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Vol. 47 Issue No. 17

Anpetu Iyamni, April 27, 2016

Inside this Edition –

SWO Self-Governance planning study underway

Chairman's Corner: Message from SWO Tribal Chairman Dave Flute

Harvey DuMarce and Linda Flanery honored for serving SWC

Photo highlights of last week's Earth Day 2016 walk

Tribal Council increases Reward for AJ Lufkins to $20,000

Introducing SWO Victim's/Witness Coordinator

Planning Department grant program in action

Cansayapi LaCrosse Team invites SWO to varsity games

Stand-up Comics wanted for comedy hour at admin building

Deadline for receipt of copy is Friday noon

Chairman's Corner

I will be providing a full report next week concerning work of the SWO delegation that traveled to Washington, DC to lobby Congressional leaders to meet our Tribal needs.

Watch for the report here in the "Chairman's Corner."

My heart goes out to those that have lost loved ones this past month, especially the Robert "Bobby" Thompson family. Robert was a great friend of mine and will be dearly missed, "koda, toksta waciyakekte."

Tribal Chairman Dave Flute.

SWO Self-Governance planning study underway

The SWO Tribe is completing a Tribal Self-Governance Planning Phase in 2016.

Purpose of the planning phase is to explore whether health care services, health status, and access for the people would improve under Tribal operation.

Another purpose of the planning phase is to assess the Tribe's readiness for operating programs in addition to those it already operates under Title I.

The goal is to complete the planning phase this summer.

Self-Governance is authorized under the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act, also known as P.L. 93-638. Congress enacted this Law in 1975 and has amended several times. The Tribe currently operates its health programs under Title I of the Act. It is referred to as the "IHS Master Contract" because the award is consolidated into one for all the programs operated by the Tribe. Title V is another authority under the same Act, and the agreement (and funding mechanism) is called a "compact". The Law provides that Tribes may contract Programs, Functions, Services and Activities (PFSAs), currently operated at Service Unit, Area and Headquarters levels of the Indian Health Service.

SWO has conducted similar studies for the Indian Self-Determination and Educational Assistance Act in the past. The Tribe completed a three-year grant during years 1989-1991 to study the feasibility of assuming operation of Indian Health Service. Around that same time, SWO had a similar grant from the Bureau of Indian Affairs to look at assuming BIA programs. Field trips have been made to Red Lake, Muskogee, and Fond du Lac in past years, and there have been visits and onsite presentations by Tribal Self-Governance officials and other Tribes. There were also two other feasibility studies completed 10-12 years ago, but nothing since. As a part of these ongoing efforts, rather than hiring or contracting local people, now SWO has engaged expertise that specializes in this work.

The Tribe has contracted the premier national law firm with expertise in the Self-Determination Act: Sonosky, Chambers, Sachse, Endreson & Perry, LLP. In addition, Advocates for Native Issues, LLC, a Native-owned consulting firm with expertise in self-determination matters and tribal health management, is partnering with Sonosky for additional professional support. The consultant team was onsite March 17-18 and is scheduled to come again the second week in May.

The Tribal Executive Committee has appointed a Work Group comprised of Tribal employees who represent the critical systems that will need to interface with those currently operated by IHS. Essential systems includes governance, accounting, procurement, human resources, legal, information technology, and healthcare. The work group is tasked to:

1.  Learn and study how the Self-Governance process works.

2.  Learn and study how the healthcare programs and systems operated by the Indian Health Service might be integrated with the programs and systems operated by the Tribe.

3.  Assess how SWO might operate each individual system and program.

4.  Assess how participation by this Tribe would beneficial.

5.  Develop a plan that can be presented to the people for review and consideration

6.  Routinely report progress to the Tribal Council and make recommendations for review, input, and decision-making.

The planning phase is authorized by Tribal Council Resolution No. SWO-15-104 adopted on September 2, 2015. Completing a planning study had been Priority #15 of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Health Plan 2011-2015 that ended last year. Because the planning study was not completed, it has been continued in the new plan. SWO-15-104 states there is to be no "decision to pursue Tribal Self-Governance compacting without and until there has been a thorough review process with the Districts and applicable Tribal entities with resulting assurance that the planning phase has been completed to the satisfaction of the Tribe, as required by Law."

A Self-Governance Planning Phase Education Community Forum is planned for the evening of May 12th. See details in the notice elsewhere in this Sota.

"From the desk of Geri Opsal, Tribal Veteran Service Officer"

GeriO@SWO-NSN.gov

Phone 605-698-3388

*MAY 18, 2016: WOMENS VETERANS OPEN HOUSE: Dakota Connection Casino - Nonsmoking room. Please see flyer in this edition of the Sota. If you want to come join us but do not have a ride please call 698-3388 and I'd be happy to pick you up!!This is a great opportunity to meet fellow Women Veterans and share some comradeship, tell stories, have some laughs and get to enjoy each other's company! Fargo VAMC Women's Coordinator plans on presenting each Woman Veteran with a Women Veterans Medal – they are beautiful so please come, you must be in attendance.

*2nd Annual Bataan Memorial March: Is scheduled to take place on Friday, July 1st, 2016 and we will have it early morning like we did last year. I will be hosting a meeting to go over details and will have it posted here in the Sota so please take note. Last year we had such a great turnout in HONOR of our survivors and all survivors and those who perished on the actual Bataan Death March WWII. We hope you can join us this year. Our WWII Veteran survivors of the Death March are: Winfield Thompson Sr., WWII and Louis Williams, WWII Veteran.

*April: Please join us in honoring our military youth and celebrating Month of the Military Child in April. This is a time for us to recognize and thank our military children for all that they do. There are more than 7,100 military youth in South Dakota - over 3,900 are affiliated with the Army and Air National Guard. Please take the time to personally thank these children.

*Korean Ambassador for Peace Medal: We have received the Ambassador Peace Medal from the Korean Government; they were delivered this week by my field officer out of Pierre. We received a total of 30. There were approximately 200 applications submitted from our office and the guidelines are set by the Korean Government. Brice had all the DD214's submitted which were reviewed by SDDVA in Pierre and they determined which ones qualified. We have 36 deceased and 4 living that have medals. The 4 living Korean Veterans are: 1) Charles Amos 2 )Maynard Bernard 3)John Feather 4) David Seaboy. The 26 deceased are: 1 )Ulysses Abraham 2) Jonah Bear 3) Clifford BlueDog 4) David BlueDog 5) Thomas Brant 6) Sandford DeMarrias 7) Francis Gill 8) Glen Goodsell 9) Duane GreyBuffalo 10) Henry GreyBuffalo 11) Levi Hopkins 12) Percy Keeble 13) Woodrow Wilson Keeble 14) Creighton Louis 15) Curtis Lufkin 16) Ivan McKee 17) Orville Owens 18) Lloyd Robertson 19) Lincoln Rouillard 20) Orville Seaboy 21) Sylvester St John 22) Anthony Wanna 23) Aaron White 24) Cyrus White 25) Frank Wilson 26) Phillip Wilson. We will be planning an honoring and will be contacting the Veterans who are living to attend and also families of our Veterans have passed on to attend and receive these medals on their loved ones behalf. Please contact our office if you are the next of kin for the above so that we may get your telephone number and can notify you of the event when we get it planned. We are thinking end of May or first part of June to allow time for all to get on their schedules. Contact TVSO at 698-3388 . We have received 1 or 2 calls please family members let us know who you are. Thanks.

*VETERANS: PLEASE CALL OUR OFFICE IF YOU NEED ASSITANCE; WE ARE HERE TO SERVE! 698-3388.

*WOMEN VETERANS CALL CENTER: 1-855-VA-WOMEN. Crisis Help Line: 1-800-273-8255, available 24/7, and tell them you are a veteran. All calls are confidential.

*REMEMBER: We are here to serve you our fellow Veteran, widows, dependents. And also you see a Veteran shake their hand---that small gesture means a great deal to them! Call us at 698-3388 or cell 268-0502.

*American Legion Post #314- Delano Renville, Commander Cell: # 268-0354 / Vietnam Veterans Kit Fox Society - Phone: # 698-3901 ask for Doc / Desert Era Veterans - Danielle DeCoteau, Commander Cell#: 268-1765. For GAS ASSISTANCE: Geri Opsal 698-3388.

Have a good week.

Geri Opsal, Tribal VSO.

Forty years of Service to SWC

President Harvey DuMarce and Math Instructor Linda Flanery were recently recognized for a total of 40 years of teaching and administering services to the Sisseton Wahpeton College.

Both came to the college approximately the same time in 1996.

Linda has been the math instructor teaching classes in College Algebra and other math courses. She now chairs one of the most important committee at the college, the Curriculum Committee.

Harvey began at the college teaching English, literature courses, and Dakota Studies classes.

He later served as Vice President of Academic Affairs and was appointed President in December 2012.

When Harvey and Linda begin their teaching service their respective children were in pre-school programs, and now they are in college or will begin college in the fall of 2016.

Where has the time gone?

Rapid Creek study reveals Shiga toxin genes, Warranting further study

Rapid City, SD – March 28, 2016 – South Dakota School of Mines & Technology researchers have released findings about several potentially disease-causing traits associated with E.coli that were found in bacteria from all the test sites along Rapid Creek.

"The presence of all these traits together in one body of water is a concern and warrants further investigation," said Mines Associate Professor Linda DeVeaux, Ph.D., whose team submitted its report to the South Dakota Water Resources Institute.

Though the presence of E.coli in the water indicates fecal contamination, not all E. coli are harmful. Some E.coli, however, have gained certain genetic traits that allow them to cause disease and are often associated with outbreaks transmitted through contaminated food or water, which can cause severe illness and possibly death.

In this preliminary project, DeVeaux, along with Mines Assistant Professor Lisa Kunza, Ph.D., and graduate student Kelsey Murray, looked for these traits in the bacteria in Rapid Creek. They tested six sites, from the dog park above Canyon Lake to the Cheyenne River, twice each: once in the middle of summer, when water levels were high, and once in the fall, after water levels dropped.

The disease-causing Shiga toxin genes and three other genes also associated with particularly harmful strains of E. coli were found at all sites. Researchers recommend washing one's hands and trying to not ingest this untreated water during recreational activities, noting this is not treated drinking water.

Earlier this spring the researchers tested the Big Sioux River in Sioux Falls and, according to Murray, found the prevalence of Shiga toxin genes equivalent to Third World countries. These genes, found in 95 percent of the samples taken from Skunk Creek and the Big Sioux River, can turn the harmless E.coli into a dangerous strain that causes severe and potentially fatal illness. Moreover, another gene called Intimin, which helps E.coli colonies embed themselves in the human gut and thrive, was found in 100 percent of the samples.

In both the Rapid City and Sioux Falls waterways, researchers say it is important to find out whether all of the traits are carried in the same bacterium, which would suggest an immediate health concern, or if different bacteria have different traits, which poses a potential future health risk.

DeVeaux and Kunza are both in the Department of Chemistry & Applied Biological Sciences. Funding for the Rapid Creek project was provided by the USGS 104B program via South Dakota Water Resources Institute at South Dakota State University. Funding for the Big Sioux project was provided by the East Dakota Water Development District. Murray was also supported by the SD Mines graduate program in Biomedical Engineering.

(Editor's note: Considering the sometimes extremely high levels of E.coli found in samples taken last year by SWO Mni Wiconi and the Tribe's OEP, testing ought to be undertaken for these gene markers here.)

Introducing: SWO Victims/Witness Coordinator

My name is Rhonda Kampeska.

I come from the Ate Ya Tipi (old agency) District and was hired about three weeks ago.

I have prior experience working for the SWO Victims Assistance Program back in 2007 to 2009 as the Administrative Assistant/Advocate.

I am a certified Tribal Court Advocate since 2008, have an AA degree in Paralegal Studies, as well as a AA in Criminal Justice. I also have 8 years experience in Tribal Child Support.

I look forward to working with the various SWO Programs and Tribal Court who are here to help the SWO Adult/juveniles who are victims of a CRIME.

I can be reached at 605 698-2022.

My office is located in the OLD Tribal Court Building.

You can also reach me through my supervisor, Gary Gaikowski, at 698-7661.

Reward increased for finding AJ Lufkins

At the request of the family and friends of AJ Lufkins, SWO Tribal Council has authorized an increase in the reward money offered for locating him.

The reward has been doubled, from $10,000 to $20,000 in hopes someone who knows will call 911. All calls are confidential.

AJ has been missing since last seen carried out of the Sisseton Legion Hall unconscious from a fight. That was April 7, 2010.

The family is asking for help in finding closure.

Cansayapi LaCrosse team invites SWO to watch varsity games

The Cansayapi LaCrosse team has extended an invitation to all Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate and anyone interested in revival of the Creator's game to come and watch them play in regional games.

The team will be participating in a regional high school varsity LaCrosse tournament in Watertown this weekend, April 30 and May 1.

Dates and times

Saturday, April 30:

10:30 am-12:00 pm vs. Brookings Rage – Watertown, Mt. Hope park Field C

1:30 pm-3:00 pm vs. Grand Cities Predators – Watertown, Mt. Hope park Field D

4:30 pm-6:00 pm vs. Sioux Falls Spark – Watertown, Mt. Hope park Field D

Sunday, May 1:

12:00 pm-3:00pm vs. Black Hills Spark – Watertown, Mt. Hope park Field D

Coach Frankie Jackson says a special invitation is going to Big Coulee and Enemy Swim Districts and the SWO Youth Program for their continued support!

"We hope you can make it," he said.

"Bring lawn chairs, as most fields don't have bleachers."

And "Go team Cansayapi!"

'We Are Going To Close Down The Aberdeen Area Office'

By Brandon Ecoffey

Lakota Country Times Editor

PINE RIDGE-- Oglala Sioux Tribal President John Steele has called for the closure of the Indian Health Service's Aberdeen Area office as he has introduced massive recommendations for reform of healthcare on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation.

In a statement released Monday, President Steele addressed concerns from tribal members about the possible closure of the IHS facility in Pine Ridge. The release stated that the Oglala Sioux Tribe had received notice on April 8 from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services that the IHS facility in Pine Ridge was in violation of two provisions of Medicare Conditions of Operation. Under an agreement between all parties involved the facility now has until May 16 to become compliant with CMS standards of care or risk losing its ability to bill Medicare/Medicaid for costs of serving patients.

Both President Steele and Pine Ridge Service Unit Director Sophie Claymore assured tribal members on Monday that the facility in Pine Ridge had not closed its doors and was working to become compliant with the notice issued by CMS.

"The Emergency Department is not closing. We are open," said Claymore in her monthly report to the OST tribal council.

In an address to the Oglala Sioux Tribal Council, President John Steele announced plans to lead an effort to close the IHS Aberdeen Area office after both the Rosebud Service Unit and the Pine Ridge Service Unit found themselves in hot water with the Center Medicare and Medicaid services. The two hospitals that are responsible for serving tens of thousands of Lakota have been in danger of permanently losing their ability to bill Medicare/Medicaid on multiple occasions.

"We are going to close down the Aberdeen Area office," said President Steele.

In statements where he recalled his time as an Oglala Sioux councilman in the 1970's, President Steele said that, "In all my years the area office hasn't done anything for our people and we are going to close it down," said Steele.

The citizens of the Sicangu Nation in Rosebud has already seen their emergency room closed at its IHS facility. Patients who would normally use IHS hospital in Rosebud are now being transported nearly an hour away to a hospital in Valentine, NE. Sources in Rosebud have said that several tribal citizens have lost their lives during transport.

According to President Steele conversations between tribal governmental officials and representatives of the federal government have established the groundwork for a reconfiguring of healthcare delivery in Indian Country. Although President Steele did not go in to detail on his plans but he did present the council with options that included demanding that the federal government issue documentation to all Lakota people that would provide coverage at all not healthcare facilities, not just IHS.

Steele also announced that the tribe was foregoing IHS and had begun seeking a contractor to provide emergency room services to residents of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation.

"We have already advertised the contract for our emergency room to whoever wants to provide these services," said Steele. "It could be Sanford, Avera, Rapid City Regional or someone else," he said.

Up until this point all healthcare services at the Pine Ridge Hospital have been provided by IHS but tribal-nations have the right to contract out services for any tribal program. While some have argued that this option affords tribal-governments a greater amount of self-determination, others believe that the move let's the federal government off the hook for its treaty and trust responsibilities to provide healthcare to tribal-citizens.

The struggle to find a sustainable source of healthcare those living on Reservations on the Great Plains has been a problem as underfunded and understaffed Indian Health Service facilities are now buckling under the weight of the sheer demand for services.

Healthcare is a right guaranteed to tribal-nations through both the treaty process and as a result of the trust relationship between tribes and the federal government. Funding for IHS facilities, however, has often been shortchanged by Congress as a rising national debt and a GOP controlled congress have chipped away at the IHS budget for years. The lack of funds have left tribal-nations with the burden of finding their own ways of guaranteeing healthcare for its citizens.

"The federal government has an obligation to provide adequate healthcare to the Oglala Sioux Tribe. Unfortunately, that obligation goes widely unfulfilled. It is, therefore, up to the tribe to work directly with IHS and CMS to ensure the federal government upholds its side of the trust responsibility," said President Steele.

Efforts by the tribe to reform healthcare on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation have been bolstered by congressional interest in the state of healthcare in Indian Country. In address to members of Congress earlier this year Wakpamni Representative Sonia Little Hawk-Weston attempted to explain just what the tribe is asking from the federal government.

"All we want is quality healthcare without the inordinately burdensome and oftentimes horrific struggles they receive to get any healthcare at all, this should not be an unachievable goal in the Untied States of America," said Sonia Little Hawk Weston.

In response to demands from the tribe for more staff and housing at the IHS facility in Pine Ridge President also stated that he had received a guarantee from federal officials that a small apartment building would be built immediately to assist in the recruitment and retention of qualified healthcare providers.

(Contact Brandon Ecoffey at editor@lakotacountrytimes.com)

Presses IHS Director to guarantee support for ND facilities

After pushing IHS to fix severe shortcomings in SD, Senator working to ensure ND facilities have adequate resources

Washington, DC – April 18, 2016 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today met with Mary Smith, Acting Director of the Indian Health Service (IHS), to reinforce that IHS must guarantee quality health care for North Dakota's tribal communities as the agency invests attention and resources in South Dakota to fix severe shortcomings at health facilities.

Heitkamp requested the meeting with Smith to follow up on a February U.S. Senate Committee on Indian Affairs oversight hearing, where Heitkamp called out a "culture of failure" at the Indian Health Service. Heitkamp urged the agency to begin tackling the substandard quality of Indian health care and other severe problems at IHS facilities in the Great Plains, and particularly in South Dakota. Heitkamp and a bipartisan group of senators requested the oversight hearing in January.

"Fixing these hospitals and maintaining quality care in North Dakota is a life-or-death issue. Native communities rely on IHS for everything from child birth to emergency care during a heart attack," said Heitkamp. "As this agency works to turn around unacceptable conditions at South Dakota hospitals, we cannot overlook other Indian health facilities across the Great Plains, including in my state. North Dakota facilities need continued attention to provide the care Native communities deserve. To guarantee real and meaningful progress across the region, I'm engaging with IHS and fighting to improve services in Indian Country however and wherever I can."

Pine Ridge, Rosebud, and other IHS facilities across the Great Plains have experienced severe service disruptions in recent years, which prompted February's U.S. Senate oversight hearing. Those persistent disruptions included emergency room closures, inadequate staffing, unsafe and unsterile conditions, and regulatory violations – all of which put the health of communities who rely on the hospitals at risk.

As a member of the U.S. Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, Heitkamp has long fought to improve the quality of health care across Indian Country. The first bill Heitkamp introduced as a U.S. senator was her bill to create a commission on steps the federal government should take to improve the lives of Native children, including improving health care in Indian Country.

Heitkamp has also fought to provide quality health care for Native veterans. In October 2015, Heitkamp hosted her second Native American Veterans Summit on the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indian Reservation to connect Native veterans from across the state with top officials, guaranteeing veterans access to health care and other support they deserve. Native Americans serve in the military at four times the rate of any other group. Heitkamp held her first Native American Veterans Summit at United Tribes Technical College in Bismarck in 2014, bringing together more than 140 Native veterans with federal officials and advocates who provided resources and guidance.

Thune's taxpayer protection provisions approved by committee

Washington, DC – April 21, 2016 – U.S. Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.), a member of the tax-writing Senate Finance Committee, applauded the committee's adoption of the Taxpayer Protection Act, which included numerous taxpayer protection provisions he authored with Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa). Several provisions of the Taxpayer Bill of Rights Enhancement Act, a separate bill Thune and Grassley introduced in June 2015, have already been enacted into law and several more were adopted during the committee markup.

"We sponsored our legislation not only because of the abuses of taxpayer rights we've seen at the IRS in recent years, but also because it has been nearly 20 years since Congress enacted comprehensive taxpayer rights legislation," said Thune. "American taxpayers deserve a tax collection agency that is accountable to them and that respects their due process rights."

Thune provisions included in the committee-approved bill:

· Extends from nine months to two years the period for returning monetary proceeds from the sale of property that has been wrongfully levied by the IRS.

· Allows amounts, including interest, wrongfully levied by the IRS from retirement accounts to be re-contributed back to those accounts without penalty.

· Requires tax-exempt organizations to file Form 990 electronically and mandates that the IRS make such information available in a timely manner.

· Imposes new statutory requirements on the IRS with respect to email retention consistent with the existing directive from the Office of Management and Budget and the National Archives.

· Requires the IRS to notify a taxpayer whose confidential information has been improperly disclosed or inspected when a disciplinary action against an IRS employee is undertaken, regardless of whether or not the employee is criminally charged.

· Requires the General Accountability Office to conduct a study examining if taxpayers in those states without a permanent IRS appeals presence, including South Dakota, are disadvantaged relative to taxpayers in other states.

Noem's IRS Workforce Integrity Bill

Washington, DC – April 21, 2016 – Rep. Kristi Noem today led the House in passing her Ensuring Integrity in the IRS Workforce Act (H.R.3724), which would prohibit the IRS from rehiring an employee who has been fired for certain forms of misconduct. The legislation passed with broad bipartisan support by a margin of 345-78.

"The IRS has rehired hundreds of people who had already been fired once for misconduct. This practice needs to end and that's exactly what my bill does. It's just commonsense," said Noem. "Much more must be done to correct our broken tax system. Nonetheless, as we work toward a fairer, flatter, and simpler tax code, I'll be looking for more opportunities to make the IRS more accountable to you."

In February 2015, Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA) publicly released a new report explaining it had "identified hundreds of former employees with prior substantiated conduct or performance issues ranging from tax issues, unauthorized access to taxpayer information, leave abuse, falsification of official forms, unacceptable performance, misuse of IRS property, and off-duty misconduct."

The agency went on to say that nearly one in five of the rehired employees with a record of prior misconduct had performance issues when they returned to the IRS.

Amendment to aid Sanford Underground lab in SD

Washington, DC – April 20, 2016 – U.S. Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.) today issued the following statement after the Senate passed the bipartisan Energy Policy Modernization Act (S. 2012), legislation that would modernize energy policy and help maximize development in this economic sector. Included in the final bill was a Thune provision to create a coordinating subcommittee within the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC) focused on high energy physics and a separate provision he introduced with Sen. Mike Rounds (R-S.D.) that would facilitate a permanent land transfer of Bureau of Land Management land to expand the Black Hills National Cemetery.

"It would be an understatement to say this energy bill would not have passed without Sen. Murkowski's hard work," said Thune. "She spent a great deal of time working with senators on both sides of the aisle to make sure this bill – the first energy bill in nearly a decade – passed the Senate with bipartisan support.

"I also want to thank Sen. Murkowski for working with me to ensure my amendment to create a special NSTC subcommittee on high energy physics was considered and adopted. This newly created coordinating subcommittee would be tasked with maximizing the efficiency and effectiveness of U.S. investment in high energy physics research and supporting a robust, internationally competitive high energy physics program, which we're proud to be a part of in South Dakota."

The subcommittee's work would benefit underground science and engineering research, like the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment that will be conducted at the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility, which is being constructed at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota, and the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Illinois.

The NSTC was created by executive order in 1993 to coordinate federal science and technology policy, and its membership consists of the president, vice president, director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), cabinet secretaries, and other government officials involved in science and technology.

The Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, of which Thune is chairman, has jurisdiction over the NSTC and OSTP.

Statement on passage of bipartisan Energy Bill

Includes Sen. Rounds' easement disclosure amendment

Washington, DC – April 20, 2016 – U.S. Senator Mike Rounds (R-S.D.), a member of the Senate Environment and Public Works (EPW) Committee, today issued the following statement on the Senate's passage of the bipartisan Energy Policy Modernization Act, which included his easement disclosure amendment. The bill passed by a vote of 85-12.

"For the first time in nearly a decade, the Senate passed legislation to modernize and update our nation's energy policies," said Rounds. "The bipartisan bill will increase energy security and help keep energy costs low for South Dakota families."

"Additionally, I'm pleased the bill includes my amendment to make sure landowners are aware of all the options available to them when choosing to place their land in a conservation easement. South Dakota's landowners deserve to know that perpetual conservation easements aren't their only option. My amendment will increase awareness for shorter, termed easements and result in greater access and conservation of land."

Rounds' amendment contains language to establish a federal education program through the U.S. Department of the Interior to allow landowners to learn all of the federal conservation options available to them when choosing to restrict future use of their land through a federal easement. The agency will be required to make landowners aware of this education program when approaching them about participating in a conservation program.

Additionally, the Black Hills National Cemetery Boundary Expansion Act, introduced by Rounds and Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.), was included as part of an amendment in the Energy Policy Modernization Act. It will facilitate a permanent land transfer of approximately 200 acres of Bureau of Land Management land to expand the Black Hills National Cemetery.

The bipartisan Brownfields Utilization, Investment and Local Development (BUILD) Act, also cosponsored by Rounds, was included in the Energy Policy Modernization Act. This legislation will provide funding for technical assistance grants to small communities and rural areas, expand the scope of eligible grant recipients to include non-profit community groups, and authorize funding for multi-purpose grants to tackle more complex sites.

Summary of Key Provisions of the Energy Policy Modernization Act

Efficiency – Energy efficiency provides significant benefits for consumers, the economy and the environment. The provisions in this title include agreements on everything from longer-term utility energy service contracts to the reauthorization of the weatherization and state energy programs. The efficiency of our homes, buildings and manufacturing facilities all stand to increase as a result of it.

Infrastructure – We depend on electrical transmission lines and other infrastructure to transport energy from where it is produced to where it is used. This title will help modernize our electrical grid, enhance cybersecurity safeguards, maintain the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, provide a streamlined process for natural gas export projects and solidify a qualified, well-trained workforce.

Supply – To provide for an energy supply that is increasingly abundant, affordable, clean, diverse and secure, this title focuses on the development of renewable energy, traditional resources, and non-fuel minerals alike. The responsible development of American resources – including hydropower geothermal, bioenergy and rare earth elements – will strengthen our economy, competitiveness and security for decades to come.

Accountability – Practical reforms are needed to advance innovation, protect electric reliability and assure proper stewardship of taxpayer dollars. Among the provisions in this title are the reauthorization of certain energy-related components of the America COMPETES Act, better interagency coordination of energy/water initiatives, and the repeal of numerous provisions within the U.S. Code that are outdated or redundant.

Conservation Reauthorization – The Committee is also responsible for oversight and stewardship of our public lands. The bipartisan legislation permanently reauthorizes the Land and Water Conservation Fund in a way that balances land acquisition with other conservation programs important to states and permanently reauthorizes the Historic Preservation Fund, both set to expire this fall. It also creates a new National Park Maintenance and Revitalization Fund, to address the maintenance backlog at some of our nation's most treasured public places.

Energy Bill benefits South Dakotans

By Senator Mike Rounds

April 21, 2016

The Senate recently passed a bipartisan, comprehensive energy bill that will increase energy security and help keep energy costs low for South Dakota families. The Energy Policy Modernization Act of 2016 is the first comprehensive energy bill to pass the Senate in nearly a decade. Included in the final package are a number of measures to improve the energy needs of South Dakotans, and other provisions that will directly benefit our state. I was pleased to vote for it on the Senate floor.

The bill includes my easement disclosure amendment that would make sure landowners are aware of all the options available to them when choosing to place their land in a conservation easement. Landowners in South Dakota deserve to know that perpetual conservation easements aren't their only option. This legislation will increase awareness for shorter, termed easements that keep the landowner and the federal government on equal footing. I believe it will also result in greater conservation opportunities.

Specifically, this amendment contains language to establish a federal education program through the U.S. Department of the Interior to allow landowners to learn all of the federal conservation options available to them when choosing to restrict future use of their land through a federal easement. The agency will be required to make landowners aware of this program when approaching them about participating in a conservation program.

Another South Dakota provision included in the energy bill is the Black Hills National Cemetery Boundary Expansion Act, introduced by Sen. John Thune and me earlier this Congress. This will facilitate a permanent land transfer of around 200 acres of Bureau of Land Management land to expand the Black Hills National Cemetery near Sturgis. The permanent land transfer will guarantee that generations of South Dakota veterans will be able to rest peacefully in the Black Hills National Cemetery.

Reauthorization of the Brownfields program was included in the energy bill as well. I worked with a number of my colleagues on the Brownfields Utilization, Investment and Local Development Act, also referred to as the BUILD Act, which will provide funding for technical assistance grants to small communities and rural areas. This will be helpful to many South Dakota communities by expanding the scope of eligible grant recipients to include non-profit community groups. I was happy to see it included in the final energy bill.

The bill will enhance our ability to protect the electric grid from weather events and cybersecurity threats. Passing the Energy Policy Modernization Act is just one more example of the Senate's commitment to strengthening economic security for the American people and of our dedication to an all-of-the-above approach to energy policy. We would have liked to see additional energy production measures included in the bill, but operating under a divided government requires any legislation passed to meet the approval of both Republicans and Democrats. We may not have gotten everything we wanted, but this bill is step in the right direction.

Amendment would fund flood, drought monitoring of Missouri River

Washington, DC – April 21, 2016 – U.S. Senator Mike Rounds (R-S.D.) today offered an amendment to the Energy and Water appropriations bill that would authorize the use of up to $2 million within the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' (USACE) existing budget to implement Upper Missouri River Basin flood and drought monitoring systems. Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.) is a cosponsor.

"South Dakotans deserve certainty that the federal government has taken steps to prevent another catastrophic event similar to the 2011 flood that forced more than 4,000 families out of their homes, resulted in five deaths and caused more than $2 billion in damage to infrastructure, businesses and fertile ag land," said Rounds. "That begins with proper tools to monitor water levels as instructed in a 2014 water resources law. During my field hearing in North Sioux City last month, Army Corps officials told me they didn't have proper funding to implement the soil moisture and snowpack monitoring system that would help prevent a future major flood event along the Missouri River. By making these funds available, the Corps will have all the tools they need to implement the monitoring system."

Last month, Rounds chaired an Environment and Public Works Subcommittee on Superfund, Waste Management and Oversight field hearing in North Sioux City to focus on the USACE management of the Missouri River following the flood of 2011. At the time of the hearing, USACE noted that it does not have the funding to improve its soil moisture and snowpack monitoring system, nor has it made an appropriations request to Congress to take such action.

Peru's President Toledo to serve at Young World's environmental event

Tucson, AZ – A list of global figures will lend their stature and counsel to young leaders at the One Young World Environment Summit, which takes place May 19-21 in Tucson at the University of Arizona's Biosphere 2. Counselors at One Young World's event will work with young leaders from around the planet addressing challenges across the environmental field including changing weather patterns, food security and indigenous rights.

Counselors for the One Young World Environment Summit include actor and activist Adrian Grenier; the first indigenous President of Peru, Alejandro Toledo; NASA Astronaut Ron Garan; CNN meteorologist Jennifer Gray; and Robert Swan OBE, the first man to walk to the North and South Poles.

Other counselors include Jayne Poynter and Taber MacCallum, two of the original "Biospherians" who lived in the biosphere for two years, from 1991 to 1993. This is the 25th anniversary of the Biosphere, a "must see wonder of the world" that houses biomes such as a rainforest, a fog desert, mangroves and a coral reef under 3.14 acres of glass in the Sonoran desert.

One Young World is unique in giving delegates the opportunity to interact with some of the world's leading politicians, business leaders and campaigners and opens up a platform empowering them to make lasting connections to drive positive change.

The One Young World Environment Summit is the first in the One Young World series to address one specific topic following six global events that have attracted young leaders from more than 196 countries making One Young World the most international gathering of young people other than the Olympics.

"We are thrilled to announce the initial list of speakers for the One Young World Environment Summit. It is a testimony to the draw of the energy and ideas of young people that experts from around the world are coming to share their knowledge with the One Young World audience," said Ella Robertson, Managing Director of One Young World International. "The setting of Biosphere 2, the world's largest earth science lab, will inspire tangible action on environmental issues."

The list of confirmed counselors attending the One Young World Summit Environment Summit includes:

· Adrian Grenier, Actor and co-founder of SHFT.com

· Alexander Verbeek, Founder of the Planetary Security Conference, diplomat and security adviser

· Charlene Wheeless, Principal vice president of Global Corporate Affairs, Bechtel

· Christine Milne, Environmentalist, former Leader of Australian Green Party and retired Australian senator

· Hugh Welsh, President and general counsel, DSM North America

· Jan Pronk, Professor, veteran of Dutch Politics and president of the Kyoto Protocol

· Jane Poynter, CEO World View Enterprises Inc, former Biospherian

· Jennifer Gray, CNN meteorologist

· Joaquin Ruiz, Director of University of Arizona Biosphere 2, dean of the UA College of Science and Thomas R. Brown Distinguished Professor

· John Baker, Managing director of WildAid

· John Schulz, AVP, sustainability operations, AT&T

· Sir Jonathon Porritt, Founder-director of Forum for the Future

· Leyla Acaroglu, Founder and director of Eco Innovators & Disrupt Design, creative force for positive sustainability-led change

· Ken Kragen, Legendary pop music manager of We Are the World and Hands Across America

· Margie Alt, Executive director, Environment America

· Miranda Johnson, Environment correspondent, The Economist

· Philiip Barlag, Executive director, World 50

· President Alejandro Toledo, first indigenous president of Peru

· Robert Swan OBE, Polar explorer, environmentalist and the first man ever to walk unsupported to both the North and South Poles

· Ron Garan, Humanitarian and former NASA astronaut

· Taber MacCallum, Chief technology officer of World View Enterprises, co-founder of Paragon Space Development Corporation, former Biospherian

· Col. Hal Bidlack, Valued member of ASP's Consensus for American Security

More confirmed counselors will be announced closer to the event. For more information, visit www.oneyoungworld.com.

About One Young World International

One Young World International is a new division of One Young World, the premier global forum for young leaders. It will host a series of satellite events throughout the year, gathering 500 young leaders to discuss pressing global issues. The first event will be specifically themed on the environment and will take place at Biosphere 2, Tucson, Ariz., May 19-21, 2016.

About One Young World

One Young World is the principal global forum for young leaders aged 18 to 30. Established in 2009, One Young World hosts an annual summit attended by 1,300 delegates from 196 countries. No youth-dominated event represents as many countries outside the Olympics. One Young World is a unique platform for young leaders to network with peers from every country and sector, sharing ideas to develop solutions to address urgent global issues. Following the summit, One Young World Ambassadors go on to deliver initiatives in their countries and communities, often collaborating with other One Young World Ambassadors to develop projects on a global scale. Over 8.9 million people have been impacted by the work of One Young World Ambassadors since 2010, with 2.7 million being impacted in 2015. Unlike any other event, the One Young World Summit gives delegates the kind of media platform afforded ordinarily only to those who lead countries and corporations.

About Biosphere 2

The University of Arizona Biosphere 2 consists of a unique large-scale experimental apparatus housing seven model ecosystems, a team of multidisciplinary scientists, a broad science education and public outreach program, and a modern conference center. The seven model ecosystems are: 1) a mature rain forest with over 90 tropical tree species, 2) a 2600 m3 ocean, 3) forested swamps dominated by mangrove trees, 4) a tropical savanna grassland, 5) a 1,400 m2 coastal fog desert, 6) three desert hillslope landscapes, and 7) a 162,000 m2 model city and urban ecosystem comprising Biosphere 2, its campus, and associated buildings and facilities. The Biosphere 2 Science Program addresses societal grand challenges related to water, environmental and energy management through design of large-scale experimentation in each of these model ecosystems. These experiments support the development of computer models that simulate the biological, physical and chemical processes to predict ecosystem response to environmental change. In return, these coupled-systems model simulations inform scientists about the next level of experimentation needed to advance understanding of these complex systems' responses that can be tested against observations in natural systems.

Bill would increase access to cultural education for Native students

Washington, DC – April 21, 2016 – U.S. Senators Heidi Heitkamp (D-ND) and James Lankford (R-OK) today introduced bipartisan legislation to update decades-old data the federal government uses to distribute funds to Native American students. The data currently excludes about 500,000 Native students from accessing federal resources they could be eligible for that would help address many of the students' unique academic and cultural needs.

Because of the lack of accurate data in how Native students are counted by the federal government, many Native students in public schools across the country eligible for federal cultural educational support through the Johnson O'Malley (JOM) program have lacked access to such resources. The Bureau of Indian Affairs' (BIA) last official count of Native students took place more than two decades ago, yet it uses these numbers to determine which students get federal resources. Heitkamp and Lankford introduced bipartisan legislation to require the federal government to quickly and accurately count all eligible Native students for the program, which would allow these students who currently aren't being counted to federal resources that will help them improve academically.

"In too many forgotten corners of our country, Native young people – often neglected and underserved – are falling behind," said Heitkamp. "We already know that culturally specific programs in schools, like Native language preservation courses, help put Native students on brighter paths personally and academically. But for the past two decades, federal agencies have failed to provide an accurate count of the Native students most in need – and potentially eligible for – these resources. As one of the fastest growing populations in the country, U.S. Census data suggests that Native students eligible for such resources have dramatically increased. No child in America deserves to be forgotten – and every child deserves the chance to succeed. That's why our bipartisan bill would work to get accurate numbers and increase access to the cultural programs that help Native children thrive."

"The Johnson-O'Malley program addresses some of the unique cultural and academic needs of Native American students, but the efficiency of its management is questionable," said Lankford. "Congress has raised concerns about JOM's inaccurate count of Indian students attending public schools before. It's now time for statutorily-enforced updates to this program so that it truly helps the students it was intended to help. The JOM Modernization Act will provide a needed reformation to ensure the program effectively reaches Indian students in public schools throughout the United States."

"The National Johnson O'Malley Association is very excited to have Senators Heidi Heitkamp (D-ND) and James Lankford (R-OK) sponsor and introduce the Johnson-O'Malley Supplemental Indian Education Program Modernization Act. This legislation will provide long needed and necessary updates to the JOM program which awards supplemental assistance to tribal organizations, school districts, and other partner organizations to address the unique cultural and academic needs of Native American students," said James Whitman, an MHA Nation enrolled member and National Johnson O'Malley Association Board Member representing North Dakota. "The most important provision of this bill will result in the first update of the number of Indian students eligible for Johnson O'Malley services and assistance in over 20 years. Obtaining this eligible student count will drive the policy, program and funding discussions needed to make JOM more effective, meaningful and beneficial for all eligible Indian children."

During a time when Native students graduate from high school at a rate far lower than any other racial or ethnic demographic in the country, Heitkamp is working to make sure that the cultural programs in public schools that have linked to boosting Native students' morale, as well as academic performance and attendance, are readily available in classrooms. Despite the stark need for such programs, the last official count in 1995 by BIA, identified 271,884 Native students eligible for such resources. Since that time, the BIA has attempted to officially verify Native students eligible to the program without success, while the National Congress of American Indians has recently indicated a large gap in access to these programs – with a marked increase of more than 500,000 Native young people nationwide that could be eligible for JOM cultural resources.

Heitkamp and Lankford's bipartisan bill would call on the U.S. Department of the Interior to update its severely outdated count of Native students in a timely manner by using existing public information from the U.S. Census Bureau and the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) to show underserved students who are potentially eligible under the program. This data is crucial for making sure Native students in public schools can access the cultural and educational investments critical to their success.

Heitkamp has long worked to make sure Native young people living in Indian Country have access to the quality educational opportunities and resources they need to thrive by:

· Protecting and strengthening Native languages and cultures: Building on her work to reauthorize legislation to help preserve often endangered Native languages, Heitkamp encouraged Congressional leaders in November to protect cultural language enrichment and immersion programs in the U.S. Senate's K-12 education reform bill that boosts pride and morale in Native communities and improves students' academic performance and attendance.

· Improving access to educational resources and opportunities for Native youth: Heitkamp has long promoted safe after-school programs like 21st Century Community Learning Centers for vulnerable and at-risk youth in Indian Country, and pushed to include provisions reinstating resources dedicated to such programs in the U.S. Senate's K-12 education reform bill last April. Heitkamp also convened North Dakota educators last year to discuss challenges Native students in rural areas face in accessing academic opportunities, and met with the head of U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Rural Utilities Service (RUS) in 2014 on improving connectivity to make sure Native students in rural areas can access technology for educational and economic opportunities.

· Identifying challenges faced by Native young people: Among Heitkamp's top priorities is boosting communication between programs intended to comprehensively address the challenges Native children face – including inadequate access to educational opportunities. Her first bill introduced as a U.S. Senator, a bipartisan bill to create a Commission on Native Children, unanimously passed in the U.S. Senate and was introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives.

Encourages support of 4-H

Washington, DC – April 20, 2016 – The U.S. Senate has unanimously approved a bipartisan resolution authored by U.S. Senators Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D., and Roger Wicker, R-Miss., in support of 4-H and its recently-launched "Grow True Leaders" campaign. The measure, which is cosponsored by 34 senators, recognizes the immeasurable benefits of the national 4-H program for young people and its potential growth under the new initiative.

"For over 100 years, 4-H has nurtured young leaders in rural America – and it had a huge impact on me growing up. Now, 4-H programs supporting civic engagement, science education, public speaking, and more are moving further into urban and suburban communities as well," Heitkamp said. "As a fellow 4-H'er, I know personally that these programs make a difference in students' lives, and I continue to hear about the opportunities 4-H provides for young North Dakotans around our state. With 4-H expanding, I'm proud to honor this national program for its work to grow the next generation of leaders in local communities across the country."

"4-H plays an important role in shaping the lives of young people in Mississippi and across the country," Wicker said. "Historically, the organization's nearly 6 million members typically hail from rural areas of America. I am impressed with the incredible strides that 4-H has made in our rural communities and encouraged that 4-H is expanding into the nation's urban centers and suburbs, significantly growing its outreach. I look forward to helping facilitate the growth of True Leaders, giving students a place to learn and exercise valuable leadership skills."

The 4-H movement supports young people through programs designed to shape future leaders and innovators, particularly in rural communities. Last week, 4-H launched a campaign called "Grow True Leaders," which seeks to replicate 4-H's success in rural communities in urban areas. The program's new initiative hopes to reach a broader, more diverse population, impacting more African American and Hispanic children.

In addition to Senators Heitkamp and Wicker, cosponsors of the resolution include Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., Tammy Baldwin, D-Wis., John Barrasso, R-Wyo., Roy Blunt, R-Mo., John Boozman, R-Ark., Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.Va., Bob Casey, D-Pa., Bill Cassidy, R-La., Thad Cochran, R-Miss., Chris Coons, D-Del., John Cornyn, R-Texas, Mike Crapo, R-Idaho, Steve Daines, R-Mont., Joe Donnelly, D-Ind., Mike Enzi, R-Wyo., Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, Cory Gardner, R-Colo., James Inhofe, R-Okla., Johnny Isakson, R-Ga., Mark Kirk, R-Ill., Angus King, I-Maine, Jeff Merkley, R-Ore., John McCain, R-Ariz., Jerry Moran, R-Kan., Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, Gary Peters, D-Mich., Pat Roberts, R-Kansas, Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich., Thom Tillis, R-N.C., Tom Udall, D-N.M., and David Vitter, R-La.

$4.7 million in grants for Food Safety Training, Outreach and Technical assistance

Washington, DC – April 18, 2016 – The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) today announced the availability of $4.7 million in grants for food safety education, training, and technical assistance projects that address the needs of owners and operators of small to mid-sized farms, beginning farmers, socially-disadvantaged farmers, small processors, small fresh fruit and vegetable merchant wholesalers, food hubs, farmers' markets, and others. The grants, offered through the Food Safety Outreach Program and administered by USDA's National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), are designed to help these stakeholders comply with new food safety guidelines established by the Food and Drug Administration under the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA).

"As growing demand for local food creates new economic opportunities for small farms, beginning farmers, and others, we are committed to ensuring that all types of farmers and businesses have the tools they need to be successful," said Agricultural Secretary Tom Vilsack. "By supporting projects that offer tailored training, education, and technical assistance for producers and processors of local food, these grants will benefit producers, the entire food supply chain, and consumers."

In fiscal year 2015, NIFA and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) funded an infrastructure of National and Regional Centers to extend food safety education, training, and technical assistance to specific audiences affected by new guidelines established under the FSMA. In fiscal year 2016, the Food Safety Outreach Program at NIFA will build upon this established national infrastructure by focusing on the delivery of customized training for owners and operators of small farms, food processors, small fruit and vegetable wholesalers, food hubs, farmers' markets, terminal markets, and farms that lack access to food safety training and other educational opportunities.

This year, NIFA will fund three types of projects to help producers comply with FSMA. Pilot projects will support the development and implementation of new and potentially high-risk, high-impact food safety education and outreach programs in local communities that address the needs of small, specialized audiences from among the various target groups. Community outreach projects will focus on the growth and expansion of already-existing food safety education and outreach programs that are currently offered in local communities. Multistate Education and training projects will support the development and implementation of multi-county, state-wide, or multi-state food safety education and outreach programs where there are common food safety concerns, but the states are not necessarily located within the same regions.

A webinar for potential applicants is scheduled for April 19, from 2:30-3:30 p.m. EST. Applications are due June 2. See the request for applications on the NIFA website for more information.

The Food Safety Outreach Program is just one example of the many USDA programs and services that support strong local and regional food systems. Across USDA, the Know Your Farmer, Know Your Food Initiative coordinates the Department's policy, resources, and outreach efforts related to local and regional food systems. Over the past seven years, USDA has supported providing consumers a stronger connection to their food with more than $1 billion in investments to over 40,000 local and regional food businesses and infrastructure projects since between 2009. Industry data estimates that U.S. local food sales totaled at least $12 billion in 2014, up from $5 billion in 2008. More information on how USDA investments are connecting producers with consumers and expanding rural economic opportunities is available in Chapter IV of USDA Results on Medium.

Since 2009, NIFA has invested in and advanced innovative and transformative initiatives to solve societal challenges and ensure the long-term viability of agriculture. To learn more about NIFA's impact on agricultural science, visit www.nifa.usda.gov/impacts, sign up for email updates, or follow us on Twitter @usda_NIFA, #NIFAimpacts.

Federal funds for Land & Water Conservation in ND

Washington, DC – April 18, 2016 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp, a member of the U.S. Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, & Forestry, today announced a federal investment of $850,801 to protect, maintain and develop the state's outdoor recreation areas.

"North Dakota has a long tradition of supporting our natural resources, enabling families to enjoy them for generations to come," said Heitkamp. "From hunting and fishing to baseball fields and parks, these resources provide the needed space for families to enjoy the great outdoors. This federal support will make sure communities have the resources they need to develop and maintain land and water for recreational use."

These federal funds are made available through the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) of the U.S. National Park Service. The LWCF invests in outdoor recreational space to develop areas for communities to use and enjoy. These funds are partially generated from the revenue received from oil and gas development and are used for community driven outdoor projects to stimulate the local economy based on their local priorities.

Heitkamp helped negotiate a bipartisan deal, which passed in Congress in December 2015, to lift the ban on exporting oil as well as extend the LWCF and extend tax credits for wind and solar energy.

Editorials –

Sota guest editorial –

SD Oil Spill reveals major Pipeline problems

By Ken Ilgunas

States with tar sands pipelines are dealing with lousy leak-detection systems, toxic and difficult-to-clean spills and pitiful tax revenues

Time Magazine – April 14, 2016 – When I trespassed across America in 2012 as part of my 1,700-mile hike along the proposed route of the Keystone XL pipeline, I fell in love with South Dakota: its big skies, its gently rolling grasslands, its herds of deer and pronghorn. Despite being hit by blizzards and stampeded by cows and called "crazy" every day, South Dakota would settle into my memory as one of the grandest places I've ever visited.

Most of this land, though, was considered by TransCanada, the Canadian pipeline company that wanted to build the Keystone XL, to be "low consequence," a designation that TransCanada sought to apply so that they could use a thinner pipe.

On April 2, 2016, some of this low-consequence land was soaked in oil because of a leak in the Keystone 1 pipeline near Freeman, S.D. TransCanada responded by requesting the FAA to create a no-fly zone above the spill.

The original low-consequence sum of 187 gallons of spilled oil—just enough to fill a kiddie pool—soon increased 90 times to 16,800 gallons. Oil was discovered on 300 square feet of farmland by a neighbor of landowner Loren Schultz. TransCanada pulled out soil around 275 feet of pipe in their search for the leak, which TransCanada would eventually call "small," despite it having just spurted out benzene-laced tar sands oil over a football field-sized piece of land.

The spill—the largest in South Dakota in Keystone 1's six-year life—is certainly a mess that an ogreish and shady pipeline company would want to hide, but it's probably not the only thing TransCanada doesn't want us to see. In the Heartland, states with tar sands pipelines have been dealing with lousy leak-detection systems, toxic and difficult-to-clean spills and pitiful tax revenues for years.

The Keystone 1 pipeline stretches from Hardisty, Alberta to Illinois and Oklahoma. The pipe, which started pumping oil in 2009, was approved by President George W. Bush and advanced through the application and construction process without much trouble. These were the years before the Keystone XL, when pipelines were relatively uncontroversial and easy to build.

Some states wanted the Keystone 1 so badly that they gave TransCanada generous incentives, like Kansas, which gave TransCanada a baffling 10-year tax exemption. Nebraska may have buyer's remorse, too, as it watch its annual tax revenue from TransCanada decrease year to year (from $7.6 million in 2012 to $5.9 million in 2015, according to data from Bold Nebraska). In Nebraska, the pipe will be valueless and cannot be taxed after 15 years. South Dakota lost out on big money, too, when it gave TransCanada (a company with $64 billion in assets) $14 million as part of a contractor's excise tax rebate. TransCanada projected they'd pay $6.5 million in property taxes to South Dakota for the first year of operation, but from 2010 to 2013, South Dakota received an average of only $3.4 million.

With all of this money that TransCanada is saving, you'd think they could invest it into their "state of the art" leak-detection system, which, Bill McKibben, the founder of climate advocacy organization 350.org, wryly tweeted "involves passerby noticing pools of oil." The leak-detection system uses sensors to monitor for leaks, but the truth is that the general public reports 22% of spills nationwide, according to Inside Climate News, which analyzed data from the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration between 2002 and 2012. In that same time period, only 5% of leaks were detected by remote sensors.

Rider Press In just its first year, the Keystone 1 sprung 35 leaks, including a 21,000-gallon gusher at a North Dakota pump station. When North Dakota rancher Bob Banderat went to check on his cows, he saw a 60-foot-high geyser of oil. He reported the spill over the phone, and he said that TransCanada asked him if he was joking and put him on hold for five minutes.

TransCanada's leak-detection system is designed to detect high-volume spills, but it has reported that its sensors are not able to detect leaks beneath 1.5% to 2% of the pipe's flow rate, which means that the Keystone 1, which carries about 500,000 barrels of oil a day, could theoretically leak as many as 420,000 gallons every day without their sensors detecting it. This flaw in TransCanada's detection system likely contributed to the recent South Dakota spill, which was caused by an anomaly on a girth weld, where there was an observed leak of two drops per minute.

The South Dakota spill is another ill-timed blunder for an industry reeling from its unlikely loss over the Keystone XL, which President Barack Obama rejected last November 2015. Dominion Energy's Atlantic Coast Pipeline, a 550-mile pipeline that would go through West Virginia, Virginia and North Carolina, is being aggressively fought by protestors, as is the Northeast Energy Direct, a proposed 188-mile gas pipeline that would bring fracked gas from Pennsylvania and New York to New England. In February 2016, a Kentucky Supreme Court let an appeals court decision stand that had killed the Bluegrass pipeline.

Environmental leaders believe that the rejection of the Keystone XL has bolstered the movement against pipelines.

"I think people now believe that they can win," said Jane Kleeb, founder of Bold Nebraska, an advocacy group that opposed the Keystone XL. "[They think,] 'if a state like Nebraska can beat a pipeline, so can we.'"

The recent spill may make things even harder for the Dakota Access Pipeline, a proposed pipeline that would cross South Dakota while transporting oil from North Dakota to Illinois. The pipe has been subject to strong opposition from landowners, tribes and advocacy groups.

Paul Seamans, a South Dakota rancher who opposed the Keystone XL, a grassroots agriculture and conservation group, says the Freeman spill might serve as a warning for other states contemplating pipelines.

"To me, the spill is good news," said Seamans. "I'm happy it happened. It shows the dangers of spills from even new pipelines. This spill was less than thirty miles from where the Keystone 1 is bored underneath the Missouri River. We should all consider ourselves fortunate that it didn't happen there."

It's uncertain if the other proposed pipelines will fail the way the Bluegrass and Keystone XL have, but it's clear that, in America, no pipeline is a safe bet anymore. Pipeline companies' futures may be in jeopardy, but that won't bother a lot of ranchers and farmers of the Heartland. To some, that may be a matter of low consequence.

*****

Ken Ilgunas is the author of Trespassing Across America.

Brief editorial comments from the editor's desk –

On and Off the Lake Traverse Reservation

In reporting the Chairman's recent open forum on concerns with IHS quality of care and claims coverage, we brought out the possibility of Tribal self-governance of health services.

Well, the planning phase is already underway.

Last month we sat in one of Council's preliminary roundtable talks with outside specialists.

This week, we have an update on how the planning is going and when this initial phase is expected to end.

Please read the article on page one.

*****

See highlights of last week's Earth Day walk and the community meal.

It is extremely important that we all take responsibility for the environment.

Caring for Ina Makoce means we are caring for ourselves, for our relatives, human and others, and for all that sustains our life.

Watch for more from SWO Mni Wiconi.

*****

Congratulations to President Harvey DuMarce and Math Instructor Linda Flanery for their long service to Sisseton Wahpeton College.

Each were recognized with a star quilt recently.

They have a combined total of 40 years of service to students of the SWC.

Congratulations!

*****

Please welcome Rhonda Kampeska in her new role at SWO Victims/Witness Protection.

Rhonda is serving as Coordinator of the program, which provides support for victims and witnesses of crime.

It's an important position, and we wish Rhonda well in her new duties.

Contact Rhonda if you are in need of help: 698-2022 or 698-7661.

*****

Watch in an upcoming Sota for an on-site report of activities at the spirit camp at Standing Rock. And stand in solidarity with those who are fighting the pipelines.

The SWO Tribe partnered with the other tribes in a legal battle against Keystone I.

Now is time to step up and rejoin the allied tribes.

*****

Please note that Tribal Council has authorized an increase in the reward money being offered for information leading to the return of AJ Lufkins to his family.

Anyone with information is asked to call law enforcement at 911.

All calls are confidential.

Please help the family find closure.

*****

We'd like to call attention to Team Cansayapi's invitation to come out this weekend at Watertown to cheer for them in high school varsity LaCrosse competition.

The times and places are listed elsewhere in this Sota.

Come if you are able!

Oh, and bring your lawn chairs along as most of the Mt. Hope park fields do not have bleachers.

It is exciting to see interest growing in this traditional support, sometimes referred to as the Creator's game.

*****

Last call to enter your suggestion for naming the Tribe's new homeless center!

Deadline for submitting a recommendation is this Friday, April 29.

Submit your best idea to the office of Tribal Secretary Crystal Owen. You could win the prize – $200.

Watch for the winning name in an upcoming Sota!

*****

Please note!

There are AA meetings taking place at the SWO homeless center weekly.

AA is now meeting from 6-7 p.m. every Saturday.

Everyone is welcome to attend.

There will be refreshments, coffee and cookies.

*****

Elder's Meditation:

"Each creature has a medicine, so there are many medicines. Because they are so close to the Creator, they are to communicate that medicine. Then they bring help and health." –Wallace Black Elk, LAKOTA

The Elders say everything has a purpose and everything has a will. We should never interfere with purpose or the will of everything. Every plant, creature, animal, insect, and human being has a purpose to be here on the Earth. Each has a special medicine to contribute for the good of all things. Each person also has good medicine, a special talent, a special gift. These medicines are to help others or to help make us healthy. What is your special medicine?

Creator, today, help me discover and use my medicine to serve a greater good.

*****

Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

Ours is the age that is proud of machines that think and suspicious of men who try to. H. Mumford Jones (1892 - 1980)

Absurdity, n.: A statement or belief manifestly inconsistent with one's own opinion. Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914), The Devil's Dictionary

What is the difference between unethical and ethical advertising? Unethical advertising uses falsehoods to deceive the public; ethical advertising uses truth to deceive the public. Vilhjalmur Stefansson (1879 - 1962), "Discovery", 1964

Life is nothing but a competition to be the criminal rather than the victim. Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970) (Must comment on this quote: What an indictment against the way warrior tribes have dominated the world for the past five millennia.)

Delusions of grandeur make me feel a lot better about myself. Jane Wagner

A newspaper consists of just the same number of words, whether there be any news in it or not. Henry Fielding (1707 - 1754)

Some men are born mediocre, some men achieve mediocrity, and some men have mediocrity thrust upon them. Joseph Heller (1923 - 1999), "Catch-22"

Everything that irritates us about others can lead us to an understanding of ourselves. Carl Jung (1875 - 1961)

In the United States, doing good has come to be, like patriotism, a favorite device of persons with something to sell. H. L. Mencken (1880 - 1956)

*****

The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Earlier receipt of copy is always appreciated. So, if you are aware of a date or message that needs to be publicized or advertised, please let us know about it in advance of the weekly deadline.

The preferred way to submit typed articles and ads, art and photos, is by e-mail.

The editor can be reached at the following e-mail address:

earthskyweb@cs.com

For more information, leave a message on the Sota production office voicemail (605) 938-4452, or send a fax to the 24-hour dedicated line (605) 938-4676.

-- CDF

Obituaries –

Services for Robert Wayne Thompson

Funeral service for Robert Wayne Thompson, 64, of Sisseton, South Dakota was held Saturday afternoon, April 23, 2016 at the Tribal Community Center, Agency Village, South Dakota with Spiritual leaders Danny Seaboy and LaVerne Blackthunder Jr.

Pallbearers were Robbie Thompson, Clayton Ayutapi Jr., Cole Richotte, Romeo Renville, Melvin Thompson, Tyson Seaboy, Dusty Snow, Travis Max, Vincent Max Jr., Calvin Max Sr., Derrick Locke and Kenny Abraham.

Honorary pallbearers were Tom Locke, Clayton Ayutapi Sr., Curt Snow, Little Joe White, Lonnie Rodlund, Creighton Renville, Kevin Amos, Raymond Quinn, Cheryl Ann Renville, Cheryl DeCoteau, Dustin Robertson, Bruce Robertson, Wayne German, David Robertson, Harvey Quinn, Kevin LaFontaine, Coke LaFontaine, Matt Cleveland, and too numerous of family and friends to mention them all. Drum group Wahpekute and special music by Jaiden Snow, Moonlight Aadland, and Misty Langdeaux.

Wake services were held Thursday and all-night Friday.

Burial is at the Max Family Cemetery, Agency Village, South Dakota.

The Cahill Funeral Chapel, Sisseton, SD was in charge of the arrangements.

Robert was born February 24, 1952 in Sisseton, South Dakota to Edward Thompson and Rose Max.

Robert attended Old Agency Day School 1st thru 8th grade where he was part of the talent events, taking 1st place with his sisters Rogene and Pat.

He loved many athletic events; his favorite was playing football for the Sisseton Redman, playing catcher for fast pitch at Old Agency.

He was a jack of all trades. He excelled in everything he did.

He lived in California where he worked at Howard Hughes Aircraft as a welder.

When he returned to South Dakota he worked on the Interstate helping to complete it to Canada as masonry, concrete finisher.

He worked on many homes as a carpenter.

He loved his family very much. He was a protector to his sisters and children. He loved his mom Rose very much and he spent his time raising a grandson Keenan. He was staying with his mom at the time of his passing.

Robert passed away on Tuesday, April 19, 2016 in Fargo, North Dakota.

Robert is survived by his wife Pheobe Thompson of Fargo, ND; daughters Ricky Thompson-Kluthe, Rocky Thompson, both of California; sons Robbie Thompson of California and Dustin and (Dezarae) Thompson of Sioux Falls, SD and Melvin Thompson of Sisseton, SD: daughters Autumn Rose Thompson and (Rhea Newholy) and Terri Hanson of Montana; mother Rose Max of Sisseton; sisters Florence Rogene Seaboy, Pat Taylor, Debbie Richotte, Davana BlackThunder, Roxanne Marchand of Minnesota, Rita Marchand of Minnesota, Doreen Thompson of Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin; numerous nieces, nephews, grandchildren Winter and Destiny Thompson, Rayven, Traya, Fay, and Aiyana, and great grandchildren, very special grandchildren Keenan and Keandra who he raised, adopted daughters, Amanda and Ashley Haug, and Cheyenne Barse, and many cousins and friends.

He is preceded in death by his father Eddy Thompson, daughter Missy Thompson, grandmother Helen Nahotan, uncles Vincent Max Sr. and Robert Herbert Max, nephew Duran Richotte, granddaughter Alayla Richotte, cousin Colette Max and brother Josh Thompson and sister Lorene Thompson.

The family wishes to express our forgiveness if we missed any family or friends we forgot to mention.

For Robert's obituary and online registry please visit www.cahillfuneralchapel.com/.

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor's note: The following comes from the editor's column and the Sota "deadlines and policies" statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and must be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Open letter to the Oyate

I have become so upset with the way in which my 16-year-old daughter is being profiled by the Sisseton High School staff. I have made a few verbal and written complaints to voice our concerns to the principal regarding his staff. This is my daughter's junior year in Sisseton High School and by far her worst year yet.

The latest incident concerning my daughter was the most upsetting the teacher actually named my daughter and others in a lesson to her students about being disrespectful. She used my daughter as an example of disrespectful behavior.

Another student informed my daughter about the teacher's rant in class.

When my daughter informed me of the fact that she hasn't taken a course with this teacher for over a year, I became outraged.

How many other students heard this story from this teacher? How many other students had their names broadcasted in classes?

My daughter had always been taught respect and how to handle situations in a respectful way, but this latest incident was inciting my "momma bear" instinct to come out.

If this teacher had any concerns with my child or behavior issues, she should have brought them to my immediate attention while my child was in her class.

Instead every student that has heard this story is under the assumption that my child is rude or misbehaves in school.

This has affected my daughter to the point of not returning to Sisseton School. And if she does return … will my daughter be the target or profiled in other ways?

I believe that this is not an isolated incident and wondering if any other parents have similar complaints with the Sisseton School.

Thank you for your time.

Amy Trevino.

A poem: "When healing hurts"

Written by Jessie Heminger

I know I'm only human.

When healing hurts

I know it's ok to feel that hurt

to allow itself to present its deadline dues.

To be able to face it with courage and

be brave enough to let it go.

When healing hurts

I know I've forgiven and given my best.

When healing hurts

I know I'm allowing myself to heal

more than what the that pain brings

in its own healing.

When healing hurts

I know I'm able to recognize

what it is when I face it,

it shows its face right back at me

and not an illusion or lies.

When healing hurts

from the same condition

I'm meeting that healing to the end

of its forgiveness.

To growth spurt from that process

to be able to be stronger

in facing heartache and pain

heartache and pain become lighter.

It may not be easy, but who ever said

it was hard to do.

When healing hurts

just simply allow it to

and swallow it away to a non existence.

Nip it at its bud, to create a better bud.

Flourish through it to claim

"That I Am A Warrior, Warrioress

whose pain can be turned into

something better … great!"

Because through every heartache,

through every pain,

through every disappointment,

through every struggle,

through every failure,

through every loss,

through every battle,

through every fight,

through every bleeding

inch of its existence.

Beneath it all flows the beating fire

of a heartbeat in our hearts.

It's Our Love that will always,

always withstand it all!

When healing hurts

love it through.

When loving a healing naturally,

love comes softly, softly love,

and love thyself once more,

and again more than once.

When healing hurts.

It matters.

E-Ternal Entertainment –

Poetry of Elijah Hard Heart

Our Lost Language

She could speak her Native tongue fluent

than anyone amongst us. Long black hair

with a smile so beautiful it'll outshine

any sunrise. You couldn't be just any man

to have this bride, every star in the sky could

be collected and you still wouldn't be elected.

You can be the greatest warrior in your camp flexing

you still wouldn't be selected. Her Ina and Ate

don't ever get to say. All they can do is bow

their head and pray, pray that swirling smoke

in that bulb leaves, pray that this brown skin

that we possess is too strong for that needle

to inject any more meth.

Meth is her man, to her meth is the only one

that understands why that sacred language

of this land no longer comes from her tongue…

Without You

My love without you my dreams shattered

by the morning bell behold the bars and concrete

my nightly taste of false freedom

gives way to reality, caught up in a new wave

of sorrow cast to and from by the tide

the mirror reflects a hardened con

no hint of emotions inside.

Churning sea of humanity spit me out onto

the beach, the years, the tears are faded now

hope finally out of reach. Step kids. I'll no longer

see again. I know they are a blessing but this

love is bittersweet to look upon their faces

drives a knife into my chest. A pain I knew will

never fade til my bones are laid to rest.

So I cry out for the hangman, caress my neck

with a noose. Strap me in the electric chair

and hit me with the juice, I hear the clap of

thunder always knew that it would rain.

I see your family judgement written on their

faces. I pray they'll find some closure, now

my soul has left this place without you.

(I love and miss you, son, Shiane and my wife Kerri."

E-Ternal Entertainment –

Poetry of Trinity L. Thompson

Our Lost Language

ma-he-ta-tan-han (from within)

from within my mind…

from within my heart…

from within my spirit…

together as a nation

we need to express a strong

sense of devotion to each other,

so that we as natives can overcome

the limitations of our senses, and

discover greater truths that our

eyes alone can reveal…

let us understand the tragedy,

let u embrace the conflict,

together … let us ease the pain,

your warriors … are standing strong

within the struggle determined,

there is only one end to the struggle…

and that is VICTORY!

never underestimate how dangerous

the fire smolders in indian hearts,

listen to the conscience of mother earth…

create harmony amongst your surroundings,

walk with the strength of our buffalo

and continue to shine as a symbol of greatness.

Like water over sand

I can sense the pain and see

the loneliness behind a fixed stare…

the stgrength to hold back tears

is crippling when the one you

search the skies if you must

it's better to cry…

just don't lose the twinkle

in those beautiful eyes,

I'm here if you need a shoulder

to lean on…

IU have all the time to listen…

allow me to be a source of strength

and help you find what's missing,

we all have flaws don't be surprised…

I'm only here to wipe

the precious tears from your eyes,

there's not much that I can really say…

and I know you're feeling all alone,

we all have that special place where we

can go … a place we clal our own,

but the time has come

one day we'll understand…

what brought us together

what pushed us apart

like water over sand.

(Dedicated to Elijah and Kerri)

Commonsense accountability

By Rep. Kristi Noem

April 22, 2016

With Tax Day only a week or so behind us, the amount of personal information we send in with our tax return is still fresh in our minds: Social Security numbers; our annual salary; in some cases, the routing number for our bank account! That's the kind of information we wouldn't share with just anyone, so it begs the question: whose hands does this information fall into once it arrives at the IRS?

Before we get too far in, I want to say that I've met with some incredible folks in South Dakota who do some of this work and do it with integrity. But the IRS is a nationwide agency. Not everyone lives up to South Dakota's standards, including many decision-makers within the IRS.

In the past few years alone, the agency has targeted groups based on their political beliefs. They've let criminal acts pass by the wayside, sending out billions of dollars in improper payments. They've let calls from taxpayers go unanswered, picking up just 15.6 percent of calls during the height of tax-filing season this year. Thousands of employees have neglected to pay their own taxes. And all the while, the agency has handed out about $6 million worth of bonuses.

With all of this as background, it may come as no surprise that the IRS also knowingly hired hundreds of former employees who had previously been fired for misconduct. Some of these people had been fired from the IRS for filing false documents. Some accessed sensitive taxpayer information without permission. Some just didn't show up to work for what totaled about 8 weeks' worth of work, leading to a stamp on their personnel file saying: "Do Not Rehire." Incredibly, all of these people were rehired.

Nearly one in five of the rehired employees had new performance issues when they returned to the IRS, according to a federal report. This defies commonsense.

What's more, the IRS has shown a complete disregard for changing the practice and insists that prior conduct or performance issues do not play a significant role in deciding the candidates they choose to hire. I couldn't let this policy stand.

I introduced legislation to prohibit the IRS from hiring employees they had already fired once for misconduct. It earned bipartisan support, and on April 21, the House of Representatives gave the legislation its stamp of approval. The Senate has already started its work on this legislation. I'm hopeful they can sign off on this bill soon and put this commonsense reform on the President's desk.

In addition to the bill I introduced, the House passed legislation that ended bonuses to IRS employees until the agency starts to fix its terrible customer service record. We also passed a bill to get rid of an unaccountable IRS slush fund, giving taxpayers a greater say over how fees the IRS collects are used. Finally, we passed legislation to stop the IRS from hiring any new employees until they can certify that no employees are delinquent on their own taxes. These are commonsense, if you are out there to protect hardworking taxpayers.

These bills are only a snippet of what must be done to correct a broken system. Nonetheless, as we work toward a fairer, flatter and simpler tax code, I'll be looking for more opportunities to make the IRS more accountable to you.

Too much insulin

By Richard P. Holm, MD

Balance is so important. For example, too much food causes obesity. Too little food causes starvation and sometimes death. Like Goldilocks, our bodies are always in search of balance: not too much or too little, but that which is "just right."

It's sweet news that a healthy pancreas makes a hormone called insulin to keep blood sugars from going too high. When something goes wrong and either the pancreas fails to make enough insulin or the body becomes resistant to it, diabetes mellitus with elevated sugars will occur. This, however, is only half the story. What happens to keep blood sugars from going too low?

A couple years ago, a patient of mine came in having sporadic nervous spells of fast heart rate, tremors, sweating, hunger, butterflies-in-the-stomach, and poor sleep with night sweats. These spells were all from low sugars, which he documented on his home blood sugar monitor. He was not taking insulin or medications that lower sugar, was eating correctly, not drinking alcohol, and not excessively exercising. His was a rare case of a pancreatic insulin-making tumor, and after tests supported that diagnosis, referral to an endocrinologist allowed for effective treatment.

Last week I spoke to a middle aged woman who once-daily was taking long-acting insulin and multiple-times-daily short-acting insulin before meals and as-needed depending on measured blood sugar levels. She had been experiencing roller-coaster sugar levels sometimes above 300, but, far more dangerous, sometimes below 70 with nervous spells similar to the man with the pancreatic tumor. The spells were happening from too much insulin, and now-a-days, this situation is too common.

These are two different causes for low sugars, and there are others, but for whatever reason, low sugars can deteriorate brain function, and when low enough, bring on loss-of-consciousness and even death. We've learned that when blood sugar drops much below 70, the body produces five different hormones to bring it back up. It's that important! The list includes well-known hormones like adrenalin and cortisol, and some lesser-known like glucagon, noradrenalin, and growth hormone. Once sugars go too low, it's a week before these hormones settle down, making it extraordinarily difficult to find the correct dose of insulin.

Of course enough insulin is important in preventing complications from elevated blood sugars and diabetes mellitus, but when there's too much insulin, dosing becomes more difficult and the danger becomes more significant. That's why balance is so important and we need to get the insulin dose, "just right."

*****

To hear more from Dr. Holm, visit his website, www.PrairieDoc.org. On Call with the Prairie Doc is produced by the Healing Words Foundation in association with the South Dakota State University journalism department and airs Thursdays on South Dakota Public Broadcasting Television at 7 p.m. CT, 6 p.m. MT, and streams live at www.PrairieDoc.org.

The man with the bulbous nose

By Richard P. Holm, MD

Despite his caring conversation, I heard very little of it because his large, rosy, bulbous, and bumpy nose had stolen my attention. Years later, when I met him again, he looked like a different man. The rosacea and rhinophyma skin condition, which had made his face so red and nose so massive, was calmed down with medication, and the excessive growth of skin over the nose had been trimmed away by laser scalpel. This time my eyes were no longer drawn to that globular and swollen proboscis and instead I was able to see his kind and wizened eyes.

Acne rosacea, or more commonly called just rosacea, affecting 14 million people in the U.S., or five percent of the population, is sometimes said to be an adult version of acne vulgaris. We see rosacea more often in 30 to 50-year-old women, and it can flair as menopause approaches. When it does affect men, it can be severe. And in a percentage of cases, rosacea can cause an ever-growing piling up of skin over the nose, called rhinophyma.

Rosacea more-often targets fair-skinned, freckle-faced, blond-or-redheaded, blue-eyed people who flush easily. It seems triggered by sun exposure, hot drinks, hot baths and showers, hot spicy foods, stress, exercise, and steroid medications. Of course, one way to prevent rosacea is to try to avoid such triggers.

Acne vulgaris, or more commonly called just acne, is similar to rosacea, seems also related to hormonal swings, but it affects about 85% of all U.S. adolescents and, more often than rosacea, causes whiteheads and blackheads. Adolescents living in western modernized civilizations struggle with acne, however it affects few living in non-industrialized societies. This has lead some experts to believe acne, and also rosacea, might be made worse by soap, excessive cleanliness, antibiotic use, and alteration of the normal-flora living on our skin that protects us from invasive bacteria; like grass on a lawn protects against weeds.

The two conditions of rosacea and acne have common methods of treatment. Over-the-counter lotions like benzoyl peroxide, prescription antibiotics and Vitamin A, both in lotion and pill form, are still the mainstay of therapy.

In contrast, recently there is a trend to move toward supporting one's normal flora, avoiding antibiotics, cleansing agents, or oil removing methods, and even trying probiotics. This is all in an effort to re-establish a lawn of protection to fight the invasion of weeds.

Any of these treatments are effective in most people, but not all. So if you don't find relief with typical treatments, or your nose starts growing, it's time to see the dermatologists.

*****

To hear more from Dr. Holm, visit his website, www.PrairieDoc.org. On Call with the Prairie Doc is produced by the Healing Words Foundation in association with the South Dakota State University journalism department and airs Thursdays on South Dakota Public Broadcasting Television at 7 p.m. CT, 6 p.m. MT, and streams live at www.PrairieDoc.org.

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

From Tribal Realty 2501 Program –

Youth-Elder Garden Project making progress

These, helped to construct 26 raised bed garden boxes this spring.

Ray Brown, Zach Thompson, Westen Hill, Nash Heminger, and Nate Thompson contributed many hours to this project and got some carpentry experience doing it.

The 4'x10'x1' boxes were part of a community project to get youth involved in growing healthy, fresh veggies guided by a mentor.

If it's a good year, look for the youth to display some produce at the Fall Festival.

Thanks to the TZ and SWC Vo-Tech students for their help.

Thanks to SWO Natural Resources crew for handling the deliveries of the boxes.

Jerome Renville Sr., outreach worker with the SWO 2501 Program, presented the boys with a gift certificate for their help with the project.

See the accompanying photos.

Tiospa Zina students participate in "Catch the Wave"

Article composed by Samantha Crawford, Anthony Genia, Christian Heminger White, Itancan Christenson, Duane Brown and Sister Patrice Collette.

On April 20, 2016, 18 students from Tiospa Zina Tribal School went to Watertown, SD to Lake Area Technical Institute. We attended a conference called "Catch the Wave." It was for students with disabilities from across the area.

It was a conference for planning for college. We learned about disabilities. We learned about assistive technology like the Kurzweil (reading software) and the Dragon Dictate (writing software).

We learned about service dogs. The dog's name was Rocky and his job was to help keep the man stay steady. When you see a service dog, the rule is do not pet them because they are on duty.

We learned about what they do at Lake Area Technical Institute. Some of the programs were building and construction, security and law enforcement, cosmology, nursing, occupational and physical therapy and welding. We learned that this a fun place to go.

Students that attended Catch the Wave were Jack Barse, Brandon Redday, Raycee Brown, Westen Hill, Mari Shepherd, Nash Heminger, Christian Heminger White, Samantha Crawford, Duane Brown, Andrew Lafontaine, Anthony Genia, Itancan Christenson, Lannie Paul, Zach Thompson, Danny Thompson, Shelby Neilan , Robert Laughter III and Tre Neilan.

Staff that attended were Sister Patrice Colette, Arnold White, Mike Ketchen, Lori Borgen and Kari Ewalt.

PEACE makes community connections

By Karen Fink

Over the past few weeks PEACE has been exploring the community for possible employment opportunities and future resources after high school.

On April 4th we ventured to the United State Postal Service office, while there we learned from Ann Grabow, the postmaster, about 98% of the mail is sorted by machine, so it is very important to write clearly. We found out that you can apply online and find a job anywhere in the United States as long as you are 18 years old and be able to walk 5 to 12 miles a day. We heard that dog bites are a concern on this job. The best news we found out was that postage stamps will cost two cents less starting on April 10, 2016.

On that same day we visited with Janice Neilan at the Sisseton Library she told us that sometimes the library can be almost too quiet and other times there is chaos. She stressed to us that the library is a community resource. She and her staff answer about 8 or more resource questions daily. She also told us how to obtain a library card, you must show proof of address and you must present an ID card. For Sisseton residents there is no cost for the card but the neighboring communities the card will cost $10 per person or $15 per family. The library card must be renewed yearly. Almost 700 digital books were checked out last year and the library also has over 31,000 hardcover books and almost 700 paperbacks. She told us about weeding the collection and adding new additions to the library. Janice also talked to us about using the state library as a resource for many things but the most exciting was learning new languages and finding your ancestors.

On April 7th we were welcomed to the Wells Fargo Bank by Amy Currence, the store manager for Sisseton. She told us how she has worked her way up from being a teller to store manager. We wanted to know about bank robberies and panic buttons and she answered all of our questions. She went over the need for a checking account and how to keep your accounts safe. She provided us with materials that we could keep and use as we become more financially savvy.

Sisseton Flower Shop owner Jenny Nelson invited us to tour her shop on April 13th, and allowed us to ask her some questions about being a small business owner. Jenny told us to "Do it once and do it well." When we asked her what she felt was her secret to success she said her secret was to have a good team, and she was proud of her employees because they were trustworthy, on time and respectful. She also mentioned that they attend classes to continue to learn more about the products they work with. There is a high level of quality control with all items that go out the front door. She told use how she minimizes losses and how flowers are transformed into non-natural colors. Jenny gave use each a gift of a carnation in our favorite color.

We then went next door to learn about auto mechanics from John Wickre owner of Sisseton Radiator Works. We asked him how he deals with difficult customers and he said, "Try to treat them nicer than you have to." He also explained that when repairing items it is necessary to keep the area you are working on clean. He allowed us to have some hands on experience with a car he was working on. He showed us where the different fluids are put and how to check the levels of fluids. He also had us clean the glass on the car. We enjoyed the experience once we got into it.

PEACE learned so much from these community leaders each experience was unique and provided us with much needed knowledge for the future.

 See accompanying photo highlights.

Outdoor news

Submitted by Dean E. Shultz Jr.

Roberts County Conservation Officer

The border water opener and flowing water opener went on with very little problems. Everyone needs to remember to check and make sure you have a valid fishing license. Also remember that you have to have that license in possession while you are angling, with a valid state issued ID card, drivers license with an expiration date or your Hunt Safe card.

Boaters need to remember to look at their boat license and ensure that it is valid. Also remember all the safety gear that is required in a boat. Class A Boats, which are boats less than 16 feet. In these types of boats you need properly displayed boat numbers and current license decals if motorized or over 12 feet. U.S. Coast Guard approved wearable personal floatation device for everyone on board. Proper navigational lights displayed when on the water between sunset and sunrise. At least one U.S. Coast Guard approved fire extinguisher of B-1 type or larger, unless the construction of your boat will not permit the entrapment of explosive or flammable gasses or vapors. Class 1 Boats, which are boats 16 feet or over and less than 26 feet long, except canoes and kayaks. These boats need numbers and current license decals. A U.S. Coast Guard approved wearable personal flotation device for each person on board. An U.S. Coast Guard approved throwable flotation device (Type IV cushion or ring buoy). At least one U.S. Coast Guard approved fire extinguisher of B-1 type or larger, unless the construction of your boat will not permit the entrapment of explosive or flammable gasses or vapors. Proper navigational lights displayed when on the water between sunset and sunrise. A whistle, or sound-producing device capable of a two-second blast audible for at least one-half mile.

Boaters and anglers also need to remember the aquatic nuisance species rules that are now in effect. Boaters and anglers are required to open or remove all drain plugs or similar devices; except when in the boat ramp parking lot or when the boat is being launched or loaded. A boat may have these devices closed or in place while in route to a fish cleaning station that is immediately adjacent to where the boat was loaded, but they must be opened or removed before leaving the fish cleaning station. What this means: Plugs have to be pulled when a boat is not on the water. Boaters and anglers may keep fish or bait in a live well while transporting the boat from the water body to the cleaning station, but have to pull the plugs before they leave the cleaning station. The cleaning station has to be immediately associated with the boat ramp (they cannot load at one ramp and drive 10 miles to get to a cleaning station). If there is no cleaning station immediately adjacent, then the plugs need to be pulled when leaving the boat ramp parking lot. Bait and fish may not be transported in water taken from a lake, river or stream. Bait may be transported in water taken from a lake, river or stream only while in route to a fish cleaning station that is located immediately adjacent to the lake, river or stream, but must be drained prior to leaving the fish cleaning station. What this means: If anglers wish to transport their aquatic bait and fish in water, they can only be transported in domestic water (tap water, well water, bottled water, ice). Most domestic water must be treated to remove chlorine prior to putting fish in it. However, when leaving a water body, boaters and shore anglers can wait until they reach an immediately adjacent fish cleaning station to put their bait in domestic water. The new rules allow trailered boats to travel from the boat ramp to an immediately adjacent fish cleaning station prior to having drain plugs removed. What this means: Immediately adjacent is defined as the nearest fish cleaning station that can be driven to (by the most direct route) without leaving the public water access area. If anglers have to leave the access area to reach the fish cleaning station, it is not considered immediately adjacent. Anglers have three options for transporting whole fish for cleaning at home or at a cleaning station that is not immediately adjacent to the boat ramp. Which are:

1.  In a container (not a part of the boat), that is filled with domestic water (tap water, well water, bottled water, ice).

2.  On ice - in a cooler or pull the plug on their live well and fill it with ice (plug must remain out).

3.  Dry - put fish in an empty bucket or pull the live well plug before leaving the boat ramp and let it drain when traveling.

Bait can only be transported away from a water body in domestic water (tap water, well water, bottled water, ice). Most domestic water must be treated to remove chlorine prior to putting fish in it. Boat anglers can wait until they reach an immediately adjacent fish cleaning station to put their bait in domestic water. They can dump out the lake water and fill their bait bucket up with water from the cleaning station or water they brought with them. A shore angler can do the same if they are able to access the domestic water source at a fish cleaning station that is immediately adjacent or if they bring domestic water with them. Minnows may be used in multiple lakes as long as they are transported between lakes in domestic water. Lake water must be drained before leaving each lake. Unused minnows should be poured into the fish grinder at a cleaning station or drained and disposed of in the trash containers at the boat launch or cleaning areas. It is a violation of state statute to dump unused minnows into a water body. If there is not a cleaning station at the site where anglers are fishing, drain plugs must be opened and bait containers must be free of lake water before leaving the boat launch area. All bait containers must be free of lake water before leaving the water body where they are fishing or the immediately adjacent fish cleaning station.

If you have any questions about the information in this article or any other topic please feel free to give me a call at 605-881-3773.

Good luck, on your next outdoor adventure.

Legals

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 16-072

SWOCSE/ Sharon Brown, PLAINTIFF

VS.

GWENDOLYN CLIFFORD, DEFENDANT

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of April, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of February, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

15-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 07-082

SWOCSE/ Josh Johnson, PLAINTIFF

VS.

GWENDOLYN CLIFFORD, DEFENDANT

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support Arrears and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of April, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of February, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

15-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 08-115

SWOCSE/ SD/Carol Friemel, PLAINTIFF

VS.

GWENDOLYN CLIFFORD, DEFENDANT

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of April, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of February, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

15-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 13-108

SWOCSE/ Keisha Godfrey, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DERRICK FLUTE, DEFENDANT

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of April, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of February, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

15-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 15-026

SWOCSE/ TANF/Carrie His Gun, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DERRICK FLUTE, DEFENDANT

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of April, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of February, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

15-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 15-094

SWOCSE/ Rex Godfrey, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DERRICK FLUTE, DEFENDANT

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of April, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of February, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

15-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 14-082

SWOCSE/ Aaron Keeble, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DERRICK FLUTE, DEFENDANT

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of April, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of February, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

15-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 00-433

SWOCSE/ Memoree White, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DONALD WILLIAMS, DEFENDANT

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of April, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of February, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

15-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 16-061

SWOCSE/ Mark Genia, PLAINTIFF

VS.

KYLE WOLFE, DEFENDANT

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Paternity and/or Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of April, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of February, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

15-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 16-056

SWOCSE/ Susan Peters, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ELSIE CAMPBELL, DEFENDANT

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of April, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of February, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

15-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 15-092

SWOCSE/ Tessa Campbell, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ELSIE CAMPBELL, DEFENDANT

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of April, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of February, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

15-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 16-048

 

SWOCSE/ Lynn Donnell, PLAINTIFF

VS.

AMBER FROST, DEFENDANT

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of April, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

 

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

 

Dated this 26th day of February, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

15-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 14-150

SWOCSE/ Davonna Keeble, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JEFFREY HENRY, DEFENDANT

 

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of April, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

 

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

 

Dated this 26th day of February, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

15-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 07-170

SWOCSE/ Orvella Bird, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LUCILLE EASTMAN, DEFENDANT

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of April, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of February, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

15-3tc

Trading Post ads

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

Job Openings

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate is seeking to fill the following positions(s):

Family Liaison/Intervention Paraprofessional, Early Childhood Intervention

CD Technician, Dakotah Pride

Procurement Clerk (Temporary), Vice Chairman's Office

Closing Date: April 29, 2016 @ 04:30 PM

Protective Service Worker, Child Protection Program

Procurement and Contracting Officer, Vice Chairman's Office

Dispatcher, Law Enforcement

Closing Date: May 6th, 2016 @ 04:30 PM

All interested applicants may obtain application and job description information at the Human Resource Department, of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate or contact Arnold Williams at (605) 698-8238 or Denise Hill at (605) 698-8251. (Tribal preference will apply).

 

WANTED: PHOTOGRAPHER

The SWO Dakotah Language Institute is looking for a photographer. This person will be given a list of specific pictures which need to be taken which will become a part of the Dakotah language curriculum for our schools so they need to be complete on or before July 15. Photo quality is a must. Payment will be made on a "per picture" basis and the price is negotiable. The person selected must either have or obtain a Tribal Business License.

Tammy DeCoteau

SWO Dakotah Language Institute

PO Box 509

Agency Village, SD 57262

605-698-2030

17-2tc

 

Sisseton Wahpeton College

Comptroller

The Sisseton Wahpeton is seeking qualified candidates for the position of Comptroller. Candidates must possess a bachelor's degree in accounting and either a Certified Public Account (CPA) or a Certified Management Accountant, or a master's degree in accounting. Candidates should also have a minimum of four (4) years' experience in accounting and a minimum of two (2) years' work experience with fund accounting, preferably at an educational institution. Working knowledge of Jenzabar is strongly preferred. Indian preference will apply. Salary range: $65,000-$85,000. Benefit package includes 401K, Health, Vision, Dental, and Life Insurance. Visit our website: www.swc.tc for a complete job description and details for applying, or contact the HR office at (605)698-3966, ext. 1118. Position is open until May 6, 2016.

17-2tc

 

Tiospa Zina Tribal School

Employment Opportunities

Current Vacancies:

Substitutes needed for custodial, kitchen, teaching, and transportation - starting at $10/hr, varies per position Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma (please contact the HR office for more information) Applications are accepted on an on-going basis.

2016 Summer Program Vacancies - May 31st to June 23rd (4 days/wk):

Vacancy: (4) Special Education Teachers Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Special Education Teacher. Opening Date: April 22, 2016. Closing Date: May 6, 2016.

Vacancy: (4) Special Education Paraprofessionals Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma plus a score of 461+ on the Paraprofessional Praxis, or 48+ college credits; and 1 year directly related experience. Opening Date: April 22, 2016. Closing Date: May 6, 2016.

Vacancy: (4) Elementary Teachers Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for an Elementary Teacher. Opening Date: April 22, 2016. Closing Date: May 6, 2016.

Vacancy: (2) Middle School Teachers Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Middle School Teacher. Opening Date: April 22, 2016. Closing Date: May 6, 2016.

Vacancy: (2) High School Teachers Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a High School Teacher. Opening Date: April 22, 2016. Closing Date: May 6, 2016.

Vacancy: (2-3) Bus Driver/Custodians Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma and a Current South Dakota Commercial Drivers License with Air Brakes and Passengar endorsements and 1 year directly related experience. Opening Date: April 22, 2016. Closing Date: May 6, 2016.

2016-2017 School Year Vacancies:

Vacancy: High School Science Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a High School Science Teacher Opening Date: January 29, 2016 Closing Date: open until filled

Vacancy: High School English Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a High School English Teacher Opening Date: March 11, 2016 Closing Date: Open until filled.

Vacancy: Family and Consumer Sciences and Personal Health Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Family and Consumer Sciences and Personal Health Teacher. Opening Date: March 11, 2016. Closing Date: April 29, 2016.

Vacancy: Career and Technical Education Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Career and Technical Education Teacher Opening Date: March 11, 2016 Closing Date: Open until filled.

Vacancy: Middle School Math Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Middle School Math Teacher. Opening Date: March 11, 2016. Closing Date: April 8, 2016.

Vacancy: Middle School English Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Middle School English Teacher. Opening Date: April 22, 2016. Closing Date: May 6, 2016.

Vacancy: Middle School Social Studies Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Middle School Social Studies Teacher. Opening Date: April 22, 2016. Closing Date: May 6, 2016.

Vacancy: Special Education Paraprofessional Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma and a 461+ score on the Paraprofessional Praxis, or 48+ College Credits; and 1 year directly related experience. Opening Date: April 22, 2016. Closing Date: May 6, 2016.

If interested please submit an application and Advisor Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School. Opening Date: September 11, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled.

If you would like to apply to be a part of the TZ tiwahe you may pick up an application from the TZTS HR office located at #2 Tiospa Zina Dr. Agency Village, SD 57262. Applications may also be printed off the HR web page by downloading from links under employment forms to the left. Completed applications may be sent to PO Box 719, Agency Village, SD 57262. Faxed to: 605-698-7686. For further information call 605-698-3953 ext. 208. Indian Preference employer. At will employer. All applicants are subject to a Background Check and Pre-Employment Drug Test, pursuant to SWSB policy.

 

Dakota Magic Casino

Job Openings

Accounting Department: Revenue Audit Clerk (Full-Time or Part-Time) Day-rotating weekends

Foods Department:

Bus Persons (Full-Time or Part-Time) as needed

Cashiers (Full-Time & Part-Time) as needed

Dishwashers (Full-Time or Part-Time) as needed

Wait Staffs (Full-Time or Part-Time) Swing

Hotel Department:

Room/Laundry Attendant (10 Full-Time or Part-Time) 8:00am to finish

Housekeeping Department:

Porter (12 Full-Time or Part-Time) as needed

Marketing Department:

Assistant Supervisor (Full-Time or Part-Time) Swing

Slots Department:

Technician (2 Full-Time or Part-Time) Rotating

Closing Date: April 29, 2016 at 4:00 p.m.

Starting Wage: D.O.E.

High School Diploma or GED required for most positions

Two identifications documents required upon hire

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department, 16849 102nd Street SE, Hankinson ND 58041.For complete Job Description contact James Neconish 701-634-3000 ext. 2582 Indian Preference will apply / EEO. (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment). Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

FOOD SERVICE: DISHWASHER ( FULL-TIME) ROTATING SHIFTS GENERAL FUNCTION: To collect, clean and wash dishes. Clean pots and pans. May have to assist wait staff bussing tables when needed in a friendly, helpful and courteous manner. REQUIREMENTS: Must be licensable by DNGE Non-Gaming. Operate and clean kitchen equipment, dishwasher, meat slicer and mixer. Stooping, bending standing for long periods of time, or lifting up to 50 lbs. Must abide by Food Service expectations per facility. Required to rotate shifts, work holidays and weekends are mandatory.

This position will close on April 27, 2016 at 4 pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

Security Department: Officer (1) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, weekends, holidays, and the ability to work flexible hours. Mobility throughout the facility 45% percent of time; will be stooping, bending, walking for long periods of time, able to lift up to 40 pounds, computer skills required for report writing. Will be exposed to noise and tobacco smoke. Appropriate dress code. Must be at least 21 years old. Must have High School Diploma or G.E.D. Must be able to obtain a Key License.

Sales & Marketing Department: Reel Deal Attendant (1) full-time; rotating shifts; day, swing, weekends, holidays, and the ability to work flexible hours. Must have good communication skills, customer service skills, computer experience, telephone skills, and ability to work under supervision and meet deadlines, previous experience is preferred. Must be at least 21 years old. Must have a High School Diploma or GED. Must be able to obtain a Key Gaming License.

C-Store Department: Clerk/Cashier (3) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, weekends, holidays, and the ability to work flexible hours. Excellent customer service skills; math skills essential; ability to operate necessary equipment; physical ability to lift moderate amounts of weight; previous experience working with money preferred; strong organizational skills managing various functions; and dependable. Must be at least 21 years old & have a High School diploma or GED.

Deli Attendant (2) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, includes weekends & holidays. Ability to operate necessary equipment. Physical ability to stand for long hours, clean, lift heavy objects up to 30 lbs., and restock inventory; 6 mos. Previous cooking experience preferred, 6 mos. working with the public. Knowledge of food preparation safety requirements. Must be dependable & available to work any and all shifts. Must be at least 18 years old and have a High School Diploma or GED.

Restaurant Department: Prep cook/cook (2) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, includes weekends & holidays. Previous experience is preferred. Must be able to multi-task; have the ability to work under pressure; the ability to operate necessary equipment; knowledge of food preparation safety requirements and ability obtain a "Food Handlers" certification; physical ability to clean, lift heavy object up to 20 lbs. or more and restock inventory. Have the physical ability to stand for prolonged periods of time. Must be at least 18 years old & must have a High School Diploma or GED.

Wait staff (1) part-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, weekends & holidays. Customer service skills, prior experience with waiting on tables is preferred. Must be able to multi-task. Appropriate dress code. Have the physical ability to stand for prolonged periods of time. Must be at least 18 years old & have a High School Diploma or GED.

Opening date: Thursday, April 21, 2016

Closing date: Wednesday, April 27, 2016 @ 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

Slot Department: Slot Technician (1) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, weekends & holidays, and the ability to work flexible hours. Excellent customer service skills with both external and internal customers. Math skills are essential, mechanical skills, and the physical ability to lift heavy objects. Knowledge of other gaming related equipment. Must be at least 21 years old, have a High School diploma or GED, must be able to obtain a Key Gaming License.

Opening date: Thursday, April 21, 2016

Closing date: Wednesday, May 4, 2016 @ 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 
 

 

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