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Sota Volume 45 Issue No. 16

Anpetu Iyamni, April 23, 2014

Inside this Edition –

Indianpreneurship: What’s it all about? Come find out next week

SWO represented at Rosebud Keystone XL protest camp

GOTV reminder: Register to vote!

SWC Health Fair Monday, April 28th

Dispose of unused prescription drugs on “Take Back Day” Saturday

SWC Dakota Studies students, TRiO visit Minnesota Historical Society

Micah Gill selected as Columbia University HS Summer Program Fellow

Sisseton Jr. High wrestlers recognized for national competition

Next week: Winter 2013 General Council part twelve in a series

Deadline for receipt of copy for consideration is 12:00 noon Fridays

SWO represented at Rosebud Keystone XL protest camp

By Bessie Genia

Sota Reporter/Photographer

Sitting at home, reading random posts, I came across a post that invited people to head to RST Spirit Camp for a day. I didn't really give it any thought until my sister Tea told me about that same post later on that evening. We talked of what we knew about this spirit camp which was hardly anything concrete or substantial. I read in another native newspaper that they started this camp to protest the pipeline, and that was pretty much all the info we had. So we decided to go on this venture, to understand what's really going on and to get a better perspective on our communities. April 6th, and 7th was the official time frame so Tea and I made arrangements for our absence. We packed our hobo bags and headed to Dakota Connection to wait for the Long Hollow Van. Tom Wilson who hosted this expedition pulled up to our amazement with an empty van. We threw our Hobo Bags in the back and picked our seats, thinking maybe we were the first pick up site. So we sat together, and busted out our popcorn snacks as we headed out to the next pick up destination. We picked up John Heminger on the south side of our reservation, and Tom said we were on our way. It was upsetting to know that a call to public interest only had four people respond but at the same time it became a more in depth look.

After a few hours drive and a huge storm...we arrived at the Rosebud Sioux Tribes Spirit Camp. Freshly drenched with rain, we came upon a murky camp out in a corn field. Men were uncovering their wood piles, and opening up tipi flaps. We were welcomed to take pics as they set their camps back up, and we were invited to a late supper in their community tent on the North side of the camp. They used generators and propane in the makeshift kitchen/mess hall. We were offered hot coffee, juice, some pasta salad, and blueberry cake that was all made and donated by community members showing their support. That evening we sat, and these men gave us some good laughs. We were introduced to Russell Eagle Bear, a Rosebud Sioux Tribal council member and traditional/spiritual man. This Spirit Camp has support from the Rosebud Sioux Tribe, and Russell Eagle Bear drives 150 miles round-trip per day to show his support for this cause. Aldo Seoane a co-founder of Wicaga Agli helps out at the camp in many ways, and he hosted for us during the night at the Camp. Greg GreyCloud made sure we were fed and had coffee, but he also provided our discussions with an approachable insight.

It was discussed on what was being said live on KXSW 89.9 the next day, and sitting in the tent with these men....laughing and joking but also having serious conversations was a real eye opener to this cause. Most of what was talked about was in preparation for the live broadcast the following morning. They also showed us some of the signs that were torn down by "bad weather", and other small vandalism had occurred during their occupation. We arrived on DAY 9, and many ideas were tossed around to combat the vandals, and get people to know where to turn to get to this camp. John was nice enough to hold up one broken sign as a statement.

We were invited to spend the night at the camp in a fresh tipi they just set up that day, and they asked if we had blankets, Tea and I were the only ones to pack our own. They gave us a box full of disaster blankets and a huge pile of wood for the night. We said our good nights and bunked down in a tipi. It was hard to sleep simply because of appreciation. Appreciation for the time we had here, the new friends we met, the strength of the cause, the empowerment of what these men had to say, and what we were going to learn the next morning. Tom, John, Tea, and I sat up and talked about our journey so far, and how we can help. With all the years of experience both Tea, and I have in taking care of a tipi, I have to admit it was pretty tough to spend the night in a tipi that is fashioned to cover the basics. Chilly night air, and frost forming over everything, we had to keep the fire going in the wood stove provided...so needless to say we took turns sleeping.

As the Sun came up that next day, I was awakened by singing, and payers. The tipi had a soft glow from the sunrise that kept getting brighter and brighter with each song...I should have gotten up and taken some real nice morning pictures but that moment was too nice to disturb and try to capture it on camera, so I laid there next to the wood stove listening to the morning. Throughout the night we all experienced something out of the regular physical aspect of the camp, and by 4am or so we lost a koda to the cold. He threw in his hat and slept in the van. I don't want to name names but coming from our particular background associated with the tipi, it wasn't one of the ladies. Tea had here eyes pop open and we both stared out the smoke hole when we heard that same koda come back to the tipi and wake us up by saying "you-hoo" at the door a bunch of times. It was time to start the day, and complete our mission to get the word out.

Morning came with a crisp wind and another storm cell coming from the northeast, but we had a sunshine for miles yet. A hardy mixture of fried potatoes, bacon, goose eggs and cheese, along with super hot coffee was great breakfast. You can totally tell that these men, are definitely stepping out of comfort zones and doing new things all in the name of this Spirit Camp. More members of the Wicaga Agli came this day, to support the broadcast. With the generator going, extension cords plugged in Tom was setting up all his equipment to go live on air, and inform people about The Keystone Pipeline and Native issues.

After breakfast we went live on air, and first to speak on behalf of the camp was Gary Dorr. A Nez Perce Native who came to support the Shield the People project, and is the mediator for the Rosebud Sioux Tribe Spirit Camp.

They set up this Spirit Camp in order to emphasize the power of prayers, and the power of unity. It will stay here until one of two things happen. First option is President Obama denies the Keystone XL Pipeline permits, or the permit is signed and construction begins. That is when they turn from a Spiritual campaign to a blockage campaign. For many people who are unaware, the Keystone Pipeline is a 36 inch pipe that goes from Canada to Texas that pumps tar sands. Tar sands is a diluted particle matter mixture of particle crude, steam, mixed with 4 different types of carcinogenic compound chemicals. The pipeline is only buried seven feet beneath the surface, when terrain changes near lakes or rivers this pipeline will be buried at 25 feet deep. One of the main concerns Gary Dorr talked about was is the pipeline was faulty in areas,and just how devastating that impact would have on the surrounding areas. He gave two examples of a burst pipe, one in North Dakota, and one in Mayflower, AK. The pipeline was alleged to be moved to "protect" the Sand Hills in Nebraska, and they moved it a little to the East. By moving towards the East the pipeline is currently scheduled to run underneath the Oglala Aquafur, and the Mni Wochoni waterlines that supplies Rosebud with drinking water. The Missouri will be crossed with this pipeline. Open pit mining is toxic to the surrounding communities- cancer rate are sky rocketing in these areas near the open pits. Shield The People are in place to protect the water, the lands, and the air.

Tom Wilson asked a great question about if there was a breakage in the pipeline, who is in charge of clean-up? Surprisingly Gary Dorr said the Shield the People team has researched on how to clean tar sands spills, and there is no real effective ways to clean up. If it spills its toxic for years. At this time Shield the People is working hard to get a four billion dollar bond against Trans Canada for any leaks to help make sure the company is liable for faulty equipment and potential/serious accidents. Anywhere along the route of this pipeline Trans Canada has not put up any bond structures for itself, instead the company has been going through each state/county regulations. Local farmers that are in the pathway of this pipeline are signing easements, that basically says if a leak or crack happens to the pipeline running through their lands, Trans Canada has the right to hold individual land owners liable for damages, and clean-up will be the sole responsibility of the land owner in South Dakota.

Another example Gary Dorr uses comes out of North Dakota, where there was leakage in a wheat field. The contaminated land had to be removed, and it was thought that if baked the tar sands will be eliminated however it still left the soil unusable. Shipments of new soil had to replace all that was contaminated. He also talked about Keystone One that runs in the southern states, in the environmental impact statement for that pipeline and the XL Keystone pipeline as well...it is predicted to leak once every two years. On their Facebook page Oyate Wahacanka Woecun, one of their supporters posted a picture of a glass of contaminated water stating the Keystone One pipeline has been operational for eighteen months, and has already leaked 14 confirmed times. The best way to explain is the simplest term Gary Dorr says "It's 100% profit for Trans Canada, and 100% Liability for the United States."

Russell Eagle Bear gave us a bit of history on how long different tribes have been fighting and petitioning both Keystone Pipelines. He asked for the Oceti Sakowin to stand and support these prayer camps that are showing up on different reservations that run along the supposed pipeline. Prayers are strong, and we can make a difference with this strength. Russell Eagle Bear stated "This is our land and we shouldn't allow major corporations come in and do what they please." He also stated that if you wanted to show support, they take meat and food donations, blankets, and other needed items, also if you wanted to make a monetary donation that is welcomed too. A great mark of support can also come from sending your tribal flag, to help encourage and remind the camp that they are not alone in this fight. The weekend before we arrived a segment was shot for MSNBC so please check on that as well. Since the broadcast was live this morning, Russell had answered questions that Kxsw fans posted on the radio station's Facebook page. It was a real nice interaction between peoples.

Wayne Frederick was live on air, he also is one of the camp leaders. He expressed his gratitude for our tribal flag, and talked about the huge undertakings that happened to make this Spirit camp possible in the amount of time that they were given. He also explained that the Petroleum Coke is made of tar sand, through a refining process it's basically condensed coal. The United States has banned such a carcinogenic from being burned here, and we can only export to certain countries that are more relaxed in these environmental laws. Wayne wanted to debunk the rumor of potential gasoline...this pipeline is not going to pump Arabian crude oil, or North Dakota crude oil for gasoline, it is merely tar sand which is toxic and useless in the United States.

Greg GreyCloud sang a real awesome prayer song live on the broadcast, which was pretty amazing. When he started singing the wind really picked up around the mess hall tent we all were in. Standing there watching all these men come together from different roles they play and listening to Greg sing was a real nice sign of strength. Coming together to fight this cause, and to fight for our Nation I believe these men need and deserve our help, appreciation, and gratitude. Since this was officially day 10 of the spirit camp they already face opposition, and they are standing strong. Tom wrapped the broadcast up and the men kept going with their daily routines. Some had errands to run, some had services to attend, so Tom took out the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate tribal flag, and gave it to Greg GreyCloud so he can hang it with the other tribes that sent their support as well.

We left the spirit camp a little after noon. Tom, John, Tea, and I made our trip home seem so short because all we could talk about was how to help these men, and this cause. We plan on taking another trip, hopefully with more donations, and helpful knowledge on how to maintain functionality at the camp. Not to say it was rough but ideas to make it smoother. If you are interested in any way to help support this camp donations will be welcomed. Please go to their facebook account called Oyate Wahacanka Woecun and like this page for any further information or donation needs. As Russell Eagle Bear said "Once Crazy horse was asked 'where are your lands Crazy Horse?” and he said “Our land is where our relatives lay buried." This is a powerful statement that we all need to remember when it comes to protecting our lands.

Indianpreneurship: What’s it all about? Come find out next week

If Sota readers have been wondering what “Indianpreneurship” is all about there is a simple way to find out. Come out for next week’s free training Thursday and Friday, April 24-25 at the SWO administration building.

Here is the agenda. (Also see the notice elsewhere in this Sota.)

AGENDA

TRIBAL ENTREPRENEURIAL TRAINING

Sisseton Wahpeton Administrative Complex

Thursday - April 24, 2014

8:00 am – 9:00 am Breakfast

9:00 am – 9:45 am Blessing – Jesse Larson

Tribal Opening Remarks– Robert Shepherd, SWO Chairman

Opening Discussions - DelRay German, Chairman Dakota Nation Development Corporation Board of Directors

9:45 -10:15 am Business Planning – Kyle Smith

10:15 – 10:45 am Marketing – Kyle Smith

10:45 – 11:00 am Break

11:00 – 12:00 am Marketing

12:00 – 1:00 pm Lunch – Guest Speaker /Mark Nelson – “Spirit of an American Entrepreneur”

1:00 pm – 2:20 pm Mark Nelson, “Spirit of an American Entrepreneur”

2:20 – 2:35 pm Break

2:35 – 3:30 pm Record Keeping & Start-up Costs

3:30 – 4:00 pm Day in Review – Your Questions and Comments

Friday - April 25, 2014

8:00 – 9:00 am Breakfast

9:00 – 9:30 am Opening Discussion – Kyle Smith

9:30 – 10:00 am Reflections, Comments, Homework - Kyle Smith

10:00 – 11:00 Market Research

11:00 – 11:15 am Break

11:15 – 12:00 am General Business Issues – Overview

12:00 – 1:00 pm Lunch - Guest Speaker/Larry Swain

1:00 – 1:45 pm Financial Literacy – Ella Robertson, Community Planner

1:45 – 3:00 pm Cash Planning & Tools for Financial Management – Kyle Smith

3:00 – 4:00 pm Reflections and Goodbye – Kyle Smith

*Graduation and importance of ceremony

BIOGRAPHIES

Kyle Smith

Kyle founded RedWind in September 1999. He has 20 years experience in business planning, procurement, accounting, and administrative work systems. His major area of focus is in the redesign, development and management of high performance work systems for tribal, manufacturing, government and service sectors. He has led and facilitated multiple teams in organizational redesign, business process redesign, and project implementation, including the installation of enterprise-wide information systems and shared service organizations.

 

Mark Nelson

“Mark Nelsen is the definition of an Entrepreneur! From selling t-shirts out of the back of his pick-up, to Managing a multi-million dollar business, Mark has lived the life, and learned the lessons that every business person needs to know! The Principals and Practices he shares can help you become successful in whatever endeavors you pursue in life."

 

Dana Dykhouse - President & CEO

First Premier Bank

Sioux Falls, South Dakota

Family Business is an engaging, wise book. It offers help and insight for those from difficult families and it also offers much inspiration for those working to make their businesses or careers better. Mark’s story is an American success story, a story of setbacks and satisfaction, trials and triumph. The book is full of life.

 

Dan Neuharth, PhD

Greenbrae, CA

“The complexities of family business and the lingering impacts of long-ago relationships come to life in Family Business. A story of challenge, faith, relationships, ambition and vulnerability that explores what makes some family businesses a success, while others fail. A must-read for those who strive to thrive in business and in life. “

 

T.D. Griffith

Author & Small Business Owner

TDG Communications

Deadwood, SD

“This book is a story of one man’s journey of family to business and back again. Mark does a great job of teaching the reality of how family business’s blend. Using reality from personal experience, humor, open honesty and true insightful business strategies, Mark teaches the delicate balance of how the business of the family overlaps into family owned businesses and how the business is hauntingly ever present within the family dynamic. This is a great book for those seeking to understand family business dynamics, the impacts of the family on the business and vice versa and the important principles needed not to reinvent the wheel in your own family business.”

 

Dr. David N. Bird - Marriage & Family Therapist

Corvalis, Oregon

 

Larry Swain

SWC Dakota Studies, TRiO visit Minnesota Historical Society in St. Paul

Dakota Studies and Trio students from Sisseton Wahpeton College traveled to the Minnesota Historical Society in St. Paul, Minn. on April 15th.

The students toured the Library and Collections and viewed books, maps, documents, and Dakota material culture.

The fieldtrip was organized as an educational supplement to the Dakota Culture and Dakota Quillwork classes and as a cultural activity for TRIO students.

Erin Griffin is instructor of the Dakota Culture and Quillwork classes; Whitney Renville, MS, is Student Support Services Director/TRiO.

Thank you to Ben Gessner from the MHS for helping make this possible.

From the SWO “Get Out The Vote” (GOTV) –

Reminder to Register to Vote

April  2014

Dear Sota Iya Ye Yapi Readers:

Are you registered to Vote?

It is election year, not only for tribal elections but also state and national elections.

We are not only tribal citizens but we are also state citizens who have the right to exercise the right to vote.

 Your vote is important. Your vote decides who will be elected for offices at the local, state and national level.

When do I vote?

Last day to register to vote for primary elections is May 19th.

Early voting begins April 18th. (Early voting is at the courthouse of your county.)

Primary Election Day is June 3rd.

Primary Elections will be held for:

*United States Senate

*South Dakota Governor

*District 1 House of Representatives

*Sisseton School Board

 District 1 (Roberts, Day, Marshall and Brown County) has a total of 15,480 registered active voters and 1,061 inactive voters (inactive means you haven't voted within the past 4 years).

GET OUT THE NATIVE VOTE

UPCOMING EVENTS

April 24th VOTER REGISTRATION at Job Fair at Dakota Connection Casino and Tribal headquarters

April 25th VOTER REGISTRATION at Dakota Magic Casino

April 28th VOTER REGISTRATION the Sisseton Wahpeton College Health Fair

Other locations will be IHS, TZTS, ESDS, dates to be announced.

Aliive-Roberts County, Roberts Co. Sheriff’s Office, DEA holds “Taking Back Unwanted Prescription Drugs”

Aliive-Roberts County, the Roberts County Sheriff's Office and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) will give the public an opportunity to prevent pill abuse and theft by ridding their homes of potentially dangerous expired, unused, and unwanted prescription drugs. Bring your pills for disposal to Teals Market in Sisseton this Saturday, April 26th from 10:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. (The DEA cannot accept liquids or needles or sharps, only pills or patches.) The service is free and anonymous, no questions asked.

Last October, Americans turned in 324 tons (over 647,000 pounds) of prescription drugs at over 4,114 sites operated by the DEA and its thousands of state and local law enforcement partners. When those results are combined with what was collected in its seven previous Take Back events, DEA and its partners have taken in over 3.4 million pounds-more than 1,700 tons-of pills.

This initiative addresses a vital public safety and public health issue. Medicines that languish in home cabinets are highly susceptible to diversion, misuse, and abuse. Rates of prescription drug abuse in the U.S. are alarmingly high, as are the number of accidental poisonings and overdoses due to these drugs. Studies show that a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including from the home medicine cabinet. In addition, Americans are now advised that their usual methods for disposing of unused medicines-flushing them down the toilet or throwing them in the trash-both pose potential safety and health hazards.

DEA is in the process of approving new regulations that implement the Safe and Responsible Drug Disposal Act of 2010, which amends the Controlled Substances Act to allow an "ultimate user" (that is, a patient or their family member or pet owner) of controlled substance medications to dispose of them by delivering them to entities authorized by the Attorney General to accept them. The Act also allows the Attorney General to authorize long term care facilities to dispose of their residents' controlled substances in certain instances.

Future of three Sisseton community services focus of April 28 meeting

For many years, three community services - the Sisseton Food Pantry, the Kateri Thrift Store, and the War Cloud Drop-In Center - received considerable financial support from a Catholic order of priests -- the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate (OMI) - which served the Sisseton area since 1923. The Order will be ending their mission in Sisseton the end of June 2014, and with their departure more than $70,000 in annual subsidy to the three community services will be lost.

The Sisseton Ministerial Association will be hosting a "Brainstorming Session" next Monday, April 28 at 5:30 p.m. at the Sisseton City Hall Community Room to gather ideas and suggestions for continuing those three services. "There is definitely a need for all three," said Fr. Joe Hitpas, OMI, "but how they will function in the future may be very different than they are now."

The public is invited to attend the meeting to help explore new ways to provide the necessary services. The meeting will begin with a free meal for participants, provided by the Sisseton Horizons Committee.

For more information contact the Sisseton Area Chamber of Commerce at 698-7261 or visit with clergy at your local church.

"From the desk of Geri Opsal, Tribal Veteran Service Officer"

GeriO@SWO-NSN.gov

Phone 605-698-3388

Tribal VSO to begin

weekly Talking Circle

*PARENTS & FAMILIES: It's that time of year when our young ones decide they may want to be a part of the Armed Forces after graduation. If you have a family member who is thinking or who has joined the Armed Forces please contact our office so that we get them on the roster and correspond with them. We have Allen Ellingson who is deploying to Afghanistan and is asking for letters for members of his unit who do not receive mail. This is something that we will do for you and fellow Veterans. Please make sure you contact me via telephone 698-3388 or email at GeriO@SWO-NSN.gov. Thank you and proud of you that decide to serve this great Country of ours!

*Operation Reaching All Veterans was very well attended we had 27 Veterans sign in. Our goal is to reach all the Veterans that have not signed up in the VA and perhaps don't realize they may be eligible for benefits. We will have another Reaching All Veterans event held in Wilmot, SD in May and I will post a flyer for that as the time nears. I want to thank all of you who attended it was a great day of fellowship with other Veterans. We had a lot of information available and it makes us all very happy when we reach a Veteran that may be eligible for benefits due. See attached photos in this edition. Also Wopida Tanka to Floyd Beaudreau, Vietnam Veteran who so generously gave out caps to the boots on the ground Vietnam Veterans. Brothers in Arms.

*The first name that will be read at the ceremony during Memorial Day weekend (May 26th, 2014) is that of Evander Earl Andrews. A small-town boy, he had left his parent's home in central Maine, joined the Air Force, and on Oct. 10, 2001, became the first military person reported killed in the post 9/11 wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. His mother, Mary, 71, said Friday that she never thought his death would be followed by 6,700 more. On May 24, Andrews's name and the names of the others killed in the recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan will be read aloud chronologically for the first time in a tribute at the Vietnam Wall, according to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund. The ceremony will open at 9 a.m. on the east knoll of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, and the reading will run from about 10 a.m. to about 5:40 p.m. Here is the link for further information of this great event. http://www.vvmf.org/reading-of-the-names

*EMPLOY OUR VETERANS: Employers, managers, readers. If you have a job that you can offer a Veteran please contact our office so I can post the information. I have Veterans stop by on a daily basis (I am right next to job service) and I am creating a bulletin board area where I can post any job prospects. I will also have a table at the job fair that will be hosted by the TERO office so Veterans please stop by. TERO job fair should be in this week’s article.

*April is National Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month and VA BHHCS joins with their community-wide partners to raise awareness about this important issue. Sexual assault impacts veterans and active-duty service members who are living with the effects of Military Sexual Trauma (MST). Military Sexual Trauma is the term used by the VA to refer to sexual assault or repeated, threatening sexual harassment experienced during military service. The VA offers specialized recovery services for both men and women who have experienced MST. To learn more about Military Sexual Trauma (MST) and available services through VABHHCS call 1-605-718-1095 extension 3018.

*WOMAN VETERAN OPEN HOUSE: Will be held in May. We will have an open house for ALL women Veterans in the area and will have literature, benefit information, gift bags. Keep posted there will be a flyer out soon. But we want to ensure that we are reaching all women veterans in the area.

*We want to start a weekly talking circle in the near future and would like anyone interested to contact our office. It's not about anything in particular just fellow Veterans sharing stories and having that feeling of brotherhood - no meeting agenda just the time to converse together and share a cup of coffee. Please call me at 698-3388. Asking the hard questions is often the first step toward getting veterans the support they need. If you think that a veteran might be in crisis, tell him or her about the Veterans Crisis Line-or make the call yourself. Call 1-800-273-8255 and Press 1, chat online at VeteransCrisisLine.net/Chat, or text to 838255 for free, confidential support 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year. We need your help in telling all veterans and their loved ones that support is available and is only a phone call, chat, or text away. Spread the word in your community; no group or meeting is too small. Each person can make a difference in the lives of veterans in your community.

*WOMEN VETERANS CALL CENTER: 1-855-VA-WOMEN. Crisis Help Line: 1-800-273-8255, available 24/7, and tell them you are a veteran. All calls are confidential.

*American Legion Post #314 (Woodrow Wilson Keeble Medal of Honor Guard) - Delano Renville, Commander Cell#: 268-0354 / Vietnam Veterans Kit Fox Society - Dayton Seaboy, Commander Phone#: 698-3299 / Desert Era Veterans - Danielle DeCoteau, Commander Cell#: 467-9714 for GAS ASSISTANCE: Geri Opsal 698-3388.

Peace, Geri Opsal, TVSO.

We must look for the opportunity in every difficulty instead of being paralyzed at the thought of the difficulty in every opportunity." -Walter E. Cole, Korean War Hero

“Ehanna Dakota Woyakapi”

Dakotah stories feature column

By Vine T. Marks

**** IKTOMI MICAKSICA KCI ****

Makoce obdaya tanka hed wi wiyakpayena he ka wato ehna toktekte canhdohu hota wapamna yakapi. Canku cistina wanin wato ehna , wikcekce , tahca ha ktun, pa sabyena wiyakpayena Iktomi mani yawanke.

Canhdohu wapamna enannaked yukanm ehna yuksanksan yawanke. Nakun inmutanka se owasteyena itonpeya mani, ka canhdohu oge tewankantu isakip inanji. Hiyate akan hetanhan pa yuptanptanyena oksanksan etuwan, ka nakun imnasni tahu hanska hukucenanh magaksica se hduse ka taku hinsma wanke ohdate wanyag wacin.

Unkan, itehota sunktokeca cistina heca! Wato ehna yuhmihmi pasu hanska sapa siha ohdata paoskica ka sinte hinhteyena owas akape, ka hed istimayake! Heced Iktomi wayake. Hecen owastinanh siha wanjigji ehnakayake, ka taku peji hota ohdate wankawanke anasdate. Wanna isakib inanji ka ikiyenanh amdeza tka istahmus owanjinanh wankawanke. Isti paskid ihduyuse ka micaksica iwankap baptus inanji ka nuge pazu itokap hduze kas icacakas niya sni secece.

"Ta!" kitah eye. “Ta, tuka tehantuh sni, ded tinta oinyang skanyake. Wayake eto, wiyaka wan tecahce henanh yus un. He nina tado wastekte." Iyoki nape wiyaka yus un he icu ka heye, "Wan, ninanh tehan te sni naka henanh kata! De watig heciya awahde ka waceonpa ka yupiya ipimiciyeke. Wastedo!" hecen iha ka, micaksica siha owas kage yuse ka cakahu akan kaho iyeya. Yupiya wotekte heceyena awacin yawanke , tka sunktokeca nina tke ka tokiya tig he nina tehantu, ka istakakpayake ecin temni ista mahed iyayekte cinsni.

Kin yuha yawanke hecen micaksica iyeka ista kabdaya ka nakun hi hanskaska wiyakpayena mahpiya etkiya etuwan wankawanke. "Miye de mani bdamake kinhan wanna matukakte tka, tka akicita okiciza hetanhan hdi se yuha amakiyahdap de nina iyomakipi!" Heced tawacin imahed heyayake. Toheni tuwena decumsni hecen wikcekce wankawanke ka ake wanjigji ista to istakakpan. Tohinna zitkana hecun wadakesni? Ehanna oyate unkitawapi hena tokahiye woeyepi. Tohan zitkana waniyag nanjiyake kinhan , taku ska ka ospa to ista aogangan koyahanye akahpa ka ake tokiya iyaye ce, heon istakakpan to cazeyatapi. Tohan siceca hpa ayap kinhan he isa heced ista kabdayapce, hehan oge is canzep se ista sniyanh ahituwanpce.

Kin ayap ka nahunhunza he owas hba kiye ka istakakpan isa mahpiya se to, henan owas inanji, ecin Ikotmi wanna tig heciya ihuni. Wanna hpasni ka skan hinhde, unkan hinhpayayake seecece, ye ka ye ka eced maka akan buyena hdinhpaye ka niya okihisni. Iktomi taktokun kte stodyesni, hecen owanjina wankawanke. Hecen de Iktomi oinyang skan ka waci konsa ka zizidowanyake. Nakun cansakena owas puze oge pahi ka hupahu akan yuksaksa ka iyoki peta wan tanka kage. Wanna peta hmuyena ide hehan Iktomi micaksica hwe iyaye.

Ake shunktokeca siha topa kage yusa ka tohanye okihi kahomni yake hehan peta etkiya yekkte scece ayustan eyeya. Ake sunktokeca kinyan se iyaye ka tate katahce pazu izitese ksuye. Peta sayena ideyake wayake iyoki petaga ehna bobduyena hdihpaye. Koyahena peta hetanhan psid iyaye ka siyete hetanhan petaga bobdu ka Iktomi hiyete ka isto tawa akan hdinhpayapi. Iktomi nina yusinye ka nagi wan peta hetanahan heyu kcin. Ista niskotanka icap nanji, ka ahakupana pan tka.

Micaksica wato ehna kahmihmi iyaye ka pa nakun maka akun nina pakinta eced hin tawakin ideyake owas kasni. Iktomi is ista nahdesina, pa etanhan napsid heyupte se, nanjiyake, ka isto hu sniyekte ipohonyake. Hehan micaksica peta omaeceyetan nanjiyake ka Iktomi aihayake. "Hau koda, toksta ake anpetu wan hikte, tka inupe decenu kinhan toka tehce stodyaye, hehan peta wan yakage oyakihi." Heye iyoki uwinh omaecedkiya nastod kinhde. De woyakapi owihanke.

Mitakuyapi, Vine T. Marks, Sr.

Lakota Solar Enterprises Founder honored at White House Solar Summit

Washington, DC – April 17, 2014 – Henry Red Cloud, founder of Lakota Solar Enterprises, was one of ten honorees celebrated today at the White House’s Solar Summit to recognize leaders in solar innovation and deployment.

“I applaud Henry Red Cloud’s dedication to bringing clean, renewable energy to families and communities in Indian Country,” Senator Tim Johnson said. “Lakota Solar Enterprises has provided affordable and reliable home heating throughout our tribal communities, and I’m pleased that he is being honored today at the White House.”

Lakota Solar Enterprises is a Native American-owned and operated renewable energy company located on the Pine Ridge Reservation that manufactures and installs solar heating systems to homes across tribal communities. Lakota Solar Enterprises also offers a job training program through the Red Cloud Renewable Energy Center (RCREC) that provides tribal members with the knowledge and skills to develop additional renewable energy programs and businesses.

Henry Red Cloud’s company employs tribal members who manufacture and install solar heating systems for Native Americans.

Red Cloud also runs a renewable energy center that provides green job training. The White House says his sustainable energy projects offer Native Americans "a new way to honor the old ways."

The Lakota Solar Enterprises founder is the direct 5th generation descendent of Chief Red Cloud, one of the last Lakota war chiefs and one of the most famous Native Americans in history. Henry was born and raised on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota, home of the Oglala Lakota Nation, where living conditions are extremely difficult.

For more than a decade, Henry has devoted himself to developing his expertise with renewable energy applications that are environmentally sound, economically beneficial, and culturally appropriate. Today, Henry is a twenty-first century Lakota Warrior, bringing green technology and employment to Native American communities. He reminds tribes that they can live sustainably and shows them that by embracing clean, renewable energy applications there is a way to get back to a traditional relationship with Mother Earth. As Henry says, “This is a new way to honor the old ways.”

Henry’s efforts to bring renewable energy to tribal lands have been recognized nationally. In 2009, he was named an Innovative Idea Champion by the Corporation for Enterprise Development (CFED) and had the opportunity to share his work with hundreds of people at the 2009 Innovation Summit in Washington, D.C. Henry has also received special recognition by the Nuclear-Free Future Awards (NFFA), which honor the ongoing work of individuals and initiatives struggling to bring an end to the Nuclear Age.

NCAI proud of Pine Ridge Champion of Change

Washington, DC – The National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) is proud that the White House has chosen a representative of Indian Country as a “Champion of Change.”

Henry Red Cloud is the Founder and Sole Proprietor of Lakota Solar Enterprises (LSE) on Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota. One of the first 100% Native American-owned and operated renewable energy companies in the nation, LSE employs tribal members to manufacture and install efficient solar air heating systems for Native American families living on reservations across the Great Plains. Additionally, Henry manages the Red Cloud Renewable Energy Center (RCREC), a one-of-a-kind Native educational facility where tribes from around the U.S. receive hands-on green job training in renewable energy technology and sustainable building practices. Henry Red Cloud is providing Native Americans with “a new way to honor the old ways” through sustainable energy solutions that are environmentally sound, economically beneficial, and culturally appropriate.

Tribal nations are engaging in some of the most innovative and dynamic projects around clean energy development. NCAI is encouraged that the Administration continues to highlight this work and give Native enterprises the attention they deserve.

SWO Grazing Workshop next week at Tribal admin building

Open to the public

A Grazing Workshop for anyone interested in managing their grass lands will be held at the new SWO Admin Building located in Agency Village on April 30th from 9:00 to 4:00. Please RSVP to Karen at SWO Realty at 698-8220 with numbers attending. There will be a $5.00 charge for noon meal.

Topics to include water and fence systems and possible ways to pay for them. Monitoring tools and Invasive species- chemical considerations and pollinators. Soil health, cover crops and demonstration of the rainfall simulator. Also addressing resource concerns on tribe and trust lands and 2 producer presentations.

Look forward to an interesting day of livestock related topics.

Sponsors and supporters are SWO Realty and SWO Natural Resources, NRCS, SDSU Extension, Roberts Conservation District, and SD Grassland Coalition.

Remarks by Assoc. Attorney General Tony West at Nat’l Indian Child Welfare Assn. annual conference

Ft. Lauderdale, Florida – April 14, 2014 – Thank you, Theodore and Alex, for that kind introduction and for inviting me to join you today at this conference. It is wonderful to be here with so many friends, colleagues, and supporters. And it is an honor to share the stage this morning with two great partners, Assistant Secretary Washburn and Associate Commissioner Chang.

I would especially like to thank NICWA and its members for the work that you do -- day in and day out -- to strengthen Indian tribes, to support Indian families, and to protect Indian children in both state child-welfare and private-adoption systems throughout our nation.

And I think it's fitting that what brings us together this morning, this week -- from communities across this country -- is our commitment to children, particularly Native children. I think it was the French philosopher Camus who wrote about this being a world in which children suffer, but maybe, through our actions, we can lessen the number of suffering children.

Indeed, what brings us to Ft. Lauderdale is that promise we make to all of our children: that their safety and well-being is our highest priority; that they are sacred beings, gifts from the Creator to be cherished, cared for, and protected.

It was that promise that, nearly forty years ago, led Congress to hold a series of hearings that lifted the curtain and shed light on abusive child-welfare practices that were separating Native children from their families at staggering rates; uprooting them from their tribes and their culture. Roughly one of every three or four Indian children, according to data presented at those hearings, had been taken from their birth families and placed with adoptive families, in foster care, or in institutions that had little or no connection to the child's tribe.

And in the face of that overwhelming evidence, a bipartisan Congress acted and passed the Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978.

And in the four decades since, as everyone here knows, ICWA has had a dramatic impact. Families, tribes, social workers, and Indian foster and adoptive parents have invoked ICWA’s core protections to stem the most flagrant abuses.

Tribes no longer face the prospect that a quarter to a third of their children will simply disappear, shipped off to homes halfway across the country. Today, in many places, tribes and states have developed productive working partnerships to implement ICWA – partnerships that ensure that Indian families and cultures are treated with the respect they deserve.

And while it is right for us to recognize the landmark achievement that is ICWA, we also know that there is much work left to do. There is more work to do because, in some states, Native children are still removed from their families and tribes at disproportionately high rates.

There's more work to do because nationwide Indian children are still two to three times as likely as non-Indian children to end up in foster care; in some states the numbers are even larger.

There's more work to do because every time an Indian child is removed in violation of ICWA, it can mean a loss of all connection with family, with tribe, with culture. And with that loss, studies show, comes an increased risk for mental health challenges, homelessness in later life, and, tragically, suicide.

So, as far as we have come since ICWA became law in 1978, we have farther still to go.

You all know this is true from both professional and personal experience. And I want you to know that President Obama and Attorney General Eric Holder share your commitment to improving the welfare of Indian children and are committed to working with you to help achieve that goal. Although ICWA speaks primarily to the responsibilities and roles of the states and the tribes, we believe there’s a constructive part for the federal government to play.

That's why the White House has directed the Departments of the Interior, Health and Human Services, and Justice to engage in an unprecedented collaboration to help ensure that ICWA is properly implemented. I believe we will hear more about this effort from Assistant Secretary of the Interior Washburn in a few minutes.

For our part at the Justice Department, our main ICWA contributions have focused on precedent-setting litigation that can affect ICWA's reach and force. One of ICWA’s most important provisions is its recognition that Indian tribes, as sovereigns, have presumptive jurisdiction over Indian child-custody proceedings. And over the years we have worked hard to help protect this tribal jurisdiction by participating in federal and state court litigation as an amicus curiae, or “friend of the court.”

In Alaska, for example, we’ve participated in a line of cases over the last 20 years to ensure that Alaska tribes have jurisdiction over child-custody disputes. Starting with the landmark John v. Baker case, we’ve filed multiple amicus briefs in the Alaska and U.S. Supreme Courts, successfully arguing that even tribes that lack “Indian country” retain jurisdiction to address child-custody disputes.

Of course, we've not always prevailed. Last June's U.S. Supreme Court decision in Adoptive Couple v. Baby Girl, which narrowly interpreted ICWA and terminated the parental rights of a Cherokee father in connection with his daughter, was decided over our arguments in support of the father.

But even when we don't prevail, our legal arguments can have a major impact on the ultimate decision. You'll recall that in Baby Girl, one of the arguments advanced by the adoptive couple was, essentially, that ICWA was unconstitutional -- that it "upset the federal-state balance," suggesting that Congress was prohibited from overriding state child-custody law when an Indian child was involved.

We countered that applying ICWA in that case raised no constitutional concerns, as Congress has plenary authority to protect Indian children from being improperly separated from Indian communities. And on this point, we were successful: even though we lost the ultimate issue and the High Court ruled against the Cherokee father, the Court did not rely on the adoptive couple's constitutional argument and did not rule that ICWA was unconstitutional.

Notwithstanding setbacks like the Baby Girl decision, we will continue to stand up for ICWA because, as we said in the Supreme Court, it's “a classic implementation of Congress’s plenary [trust] responsibility . . . for Indians.” You see, for us, standing up for ICWA means standing strong for tribal sovereignty. "Nothing could be more at the core of tribal self-determination and tribal survival,” we said during oral argument in the Baby Girl case, “than . . . [determining] tribal membership and . . . [caring] about what happens to Indian children.”

This, of course, is completely consistent with the Administration's steadfast efforts to advance tribal sovereignty on a whole host of fronts. It was our Nations’ Founding Fathers, the framers of our Constitution, who expressly acknowledged tribal sovereignty when they empowered Congress to regulate commerce not only “among the several States,” but also “with the Indian Tribes.”

It's a principle that was succinctly summed up by President Obama in 2009 when he observed: "Tribal nations do better when they make their own decisions."

And for those of us privileged to serve in the Obama Administration, what does standing up for tribal sovereignty mean?

It means not only filing briefs in Indian-law cases that seek to preserve the victories tribes have won in the lower courts; but also seeking to change the law, where necessary.

Perhaps the best example of that is last year's fight to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act, or VAWA. As you know, the same year Congress helped advance tribal sovereignty by passing ICWA, the Supreme Court, in the Oliphant case, held that tribes lacked criminal jurisdiction over non-Indians unless Congress said otherwise. But for 35 years, Congress remained silent.

So even violent crimes committed by a non-Indian husband against his Indian wife -- in the presence of their Indian children, in their home on an Indian reservation -- he could not be prosecuted by the tribe. So violent crimes went unprosecuted and unpunished, and violence against Native women escalated.

So in 2011, the Justice Department drafted federal legislation to fix this problem by restoring tribes’ criminal jurisdiction. Last winter, that legislation was enacted by Congress and signed into law by President Obama. Today, the Justice Department and three Indian tribes -- the Pascua Yaqui Tribe of Arizona, the Tulalip Tribes of Washington, and the Umatilla Tribes of Oregon -- are all actively implementing the first pilot projects under VAWA 2013.

And while VAWA 2013 is the best example of our trying to change the law's balance in favor of tribal sovereignty, it's not the only one. When the Supreme Court's decision in the Carcieri case made it harder for the Secretary of the Interior to take land into trust for some tribes, we stood with the tribes and repeatedly pushed Congress to pass the Carcieri fix, so that tribes could put their land into federal trust regardless of when they were recognized.

In addition, in response to Carcieri, the Interior Department has analyzed what tribes were under federal jurisdiction in 1934, which in turn has enabled Interior to make positive land-into-trust decisions for many tribes. And the Justice Department is vigorously defending those decisions when they are challenged in court.

Standing up for tribal sovereignty also means extending the benefits of that government-to-government relationship to every legitimate Native American group in the United States. That’s why the Interior Department is currently revising its federal acknowledgment regulations, so that tribes that have been terminated or otherwise denied their proper status as sovereign nations can reestablish a government-to-government relationship with the United States.

Standing up for tribal sovereignty means supporting the U.N. Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, as this Administration does, declaring that all “[i]ndigenous peoples have the right to self-determination . . . [and to] freely determine their political status.”

And it means not overlooking one of our country’s largest indigenous communities: the Native Hawaiian people. In 2010, Attorney General Holder and then-Secretary of the Interior Salazar took the historic step of expressing this Administration’s strong support for a proposal that would lead to reestablishing and maintaining a government-to-government relationship with the Native Hawaiian community.

Tribal leaders in the continental United States have long proclaimed that Native Hawaiians deserve the same inherent rights to local self-government, self-determination, and economic self-sufficiency that other Native Americans enjoy. And today we have a federal government willing to stand beside them and defend those core principles.

So standing up for tribal sovereignty means moving forward on all of these fronts, as well as many others, like continued support to improve public safety in tribal communities -- almost 1000 DOJ grant awards to tribes totaling nearly $400 million over the last four years.

Or working to identify ways to reduce the violence experienced by too many of our Native children, as our Task Force on American Indian/Alaska Native Children Exposed to Violence is doing through convenings and listening sessions throughout the country, the next one occurring later this week here in Ft. Lauderdale.

Or improving the safety of tribal communities by more U.S. Attorney prosecutions of cases in Indian Country -- up by more than 50 percent in the last four years.

These are pragmatic, meaningful and significant measures in support of tribal sovereignty, and they are making a difference every day.

Let me close by saying this: one of the great privileges of my office as the nation's Associate Attorney General has been the opportunity to delve into issues of tribal public safety and tribal sovereignty. And over the last five years, my work has taken me to Indian Country more than a half-dozen times.

And for me, those visits are a reminder of the rich legacy that First Americans have bestowed upon this country, and that we are a stronger America because of that legacy.

They remind me of the important trust relationship between the United States and tribal nations, and that the struggle for tribal sovereignty and self-determination has too often been waged in the face of disruption and devastation caused by assimilation and termination policies pursued in the not-so-distant past.

They remind me of the Code Talkers, the Cold War Warriors, and the other Native American men and women who proudly wore the uniform and whose continued service today helps secure the freedoms we enjoy here, at this moment and in this place; and that, as important as is our shared history, so too is our common destiny: a future that is left in our hands to shape.

A future that can be defined by sovereignty and self-determination; by resilience and sustainability and economic opportunity; a future unclouded by violence, in which the Seventh Generation is healthy, happy and strong.

That is the vision of the future that unites all of us in this room. It is our charge and our challenge; our collective mission. And for all that you do to make real this promise to our children, know that I salute you, proudly stand with you, and will work alongside you, today and in all the days ahead.

Thank you very much.

Grants $500,000 to AICF to strengthen family engagement in Native early childhood education

Denver, Colorado – April 17, 2014 – Research has shown that when entire families are engaged in their child's education from an early age, the child is more likely to succeed in school. A $500,000 grant from the W. K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF) to the American Indian College Fund will establish an 18-month program to engage Native families in the development and transformation of education practices and outcomes in their children's education at early childhood education centers located at tribal colleges and universities.

The American Indian College Fund provides financial support for programs at tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) which are located on or near American Indian reservations to provide American Indians with affordable place-based education grounded in Native culture. The Ké' Early Childhood Initiative: Strengthening Systems of Shared Responsibility among Native Families, Schools, and Communities positions TCUs to develop opportunities with Native families to engaging in and transform early childhood educational practices and outcomes by becoming informed educators, researchers, and advocates. Family engagement is a shared responsibility that will promote partnerships and methods to address racial, cultural, social, and systemic inequities embedded in educational systems, starting with early learning environments serving Native children from birth to eight years old. At each project site, Native families will play a central role in designing, implementing and examining the success of programmatic innovation. Families and kinship relations will ensure Native culture and language are central forms of knowledge that are aligned with academic knowledge presented in early learning program curricula.

This project will impact Native communities in powerful and transformative ways. Collaborations among the College Fund, TCUs, and families will generate a visionary movement that is urgently needed to shape the future for young children and families.

The College Fund plans to announce TCU grantees in June 2014.

"WKKF is proud to partner with an exceptional organization like the American Indian College Fund, which is clearly committed to ensuring families, schools and communities are working together to help children reach their full potential," said Carla Thompson, vice president for program strategy at WKKF. "The College Fund's focus on the importance of Native culture and language is an especially important reminder that all families are powerful assets for their children's education."

Dr. Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund said, "As tribal people, our kinship is the foundation of our understanding of the world. Our children are our most important assets and when the family and community surround our children with the best opportunities, partnerships, and resources then we pave the way for more prosperous and healthy tribal societies. The College Fund is pleased that the partnership brings resources to our students and their families in a manner that recognizes our understanding that education is a life-long experience and not only the opportunity to go to college."

From the White House blog –

Update on the President’s My Brother’s Keeper Initiative

Broderick Johnson and Jim Shelton – Posted April 9, 2014 – “My administration’s policies—from early childhood education to job training, to minimum wages – are designed to give a hand up to everybody, every child, every American willing to work hard and take responsibility for their own success. That's the larger agenda.

But the plain fact is there are some Americans who, in the aggregate, are consistently doing worse in our society—groups that have had the odds stacked against them in unique ways that require unique solutions; groups who’ve seen fewer opportunities that have spanned generations. And by almost every measure, the group that is facing some of the most severe challenges in the 21st century in this country are boys and young men of color.”

President Obama used these words to launch My Brother’s Keeper, his initiative to help ensure that boys and young men of color in America have the opportunity to reach their full potential.

Since then, the public response has been overwhelming. We’ve heard from private philanthropies and businesses, mayors, state and local leaders, faith organizations, community based non-profits, and thousands of interested citizens, all who are committed to creating more pathways to success for these boys and young men. We will continue to engage and listen to these critical voices and those of the boys and young men this initiative focuses on, as we continue to learn from the efforts of the many stakeholders who have been committed to this cause for years. And we will do our best to live up to the optimism and incredible expectations this initiative has unleashed.

The first phase of the initiative has already begun in earnest and we want to provide an update on our progress to date and a sense of what to expect in the near future.

The Task Force has begun a 90-day process to develop the plans and infrastructure required to implement and sustain the initiative’s efforts. We are currently listening and engaging, working with stakeholders across the country to get their feedback on how we can all work together to make this initiative a success.

On the day of the launch in February, President Obama signed a Presidential Memorandum on “Creating and Expanding Ladders of Opportunity for Boys and Young Men of Color” which created a Federal Task Force to provide an assessment of and recommendations on how public and private actors can improve measurably expected educational and life outcomes and address persistent opportunity gaps. To inform that work, the President called for tools that will assess critical indicators of life outcomes for boys and young men of color and online engagement to lift up strategies, practices and programs with strong evidence of improving outcomes.

The Task Force’s work begins with identifying these critical indicators. We are focusing on five key moments that mark critical junctures on the path to healthy and productive adulthood: early learning and literacy, pathway to college and careers, ladders to jobs, mentors and support networks, and interactions with criminal justice and violent crime. Participating federal agencies are also now beginning to assess strategies, practices and programs to determine how they impact life outcomes for boys and young men of color. All of this work will inform a report by the Task Force on our progress and recommendations that we will submit to the President at the end of this 90-day listening and learning process.

At the same time, ten leading foundations have launched a private sector coalition that seeks to invest at least $200 million dollars over the next five years to find and rapidly spread solutions that have the highest potential for impact. This is on top of $150 million in current spending that these foundations have already committed toward this work. These foundations have announced they aim to put in place a strategy and infrastructure for coordination of their investments and additional commitments from a diverse array of actors from other sectors.

My Brother’s Keeper is focused on unlocking the full potential of boys and young men of color—something that will not only benefit them, but all of America. The Federal Task Force will pursue collaborative and multidisciplinary approaches to building ladders of opportunity. We are excited about the progress we are making and believe this effort has the potential to teach us a great deal about using evidence-based strategies to achieve the universal goals we have for all of our nation’s children.

*****

Broderick Johnson is Assistant to the President and White House Cabinet Secretary, and the Chair of the My Brother’s Keeper Task Force. Jim Shelton is the Deputy Secretary of Education and Executive Director of the Task Force.

Editorials –

Sota guest editorial –

U-WI-TA coming together

Important message from Chief Arvol Looking Horse, 19th Generation Keeper of the White Buffalo Calf Pipe

We, the Original Caretakers of Mother Earth, have no choice but to follow and uphold the Original Instructions, which sustains the continuity of Life. We recognize our umbilical connection to Mother Earth and understand that she is the source of Life, not a resource to be exploited. We speak on behalf of all Creation today, to communicate an urgent message that man has gone too far, placing us in the state of survival. The Keystone XL Pipeline and the dirty oil that it transports creates an urgent threat to our collective future and poses the greatest immediate risk of contaminating our sacred waters, land, air, our communities and our way of life as the People of the Earth. In time, we will reconcile our differences, but for now we must come together for Mother Earth.

We, the People of the Earth, were instructed that the original wisdom must be shared again when imbalance and disharmony are upon Mother Earth. In 1994, the birth of a white buffalo calf revealed Pte San Win’s (White Buffalo Calf Woman’s) prophecy: “when a white buffalo calf stands upon the Earth it will be the sign of great changes to come”. This prophecy was given to the Pte Oyate, the Buffalo People (Lakota, Dakota, Nakota dialects) to bring forth the sacred message that the winds of change are here. On behalf of our future generations, we urge all Nations and human beings around the world to come together with good minds and prayer as a global community of all faiths to unite spiritually to heal the minds of those that are bringing danger with their decisions.

We are inviting all Nations to the home of the Sacred White Buffalo Calf Pipe Bundle to pray with the sacred fire and one another. This gathering will take place here in Green Grass, SD, lighting the sacred fire on April 23rd, 2014 and ending on the 26th of April. There will be a Sacred Horse Ride on the 25th: with the help of the Horse Nation we will carry our prayers to the sacred fire. We are asking all Nations to pray at their sacred sites as well, if you cannot attend.

In the Sacred Hoop of Life, where there is no ending and no beginning…

Ana-h’opta po Hear my words!

Chief Arvol Looking Horse 19th Generation Keeper of the Sacred White Buffalo Calf Pipe Bundle

Brief editorial comments from the editor’s desk –

On and Off the Lake Traverse Reservation

Thank you to our Sota Reporter/Photographer Bessie Genia for her feature article and photos showing the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate involvement in the Keystone XL pipeline protest camp at Rosebud.

Reading what she has to say about the camp can make us feel as though we too have been a part of it.

We encourage everyone to join in this effort, in any way possible.

Here is a quote from Debra White Plume, Owe Aku:

“Our Lakota prophecy tells us when Mother Earth cries we stand up and we fight for her, or she will die and we will die with her.”

*****

We have many good things to say about Senator Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota.

She has consistently worked for improvement in the lives of our Tribal peoples.

But her loud and persistent support for the gas and oil lobbies, including support for Keystone XL, puts her in lockstep with the forces in our society that are bringing down not only our way of life but of all living things!

Instead of her criticizing President Obama for not doing enough to push for these corporate lobbyists she ought to ask him to join with her in our opposition!

Of course, the Senator’s biography lists years of working in for the fossil fuel industry.

The words of one of Dylan’s Blood on the Tracks songs come across my mind.

Who you gonna serve?

Well, are you politicians gonna serve the people and Mother Earth or are you gonna serve the destroyers . . . the beast?

*****

Please read our Legal notices section.

The Reservation Election Board has posted important information about the process for the primary and general elections.

You will also find information about how to make proposed amendment changes.

*****

Candidates:

Also note that the Sota is returning to a former policy of ONLY PUBLISHING PAID IN ADVANCE POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENTS.

This policy must be followed because of not being able to collect on outstanding invoices.

Because we do not accept credit cards, checks must be made at the time of ordering a political ad.

Our political ad rate is discounted at $2.50 per column inch in order to make it less painful on candidates’ pocketbooks.

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We urge you to plan accordingly so that you are not telephoning or messaging at the last minute to have an ad placed without pre-payment.

Pidamiya!

*****

Congratulations to Micah Gill for being selected as one of this summer’s Columbia University high school fellows!

Please read about her selection elsewhere in this edition of the Sota.

*****

Do you have any unused old prescription drugs around the house?

Consider taking them to the “Taking Back Unwanted Prescription Drugs” event on April 26th.

Read more in this issues about this cooperative take-back sponsored by Aliive-Roberts County, Roberts County Sheriff’s Office, and the DEA.

*****

Elder's Meditation:

"Our people don't come in parts. Either you are Indian, or you are not." -- Nippawanock, ARAPAHOE

We really need to take a look at how Indian People are talking about Indian People. We say there are Rez Indians, Traditional Indians, Urban Indians and Breeds. This type of thinking will keep us separated. An Indian is an Indian, a brother is a brother, a sister is a sister. We are all related. Today, let us respect ourselves and our people. Today, let me realize Indians are Indians.

Great Spirit, let me see the Unity of the People. Indians are Indians.

*****

Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

Puritanism: The haunting fear that someone, somewhere, may be happy. H. L. Mencken (1880 - 1956)

A husband is like a fire, he goes out when unattended. Evan Esar (1899 - 1995)

I bought a cactus. A week later it died. And I got depressed, because I thought, Damn. I am less nurturing than a desert. Demetri Martin, New York Magazine, October 3, 2005

That's what college is for - getting as many bad decisions as possible out of the way before you're forced into the real world. I keep a checklist of 'em on the wall in my room. Jeph Jacques, Questionable Content, 01-04-07

Everything that irritates us about others can lead us to an understanding of ourselves. Carl Jung (1875 - 1961)

Barring that natural expression of villainy which we all have, the man looked honest enough. Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)

Computer games don't affect kids, I mean if Pac Man affected us as kids, we'd all be running around in darkened rooms, munching pills and listening to repetitive music. Marcus Brigstocke

*****

The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or “opinion” letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author’s name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor’s explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

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For more information, leave a message on the Sota production office voicemail (605) 938-4452, or send a fax to the 24-hour dedicated line (605) 938-4676.

-- CDF

Obituaries –

Daniel Amos funeral services pending

Daniel Amos went to be with the Lord last Friday afternoon, April 18, 2014 at Sanford Hospital in Fargo, ND.

Funeral services are pending.

Please check on Facebook or on the Sota website for updated information.

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor’s note: The following comes from the editor’s column and the Sota “deadlines and policies” statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or “opinion” letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author’s name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and must be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor’s explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Words from Winona LaDuke “Honor the Earth” –

Our tipis are packed, and our horses are ready

This week on Tuesday, April 22, 2014, Honor is joining with Native peoples and ranchers (called the Cowboy and Indian Alliance) from along the pipeline route in Washington, DC, to show Obama and the world that Native Nations will stand firm in asserting our human and constitutionally protected treaty rights in saying NO to the Keystone XL Pipeline. We won’t be leaving DC until the voices of our people are heard. We invite you to visit us at the tipi camp on the National Mall during the week, but urge you to participate on Saturday the 26th in a day of action. Click here to RSVP, and to donate to Honor the Earth’s work to support this action, and the frontline groups opposing this pipeline in their territories.

Just as we keep a close watch on the Keystone XL, we must also work to oppose the pipelines of the north, many of which are as big or bigger than the KXL. Honor has been focusing our efforts on the Sandpiper pipeline, and has filed a Motion to Extend the Time, a Motion for an Alternative Route, and the Memorandum of Law in Support of Lack of Jurisdiction for Usufructuary Property Rights Protected by Federal Treaties.

This past six months at Honor the Earth has been breathtaking. Breathtaking, in that we’ve summoned up our courage, trained new young leaders, and joined with local lakeshore owners and farmers to challenge the biggest fracked oil pipelines and some huge tar sands pipelines that threaten our water, our sacred wild rice, our economy and our way of life. Minnesota is becoming the pipeline battleground:

The Alberta Clipper pipeline is already in, and the Enbridge Corporation hopes to double the pipeline’s size to carry 880,000 barrels per day of tar sands oil. Line 3 is proposed to double its capacity. The Sandpiper pipeline is proposed, and will cut through our wild rice territory on the White Earth reservation, moving 375,000 barrels per day of fracked oil from the Bakken Oil Fields. And now the corporation wants to do more. Minnesota is today the Canadian oil super-highway, and this is a threat to our water – and everything else, too. The Enbridge corporation has had over 800 leaks, including the Kalamazoo Spill, which was the largest pipeline spill in US history. This company wants to move more oil, and it wants to move it into Lake Superior, adding tankers and refinery capacity, to the place where one fifth of the worlds’ fresh water is. We are saying no, and we need your help. Please join us.

Our lakes and rivers are healthy. Minnesota has some of the most amazing water in the world and we believe it should stay healthy, full of wild rice, ducks and water lilies. This fall, we rode our horses on the Enbridge Alberta Clipper and Sandpiper lines to draw attention to the pipelines, and to protect our Mother Earth. We met a lot of people, had meals in many communities, and learned that people want their water protected, and want to help. We put up billboards to draw attention to the issue, and to challenge a corporation whose proposal threatens all of us.

Let me tell you who we are. We are Anishinaabe people from Minnesota. We are wild rice and medicinal plant harvesters, we are mothers and grandmothers, and we are intent upon protecting all of this land. We are finding that we are not alone. This past fall, we began to work with landowners in Carlton and Hubbard County, and together we are challenging the largest oil transporter in North America. Together, we are at every hearing, asking lakeshore associations, counties and public officials to protect our water and our future. But we need your help.

Honor the Earth is a small organization, but we are committed and agile. We are a Native environmental organization, and we are here on the White Earth reservation. Your funds will go to our work and our combined efforts with all people from the north. This is our collective future. Stand with us to protect Mother Earth. NH_mailing_5.jpg

Winona LaDuke

http://www.honorearth.org/

Open letter to the Oyate

Native Mascots

Let us change our mascot to George Washington in his masonic apron and we could say our motto is the "Fighting Rednecks." What kind of outrage do you think that would create? How much attention would Haskell Indian Nations University receive if this were to happen? We hear regularly the controversy over people using "Redskins" and "Chiefs" as mascots, but Natives are not to be offended? Xochitl Sandoval an indigenous student at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign contemplated killing herself this semester over her school mascot Chief Illiniwek. Their mascot, Ivan Dozier Jr., dressed in full regalia replied, "When I was little I had a harrowing experience with animal crackers because I couldn't decide whether they wanted to be eaten or not, and I couldn't eat animal crackers, but we can't ban animal crackers because of that," after Xochitl's threat of putting a gun to her head and pulling the trigger in front of the student union building. This quote was reworded from M. Garlinda Burton's book called "Never Say Nigger Again," where she said, "When I was little I had a harrowing experience with Indians because John Wayne was always killing them and I wanted to also, but we can't anymore because they're supposedly human beings." Michael Madrid, commented after the story, "it's much easier to trust an overt racist because you know exactly where they stand."

"We hold these truths to be sacred & undeniable; that all men are created equal & independent, that from that equal creation they derive rights inherent & inalienable, among which are the preservation of life, liberty, & the pursuit of happiness; …" wrote Thomas Jefferson in the United States Declaration of Independence. If these truths are undeniable, where is the justice for the racial inequality? This has been occurring since the writing of this sacred scripture which our country is founded upon. When will the hypocrisy discontinue? Xochitl feels this type of insult will never cease. The story of Xochitl ran in the Indian Country on April 4, 2014. The university had officially discontinued the mascot however Dozier Jr. is still seen at most college games, including high school and elementary, representing the university.

Lisa Jones, President United Pueblo Club, Indigenous and American Indian Studies Major, Haskell Indian Nations University, Ljones.lj505@gmail.com

Rebuilding Bridges

Sitting in prison with change on our hearts.

We all have the tools so let’s make a new start.

Let’s build a bridge to break free of our past.

Working together for trust that will last.

Nothing to lose but everything to gain.

Taking this new route to cure all of our pain.

Now that we are ready and have a brand new plan.

Let’s take these steps to become a better friend,

dad, uncle, brother and man.

 

Elroy Floyd White

Forsaken

A dream of finding love

walks of hope

a walk to know my purpose

dream of change to know

I’m better

 

I’m abandoned in early life

walked on ways available for your

abuse more the same as now

I feel alone as a child cause I

was abandoned from my mom

and dad

 

I walk many roads in my journey

to find love and care from anyone

many journeys, many empty bottles laid about

I wake find that I’m here in jail again

for what have I done

 

To forgive myself ain’t in my language

cause every day or night is the same

I’m on a journey that leaves me

alone to search for you and love

understanding of my purpose

 

As I sit writing about my feelings

a cross appears in every sentence I write

I leave again to search

 

It’s fortunate that I’ve walked

into this building and sit in the middle pew

and I look up front

I listen to you and speak am I

the only one sitting here

 

My journey ends I lost you

I don’t see your black hair any more

as it flows around your shoulders

your dark eyes as they sparkle

with care and understanding

I feel abandoned again

I’ve been disowned

 

I thrive on your beauty

and your works spoke are true

my journey don’t end

but your journey starts anew

I see you and I’ll remember you

as my journey to succeed goes on

 

I pray to my higher power

that we may meet again

and I can see the change you’ve made

for yourself I will change

and advance forward also

 

I may dwell on my loss of you

but it will make me strong

to know we both will change

 

Roland Brant

2013

Day County supports SWO safety program

The Day County Commissioners signed a letter of support for a Tribal safety program being developed by the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribe.

The Tribe asked Day County and other adjoining counties to partner with the safety program to improve signage, shoulder sloping and address other related road issues.

SWO officials are not asking counties for any money, only letters of support.

The Tribe will access different sources of federal funds and the safety program should benefit both the Tribe and adjoining counties since so many area roads are interconnected.

Feickert announces candidacy for state House

Dennis Feickert has announced that he is seeking re-election to the state House of Representatives in District 1. He has served three terms (six years) in the House; four of those years were in District 3, and through redistricting, two years were in District 1. In Feickert’s first four years, he was on the Local Governments and Taxation Committee, and in the past two years, he served on the Ag and Natural Resources Committee and the Transportation Committee.

Prior to his time in the state Legislature, Feickert was a County Commissioner in Brown County for 20 years. He is retired from the Aberdeen City Fire Department, having been a fireman for 26 years.

Feickert was raised on the family farm northwest of Leola and has always been involved in farming. With his son, he has a cow-calf operation in northwest Brown County. He does custom haying in the summer months and has a custom hay hauling business in the fall and winter.

A graduate of Leola High School, Feickert is married to Rae and has three children and six grandchildren. He says his passions are agriculture and local government.

Feickert states these issues as his primary concerns as a Legislator: helping townships and counties with financial struggles to maintain roads and bridges; resolving water drainage issues, including serving on the Water Drainage Taskforce this past summer; procuring adequate funding for education to move South Dakota out of 50th in the nation for teacher salaries; and improving relations with Native American people and working with them to create jobs and stop the cycle of poverty on the reservations.

Quiet Sacrifices of Military Children

By Senator John Thune

As a country, we take special opportunities to thank the men and women in uniform who bravely defend our freedoms at home and abroad. These heroes deserve our gratitude and praise for the work they do throughout the world to keep us safe. While we remember our troops, we sometimes forget about family members waiting in the wings and holding down the fort for those serving on behalf of our country. Thousands of military children share their moms and dads with us each and every day. Their unsung sacrifice, which comes at the expense of basketball games, birthdays, and parent-teacher conferences, helps to ensure that America remains the greatest nation in the world.

Since 1986, April has been designated as the Month of the Military Child to honor the sacrifice and show support for the millions of military children who’ve shared their parents with the U.S. armed forces. There are currently around 1.2 million children of American military service members. These children, who often adapt to new schools or take on additional household responsibilities, make daily sacrifices and face unique challenges that sometimes go unnoticed by classmates, teammates, and friends.

As members of our communities, we can do more to show our support for military children and families. Whether cheering them on at the track meet, inviting them over for a family dinner, or taking them around on the first day of school, each of us can provide a source of comfort, friendship, and support to a child in need. You can also consider donating items or volunteering for an organization that supports military families. Big or small, the work you do in service to our military children serves as a reminder that we are thankful for their sacrifice and our community is here to support them.

Our military children deserve our support, respect, and our thanks. I invite all South Dakotans to join me in keeping military children throughout South Dakota and our nation in their prayers.

A Private Battlefield

By Rep. Kristi Noem

April 18, 2014

Each year, I have the privilege of nominating a handful of South Dakota students for admission into one of our nation’s military academies. I’m always amazed by the integrity, grit, and intelligence of these students. They are the best South Dakota has to offer and there’s no doubt their accomplishments will be great.

A few weeks ago, I had the opportunity to speak with one of the students who was accepted into an academy and her mother. As I looked at this young woman, I thought of my own daughters and all the questions, concerns and worries I would have if either of them were going to a military service academy, including the question of whether we are doing enough to combat the sexual assault crisis in our military.

During the 2012-2013 school year, there were 53 reports of sexual assault at our four military academies. And that’s just a snapshot of what’s happening throughout the military. Last summer, a survey found that 26,000 men and women in the military were sexually assaulted in 2011, up from 19,000 in 2010. Rightfully so, the significant increase brought the issue to the attention of people across the country.

In the months since, Congress has sought to find a better way to combat sexual assault in our nation’s military. Before the New Year, we passed the annual National Defense Authorization Act, which directs the federal government as to what national security programs should be implemented. I sit on the Committee in Congress that writes the bill each year.

The FY2014 bill included more than 30 provisions that we hope will equip the military with the tools needed to begin to address the epidemic. Included in the package were three provisions I authored.

One of the most upsetting things we’ve learned is that on more than one occasion, the individual who held a sexual assault prevention related position was a suspected offender themselves. One of the provisions I wrote would set up specific criteria that anyone interested in a position that involved sexual assault prevention duties would need to meet.

We also know that sexual assault prevention training is not consistent throughout the military, so another provision I authored would create a standard training regimen across all branches.

Finally, we asked for clearer guidelines to help military criminal investigators determine whether a sex-offense was founded or unfounded. We’re hopeful this will give military commanders better information when deciding how to proceed with the prosecution of a sexual assault case.

These are a starting point that we hope will provide immediate relief and better information to make long-term modifications.

There are still more proposals on the table that I’m reviewing. I want to be sure the proposals that move forward will address the fundamental drivers of the problem while continuing to give the military all the tools they need to achieve their assigned missions.

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month and making sure people are aware of the problem is another critical way we can all be part of combatting the crisis. Since this issue gained national attention, reports of sexual assault in the military have increased by nearly 50 percent. It seems contrary to say, but that’s a good thing. It means victims are more likely to step forward than they were before.

The vast majority of our nation’s service members live lives of integrity and deference, as we would hope our heroes would do. We thank them for their service.

But it’s unacceptable that some of our women and men in uniform return from the battlefield only to be just as afraid in their own barracks. We must continue to talk about this issue, search for remedies, and make certain those who have acted dishonorably are brought to justice.

Family Life Assembly to hold Spirit-Life Conference

Family Life Assembly will be holding a Spirit-Life Conference from Thursday, Apr. 24 through Saturday, Apr. 26 in their new Family Life Center. “Rebuild The Walls” will focus on equipping leaders to impact the world.

There is no cost for the event. Contact Joe Donnell to register at 605-515-3708 or email him at warriorscircleup@gmail.com. There will be registration at the church from 4:00 - 6:00 p.m. on Thursday.

Conference speakers include Dobie Weasel (Assiniboine), Dr. Jay Swallow (Cheyenne/Lakota) and Tom Veltierra (Ojibwe).

There will also be a concert with Paradigm and G.U.Y. Native Rapper on Friday, Apr. 25 at 9:00 p.m. which is open to all ages.

Sponsor for the event is Warriors Circle, www.warriorscircleup.org.

Gordy Pratt in Concert

Gordy Pratt of Spearfish will bring his music and comedy to the stage of the Sisseton Performing Arts Center Friday, April 25, at 7:00 p.m. Called "The Victor Borge of the Guitar," Gordy entertains and engages audiences with a concert that blends world-class guitar playing, original songs, popular favorites and his unique sense of humor. Gordy has appeared in concert venues from Vancouver to San Francisco to New York, including ABC's "Good Morning America," and numerous other television and radio shows. His Sisseton show will include surprise "guest appearances."

The concert is sponsored by the Sisseton Arts Council. South Dakota Arts Council support is provided with funds from the State of South Dakota, through the Department of Tourism, and the National Endowment for the Arts. Freewill donations will be accepted.

Social “helper” column dedicated to young generation Oyate –

Wawokiyape

By Sherielle “Shay” DuMarce

Dear Shay,

I am currently in a relationship that is not so great as some people seem to think. I know my husband is having an affair/affairs and it hurts me so bad but I'm scared to leave him. I don't want to start over and have to struggle or want for everything. Is that cowardly of me or do I just 'shut up' and deal with it to keep living comfortably? I don't know what to do and I hate this feeling. Help!

Signed, Housewife.

Dear Housewife

First of all, it seems as though you know it's a bad relationship and you know your husband is cheating. What more evidence do you need to leave the man? In my honest opinion it is never not alright to make vows before god and then break them which is what your husband is doing by committing adultery and by you knowing it and still staying with him.

And as for the second question, I would have to agree that it is as you have stated because thinking like that sets women back decades. No woman has to make any sacrifices to "live comfortably" with a man who doesn't appreciate them or value them. Women Start over every day and it is scary at first but there is a strength in every woman that helps her get back on her feet when she is knocked down. Trust me I know, I have been knocked down plenty of times and have started over numerous times alone because I know I deserve better, as do you. Don't ever think that you have to 'share' your husband and overlook his indiscretions just to be happy. I know you may love him but it’s not right for him to think he can have his cake and eat it too because at the end of the day you will be the one looking like the fool for staying with someone like him.

All in all, I can't make the decision for you. That is something that needs to come from you and I believe you have the strength to change your situation if you wanted too. You have to decide is it worth it to stay with him and look like a fool while he is out with his mistress or should I stand up and be a woman and know my worth, my value and walk away from it. The choice is yours. God bless and I hope this finds you in a happier place in your life.

Respectfully, Shay.

VA2K Walk and Roll supports Homeless Veterans and promotes Physical Activity

The Sioux Falls VA (Dept. of Veterans Affairs) Health Care System will host a VA2K Walk and Roll on May 21, 2014 from 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM to encourage healthy activity while supporting homeless Veterans with donated items.

The VA2K Walk and Roll is free and open to employees, Veterans, and the general public. Registration will take place in the main lobby of the medical center, and walkers may walk a route around the VA neighborhood. In the event of inclement weather, there will be a designated route inside the medical center. Pre-registration is not required, and those interested in participating should plan to arrive at the main lobby no later than 12:30 PM to participate in the walk.

The Sioux Falls VA2K is just one of many taking place May 21 at other VAs across the country. In conjunction with the event, VA is authorized to accept items for homeless Veterans. Suggested donations include all purpose cleaners, mops, brooms, laundry supplies, and bus passes. Individuals are not required to donate to participate.

The event is open to individuals of all fitness levels and can be done over a lunch break. Whether you team up with a coworker, a friend, or participate on your own, there’s no better time to step up your activity level and help improve the lives of homeless Veterans. For additional information, please contact Denise Schwardt, local VA2K Coordinator, at 605-336-3230, Ext. 7946 or denise.schwardt@va.gov.

Prairie Doc –

The Dirty World

By: Richard P. Holm MD

He had no complaints, like many men who come to my office for an appointment scheduled by their wives, but as I was asking routine questions he told me that food sometimes catches on the way down.

Since this symptom can be an early sign of cancer I scheduled an EGD to look at his esophagus with a scope. We were both pleased it wasn't cancer but I was surprised to find another case of what used to be a very rare disease called Eosinophilic Esophagitis. It was the second time I ran into this in the last few years, and I was aware of a few children in town who also had the diagnosis. It was one of those conditions you hear about as a med student, but never see... except now we are finding much more of it.

Eosinophilic esophagitis, or EE, is characterized by an inflammation of the esophagus and the finding under microscope of many of a special type of white cell called eosinophil. We've learned this diagnosis can occur in young children to older adults with symptoms of reflux, trouble swallowing, and even food catching or getting stuck.

It is interesting how EE brought specialty groups together. First the Pathologists started seeing more eosinophils on pieces of esophagus biopsied by both Pediatric and adult Gastroenterologists in patients referred by Pediatricians, Internists, and Family Physicians. Since eosinophils are an indicator of an allergic process, the patients were then sent to allergists, who put it together. We've discovered it's generally related to food allergy, cow's milk the most common offender, and is treated by avoidance of the allergenic food, by anti-reflux medicines, and by swallowing a steroid spray that is usually used for asthma. And we're not sure why this formerly rare disease is happening more often now, but we have our suspicion.

Of course C-sections can save lives, baby formula is sometimes necessary, and less dirt means less infections, but we think EE might be secondary to our overly clean environment, sterile baby bottles, and our too persnickety way with the food to which our babies are exposed.

Imagine that! There might be an advantage for babies who come down that non-sterile birth canal, who suckle up against mamas' breasts awash with normal flora, and who are exposed, not protected, from the dirty world in which we live.

*****

Dr. Rick Holm wrote this editorial for "On Call®," a weekly program where medical professionals discuss health concerns for the general public. "On Call®" is produced by the Healing Words Foundation in association with the South Dakota State University Journalism Department. "On Call®" airs Thursdays on South Dakota Public Broadcasting-Television at 7 p.m. Central, 6 p.m. Mountain.

Ripple Effect –

Celebrating Trees

Days to celebrate trees have a variety of names. For example, in Germany, Mexico, and the UK, it’s Tree Day; in Spain, it’s Tree Festival. Closer to home, it’s Arbor Day in the US and Maple Leaf Day (part of National Forest Week) in Canada.

The times these tree celebrations are held also vary among countries. In the US, national Arbor Day is celebrated in the spring (the last Friday in April), a good time in many states for planting trees, while Canada celebrates Maple Leaf Day in the Fall (last Wednesday in September), another good time for planting trees.

Whatever the name and date, tree celebrations are held in countries all over the world, with the common goal of protecting and sustaining trees, which protect and sustain us.

With US Arbor Day just around the corner on April 25, we might consider how we might celebrate trees in 2014. Following are suggestions offered by the Canadian Forestry Association and the US Arbor Day Foundation.

PLAN A COMMUNITY EVENT

-- Arrange a tree planting.

-- Organize a beautification project in a public area.

-- Ask a civic or service group to gather paper to be recycled and save a tree.

-- Sponsor a tree trivia context. Give away trees to winners.

-- Ask people to find large, unusual or historic trees in your community, then publish maps of winners or hold a showcase walk.

-Hold a poster contest, strike up the band/chorus, make the day fun and memorable!

LOOK FOR WAYS TO LEARN

--Read a book about trees.

--Identify all the things at home or school that are made of wood.

--Tour a forest sector industry or processing site.

--Attend a class on tree and plant care.

--Learn about the causes and prevention of forest fires.

CELEBRATE INDIVIDUALLY

--Take a walk in a local park or nearby woods.

--Care for a newly planted or neglected tree, and study its species.

--Volunteer with a local tree-planting organization to make a difference in your community.

--Plant your own tree(s)—it is an act of optimism and stewardship.

For more information on choosing, planting and taking care of your new trees, go to http://www.arborday.org/.

Until the next Ripple Effect, The Red River Basin Commission (RRBC).

*****

The RRBC is a grassroots organization that is a chartered not-for-profit corporation under the provisions of Manitoba, North Dakota, Minnesota, and South Dakota law. Our offices in Fargo, ND and Winnipeg, MB can be reached at 701-356-3183 and 204-982-7254, or you can check out our website at www.redriverbasincommission.org.

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

TZTS students attend Lead Now! leadership conference in Sioux Falls

Submitted by Jen Heath

Nine high school students from Tiospa Zina attended a Lead Now! Leadership conference hosted by Representative Kristi Noem on April 15 at Augustana College in Sioux Falls. Students listened to motivational speakers including Rich Chapman, Tammy Duckworth, Paul Ten Haken and two time WNBA champion Olympia Scott.

TZTS Cloverbuds natural science projects

Submitted by Siyo Peters

Our Clover buds have been working on natural science projects lately.

They learned about different farm animals and their many uses. They got to team challenge each other to a farm animal Jeopardy type quiz and they knew more than they thought they would.

And, at their latest meeting they learned about trees with our special guest Mr. Lorne Aadland of the USDA/NRCS. They learned about the importance of trees and other plant life in the prevention of erosion. All participant took home a state tree to plant and care for so that their future grandchildren can have clean air and shade.

Our final 4H meeting for the school year will be May 7th, so all 4H'ers, Be Sure to Be There!

See photo highlights.

Guess who came to the ESDS FACE classroom?

Submitted by Nita Jones

Guess who came to our classroom?

Tucker! He cleaned our teeth and gave our parents advice on brushing. It looks like it hurts but it doesn't! Tucker does an awesome job! Pidamaya Tucker!

Thanks for helping us keep our HE[teeth] clean and healthy!

See accompanying photos.

Youth selected for Columbia University HS Summer Program Fellowship Scholarship

Micah Gill has been selected by the Center for Native American Youth to receive the scholarship to attend the Columbia University 2014 Summer High School Program in New York City. CNAY gives one scholarship per year to pay the tuition cost of the program which is a little over $8,000 so Micah was elated to hear the news that she was selected.

Micah attended Columbia University last summer as part of the Lead America Program with peers from across the world, which was an experience all in itself. This year she is excited to spend three weeks engaging with Native American peers from across the country at the same university in the Summer High School Program. In addition to the program they will travel throughout New York and attend Broadway shows, sight see and attend concerts. She is responsible for the costs of her travel, weekend meals and entertainment so you will see her fundraising in the near future. She also has a fundraising account at the Sisseton-Wahpeton Federal Credit Union under “Micah Fundraising”.

Micah is a sophomore honor roll student at Sisseton High School and is one of the Aliive Roberts County Youth Leaders and is very involved in the community. She is employed at Teals Grocery and spends her spare time painting, playing piano or hanging out with her grandpa. Micah is the daughter of Dustina Gill and the late Michael Rencountre.

The announcement was made by Josie Raphaelito, MPH, Program Associate, Center for Native American Youth.

Since the Center for Native American Youth launched in February 2011, we have partnered with key foundations and organizations like the W.K. Kellogg Foundation and Casey Family Programs to achieve our mission to improve the health, safety and overall well-being of Native American youth. Key initiatives include efforts to build a resource and policy platform related to racial equity for Native youth, develop programming to elevate issues - such as suicide prevention and bereavement, Indian child welfare, public safety, and educational opportunities - into the national dialogue, and expand youth development opportunities.

Sisseton Jr. High wrestlers compete in National MS Duals

By Coach Kasey Metz

Nine Junior High Sisseton wrestlers competed for Team South Dakota at the National Middle School Duals in Des Moines, Iowa April 10th though April 13th.

The trip started with a mini camp at the Legends of Gold national training facility in Beresford, SD. Wrestle offs were held at the camp to determine what team the kids were on.

Team South Dakota took two 7th & 8th grade teams and a 6th grade team to Iowa. Andrew Toelle and Colbey Lehrke won there wrestle off and were members of the South Dakota Blue team. Braimen Steen, Keanan Pikarski, Bergin Bertsch, Dane Christopherson, Christian Kirk and Koben Huber were members of the South Dakota Red team. Isiah Grimm was the only 6th grade to go and he was a member of the South Dakota White 6th grade team.

Friday they travelled to Simpson College in Iowa for Weigh In.

Saturday the 6th & 7th & 8th grade teams wrestled five duals. On Sunday the 7th & 8th grade teams wrestled three duals. The Blue team finished 7th in the Bronze bracket with a record of 4 - 4. The Red team finished 1st in the Platinum bracket with a record of 3 - 5. The White team finished 3 - 2 giving them a 3rd place National finish in the 6th Grade division.

When wrestling was finished they returned to Beresford, SD then back home to Sisseton late Sunday evening.

The kids had a great time and made a lot of new friends.

I was very proud to be a part of this trip, not only coaching some of my kids but to have the chance to coach kids from across the state was a great experience. The competition was great with teams from all across the nation.

Thank You to the parents and all who made this trip possible.

Roberts County 4-H Archery participants

Many have qualified for the State Shoot

Since January, Roberts County 4-H Archery practice has been held on Monday and Tuesday evenings at the 4-H building in Sisseton. Beginners who are youth ages 8-10 shoot at a target that is 10 yards away. Youth ages 11-13 are juniors and aim at a target at 15 yards while the senior members, ages 14-18 have their target on the 20 yard line.

4-H members have the opportunity to compete at the state level if they shoot a qualifying score at their county. 4-H State Archery is held in Fort Pierre on April 25-27.

2014 State Shoot Qualifiers from the Roberts County 4-H Archery Program are: Carsten Archer, Raif Bartz, Kadee Davidson, Avery DeSpiegler, Ethan DeSpiegler, Mason Gray, Zoey Gruby, Colter Hanson, Parker Hanson, Reece Hanson, Angela Howell, Rebecca Howell, Lee Iverson, Tate Johnson, Tyan Johnson, Dante LaFontaine, Spencer McCleerey, Matthew Moen, Mitchell Moen, Damon Nieland, Parker Nieland, Blake Nielsen, Nate Nielsen, Jaslyn Peterson, Maddie Pistorius, Veronica Rice, Savannah Sahnow, Carter Schaunaman, Ashley Shultz, Dean Shultz III, Abby Steen, Gunnar Thoreson.

Thunderbird Spring Run set for April 26

Bismarck, ND – UTN – United Tribes Technical College invites all runners to the Thunderbird Spring Run Saturday, April 26 at the college in Bismarck.

The event is a benefit for United Tribes running programs.

“We’ve added a Half Marathon distance to the spring run and a Half Marathon Relay,” says Dan Molnar, event coordinator and coach of United Tribes running-teams.

The course will change slightly, starting on campus before heading to Cottonwood Park and returning.

Events begin at 8 a.m. with the Half Marathon and Half Marathon relay followed at 9 a.m. with the 10K, and 10 a.m. the 5K. A children’s fun run is scheduled for 11 a.m. Cash prizes and awards will be presented at 11:30 in the Multi-Purpose Building during the Winter Market.

All races start and finish in front of the college’s main Education Building on the campus at 3315 University Drive in south Bismarck.

RACE SEASON

United Tribes hosts two additional races during the 2014 season: the Thunderbird Half-Marathon on Saturday, August 23 and the Thunderbird Powwow Run on Saturday, September 6.

The Thunderbird Run originated in 2006, attracting students and adult runners from around the region. Proceeds have benefited tribal programs at the college’s five governing tribes in North Dakota: Spirit Lake Tribe, Standing Rock Tribe, Three Affiliated Tribes of the Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara Nation, Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate, and the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa.

To register, visit the website Thunderbird Spring Run. For more info contact Daniel Molnar 701-255-3285 x 1387, dmolnar@uttc.edu.

Register for SD 4-H Teen Leadership Conference

Brookings, SD – The South Dakota 4-H Youth Council invites you to join them on the South Dakota State University campus June 2-6, 2014 as they present Teen Leadership Conference: Around the World with TLC. Registration deadline is May 10, 2014.

"TLC will provide a great balance of leadership training, personal growth, and fun to any South Dakota youth between 13 and 18 years of age. Youth Council encourages all teens to attend and bring their friends," said Audrey Rider, SDSU Extension State 4-H Events Field Specialist. "TLC 2014 will provide the experiences you need to gain leadership skills and to make your future bright."

In keeping with the cultural theme, delegates will be entertained throughout the week while learning essential leadership skills. Complete workshop descriptions can be found online at http://igrow.org/events/tlc-2014-around-the-world/.

Delegates will have the opportunity to enjoy fun with friends at a variety of evening activities including: dances, recreation, and a special TLC Talent Show.

VJ Smith, a nationally known keynote speaker is the banquet speaker. He is well-known for his book "The Richest Man in Town," which is based on his experiences with Marty the Brookings Walmart greeter.

Registration Closes May 10

Participants can register online at http://igrow.org/events/tlc-2014-around-the-world/ or by contacting their local extension office.

Registration is $200. The registration fee includes room, all meals and a t-shirt. Transportation to Brookings is not covered, although group transportation is available for youth from western South Dakota for a nominal fee. Registration closes on May 10, 2014.

SDSU Extension hosts Writing Your Future Grant Writing Conference

Brookings, SD – A grant writing conference will be held June 18, 2014 in Rapid City at the University Center.

Hosted by the SDSU Extension Community Development team, the Writing Your Future Grant Conference will feature a variety of topics including: assembling a local leadership team, resources for identifying grants, finding matching funds, learning how to use demographic tools and evaluation methods and more.

"Do not miss this opportunity to polish your grant writing skills, learn about the resources that can help you create winning applications and discover ways you can fund your community projects," said Peggy Schlechter, SDSU Extension Community Development Field Specialist.

Sessions for this June 18 conference will be relevant for beginning grant writers as well as for more advanced volunteer grant writers. A panel of public and private grant funders will discuss grant opportunities offered through their organizations and give conference attendees insight into what makes an application successful.

Register before June 6 and save.

The SDSU Extension Community Development Team is able to host the Writing Your Future Grant Conference, for a registration cost of only $49 for those who register through June 6 and $59 for those who register after June 6 due to the generous donations made by First Interstate Bank and Black Hills Power.

Space is limited. Register online at www.iGrow.org and click on the Community Development link. For more information, contact Peggy Schlechter, SDSU Extension Community Development Field Specialist at the SDSU Extension Regional Center in Rapid City at 605-394-1722 or email at peggy.schlechter@sdstate.edu.

Legals

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 09-054

SWOCSE/Shobi Zetina, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SHAYNE COOK, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of April, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of March, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

15-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 09-106

SWOCSE/Linda Thompson, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SHAYNE COOK, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of April, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of March, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

15-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 02-201

SWOCSE/Lounda Stevens, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SHAYNE COOK, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of April, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of March, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

15-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 12-138

SWOCSE/SD/Angela Glomstad, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MARSHALL LONEY, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of April, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of March, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

15-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 12-128

SWOCSE/SD/Courtney Mussetter, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MARSHALL LONEY, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of April, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of March, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

15-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 13-055

SWOCSE/SD/Misty Ortley, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MARSHALL LONEY, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of April, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of March, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

15-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 14-099

SWOCSE/Sheila Lufkins, PLAINTIFF

VS.

OLIVER JACK, Sr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of April, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.   Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of March, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

15-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 07-015

SWOCSE/SD/Clarissa Franklin, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MICHAEL SIERRA, Sr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of April, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of March, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

15-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 11-093

SWOCSE/Jenny Gill, PLAINTIFF

VS.

OSCAR BARRON, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of April, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 27th day of March, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

15-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 13-162

SWOCSE/Ashley Kelly, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CHRISTIAN ROBERTSON, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Provide DNA sample and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of April, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of March, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

15-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 14-042

SWOCSE/Cheryl Campbell, PLAINTIFF

VS.

VIRGIL CHARGING HAWK, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of April, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.   Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of March, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

15-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 14-098

SWOCSE/Sheila Lufkins, PLAINTIFF

VS.

IDA JACK, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 25th day of April, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.   Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of March, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

15-3tc

Trading Post ads

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

Job Openings

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate is seeking to fill the following positions(s):

Site Supervisor, Head Start

Teacher, Early Head Start

Compliance Officer, Realty

Assistant Land Acquisition Clerk, Realty

Intergovernmental Case Specialist II, Office of Child Support Enforcement

Injury Prevention Coordinator, Injury Prevention Program

Prep Cook (part-time), Administration Building

Arcade Attendant (part-time), Planning

Closing Date: April 25, 2014 @ 04:30 PM.

Emergency Manager, Law Enforcement

Closing Date: May 02, 2014 @ 04:30 PM

Education Specialist, Education Department

Open Until Filled.

All interested applicants may obtain application and job description information at the Human Resource Department, of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate or contact Arnold Williams at (605) 698-8238 or Denise Hill at (605) 698-8362. (Tribal preference will apply)

 

Sisseton Wahpeton College

Openings for Fall 2014 semester - Full time English Instructor, Adjunct Psychology Instructor. Master's degree in related field is preferred, Bachelor's degree is required. For contact and application information visit our website at swc.tc or contact Human Resources at 605-698-3966. Closing date: open until filled.

 

Tiospa Zina Tribal School

Employment Opportunities

Current Vacancies:

Vacancy: Bus Monitor (Waubay Route; Sisseton Route; Browns Valley) $13.00/hr Qualifications: High School Diploma or General Education Degree; willing to obtain CRP and First Aid Certification. Opening Date: December 23, 2013 Closing Date: Open Until Filled

2014-2015 School Year Vacancies:

Vacancy: Middle School/Alternative School Principal Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Middle School/Alternative School Principal

Opening Date: February 25, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: High School English Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a High School English Teacher

Opening Date: February 25, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: Elementary Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for an Elementary Teacher

Opening Date: February 25, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: Special Education Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Special Education Teacher

Opening Date: March 7, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: School Counselor Qualifications: Current South Dakota School Counselor Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a School Service Specialist

Opening Date: March 13, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: High School Science Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a High School Science Teacher

Opening Date: March 21, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: High School Social Studies Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a High School Social Studies Teacher

Opening Date: March 21, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: High School Math Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a High School Math Teacher

Opening Date: March 21, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: High School Social Studies/Science Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a High School Social Studies/Science Teacher

Opening Date: March 21, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: Middle School Science Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Middle School Science Teacher

Opening Date: March 21, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: Secondary Art Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Secondary Art Teacher

Opening Date: April 10, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: (4) Cook Qualifications: High School Diploma or General Education Degree, 1 year directly related experience, and willing to complete State Nutrition Program.

Opening Date: April 4, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: Kitchen Supervisor Qualifications: High School Diploma or General Education Degree, 1 year directly related experience, and willing to obtain State School Food Service training and certification.

Opening Date: April 4, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

2014-2015 Extra Curricular Vacancies:

Vacancy: Head Volleyball Coach Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma, and Must meet and show proof of all SDHSAA coaching requirements at the time that your applications is submitted. Those requirements are to complete the following courses through the National Federation of High School Sports (NFHS): Fundamentals of Coaching, First Aid and Safety for Coaches, and Concussion in Sports – What you need to know. If interested please submit an application and coaching applicant questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School.

Opening Date: April 8, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: Head Cross Country Coach Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma, and Must meet and show proof of all SDHSAA coaching requirements at the time that your applications is submitted. Those requirements are to complete the following courses through the National Federation of High School Sports (NFHS): Fundamentals of Coaching, First Aid and Safety for Coaches, and Concussion in Sports – What you need to know. If interested please submit an application and coaching applicant questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School.

Opening Date: April 8, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: Head Football Coach Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma, and Must meet and show proof of all SDHSAA coaching requirements at the time that your applications is submitted. Those requirements are to complete the following courses through the National Federation of High School Sports (NFHS): Fundamentals of Coaching, First Aid and Safety for Coaches, and Concussion in Sports – What you need to know. If interested please submit an application and coaching applicant questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School.

Opening Date: April 8, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: Head Girls Basketball Coach Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma, and Must meet and show proof of all SDHSAA coaching requirements at the time that your applications is submitted. Those requirements are to complete the following courses through the National Federation of High School Sports (NFHS): Fundamentals of Coaching, First Aid and Safety for Coaches, and Concussion in Sports – What you need to know. If interested please submit an application and coaching applicant questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School.

Opening Date: April 8, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: Head Boys Basketball Coach Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma, and Must meet and show proof of all SDHSAA coaching requirements at the time that your applications is submitted. Those requirements are to complete the following courses through the National Federation of High School Sports (NFHS): Fundamentals of Coaching, First Aid and Safety for Coaches, and Concussion in Sports – What you need to know. If interested please submit an application and coaching applicant questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School.

Opening Date: April 8, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: Junior High Girls Basketball Coach Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma. If interested please submit an application and coaching applicant questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School.

Opening Date: April 8, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: 5th/6th Grade Girls Basketball Coach Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma. If interested please submit an application and coaching applicant questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School.

Opening Date: April 8, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: (2) 8th Grade Class Advisor Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma. If interested please submit an application and Advisor Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School.

Opening Date: April 11, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: AISES Advisor (American Indian Science and Engineering Society) Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma. If interested please submit an application and Advisor Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School.

Opening Date: April 11, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: Close-Up Foundation Advisor Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma. If interested please submit an application and Advisor Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School.

Opening Date: April 11, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: Destination Imagination Advisor Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma. If interested please submit an application and Advisor Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School.

Opening Date: April 11, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: (2) Junior Class Advisor Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma. If interested please submit an application and Advisor Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School.

Opening Date: April 11, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: New Teacher Mentor (Elementary) Qualifications: State Certified Elementary Teacher with 3 years+ experience and able to be available to new elementary teachers as needed throughout the school day. If interested please submit an application and Advisor Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School.

Opening Date: April 11, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: (3) Senior Class Advisor Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma. If interested please submit an application and Advisor Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School.

Opening Date: April 11, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

Vacancy: Technology Mentor (High School) Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma with knowledge and skills to assist others with minor technology questions and needs as needed throughout the school day. If interested please submit an application and Advisor Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School.

Opening Date: April 11, 2014

Closing Date: April 25, 2014

If you would like to apply to be a part of the TZ tiwahe you may pick up an application from the TZTS HR office located at #2 Tiospa Zina Dr. Agency Village, SD 57262. Applications may also be printed off the HR web page by downloading from links under employment forms to the left. Completed applications may be sent to PO Box 719, Agency Village, SD 57262. Faxed to: 605-698-7686. For further information call 605-698-3953 ext. 208. Indian Preference employer. At will employer. All applicants are subject to a Background Check and Pre-Employment Drug Test, pursuant to SWSB policy.

 

Dakota Magic Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Smoke/Gift Shop Department: Clerk (4 Full-Time) Rotating

Support Services Department: Grounds Keepers (2 Full-Time) Seasonal (Golf)

Surveillance Department: Observer (Full-Time) Rotating

Closing Date: April 25, 2014 at 4:00 p.m.

Starting Wage: D.O.E.

High School diploma or G.E.D. required for most positions. Two identification documents required upon hire.

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department, 16849 102nd Street SE, Hankinson ND 58041.

For complete Job Description contact Amanda Adams at 701-634-3000 ext. 557. Indian Preference will apply/EEO. (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment. Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

FOOD SERVICE: FOOD SERVICE SUPERVISOR (1 FULL- TIME).

GENERAL FUNCTION: Supervises and directs the overall functions of the Food Service Department on a specific shift, exhibits a friendly and courteous manner when dealing with customers and all food service personnel.

REQUIREMENTS: High School Diploma or GED is required. Minimum of (4) years Lead Line Cook. Minimum of (2) years Kitchen Management/Supervisory position. Effective communication skills. Must be computer literate with proficiency in Excel. General Experience with: Inventory Management. Will be exposed to noise and tobacco smoke. Will be stooping, bending, standing for long periods of time, or lifting up to 50 lbs. Ability to with stand temperatures (hot/cold) while working in the food service facility. Will be required to work overtime, rotate shifts, work holidays and weekends. Ability to handle diverse situations and/or people. Must obtain an Employee/ Non Gaming License upon hire.

This position will close on May 1, 2014 at 4 pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

Security Department: Officer (2) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, weekends & holidays. Mobility throughout the facility 45% percent of time; will be stooping, bending, walking for long periods of time, able to lift up to 40 pounds, computer skills required for report writing. Will be exposed to noise and tobacco smoke. Appropriate dress code. Must be at least 21 years old, & have a High School Diploma or G.E.D. Must be able to obtain a Key License.

Slot Department: Slot Technician (1) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, weekends & holidays. Excellent customer service skills with both external and internal customers. Math skills are essential, mechanical skills, and the physical ability to lift heavy objects. Knowledge of other gaming related equipment, dependable & available to work any & all shifts. Will be exposed to noise and tobacco smoke. Must be at least 21 years old & have a High School diploma or GED. Must be able to obtain a Key License.

Opening date:  Thursday, April 17, 2014

Closing date:    Wednesday, April 23, 2014 @ 4:00 p.m.

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.