officially goes into effect today, U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp is calling on the U.S. House of Representatives to vote on and pass a bipartisan resolution she helped introduce and pass in the U.S. Senate to reinstate net neutrality rules and restore fair, open, and equal access to the internet.

Last month, Heitkamp helped pass a bipartisan resolution to review and reverse the FCC's decision to repeal net neutrality rules. Under Congressional Review Act rules—which allow Congress to overturn regulatory actions with a simple majority vote in both chambers, the U.S. House can take up the resolution until the end of 2018.

"Reliable access to the internet shouldn't depend on how much money you make or how big your business may be. Mega-corporations spent millions of dollars lobbying the FCC to end net neutrality, and today— against the wishes of thousands of North Dakotans and millions of Americans— they finally got their wish," said Heitkamp. "Last month, I helped pass our bipartisan Senate resolution to throw net neutrality a life preserver. But by refusing to take any action on our resolution, the House has helped pave the way for internet service providers to legally block, throttle, or prioritize certain content. As of today, the internet is no longer fair or free, and I'm fighting for the 5,500 North Dakotans who have called and written to my office to voice their opposition to the FCC's ruling. The House needs to stand up and do the right thing by voting on our bipartisan resolution, so we can reverse this misguided decision, foster healthy competition on the internet, and restore fundamental freedom and fairness online."

Net neutrality rules were intended to protect consumers by barring internet service providers from prioritizing certain content or charging users additional fees for faster or more reliable access. In April, the FCC began taking down net neutrality rules that had been in place. As of today, they're completely repealed.

Through letters, emails, and phone calls to her office, Heitkamp has heard from over 5,500 North Dakotans about net neutrality. All but 10 of them have supported restoring net neutrality rules.

Heitkamp remains a strong supporter of a free internet and greater access to high-speed internet in rural communities. Before the FCC voted to roll back the net neutrality rules in December, Heitkamp expressed her strong concerns about the impact to businesses and consumers— and the need to investigate widespread reports of fraud during the public comment period in a letter to FCC Chairman Ajit Pai.

Background

As a member of the U.S. Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship, Heitkamp has heard concerns from small business owners in North Dakota about the impact of repealing net neutrality protections. Many small businesses use the internet to sell their products, develop their brands, and some develop technology exclusively to be used online. If small businesses have to leverage more financial resources just to compete on an equal playing field as larger more established businesses, it could hurt these small businesses, and lead to less economic activity and less job growth.

And as a founding member of the U.S. Senate Broadband Caucus, Heitkamp has been pushing for bipartisan solutions that would connect every North Dakota family, business, and school to high-speed internet. In 2016, she brought FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel to North Dakota to see firsthand how rural areas are impacted by a lack of access to high-speed internet, and she has discussed the issue in multiple meetings with the president.

Five smart ways to protect your data on social media

The Facebook data breach opened a Pandora's box of concerns for social media consumers. The company estimated that data firm Cambridge Analytica may have had information on about 87 million Facebook users without their knowledge.

In testimony before the U.S. Senate, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg promised to do more to protect the privacy of users' data. But according to studies by the Pew Research Center, people haven't had much faith in social media firms' capacity to do just that. A Pew survey last year found that only 9 percent of social media users were "very confident" that companies would protect their data. About half were "not at all" or "not too confident" their data were in safe hands.

With so many people concerned about what private data is shared by social media sites and with whom, the CEO of a social media app says users need to do more to protect their information and be aware of how their data can be used.

"In the past 60 days there has been a profound awakening by the average social media user about data privacy and trust regarding social media companies," says Scott Relf, CEO and co-founder of PikMobile Inc. (www.pikmobile.com), an ad-free social media app that allows users to share content through a unique viewing platform.

"All of the other social media companies are equally as guilty as Facebook – Twitter, Snapchat, Instagram, Google. These companies are betraying their users' trust by selling them out, and all of this with virtually no regulations or accountability to anyone."

Relf lists five ways social media users can better protect their data:

Know the people you friend. Don't accept friend or follow requests from people you don't know, even if it appears you have friends in common. "They could be fake accounts from cybercriminals, bots or just bad people," Relf says. "And the more people you're connected to, the harder it is to control what happens to the information you post."

Skip the quizzes. Those IQ or personality tests you find on social media may take you to unsecure sites, Relf says, making you vulnerable to identity theft by using information found on your account as well as the answers you provide to the quiz.

Select a private profile for maximum control. "Consider your needs," Relf says. "If you use social media mainly to keep in touch with friends, you may not need a widely open setting. If you use social media for work purposes, consider two accounts: a private personal account as well as a more public business one."

Use strong passwords and don't share them. Passwords should be memorable only to the user and kept to themselves. "Likewise, lock your phone with a pin or pattern, so that if you do lose it, whoever finds it doesn't have easy access to your entire online life," Relf says.

Don't opt-in to social media facial recognition. "The only logical reason for your social media service to ask for your facial recognition is so that they can do an even better job of harvesting your data and targeting you with ads," Relf says.

"Ideally, social media users should choose what they feed into their mind all day long," Relf says. "Don't give up control of your news feed to companies and advertisers that harvest your data for their benefit."

About Scott Relf

Scott Relf and his wife Renee are the co-founders of PikMobile (www.pikmobile.com), a dual-function mobile app that combines a unique viewing platform and a digital content publishing system. kA former senior executive for several large corporations, Relf has expertise in bringing breakthrough products and services into the consumer mass market. He sold his startup Zave Networks to Google in 2011. Relf earned a BA in management and economics from Rice University and an MSBA in management from the Boston University Questrom School of Business.

Editorials –

Sota editorial –

Stealin' the light

 

They come stealin' the light

Stealin' the light away

 

They come with their promise

With their promise of plenty

 

They come with their court orders

With their court orders and dozers

 

They come with their gift

With their gift of death

 

They come stealin' the light

Stealin' the light away

 

Away away stealin' the light

Praying our people lie in darkness

Alongside bones and spirits

Of warrior ancestors

 

Stealin' the light

Stealin' the light

 

© 2013 cd floro, ascap

Brief editorial comments from the editor's desk –

On and Off the Lake Traverse Reservation

The Tribal Vice-Chairman's office has released the agenda for the June 2018 General Council, to be held next week, on Thursday and Friday, June 28 and 29 at the Tribal administration building.

See the agenda in this week's Sota, and plan to attend if possible.

Attendance is so important.

*****

Please see the poster for the 151st annual Sisseton-Wahpeton Wacipi in this Sota.

Check out the schedule of grand entries and specials over Friday-Sunday, July 6, 7 and 8.

Please note that Tribal offices will be closed on Wednesday, July 4th, for the holiday.

Offices will be open all day Thursday, July 5, from 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

And on Friday, the opening day of the 151st annual Sisseton-Wahpeton Wacipi, Tribal offices will be open a half day, from 8:00 a.m. until 12:00 noon.

Please plan any Tribal business accordingly, and come out to the ceremonial grounds on the weekend for the annual wacipi!

Read the other notices placed by the SWO Wacipi Committee regarding food vendors, grass dancers, and princess contestants also in this week's Sota.

*****

The Reservation Election has notified the Sota that the certification process is not yet complete.

Hopefully, there will be an updated notice next week about the upcoming primary and general SWO 2018 elections.

*****

Please see this week's update on the Dakota Magic Casino renovation.

The countdown now stands at 29 weeks until completion.

Check out this space provided by the Sota for the construction project update each week (or as they are provided).

*****

While there are other options available, primarily the Tribe's Employment Training (ET Demo) program, we are disheartened to learn that Tiospa Zina's Alternative Learning Center will not be operating in the next school year.

We understand not having enough funds to go around, to cover all that's required to provide K-12 education for our TZTS students. That's due in large part to the Trump Administration's off kilter funding priorities for tribes and for education.

Please read Dr. Heath's notice elsewhere in this issue of the Sota.

Hopefully, funding can be restored so that the ALC will be back in future school years.

*****

Elder's Meditation:

"Today, what is important for us is to realize that the old sacred ways are correct, and that if we do not follow them we will be lost and without a guide."

–Thomas Yellowtail, CROW

A long time ago the Creator gave to the people all the knowledge on how we should live and conduct ourselves. The Native people have been influenced by outside "tribes" who don't know about the Sacred Way. Our Elders still know about the old sacred ways. We need to consult and talk to them before it's too late. Every family needs to seriously evaluate whether they are living according to the old knowledge. If we are fault finding, putting one another down, being selfish, being violent to our spouses or children, if we are cheating and being dishonest, then we are not living the old Sacred Way. The old way is about respect, love, forgiveness and sharing.

*****

Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

Communism doesn't work because people like to own stuff. - Frank Zappa (1940 - 1993)

Whenever I dwell for any length of time on my own shortcomings, they gradually begin to seem mild, harmless, rather engaging little things, not at all like the staring defects in other people's characters. - Margaret Halsey

The major difference between a thing that might go wrong and a thing that cannot possibly go wrong is that when a thing that cannot possibly go wrong goes wrong it usually turns out to be impossible to get at or repair. - Douglas Adams (1952 - 2001), Mostly Harmless

Boxing is just show business with blood. - Frank Bruno

Idealism is what precedes experience; cynicism is what follows. - David T. Wolf (1943 - )

On the whole human beings want to be good, but not too good, and not quite all the time. - George Orwell (1903 - 1950)

In preparing for battle I have always found that plans are useless, but planning is indispensable. - Dwight D. Eisenhower (1890 - 1969)

*****

The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Earlier receipt of copy is always appreciated. So, if you are aware of a date or message that needs to be publicized or advertised, please let us know about it in advance of the weekly deadline.

The preferred way to submit typed articles and ads, art and photos, is by e-mail.

The editor can be reached at the following e-mail address:

earthskyweb@cs.com

For more information, leave a message on the Sota production office voicemail (605) 938-4452, or send a fax to the 24-hour dedicated line (605) 938-4676.

-- CDF

Obituaries –

Service for baby Messiah Roberts

Funeral service for Messiah Esra Pablo Roberts (June 11, 2018 - June 11, 2018) of Watertown, SD was held last Friday afternoon, June 15, 2018 at Eagle Wing Baptist Church, Agency Village, SD with Rev. Jerome Renville officiating.

Interment is at the Roberts family cemetery in Waubay, SD.

Funeral set Monday for Ronald James Fayant

Funeral service for Ronald James Fayant, 57 of Watertown, SD will be held on Monday, June 18, 2018 at 11:00 A.M. at Enemy Swim Community Center, Waubay, SD with Rev. Fr. Charles Chan, and the Episcopal Lay Readers officiating.

Pallbearers will be Kenny Seaboy, Garret Iyarpeya, Christopher Fayant, Charlie Vermillion, Raymond Shepherd III, Leroy Rencountre, Julius BlueDog, Rafeal BlueDog, and Corwin BlueDog.

Honorary Pallbearers will be Clement White, Silas Shepard, Hank Iyarpeya, Danita Greene, Jerry Charger Family, Moses Keeble, Randy Iyarpeya, Vern Rouillard, Ray Rouillard, Corey Shepherd Sr., and Friends, and Relatives.

Military rights will be provided by the Vietnam Veterans Kit Fox Society.

Interment will be in the St. James Episcopal Cemetery, Waubay, SD.

Wake services were held on Saturday and Sunday at the Enemy Swim Community Center.

The Cahill Funeral Chapel, Sisseton, SD is in charge of funeral arrangements.

Ronald James Fayant, journeyed to the spirit world on June 12, 2018 at Prairie Lakes Hospital, Watertown, SD.

Ronald was born on November 1, 1960 in Sisseton, SD to Wilfred Fayant Sr. and Roberta (Owen) Fayant.

He attended Waubay High School and Kicking Horse Job Corp, where he obtained his GED and studied Carpentry and various other skills.

He enlisted into the U.S. Army in 1980 and was honorably discharged.

He then came back to the Waubay area and made his home.

He worked for Poultry Dakota, Dakota Sioux Casino, and various other jobs.

Ronald enjoyed playing cards, beading, horseshoes, pow-wows, NFL football. He was a Tennessee Titans fan, he also enjoyed softball and visiting family and friends.

John is survived by his son Mike Thennis of Watertown, SD; daughters Sheridan BlueDog of Sisseton, SD, Rainee Whipple of Santee, NE; Significant other Evie Rencountre; brothers Kenny Fayant of Enemy Swim, SD, Wilfred Fayant Jr. of Enemy Swim, SD, Rodney Fayant of Watertown, SD; sisters Barb (Randy) Iyarpeya of Enemy Swim, SD, Roxanne (Duane) Hislow of Enemy Swim, SD, Debbie Fayant of Watertown, SD; numerous nieces, nephews, and grandchildren.

Ronald was preceded in death by his parents, son Ronald "Jack" Thennis; brother Kevin Fayant; sister Cheryl Fayant; nephews Jason Sheperd, Cody Campbell; niece Jessica Shepherd; and Maternal and Paternal grandparents.

Services planned for Ursula Kirk

Ursula Lynn Kirk (born June 6, 1977) passed away on Friday, June 15, 2018.

Funeral services are set for Tuesday, June 19, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. at the SWO community center, Agency Village, SD.

Wake services were scheduled Sunday and Monday at the community center.

Chilson Funeral Home, Winsted, Minn., is serving the family.

Watch for a complete obituary in next week's Sota.

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor's note: The following comes from the editor's column and the Sota "deadlines and policies" statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and must be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Strengthening Tribes

By Rep. Kristi Noem

June 15, 2018

Much of South Dakota's history is rooted in Indian Country, but sadly, many of the systems designed to help tribal members are failing. From healthcare to education to housing, those who live on reservations are struggling.

In recent years, much of the attention has focused on the failing Indian Health System (IHS). Federal watchdog reports have repeatedly documented shocking cases of mismanagement and poorly delivered care. Babies were born on bathroom floors with no doctor present. Facilities were forced to wash surgical equipment by hand, due to broken sterilization machines. Medical personnel were coming to work with certifications that had lapsed. It is inhumane to provide this kind of "care."

I recognize recruiting quality medical and administrative staff is an issue at many IHS facilities, which are often located in extremely remote areas, but I'm confident these challenges can be overcome. I have introduced legislation, for instance, to expand the IHS' existing student loan repayment program in order to attract more and better personnel. It would also cut the red tape that impedes professionals from volunteering at IHS hospitals and clinics and allow administrators to more easily hire good employees and fire bad employees. Moreover, the legislation increases transparency by ensuring reports and plans are completed in a timely manner, enhancing congressional oversight, and expanding whistleblower protections.

The bill is one of the most comprehensive IHS reform packages to move through Congress in recent years. It was approved by a key House committee in mid-June, and I'm hopeful we can see it advance through the legislative process in the months to come.

Health care, however, is just one of the challenges faced by tribes in South Dakota. Housing continues to be an issue for many. Earlier this year, Sen. Thune, Sen. Rounds, and I put pressure on the Department of Agriculture to expand home ownership opportunities in these areas. This May, Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue responded by announcing a new pilot program on tribal lands to assist low-income families in their journey toward home ownership. I am hopeful South Dakota families will be able to take advantage of the program soon.

While housing and healthcare provide security, education offers opportunity. Recruiting and retaining good teachers, however, has proven difficult. As such, I've introduced legislation in the House to help ease certain financial burdens on tribal schools. I'm optimistic the changes, if enacted, will help communities retain teachers with enhanced employee benefits while also preserving more resources for the classroom.

The Native American people enrich South Dakota's culture and play an important role in the American story, but many are struggling. Whether it's health care, education, or housing, I'm committed to fulfilling America's treaty obligations and expanding opportunities within tribal communities.

Protecting States' Rights to Water

By U.S. Sen. Mike Rounds (R-S.D.)

June 15, 2018

For many South Dakotans, the Missouri River is a constant in our lives. We have driven past it countless times, fished its waters and boated on it with our friends and families. It has also historically been a major water source for state and municipal projects. However, a U.S. Army Corps' of Engineers proposed rule, estimated to be finalized as early as this fall, would limit states' rights to the natural flow of water through river systems.

The proposed rule, published during the previous administration, seeks to define the term "surplus water" in the Flood Control Act of 1944. In formulating the proposed rule, the Army Corps failed to take into account natural flows of the river system when defining surplus water. It was the intent of Congress to recognize and reaffirm the constitutionally protected rights of states to the natural flow of water through river systems like the Missouri. The proposed rule is an attack on states' rights and states' ability to access these natural flows.

Earlier this year, South Dakota's Game, Fish and Parks Department requested access to a small quantity of water from the Missouri River to construct a parking lot on government property adjacent to a reservoir. The Army Corps denied the request on the basis that the "surplus water" rule hadn't been finalized. The Army Corps is blocking states from legitimate usage of the water.

As chairman of the Environment and Public Works (EPW) Subcommittee on Superfund, Waste Management and Regulatory Oversight, I have held numerous hearings to review the Army Corps' management of the Missouri River. We recently held a hearing to focus on the problems with the "surplus water" rule. Secretary Steven Pirner of the South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources testified at the hearing. Of the proposed rule, he said, "this new definition of surplus water creates a monumental change to the law and steals South Dakota's rights to natural flows that, by tradition and law, are under the jurisdiction of the states."

In South Dakota, we live with a permanent flood as thousands of acres of productive farmland have been inundated to create the mainstem dams of the Missouri River. Recently, I was joined in a letter to President Trump by Governor Daugaard, Senator Thune and Representative Noem in which we stated that 500,000 acres of our most fertile river bottomlands were permanently flooded as the reservoirs filled following construction of these dams. Our citizens and tribal members were forced from their homes and communities.

We don't doubt the benefits of multi-use Army Corps projects, but they need to be taken into the proper historical context. In taking such an expansive view of what constitutes surplus water, and thus what is subject to federal control, the Army Corps clearly does not recognize the constitutionally protected rights of the states to the natural flows of the river system.

Rather, the Army Corps is attempting to produce a system in which legitimate municipal and industrial projects cannot gain access to the water passing through the states by refusing to grant easements to gain access to these water resources.

I have been working directly with EPW Chairman John Barrasso (R-Wyo.) to secure a verbal commitment toward addressing the "surplus water" rule through legislative action. We'll also continue working to make sure the Army Corps modifies its rulemaking process to consider the roles and rights of states.

Frankenstein meets a Greek god

By Richard P. Holm, MD

Have you heard the myth of Prometheus, the Greek Titan who challenged Zeus? Prometheus stole fire from Olympus and brought it down to humankind, making Zeus furious with him for sharing with mere mortals the secret of such power. Zeus punished Prometheus by chaining him to a rock. Each day, birds with sharp beaks would open his abdomen and eat away his liver, and, each night, his liver would grow back. Each day Prometheus would suffer, repeatedly punished for his gift to humanity.

There are many interpretations of the myth, but probably the most famous comes with the Frankenstein story, written by 17-year-old Mary Shelly in 1816. In Shelly's time, science was virtually exploding with new knowledge. Modern medicine was becoming effective, illustrated by how death rates were dropping; Galvani and Volt had just discovered how a dead frog leg would jerk when connected to a battery; chemists were showing how ether and nitrous gasses could make people stay asleep during surgery; and biologists were on the verge of realizing how microscopic bacteria cause contagion and fever, and how cleanliness could prevent such infection following surgery.

Thus, it is understandable why Shelly would create her famous story about scientist Victor Frankenstein. Like Prometheus who brought fire to mortals, her mad scientist brought life back to something once dead using newly discovered breakthroughs in electricity and chemistry. Shelly imagined how a mortal with scientific knowledge could create a superhuman being out of body parts stolen from a graveyard.

However, such a discovery should require responsibility and careful safeguards. Like fire that can jump its boundaries and spread destruction, creative scientific experimentation could quickly get out of control and cause monstrous harm and havoc to people and the environment. One cardinal rule of ethics we are taught in medical school demands: "first of all, do no harm."

Most every significant advancement in science has a potential good and bad side. Consider how nuclear power can produce marketable energy and yet can cause explosions of mass destruction; how antibiotics can treat life-threatening infections and yet can cause life-threatening overgrowth diarrhea illnesses; how advancements in genetics can cure a chronic disease like hepatitis C yet can potentially cause harm to our society's ability to afford health care. Indeed, great advancements in science can do tremendous good while still having the possibility to cause potential danger to public and environmental health.

Thus, the Greek myth of Prometheus and the monster story of Frankenstein both speak to us today. As we seek to advance science, we must understand the ethical responsibility of safety. First of all, do no harm.

*****

Dr. Rick Holms wrote this Prairie Doc Perspective for "OnCall®," a weekly program where medical professionals discuss health concerns for the general public. "OnCall®*is produced by the Healing Words Foundation in association with the South Dakota State University Journalism Department. "OnCall®*airs Thursdays on South Dakota Public Broadcasting-Television at 7 p.m. Central, 6 p.m. Mountain. Visit www.oncalltelevision.com

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

TZTS Youth Leadership Forum Report

By Lannie Paul and Itancan Christenson

We ventured to Aberdeen, South Dakota on June 3, 2018 to attend Youth Leadership Forum. Once we got there we settled into our rooms, which we shared with a roommate and suitemates. We were divided into four teams, Lannie was on the Orange "Big Money" team and Itancan was on the Yellow "Homies" team. This year's theme was Your Future - In It to Win It. Each day dealt with a different game show. Some people even dressed up like the Monopoly guy and Vanna "Danna" White.

On Sunday, we introduced ourselves and played team building games. Later we learned about Polynesian dances after we went to a cook-out. That evening we had a visit from the Aberdeen Firefighters, due to the fact that someone (Kirk) had overcooked the popcorn. We finally settled down and slept for a few hours.

On Monday, we did more team building and we met some awesome people including Chris and Chaz, who talked about being an adult with disabilities. They made it okay to be special. Later that day we went to the Red Rooster, a coffee shop that served us some cool treats and there we attended a magic show. Itancan held a couple of light switches for the magician. It was a crazy busy day.

Tuesday, we learned how to be self-advocates. We did more team building and more speakers came to talk to us. We went to Wylie Park in the afternoon and met Dr. Thom Flamboe. His message to us was "I AM SOMEBODY!" We had lots of fun on the go-carts, bumper boats, along with other fun things.

We were very tired on Wednesday, however we learned about goal setting and we played Jeopardy. In the afternoon we went to the Humane Society. Lannie bonded with a dog named Hannah and Itancan made friends with a dog named Buddy. There were many animals who needed "fur-ever" homes. The naughty cat's room made us laugh, because of the way they all sat in their cages. It made us wonder what they did to become the naughty cats. Later in the day we attended a dance, sang Karaoke, and worked at the Art Station. We had lots of fun. That night we each got special awards presented to us. Lannie received the "Most Respectful" and Itancan received the "Most Likely to Step-Up" awards.

Finally it was Thursday - our last day - we were sad to see it end. In the morning, we got our yearbooks and signed each other's books. We took group pictures and waited for our families to pick us up. The final event was a luncheon in our honor. We received a gift from Chris and Chaz and a Certificate of Completion from the governor of South Dakota. Then, we picked up our belongings and made our way home. We stopped to celebrate our week at the Purple Cow in Waubay.

We were glad we attended the 20th annual Youth Leadership Forum and we learned a lot.

TZTS 2018 Summer Meals schedule

Here is the summer meals schedule for Tiospa Zina Tribal School for June 4th-August 10th (Closed July 2nd-6th):

Monday-Friday

Breakfast           8:30-9:30 am

Lunch               11:30-12:30 pm

ESDS Summer Food Service Program

The Enemy Swim Day School announces the sponsorship of the Summer Food Service Program. Meals will be served to all children 3yrs. (must be with adult) thru 18 yrs. of age and under at no charge.

Children do NOT have to be enrolled in the ESDS summer program or regular school year at ESDS in order to eat breakfast and lunch.

Feel free to come join us for meals only!

Site Name:

Enemy Swim Day School

13525 446th Ave.

Waubay, SD 57273-5715

Dates of Operation: June 4, 2018 to June 28, 2018; and July 9, 2018 to July 19, 2018

Meal Service Times:

Breakfast: - 8:00 am to 8:30 am

Lunch - 11:45 am to 12:30 pm

Days Served:

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday.

In accordance with Federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA, its Agencies, offices, and employees, and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA.

Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g. Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.), should contact the Agency (State or local) where they applied for benefits. Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339. Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English.

To file a program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, (AD-3027) found online at: http://www.ascr.usda.gov/complaint_filing_cust.html, and at any USDA office, or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by:

(1) Mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights,1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20250-9410;

(2) Fax: (202) 690-7442; or

(3) Email: program.intake@usda.gov.

For more information, please contact Barbara Danley at (605) 947-4605 Ext. 3006

Visit our website at www.esds.us

Lakota Summer Institute comes to UTTC in Bismarck

Bismarck, ND – The Lakota Summer Institute North, the longest-running Lakota Language educational Institute in the country, is underway at United Tribes Technical College (UTTC) in Bismarck, ND.

Nearly 80 participants — from beginning students to language teachers — have gathered on campus for rigorous three-week classes in conversation, grammar and teaching methods developed by Jan Ullrich, co-founder of the Lakota Language Consortium, and one of the world's leading experts in teaching the Lakota language.

In addition to Ullrich, the teaching lineup this year at LSI-North includes leading language instructors from throughout Lakota Nation, among them Ben Black Bear from the St. Francis Mission School; Alex Fire Thunder from the Lakota Waldorf School in Kyle, SD; and Corey Yellow Boy from Oglala Lakota College.

2018 is a milestone year for the Lakota Summer Institute, and for the revitalization of the Lakota language.

It's the first time the Institute has been offered at UTTC, after eleven years at Sitting Bull College in Standing Rock. But it's actually the third of three Institutes taking place in Lakota Country this year.

From May 28 to June 8, The Lakota Language Consortium organized the first Summer Instiute (LSI- Lakota Language Academy) at Oglala College on the Pine Ridge reservation in Kyle. Meanwhile, Sitting Bull College is hosting their own Dakota/Lakota Summer Institute from June 4 to 22.

The expansion of Lakota Summer Instiute is a good thing for the community, notes Jan Ullrich. "We're excited about the changes" said Jan Ullrich. "The more places that offer quality Lakota language education, the better for Lakota language revitalization."

This year for the first time, free college credits (with a $35 registration fee) are being offered through a partnership with the Summer Institute of Linguistics at UND, while FREE CEU's are being offered directly from United Tribes Technical College.

In addition to the standard classes, several innovative new activities are happening this year at the Institute:

• A free one-week Hidatsa Workshop will be offered, thanks to funding from the Lewis & Clark Trail Endowment.

• A beta version of Owóksape, a new web-based program for studying Lakota being developed by The Language Conservancy, will be tested by Institute participants (Owóksape = "place of wisdom" in Lakota).

•The StoryCorps Mobile Tour, one of the largest oral history projects in the world, has partnered with the Lakota Language Consortium and coming to Bismarck starting June 29 for one month to record stories from the Lakota community for the Library of Congress archives and public radio.

LSI-North is made possible in part by support from Humanities North Dakota.

The Lakota Language Consortium is a non-profit that partners with schools and communities to help revitalize the Lakota language through organizing Language trainings; developing textbooks, apps and other learning tools; and through advocacy and media. http://lakhota.org

United Tribes Technical College in Bismarck, ND has served over ten thousand American Indian students from more than 75 federally recognized Indian Tribes across the nation. More at www.uttc.edu/about-uttc

Ten ways to encourage your daughter to become an engineer or scientist

Industrial engineer Paula Jensen vividly remembers the day her youngest daughter told her that building block toys were for boys, not girls.

"And her mother's an engineer," says Jensen, an industrial engineering lecturer at the South Dakota School of Mines & Technology in Rapid City, SD.

Despite a nationwide push to encourage more women to enter the science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields, there remains a lag.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that technology professions will see the greatest growth from now to the year 2030. Yet girls are still not pursuing the STEM fields in adequate numbers. And it's not because women can't do it. Studies show that girls score just as high or higher in math and science as their male counterparts, yet there remains a confidence gap – girls tend to believe that boys are better at science and math regardless of test scores.

What can parents do to encourage their daughters to remain open to careers in STEM fields? Here are 10 tips from the female scientists, engineers and staff at SD Mines.

Give your daughter toys that build spatial learning, an important skill in engineering fields - toys like tinker kits, Legos and builder kits. Studies show that girls tend to have less spatial skills than boys because of the toys they are given as children, says Jensen. The good news is spatial skills are easily learned, so make sure your daughters are building and creating. When Jensen's daughter told her building toys were for boys, she began to make a more conscious effort to give her toys that build spatial learning. Today, her daughter attends science-related camps and has a real interest in STEM.

Invite questions. Listen for those questions that show interest in the world, such as "Why is the sky blue?" and "What makes soda fizz?" And then answer the questions. If you don't know, together with your daughter find out. Make it fun.

Find mentors for your daughters. Do you know a female engineer or doctor or scientist? Make sure your daughter knows them, too. If you don't know any, find those examples in popular culture – books, television, movies, etc.

Don't be afraid to get involved with their schooling. For instance, if you know your child's school has one extraordinary physics teacher, go to bat to make sure your daughter gets that teacher.

Remind your daughter that it's OK not to have an A in everything. Inventors and scientists learn by trial and error. Mistakes sometimes lead to great things.

Find the science in everyday play. Does your daughter like to dig in the dirt and discover new rocks? Make the connection that this is a type of science and Google some fun stories about what geologists do. While making supper or baking cookies, talk about how there's a science behind the food cooking and yeast rising. If she figures out a solution to a problem, praise that she naturally used the scientific process, guessing and testing to figure it out. Attaching engineering and scientific terms to what they are already doing will help those labels continue to feel natural as they grow older, says Sarah Folsland with the Women in Science and Engineering (WISE) center at SD Mines.

If your daughter is especially "girly," make the science fit her spirit. A science princess is good at making beautiful glitter slime and uses chemistry to make it extra gooey and sparkly. Keep in mind that even parents can have biases of what a science experiment should look like. Identify those tendencies and get creative with your approach to make science and engineering appealing to your child's interests.

Take advantage of classes and camps. For instance, the National Security Agency (NSA) offers a free cyber security camp for girls. Even if your daughter has no experience in programming, these kinds of experiences could open her eyes to a career in computer science and coding.

Get your daughter's friends involved by creating a STEM club. Go on a nature hike and identify plants and birds. Look for science and engineering companies in your community and ask for a tour. Host a science-themed birthday party or conduct a science experiment in your kitchen when your daughter has friends visiting. There are tons of ideas online.

Be conscious of your own biases. You might not have fond memories of math and science classes, but be careful about how you describe your experiences and feelings about the subjects, says engineer Andrea Brickey, an associate professor of mining engineering and management at SD Mines. If your daughter is asking for help with her math or science homework and you don't feel you can assist, reach out to the teacher and see if there are tutors or older students who can help. There are also some great resources online to help brush up on your skills. Search for "Khan Academy" or "Just Math Tutorials" and have some fun, she says.

About SD Mines

Founded in 1885, the South Dakota School of Mines & Technology is a science and engineering research university located in Rapid City, S.D., offering bachelor's, master's and doctoral degrees. The university enrolls 2,778 students with a student-to-faculty ratio of 15:1. The SD School of Mines placement rate for graduates is 97 percent, with an average starting salary of more than $61,300. Find us online at www.sdsmt.edu and on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram and Snapchat.

Garden Corner

Submitted by Eric Hanssen

Browns Valley, Minnesota

Herbicide Drift

A subject that needs to be addressed from time to time is what to do about suspected herbicide drift injury on windbreak and ornamental trees. Each year I received numerous calls from tree owners that believe their trees were injured by a neighbor spraying a corn or bean field. The tough calls are the one where the suspected application was made the previous year but now the trees are dying and they want someone to come out to identify the chemical, give them an appraised value to the loses and fine the applicator. Unfortunately, it is not all the easy and the longer the tree owner waits to report the damage, the tougher the task becomes. I often talk with tree owners that say "Well we decided to wait a year and see how the plants do. Now they are dead." Any suspected herbicide drift tree injury should be reported to the South Dakota Department of Agriculture, Ag Services, Pesticide Complaint Investigation and Enforcement within 30 days of seeing the symptoms (call 1-605-773-4432 or use their online reporting form).

Do not wait for months or years to initiate a pesticide incident or damage complaint. Many herbicides will degrade to undetectable levels months (sometimes weeks) after an application.

The other issue is other injury can occur, for example winter injury, and that will mask any symptoms of herbicide. It can be very difficult, depending on the herbicide, to associated plant injury with a herbicide application made months or years before.

The tree owner also needs to know who applied the herbicide. There is no 'CSI' lab that can identify the herbicide and the applicator just from a sample.

The task is much simpler if the tree owner knows who sprayed.

This way the testing need only be for the herbicide applied, not all the possible herbicides that cause the particular symptoms.

The herbicide drift must also be on the land of the person who files the complaint.

Also Ag Services does not seek damages for the tree owner. This is a separate action and if herbicide drift is determined to be the causal agent then the tree owner may have to contact a tree appraiser to provide them with a value to their losses.

Finally the best option is to talk with the applicator first, have them look at the damage and try to come to some agreement without involving the state.

There are limited resources for investigation of these claims, and while they are a service that people can use, it is best if the two parties can come to an agreement without involving others.

This article comes from professor John Ball, SDSU Forestry Specialist in his Pest Update publication available online at http://sdda.sd.gov/conservation-forestry/forest-health/tree-pest-alerts/.

Legals

Statement of Non-Discrimination

Venture Communications Coop.

In accordance with Federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA, its Agencies, offices, and employees, and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, gender identity (including gender expression), sexual orientation, disability, age, marital status, family/parental status, income derived from a public assistance program, political beliefs, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity, in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA (not all bases apply to all programs). Remedies and complaint filing deadlines vary by program or incident.

Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g., Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.) should contact the responsible Agency or USDA's TARGET Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TTY) or contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339. Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English.

To file a program discrimination complaint, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, AD-3027, found online at http://www.ascr.usda.gov/complaint_filing_cust.html and at any USDA office or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call

(866) 632-9992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by:

(1) mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture

Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights

1400 Independence Avenue, SW

Washington, D.C. 20250-9410;

(2) fax: (202) 690-7442; or

(3) email: program.intake@usda.gov.

USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer, and lender.

25-1tc

 

Request for Bids

Requesting sealed proposals for:

Scope of Work

Goal: To provide educational training to Early Head Start and Head Start teaching staff and Coaching to Head Start teachers for August In-service Training August 22-24 2018 and Throughout the 2018-2019 school year

Deliverables:

1. Provide training for Early Head Start Staff that serve infants and toddlers, training requested on areas of Classroom Environment, Social Emotional, Cognitive growth, routines, meaningful age appropriate lesson plans and active engagement with an emphasis on literacy development.

2.Provide training for Head Start teaching staff that serve 3-5 year olds. Trainings need to be on small groups, mathematics in pre-k, literacy development. The importance of the classroom environment for learning, age appropriate activities and Kindergarten school readiness.

3. Coaching is aligned with the program's school readiness and programmatic goals, Creative Curriculum My Teaching Strategies, DLM McGraw Hill Developmental Learning Materials Childhood Express, Comprehensive Discipline Strategies, Developmentally Appropriate Practices, and CLASS.

August 22-24 comprehensive discipline strategy, its appropriate practices/strategies, small group classroom instruction and infant/toddler development.

All sealed bids must include and be submitted by July 6th, 2018 by 10:00am

Applicants must submit the following as a part of their proposal:

1.  Bio-sketch or resume of academic and professional credentials, technical competence, experience, and expertise.

2.  Two References that highlight the applicant's ability to perform the scope of work.

3.  Work plan to perform the scope of work delineating deliverables, timelines, costs, roles and functions.

Required Documentation:

1.  Statement of qualifications, competence, and capacity to perform the scope of work.

2.  Able to pass background checks.

3.  Willing to complete the required trainings, if applicable.

4.  Copy of SWO Business License, if proposal is approved.

Contact the Procurement Office for specifications: colletteh@swo-nsn.gov

Please submit sealed proposals to:

SWO Procurement Office

Attn: Collette Haase

PO Box 509

Agency Village, SD 57262

By 10:00 am on Friday, July 6th, 2018

All interested parties acknowledge that any Agreement executed and performed within the Tribe's exclusive jurisdiction is subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of the Tribal Court of Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation. All interested parties acknowledge that they must comply with the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Ordinances: TERO Chapter 59 Requirements, Wage Rates & Compliance Plan; Business License Ordinance Chapter 53 and Tax Ordinance Chapter 67; and Chapter 75 Sex Offender Registration.

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Tiospa Zina Tribal School

Accepting Closed Bids

For Skid Steer

Mahto Skid Steer, model no. L933. Serial No. L9330230623. Lift capacity: 950 lbs. Motor: Diesel.

Bids accepted at the school or by mail to: Tiospa Zina Tribal School, P.O. Box 719, Agency Village, South Dakota 57262. To be considered the proposal must be received no later than June 22, 2018 at 4:00 pm.

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO: D-18-495-316

IN THE MATTER OF:

RYLEE JEAN MONTREAL, Minor Child,

And concerning:

ALEX MONTREAL, Petitioner,

Vs.

SAMANTHA JO PIERCE-BARSE, Respondent.

NOTICE OF HEARING

Take notice that a hearing will be held at the above named Court, Agency Village, outside the city of Sisseton,  County of  Roberts,  South  Dakota, on the of 11th   day of  JULY,  2018  at the hour of  2:30 P.M  or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 13th day of June, 2018.

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

s/ BJ Jones,

TRIBAL COURT JUDGE

ATTEST: Eileen Pfeiffer, Clerk of Courts

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE: D-18-574-395

IN THE MATTER OF THE CHANGE

OF NAME OF:

JOSIAH CASKE CASIANO-LUFKINS, Minor,

And concerning:

STEPHEN W. LUFKINS, Petitioner

ORDER AND NOTICE OF HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Petitioner's request for a change of name from JOSIAH CASKE CASIANO-LUFKINS to STEPHEN WAYNE CASIANO-LUFKINS   shall be heard before the Honorable BJ Jones, Judge of Tribal Court, in the Courtroom of the Sisseton Wahpeton Tribal Court at Agency Village, South Dakota at 2:00 P.M. on the 26th day of JUNE, 2018.

Dated this 14th day of June, 2018

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

s/ BJ Jones,

TRIBAL COURT JUDGE

ATTEST: Eileen Pfeiffer, Clerk of Courts

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS- 05-065

SWOCSE/ Tasheena Wanna, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DARRELL DEMARRIAS, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of June, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 21st day of May, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

24-3

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS- 18-124

SWOCSE/ Vernon White, Jr., PLAINTIFF

VS.

AMBER DRUM, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish    Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of June, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 21st day of May, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

24-3

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS- 09-030

SWOCSE/ Ursula Eagle, PLAINTIFF

VS.

WILLIAM FELIX, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of June, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 21st day of May, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

24-3

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS- 07-186

SWOCSE/ Christine Hill, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JANEL HILL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of June, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 21st day of May, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

24-3

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS- 07-198

SWOCSE/ Mni Yata Hill, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CLAUDE KAMPESKA Jr, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of June, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 21st day of May, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

24-3

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I- 09-057

SWOCSE/ Leah Knapp, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LYLE BURNETT, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of June, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 22nd day of May, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

24-3

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I- 14-127

SWOCSE/ Valerie Paul, PLAINTIFF

VS.

HEATHER PAUL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of June, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 22nd day of May, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

24-3

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I- 18-083

SWOCSE/ Amanda Dietrich, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ANDREW RENVILLE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Amend Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of June, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 22nd day of May, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

24-3

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS- 03-203

SWOCSE/ Grace Frazier,

PLAINTIFF

VS.

ANNETTE BLACKTHUNDER,

DEFENDANT

 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of June, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 22nd day of May, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

24-3

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS- 14-036

SWOCSE/ Edith MacConnell, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DENISE CLOUD, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Review Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of June, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 22nd day of May, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

24-3

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS- 13-146

SWOCSE/ Jolene Bissonette, PLAINTIFF

VS.

WILFRED FAYANT, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of June, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 22nd day of May, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

24-3

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS- 06-138

SWOCSE/ Leroy Brown, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DARNELLL FEATHER, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 26th day of June, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 22nd day of May, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

24-3

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS- 07-099

SWOCSE/ TANF/Juanita Owen, PLAINTIFF

VS.

KRISTY OWEN, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of June, 2018 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 23rd day of May, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

24-3

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS- 18-124

SWOCSE/ Jessica Goodteacher, PLAINTIFF

VS.

GARY BRANT, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish    Paternity and Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of June, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 23rd day of May, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

24-3

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I- 09-008

SWOCSE/ Wayne German, Sr., PLAINTIFF

VS.

JADENE GERMAN, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of June, 2018 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 23rd day of May, 2018

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

24-3

Trading Post ads

Multi-family Rummage Sale

Saturday, June 23, 2018. St. Kateri's Hall 8 am-3 pm. Breakfast burritos at 8 am. Indian Taco sale at 11 am.

Women's clothing, kids clothing, household items, toys, some furniture, books.

25-1tc

 

HUGE SALE

Thurs.-Fri., June 21 & 22, 9 am – 7 pm. 11990 462nd Ave, Sisseton. ½ mi south of Fisher's Junk Yard. Lots of everything. Something for everyone. ALL FOR CHEAP! Household items, Knick knacks, Chest freezer, Fridge,

2 pc china stands, Seasonal décor, Strollers, Basinet, New & used boy, girl, & adult Shoes. Lots of new & used clothes ALL sizes teen, baby & adult. LOTS OF MISC ITEMS! 2004 Grand Prix. Pick-up Rims. Indian Taco's & Walking Taco's.

25-1tc

 

Sisseton Wahpeton College

Has the following vacancy:

Nursing Instructor, RN.

Sisseton Wahpeton College has an opening for a full-time Nursing Instructor. Candidate must possess a current SD nursing license, BSN is required, Master's degree preferred. Visit our website www.swc.tc for a complete job description and the application process. Contact HR at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118. Open until filled.

24-2tc

 

Tiospa Zina Tribal School

Job Openings

High School Positions:

Position: Special Education Teacher. Qualifications: Current Teaching Certification in any state meeting the requirements for the position in which applying. Opening Date: November 2, 2017. Closing Date: Open Until Filled.

Elementary Positions:

Position: Elementary Dakota Studies Teacher. Qualifications: Holds a Current Dakota Language Teaching Certification or is capable of and willing to obtain Dakota Language Teaching Certification, and 1 year experience working with Elementary students. Opening Date: June 15, 2018. Closing Date: June 29, 2018.

Support Staff Positions:

Position: Kitchen Supervisor. Qualifications: High School Diploma/GED and Completed State Kitchen Managers Trainings I, II; Completed Track I, II, III, and IV (State Nutrition Program); and Completed State School Food Service Certificate - Track 3 Class Certificate in Quantity Food Production (CANS) - Renew every 2 years. Opening Date: May 21, 2018. Closing Date: Open until filled.

Position: Special Education Paraprofessional.Qualifications: High School Diploma/GED, and 48+ college credits or Paraprofessional Praxis with 461+ score, and 1 year experience working with Elementary students. Opening Date: June 15, 2018. Closing Date: June 29,2018.

All applicants are required to complete both the Application and *Background check forms. Tiospa Zina is an Indian Preference employer.

 

Dakota Magic Casino

Job Openings

Count Department:

Team Member (5 Full-Time) 3:00 am to finish

Hotel Department:

Front Desk Clerk (2 Full-Time) Rotating

Lounge Department:

Deli Server (2 Full-Time) Day, Swing

Marketing Department:

Supervisor (2 Full-Time) Swing

Uniforms Department:

Attendant (Full-Time) Swing

Table Games Department:

Pit Boss (2 Full-Time or Part-Time) Rotating

Closing Date: June 22, 2018 at 4:00 p.m.

Starting Wage: D.O.E.

High School Diploma or GED required for most positions

Two identifications documents required upon hire

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department 16849 102nd Street SE Hankinson ND 58041 For complete Job Description contact James Neconish 701-634-3000 ext. 2582 Indian Preference will apply / EEO (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment) Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

REVENUE AUDIT CLERK (1 Full-Time): GENERAL FUNCTION: Reviews and compiles all paperwork produced by the Casino Cage and all other revenue producing departments. Generates detailed and summarized reports for each revenue category. Monitors compliance of Internal Controls. Reports any irregularities or exceptions to the Controller. Remains current on Tribal, State and Federal gaming rules and regulations.

REQUIREMENTS: High school diploma or GED required. 6 months accounting experience. Good oral and written communication and motivational skills. Accounting and computer skills required. Ability to handle confidential material and maintain confidentiality. Effective problem solving skills. Must obtain Key Gaming License upon hire.

This position will close on June 20, 2018 at 4 pm.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

SECURITY: SECURITY MANAGER. GENERAL FUNCTION: Manages all security operations. Coordinates and develops Security Policy and Procedures. Reports to General Manager.

REQUIREMENTS: High school diploma or G.E.D. equivalent. Minimum of three to five years experience in law enforcement or security operations. Supervisory experience. Effective communication skills. Ability to handle diverse situations and/or people. Physically fit and ability to lift 40+ lbs. Must complete all security certifications within a year of hire in accordance with the Gaming Commissions rules and regulations. Must obtain a Key Gaming License.

This position will close on June 13, 2018 at 4 p.m.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

M.I.S. (Management Information Systems): MANAGER (1 Full-Time). GENERAL FUNCTION: The MIS Manager directs the activities of the MIS personnel and is responsible for MIS Operations.

REQUIREMENTS: Excellent interpersonal and written communication skills. Flexibility and ability to work in a team environment. Bachelor's Degree in computer science, information systems, or a related field or 5+ years experience in a relation position; MCSE is beneficial. Extensive knowledge of Windows NT, Microsoft Proxy Server, IIS, RAID technology, tape backups and AS/400. Ability to lift equipment in excess of 30 lbs. Must be on-call. Proficiency in Unix, SQL, Micros, Casino Data Systems (CDS), computer hardware, networking, anti-virus methods and programming. Knowledge of Linux firewalls, mail servers and file servers. Must obtain Key Gaming License upon hire.

This position will close on June 27, 2018 at 4 pm.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

FOOD SERVICE: DELI COOK (1 Full-Time and 1 Part-Time). GENERAL FUNCTION: To prepare individual meals using grill, fryers, and broilers according to customers request.

REQUIREMENTS: High school diploma or GED equivalent. Must have one year cooking experience. Able to stand for long periods of time. Ability to lift at least 35 lbs. Must be able to work even shifts and weekend morning shifts. Cooking and food handling experience is required. Must obtain a Non-Gaming License upon hire.

This position will close on June 20, 2018 at 4 pm.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

PORTER: PORTER (1 Full-Time). GENERAL FUNCTION: Serves as janitorial/housekeeping staff for guests and casino operations.

REQUIREMENTS: Physical mobility throughout the facility and surrounding grounds. Able to lift 40 to 50 lbs. Must be able to bend, stoop, stand and walk a 8 hour shift. Weekends are mandatory, Must obtain a Non-Gaming License upon hire. Must be 21 years of age

This position will close on June 21, 2018 at 4 pm.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

Restaurant Department:

Wait staff (1) full-time & (1) part-time, rotating shifts, day, and swing, includes weekends & holidays. Customer service skills, prior experience with waiting on tables and working with a cash register is preferred. Must be able to multi-task. Appropriate dress code. Have the physical ability to stand for prolonged periods of time. Must have a High school diploma or GED & be at least 18 years old.

Prep cook/cook (2) full-time & (1) part-time, rotating shifts, day, and swing, includes weekends & holidays. Previous experience is preferred. Must be able to multi-task; have the ability to work under pressure; the ability to operate necessary equipment; knowledge of food preparation safety requirements and ability obtain a "Food Handlers" certification; physical ability to clean, lift heavy object up to 20 lbs. or more and restock inventory. Have the physical ability to stand for prolonged periods of time. Appropriate dress code. Must be very dependable. Must be at least 18 years old & must have a High School Diploma or GED.

Opening date: Thursday, June 14, 2018

Closing date: Wednesday, June 20, 2018 @ 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 
 

 

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