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Volume 46 Issue No. 13

Anpetu Iyamni, April 1, 2015

Inside this Edition –

Special election for SWO Tribal Secretary this Tuesday, March 31st

SWO holds Vietnam Veterans homecoming observance at Dakota Magic

Wac’ang’a hosts University of Missouri students for historical trauma workshop

Dakota Scavenger Hunt: Weeks 1, 2, 3, and 5 Clues

SWO Community Health Education health and wellness features

Aliive-Roberts County announces new intiative, second hand store

2015 SWO Career Day April 13th at Administration Building/Rotunda

Deadline for receipt of copy is Friday noon

Special Election for SWO Tribal Secretary scheduled this Tuesday, March 31st

The Reservation Election Board has set this Tuesday, March 31st, 2015 for the special election for the office of SWO Tribal Secretary.

Polls will be open from 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. that day at the District Centers; official polling place for Enemy Swim District will be the Community Center at Enemy Swim.

Here are candidates certified by REB as eligible to run in this special election:

Francis Crawford

Carrie Godfrey-HisGun

Crystal Owen

Robert Starr

Danny White

The voting rosters for this special election are closed as of 4:00 p.m. March 6, 2015. There will be no requirement for a primary election (Election Code 03-08-01[c]). Absentee ballots are not allowed.

"From the desk of Geri Opsal, Tribal Veteran Service Officer"

GeriO@SWO-NSN.gov

Phone 605-698-3388

Report on last week’s Vietnam Veterans Homecoming ceremony

Today's thought for the day: "The difference between who you are and who you want to be, is what you do." -- Unknown

*We had a great turnout for the Welcome Home Vietnam Veteran Celebration!

Thank you to all of you who came and attended. Thank you to the SWO for support of our Veterans - without you we wouldn't be able to honor our Veterans as we do.

It was awesome to hear a Veteran from Rosebud who got up to speak and who so graciously acknowledged that the other Tribes should look to the SWO for how we treat our Veterans with honor and respect and he stated something that we have never had to worry about that the new council and executives that come in and try to take everything away - our SWO leaders have always have always been nothing but supportive and promoted our "Akicita." They were kind words and we are very grateful to our Tribe for everything. - I want to thank the Chairman who so graciously served the "frybread" and served the people at this event. We did not ask - he just went and found a spot that wasn't taken and helped the Veterans serve the Vietnam Veterans and their families. It was a sign of a true leader and we thank you for that Chairman Renville - you made us all proud.

Also to the people behind the scenes who made this event spectacular and memorable. To DMC - Kent Miller, Kaye Renville, Vernon Renville and dream team - to Joe Kohl - to Heather Williams and to the GM who helped make this a true honoring. Sisseton Flower Shop for the table arrangements and your donation of hauling our cakes up for us - the saying there is power in numbers speaks volumes. To the Veterans of other Eras who served our honored Vietnam Veterans - Jaye Renville, Jesse Chanku, Danielle DeCoteau, and our very own TVSO Driver Brice Roberts. Heather & Brice put up the 152 flags on our honored wall of the 152 South Dakota lives who we lost in Vietnam (KIA). To the Vietnam Veterans who got up and spoke during open mic - your words had us all in tears and affirmed how we owe our FREEDOM to you and others that came after. Jake Thompson who so honorably escorted "Arden (Jacky) Renville home to SD many years ago also shared a few words - Butch Felix who sang and played the "era music and the stores he shared. You just had to be there - the words on this paper does not convey what was shared.

In their minds they were all 18-19-20 years old again, young men for the day – it took them all back to the days they served our great country in Vietnam.

Thanks to Tom Wilson who played some tunes and also had us on the air.

We just owe so much gratitude for everyone who made this event a true HONORING for our Vietnam Welcome Home Celebration. March of every year is National Welcome Home Vietnam Month - we will do this annually and as we learn each year we will add to it - we had songs sang for our KIA - to Mike Greeley, Dave Flute and another gentleman they sang a honor song.

Next year we will have a drum - bugle (taps) and more.

To everyone who brought their pictures - thank you!

Today is March 30th as you read the paper - there is still time to thank a Vietnam Vet and Welcome them Home - a long overdue very deserved honor. God bless our great Country the USA.

*****

While the SWO Tribe held its ceremony last week, SD Governor Dennis Daugaard proclaimed this Monday, March 30th at “Welcome Home Vietnam Veterans Day.”

Here is the text of his announcement:

"The words 'thank you for your service' and 'welcome home' are some of the most encouraging words for those who served and were rejected after the Vietnam War," said Larry Zimmerman, Secretary of the South Dakota Department of Veterans Affairs. "It is important to pause, remember and recognize the bravery of all who served and to do what we can to help heal the wounds of war."

– Governor Daugaard

*****

*Good News: We have an official ruling from the VA regarding travel benefits please contact me at the office 698-3388 so that I can share this with you and answer any questions that you may have. It is very good news!

*TAPS: This is overdue: Condolences to CHUCK WARD, USN who made his journey home. He served our country honorably and was a proud USN Veteran. Condolences - RIP.

*Remember: We are here to serve you our fellow Veteran, widows, dependents. Call us at 698-3388 or cell 268-0502.

*American Legion Post #314- Delano Renville, Commander Cell:# 268-0354 / Vietnam Veterans Kit Fox Society - Dayton Seaboy, Commander Phone:# 698-3901 ask for Doc / Desert Era Veterans - Danielle DeCoteau, Commander Cell#: 268-1765. For GAS ASSISTANCE: Geri Opsal 698-3388

Have a good week.

Geri Opsal, Tribal VSO.

We must look for the opportunity in every difficulty instead of being paralyzed at the thought of the difficulty in every opportunity." -Walter E. Cole, Korean War Veteran.

University of Missouri students attend –

Wac’ang’a hosts historical trauma workshop

By CD Floro

Sota Editor

Brenda Hill, who in past years served as a leader and advocate for Women’s Circle of the Lake Traverse Reservation (now renamed Wac’ang’a, Dakotah for Sweetgrass), returned to Sisseton last week.

Since leaving the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate two decades atgo Brenda has served as Director of the South Dakota Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault (formerly with Sacred Circle). She resides in Rapid City.

The occasion of Brenda’s return was an invitation by Julie Watts, Director, and Wac’ang’a to give a presentation on historical trauma and domestic violence and sexual assault. The event was geared for anyone in the community interested but also for a group of University of Missouri students. Annually, the school at Columbia has been sending social science and health students to our Reservation for firsthand learning experiences.

Title of the one-day session was “Historical Trauma: How does it affect us? How do we overcome it?”

But it was broken into these topics, which were more or less followed as discussion wandered in several directions – all meaningful I believe:

*“It is not all ‘historical.” (Multiple layers and connections.)

*“Define your experience.” (What we carry, what we survived and experience today.)

*“Stages of grieving.” (Identifying trauma responses and PTSD.)

*“Dangers of labels and power of words.”

*“What’s healthy?”

*“Healing: Physically, mentally, emotionally, spirituality.”

*“Culturally based healing – it’s about relationships.”

*“Identifying your gifts, strengths and lessons.”

*“Healing as a collective.”

After a prayer to the four directions, smudging, and introductions, Brenda laid out background for organizing the statewide coalition to address domestic violence and sexual assault.

Her approach to trauma and violence is “culturally based,” but Brenda shared Europeans come from tribal roots also – despite having mostly lost connection.

“All civilizations start out as tribes,” she said.

She recalled a video showing an Indigenous European man giving an opening prayer.

“He starts praying to the four directions,” she said. “I stood up….”

She asked the students if they had been studying the Inquisition in European History.

Several indicated that yes, that they have been.

“Do you know, that was about genocide?”

Brenda spoke about how genocide has been, and is still being used against matriarchal societies – which most tribes are.

Destruction of Indigenous society paves the way for imposing a patriarchal order … “and imposing a whole lot of things, economics, contracts, women as property, children as property … I could go on.”

“There were whole women’s cultures destroyed in Europe during the Inquisition,” she said.

The students, with European and African backgrounds, may have been introduced to an important point. The trauma and its layers and consequences here in Indian country does not exist without parallels in other cultures, other societies.

In introducing the SD Coalition, Brenda explained about “parallel development.”

South Dakota has such a provision in its domestic violence and sexual assault coalition. Many other states do not.

What this means is, there is supposed to be diversity, equity and equal opportunity for all victims regardless of their culture. The coalition’s “…policies, procedures and by-laws … affirm and support Indigenous women in their struggle for self-determination.” The coalition also “practices the ideology of a partnership between two peoples ….” Essentially, we have Native and non-Native participation in the coalition. Brenda serves as the Native co-director.

She did discuss how sometimes the policy has made for some conflicts.

Not surprising, as everything involved historical trauma is about conflict – genocide, murder, oppression, battering, rape, and the list goes on.

And continues in many forms.

Brenda used a laptop to show images from a Powerpoint presentation.

When genocide failed to completely destroy a culture, the next step or tactic is “colonization.”

A synonym for colonization is “oppression.”

See the graphic here that was used in her talk. (Colonization = Oppression.)

Our Native American peoples were oppressed in so many ways, and as Brenda shows, continue to be oppressed today. And not only is it the dominant social force “outside” but the fractured consequences of traumas within our oyate has created new layers of trauma and cycles of abuse.

Government, religion, education, so many institutions have imposed themselves on our people. Separating them from the natural world and their cultural heritage (language).

Dehumanizing and demonizing Native people and intimidating them in many ways are tactics used to bring about the consequences we face today.

Tactics, she pointed out, that batterers use to keep control of their partners are the same ones used in the colonization of Native people.

She touched the phases of historical trauma:

1. First Contact: life shock, genocide. Colonization period. Introduction of diseases and alcohol;, traumatic event, ie, Wounded Knee massacre.

2. Economic competition: Loss of sustenance (physical and spiritual).

3. Invasion/war, extermination, making refugees of the people.

4. Subjugation/reservation period.

5. Boarding school period: destruction of family system; beatings, rape, prohibition of Native culture and language.

6. Forced relocation and termination period.

All of these things created havoc within the tribal people.

See the graphic on “Impact of Colonization.”

These factors of external oppression turned inward.

Native communities were, and still are, filled with:

*Patriarchy.

*Male privilege and dominance.

*Battering.

*Man against woman.

*Child abuse.

*Double standard.

*Shame.

*Suicide.

*Rape.

*Incest.

*Indian against Indian.

*Chemical dependency.

*Violence of juvenile against juvenile.

*Distrust.

*Elder abuse.

*Fear.

*Loss of language.

*Poverty.

*Individualism (far from the collective ways of ancestors).

*Loss of rituals and songs.

*Loss of stories told by ancestors.

*Family alienation.

*Materialism/greed.

*Man against sacred elements, being “masters” over the earth.

*Cultural confusion.

*High mortality.

Every single one of these points is a knife that cuts into us. And what sticks in my mind, as it seems to be a universal theme for peoples everywhere:

*Identity confusion. People do not understand who they are, and are often misinformed and misled into believing they have little worth and no meaningful spiritual connection.

Internalized oppression means the oppressor no longer must exert pressure, the oppressed do it to themselves!

“Divide and conquer,” explained Brenda, “really does work.”

The presenter talked about how very much of the violence perpetrated on Native women and girls is done at the hands of non-Native people (men).

In last week’s Sota we announced that the SWO Tribe had become the first tribe in the region to adopt a judicial code to allow for arrest and charges against non-Natives for crimes of domestic violence and sexual assault. (See the VAWA notice which is being republished in this edition, on the back page.)

This has been a much-applauded feature of the new Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) passed by Congress.

Skyman Redday was seated beside me, and we both brought up how this Tribe now has this law enforcement/court option in hand.

Well, Brenda gave us a different “take” on it.

“Before we do the happy dance,” she said. “What about funding?”

“Where are the resources for our jails and courts?”

She pointed out that resources are already stretched far.

Gave us some pause to think about it.

Oh yes, we’ve been doing the happy dance.

Now we want to look at how well tribal law enforcement and courts are equipped to handle additional work loads.

Already, with the overload of addiction, chemical manufacture and abuse, human trafficking cases, all of our SWO resources are stretched way too thin.

This has been evident in our grassroots solutions meetings initiated last year by SWO Meth Prevention Coordinator Crystal Owen.

The meetings have suggested what needs to be done for improving “restorative justice” on the Lake Traverse Reservation. But more community involvement is needed.

And why is it important to bring this conversation into my report on Brenda Hill’s presentation?

Because it is all interconnected.

Domestic violence and sexual assault is one area of consequence of the historical trauma. There are others.

Look at the isolation and lack of hope that has led our youth, the most vulnerable, to take their own lives. To take meth and other drugs to escape whatever they cannot face day after day. The crime.

And the incarceration.

So many are in jails and prisons who would be so much better served with resources to provide help at home.

The afternoon session, which I unfortunately missed, was on healing strategies.

We would have enjoyed listening to Brenda speak about healing:

“Oppression and internalized oppression are about breaking relationships.”

“The circle represents connections and relationships. It provides a path to healing, physically, mentally, emotionally, spiritually, as individuals, families and communities.”

From the Powerpoint presentation:

FOUR MAJOR COMMUNITY INTERVENTION COMPONENTS:

1. CONFRONT THE HISTORICAL TRAUMA

2. UNDERSTAND THE TRAUMA

3. RELEASE THE PAIN OF HISTORICAL TRAUMA

4. TRANSCEND THE TRAUMA

Healing As A Collective

A lesson from our traditional healing ways, teaches us that we heal together, not alone.

Just as identifying our individual gifts and strengths is necessary for individual transformation & healing, identifying our traditional/cultural gifts and strengths is necessary for tribal healing & transformation.

What are the gifts and strengths of our traditional ways.

Watch for more information, especially about ways to find healing.

If you or anyone you know is suffering from domestic violence or sexual assault, and you live on the Lake Traverse Reservation, contact Wac’ang’a at 605-698-4129.

Other resources:

Following is a list of crisis and referral lines of the SDCEDSV member programs. Please contact the nearest shelter/program for help, information and support. If you are in immediate danger, PLEASE CALL 911. South Dakota does not have a state hotline.
BUFFALO
Buffalo Outreach Services  |  701-630-0724  |  800-755-8432
CHAMBERLAIN
Missouri Valley Crisis Center | Crisisline: 730-5155 Office: 605-234-5155
CUSTER
W.E.A.V.E.  |  Crisis line: 800-424-3574     Office: 673-6333
EAGLE BUTTE
Sacred Heart Women’s Shelter  |  1-800-390-9298 or 605-964-7233 
Family & Women Violence Prevention Services  | 605-964-2472
FAITH
Faith Outreach Services  |  701-630-0724 |  800-755-8432
FORT THOMPSON
Wiconi Wawokiya (Project Safe)  |  605-245-2471 or 1-800-723-3039
HOT SPRINGS
W.E.A.V.E. Outreach - Fall River I  1-800-424-3574 or 605-673-4357
LAKE ANDES
Women’s Lodge  |  605-487-7130
Native American Women’s Health Education Resource Center  |  605-487-7072 
MCLAUGHLIN
Pretty Bird Woman House  |  605-823-7233
PBWH Sexual Assault Program  |  701-823-7233 Crisis Line
MISSION
White Buffalo Calf Woman Society  |  605-856-2317
MOBRIDGE
Bridges Against Domestic Violence  |  605-845-2110 
PINE RIDGE
OST DV Program  |  605-899-0084  
RAPID CITY
Sexual Assault Prevention & Response  |  605-737-6294
SIOUX FALLS
Mita Maske Ti Ki  |  1-877-977-2130 or 605-731-1950 
Compass Center I   1-877-462-7474
STURGIS
Crisis Intervention Services  |  605-347-0050
VERMILLION
Domestic Violence Safe Options Services  |  605-624-5311

New initiative for Aliive-Roberts County

Submitted by Sara McGregor-Okroi

Aliive-Roberts County

New strategy to engage in with our youth!

The Empower Project will provide youth the opportunity to gain valuable job skills and real earnings to help them pursue positive life choices. The goal of the initiative is to provide participants with healthy life skills, job readiness (soft) skills, industry specific (hard) skills and financial literacy skills that prepare them for professional and personal pursuits beyond high school. 

Through the management of a small business, we aim to be able to reduce the cost of our programming while simultaneously providing invaluable on-the-job training to our teens. Additionally, youth leaders are engaged in the building and management of our businesses, further igniting their entrepreneurial spirit. The first business that the program will work with is the Aliive Again Second Chance Store.

Aliive Again is a thrift store located at 419 Veterans Ave in Sisseton, SD. The hours of the store are 10 am to 6 pm Monday through Friday and 10 am to 2 pm on Saturday. The store has been open since August 2014 and will now fall under the management of local teenagers. The youth involved in the program will meet weekly to manage the business; making decisions related to hiring practices, employee performance, marketing strategies, expense management and other business oversight duties. Each youth involved in the program will work a prescribed number of hours at the businesses in order to earn a paycheck.

Aliive-Roberts County also engages additional participants through the Youth Council, learning the skills that will allow them to address the problems and inequities that affect youth in our communities. Locally, the heart of our work focuses on this coalition of youth who are focused on local policymaking and strategies related to reducing the issues that affect the youth and families of Roberts County and the Lake Traverse Reservation.

Through these enterprises, we emphasize a triple bottom line:

1.  We provide working wages for our youth.

2.  We produce self- generating revenue to support our initiatives.

3.  We support community impact on sustainability by focusing on serving the local community.

We ask for community support and patience as these local leaders move into the management role. Donations at the store are accepted the first week of the month only due to storage limitations. Shoppers are welcome and appreciated ALL the time!

Native Homeownership Coalition focuses on financial education training

Pierre, SD – March 25, 2015 – Thirty participants from across the state of South Dakota are currently participating in a three-day intensive train-the-trainer session in Pierre, South Dakota focusing on financial education for Native communities. The training is sponsored by the South Dakota Native Homeownership Coalition (Coalition), which works to increase homeownership opportunities for South Dakota’s Native people to build strong and healthy communities.

Rosemarie Dillingham, Oglala Sioux Tribe Partnership for Housing, is a participant and states, “We appreciate the faith the trainers and the SD Native Homeownership Coalition members have in our organization’s purpose; getting families into homes.”

Participants representing nonprofit organizations, tribal housing entities, tribal departments, and community development financial institutions, will become certified to provide financial literacy training for Native community members. The class focuses on budgeting, savings, understanding credit, and planning for the future and provides sample training materials, best practices, and encouragement. These classes will provide a critical foundation for families working to achieve homeownership.

“The materials, discussion, and experience of the trainers is not only benefitting me,” stated Andres Ake Hede Najin Davis, Tenant Services Coordinator at the Flandreau Santee Sioux Housing Authority, “it is benefitting my people in obtaining our ultimate goal of homeownership.”

The Coalition is a collaboration of representatives from South Dakota’s tribes, federal and state agencies including South Dakota USDA Rural Development, the South Dakota’s Governor’s Office, tribally designated housing entities, nonprofit organizations, housing developers, lenders, and community development financial institutions. The training is being facilitated by First Nations Oweesta Corporation in partnership with Seven Sisters Community Development Group.

Bipartisan legislation to ease financial costs of Adoption in Tribal communities

Washington, DC – March 23, 2015 – U.S. Senators Heidi Heitkamp (D-ND) and James Inhofe (R-OK) as well as U.S. Representatives Derek Kilmer (D-WA) and Tom Cole (R-OK) today reintroduced bipartisan legislation ease the financial challenges of adopting children in tribal communities throughout the country.

In all 50 states, parents who adopt children with special needs are able to claim the full adoption tax credit, helping to reduce the financial cost of adoption. However, if they open their homes to a child with special needs from Indian Country through tribal courts, that child cannot receive the same designation – preventing adoptive parents from claiming the full adoption tax credit. Heitkamp, Inhofe, Kilmer and Cole reintroduced the bipartisan Tribal Adoption Parity Act to allow tribal governments to designate children as having special needs – just as states can – enabling adoptive parents to claim the full adoption tax credit.

“For the loving and caring individuals in North Dakota and across the country who open their hearts and homes to children through adoption, the financial challenges can be significant,” said Heitkamp. “Folks in tribal communities should be able to claim the full adoption tax credit when adopting a child with special needs, just as parents are able to do outside Indian Country. That’s why I’m reintroducing my bipartisan bill to make sure all adoptive parents are treated fairly under the tax code, enabling more selfless adults to make a positive difference in the lives of our Native children.”

“I’m happy to once again cosponsor the bipartisan Tribal Adoption Parity Act,” said Inhofe. “This act will provide families who adopt special needs children through tribal courts the same opportunity to receive the full adoption tax credit as those families who adopt through a state court. To further the goal that all children should grow up in a loving family, the adoption tax credit is an important tool to promote adoptions and help alleviate the financial burden that can come from the adoption process.”

“Our bipartisan, bicameral legislation will help Native American kids with special needs find a loving home,” said Kilmer. “It does so by following a proven model. The federal adoption tax credit has helped make the dreams of thousands of American families come true. Parents who adopt special needs children through Tribal Courts should have access to the same resources and tax relief. It’s time for Congress to provide equal treatment under the law for Native American children with special needs.”

Heitkamp, who helped introduce the Tribal Adoption Parity Act last year with retired Senator Tim Johnson from South Dakota, has long been an advocate for improving the lives of Native American children. In January, Heitkamp reintroduced her bipartisan bill to create a Commission on Native Children, which unanimously passed the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs less than two weeks later. Her bill, which currently has 24 bipartisan cosponsors, would conduct an intensive study into issues facing Native children and make recommendations on how to make sure Native children get the protections, as well as economic and educational tools, they need to thrive. Earlier this month, Heitkamp also reintroduced legislation to support the well-being of foster children by providing additional tax relief for current foster families, encouraging more Americans to consider offering safe homes to foster children across the country. The bill would also direct the federal government to do a better job reaching out and educating current foster families about the financial benefits already available to them. Kilmer is a strong advocate for tribes, leading bipartisan bills to address challenges facing tribal communities. In June 2013, Kilmer introduced the Adoption Tax Credit Tribal Parity Act with 20 bipartisan cosponsors to provide parents who adopt Native American children with special needs the same tax credit as other families receive. Kilmer also introduced the Housing Native Heroes Act in November 2013 that would ensure tribal veterans at risk of homelessness have access to the HUD-Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing Voucher (HUD-VASH) program.

Amendments to pave better future for Native children, train first responders

Washington, DC – March 25, 2015 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today introduced two amendments to the Senate budget for 2016 that would address cyclical challenges faced by children living in Indian country, and provide first responders with the training and resources they need to protect communities in the case of derailments of trains carrying hazardous materials, such as crude oil.

Heitkamp’s amendments to the budget the Senate is debating this week would recommend funds for two of Heitkamp’s key bills she has been pushing for in the Senate: Her bill to create a Commission on Native Children and her RESPONSE Act which would better support first responders. The amendments would recommend federal funds for a Commission on Native Children as well as for a panel the RESPONSE Act would create to provide recommendations to Congress about how to better support first responders around the country.

“This Congress must invest in improving the lives of our children and the safety of our neighborhoods – and we can do that by prioritizing policies I’ve put before Congress,” said Heitkamp. “By recommending the creation of a Commission on Native Children, we can stop turning our backs on the suffering experienced by too many generations of children – and start changing outcomes. It’s also on us not to leave the safety of our communities to chance. As more instances of crude oil train derailments occur across the country, we need to establish a federal panel of responders, leaders and experts to make sure the men and women on the front lines of these emergencies have tools they need to keep our neighborhoods safe. Together, we can save lives, change trajectories, and grow stronger, better communities for years to come – and we can do it by making smart investments in America’s future today.”

Commission on Native Children Amendment

Heitkamp’s amendment to the budget on her Commission on Native Children builds on her work to promote a safer, brighter future for North Dakota communities and Native children. Since last year, her bill to create a Commission on Native Children – her first bill as a U.S. Senator has been gaining momentum – first by unanimously passing in the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, then being recommended for creation by Congress as part of the bill to keep the U.S. government running.

The Commission would work to identify the complex challenges faced by Native children in North Dakota and across the United States by conducting a comprehensive study on issues – including high rates of poverty, staggering unemployment, child abuse, domestic violence, crime, substance abuse, and dire economic opportunities – and making recommendations on how to make sure Native children receive the protections, as well as economic and educational tools they need to thrive. Her bill unanimously passed the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs just two weeks after its reintroduction this Congress, and Heitkamp is committed to its creation both in the Senate budget and through its passage on the floor of the Senate.

RESPONSE Act Amendment

Since the train derailment in Casselton in December 2013, Heitkamp has been working tirelessly with local and federal officials to make sure first responders are prepared to deal with crude-by-rail emergencies as quickly and safely as possible. Her Railroad Emergency Services Preparedness, Operational Needs, and Safety Evaluation (RESPONSE) Act aims to address these challenges experienced across the country by creating a Federal Emergency Management Agency public-private panel that would bring together emergency responders, Federal agencies, and leading experts to review training and best practices for first responders. The panel would provide recommendations to Congress on how to best address first responders’ needs and help them protect communities across the country.

Just about one week after the reintroduction of her bill this Congress, Heitkamp’s RESPONSE Act unanimously passed the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs – the final step before a vote on the Senate floor. Heitkamp is committed to making sure families and communities across the country can grow in a strong and safe environment, and will continue fighting to make sure resources for first responders are a budgetary priority.

Additional offers to landowners with fractional interests at Rosebud Indian Reservation

Willing sellers have 45 Days to respond

Washington, DC – March 24, 2015 – Continuing the momentum of the Department of the Interior’s Land Buy-Back Program for Tribal Nations (Buy-Back Program), Deputy Secretary Mike Connor today announced that more than $34 million in additional purchase offers have been sent to almost 11,000 landowners with fractional interests at the Rosebud Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Interested sellers have 45 days – until May 16, 2015 – to return accepted offers in the pre-paid postage envelops provided.

This second round of offers at one of Indian Country’s most fractionated locations was prompted by the enthusiasm generated by the Program and will give landowners an additional opportunity to unlock thousands of acres of resources for the beneficial use of the tribe. In the initial round during the summer of 2014, the Department sent nearly $50 million in purchase offers to more than 11,000 landowners with fractional interests at the reservation.

“The success of this Program is a vital component of this Administration’s commitment to restoring tribal homelands and remedying the harms caused by the repudiated allotment policy.” said Deputy Secretary Connor. “Consolidating and returning these lands to tribes in trust have enormous potential to improve tribal community resources by increasing home site locations, improving transportation routes, spurring tribal economic development, and preserving traditional cultural or ceremonial sites.”

There are about 245,000 owners of nearly three million fractional interests, spanning 150 American Indian reservations, who are eligible to participate in the Buy-Back Program. Many see little or no economic benefit from what are often very small, undivided interests in lands that cannot be utilized due to their highly fractionated state.

The Buy-Back Program implements the land consolidation component of the Cobell Settlement, which provided $1.9 billion to purchase fractional interests in trust or restricted land from willing sellers at fair market value within 10 years. Consolidated interests are immediately restored to tribal trust ownership for uses benefiting the reservation community and tribal members.

Thus far the Buy-Back Program has paid more than $360 million to individual landowners and has restored the equivalent of almost 560,000 acres of land to tribal governments.

Offers are also currently pending at:

Umatilla Indian Reservation (deadline: March 30) Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community (deadline: March 31) Pine Ridge Indian Reservation (deadline: April 20) Individuals who choose to sell their interests receive payments directly into their Individual Indian Money (IIM) accounts. In addition to receiving fair market value for their land based on objective appraisals, sellers also receive a base payment of $75 per offer, regardless of the value of the land.

Sales of land interests will also result in up to $60 million in contributions to the Cobell Education Scholarship Fund. This contribution by Interior is in addition to the amounts paid to individual sellers, so it will not reduce the amount landowners receive for their interests.

The Department has announced 42 locations where land consolidation activities such as planning, outreach, mapping, mineral evaluations, appraisals or acquisitions are expected to take place through the middle of 2017. These communities represent 83 percent of all outstanding fractional interests across Indian Country.

To learn more about the Program, more than 150 tribal leaders and landowners joined Interior officials at the 2015 Listening Session last week in Arizona. Written comments are encouraged and must be received by April 20, 2015. More information is available via the Federal Register.

Landowners with fractional interests can contact the Trust Beneficiary Call Center at (888) 678-6836 with questions or to register their information. Individuals can also visit their local Office of the Special Trustee for American Indians (OST) or Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) office, or find more information at: www.doi.gov/buybackprogram/landowners.

Editorials –

Sota guest editorial –

GOP-controlled Senate passes its version of 'Disaster' Budget

Plan would continue to coddle corporations and the wealthiest Americans with low tax rates while inflicting deep cuts to social safety net programs, investments in transportation, education, health care, and other domestic programs

By Jon Queally, staff writer

(Published on Friday, March 27, 2015 by Common Dreams.org)

After an all-night session known as a "vote-a-rama" in the U.S. Senate, the Republican-controlled chamber passed a budget bill early Friday morning that Democrats, all of whom voted against it, decried as a "disaster" for the economy and the American people. Outside critics were quick to assail the budget, which would cut federal spending by $5.1 trillions over ten years, as a preliminary blueprint for dismantling key programs of the nation's social safety net while immediately gutting other key public services such as education, healthcare, and transportation projects.

According to the Associated Press:

The vote was 52-46 after a marathon session lasting until after 3 a.m. The House approved a slightly different version Wednesday night on a similar party-line vote.

Next up are compromise budget talks between the two houses, after which lawmakers will begin writing legislation to translate the non-binding plan into specific proposals that are likely to spark a struggle with President Barack Obama.

The Senate blueprint envisions about $5 trillion in spending cuts, and an overhaul of the tax code as well as repeal of the health care law.

Democratic leaders, according to the New York Times, say the budget likely to emerge from a conference between House and Senate Republicans will be nothing short of a "disaster" for the country.

"Today," said Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio), "Senate Republicans chose to give corporations and millionaires tax breaks and kickbacks at the cost of American middle class families and seniors. We know that providing tax breaks for big corporations is a losing strategy for Americans who work hard but struggle each day to put food on the table, save for retirement, and send their kids to college."

Senator Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), who voted against the final bill, criticized his Republican colleagues for voting down an amendment that called for an increase to the federal minimum wage while ultimately approving a budget that largely insulates corporations and the wealthy with disproportionately low tax rates while undermining programs that serve the middle class, low-income workers, and other vulnerable sections of the population.

Sanders' proposal would have raised the federal minimum wage from the current $7.25 an hour to at least $10.10 an hour and eventually to $15 an hour, but only two of the 48 senators voting in favor of Sanders’ amendment were Republicans. All 52 opponents were Republicans.

"Apparently they believe starvation wages are good enough for millions of hard working Americans. I disagree. I believe nobody who works 40 hours a week should be living in poverty. Let's raise the minimum wage to a living wage," Sanders said afterward.

In addition, on the subject on ongoing federal subsidies for the fossil fuel industry provided for in the Republican plan, Sanders tweeted:

“The Republican budget protects over $40 billion in unnecessary and expensive tax breaks and subsidies for oil and gas companies, even as the five biggest oil companies alone made over $1 trillion in profits over the last decade.”

In response to the overall GOP budget, Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-R.I.) voiced his dissatisfaction by tweeting:

“The Republican Senate budget would not ask millionaires, billionaires, and profitable corporations to contribute one penny to deficit reduction.”

As Reuters notes, the GOP-approved budget seeks to eliminate U.S. deficits by 2025 without raising taxes by inflicting deep cuts to social safety net programs, investments in transportation and education and other domestic programs.

Meanwhile, the budget would dramatically boost defense spending by adding about $38 billion to an off-budget war funding account, and would also continue to offer continued increases to core Pentagon programs year after year.

Tweeting its condemnation, the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) said Sen. Sanders' critique of the GOP's fiscal agenda hits the nail on the head:

“As the ranking member of the Senate Budget Committee, I can tell you what the Republican budget is all about. They want huge cuts to health care, education, nutrition and affordable housing. They want to substantially increase military spending. They want to protect all the tax breaks that the rich and large corporations enjoy. That’s it.”

The marathon voting session leading up the budget's final passage allowed any senator to submit an amendment for consideration, thus creating the spectacle known as "vote-a-rama," which Isaiah Poole, communications director at the Campaign for America's Future, said reveals much while achieving little. As the process was underway Thursday, Poole observed:

The only good that is coming out of this series of votes is that we are getting a good picture of who stands with ordinary Americans and who doesn’t, who is committed to making the economy work for working people and who are beholden to the interests of Wall Street and right-wing ideologues. As Republicans posture for the 2016 elections, senators will increasingly make themselves sound as if they care about the plight of working people and are prepared to do something about it. But it is important to remember that when they had opportunities to say with their vote that they are prepared to do something concrete to create jobs, ensure women get equal pay, that college is affordable or avert damage from climate change, they turned the other way.

(Editor’s note: This impacts all of us. Makes you wonder how blind our own South Dakota neighbors who blindly vote Republican for people like John Thune who was totally for this mis-prioritized budget. Makes us long for the days of Tom Daschle and Tim Johnson.)

Brief editorial comments from the editor’s desk –

On and Off the Lake Traverse Reservation

Thank you so much Geri Opsal, Tribal VSO, and all the many other individuals, businesses and Tribal entities that made this year’s Welcome Home Vietnam Veterans happen!

Please read Geri’s account of this year’s observance. It was a great turnout, and this will be an annual event so Geri hopes it will be even bigger next year.

Our akicita need to know how much their sacrifices mean. It was a message they did not receive at the end of the Vietnam War, so it is good that it is being shared now.

*****

Pidamiya Wac’ang’a and Brenda Hill of the SD Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault for last week’s historical trauma presentation.

As much as we were able to be there, it was an outstanding session. We are editing video highlights and may have excerpts available online on the Sota website: http://www.earthskyweb.com/sota.htm

The University of Missouri students were open and seemed to absorb the presentation.

Historical (misnamed perhaps, as it continues today) trauma is a whole web of oppression that pervades the hearts across generations.

Ignoring it, covering up, or maintaining a false belief that it is something from history, will never allow it do go away. The only path for making it go away is to face it – regardless of the pain.

*****

The next Sobriety Dance, sponsored by Dakotah Pride Center, will be this coming Saturday evening, April 4th.

The dance will be held at the Ullysses U.K. Abraham Center (Elderly Nutrition Center) at Agency Village beginning at 7:30 p.m.

This dance is being held as a special tribute to the late Gerald “Smoky” German Sr.

*****

Our long-running Zani Unpi health and wellness column from the Woodrow W. Keeble Memorial Health Care Center Public Health Nurses has been discontinued.

But, in its place, we have our own SWO Community Health Education program filling in!

Watch for regular health and wellness reports from Wellness Coordinator Gypsy Wanna.

This week Gypsy has some management tips for diabetics. How useful, especially considering how many of our oyate are impacted by diabetes.

She also provides facts about the wisdom of taking vaccines to prevent disease.

Thank you Gypsy for your contribution to the well-being of our oyate.

*****

This week’s Dakotah Language clue is for week five.

One more week to go!

Participants can only turn in items to the SWO Dakotah Language Institute Treasured Elders at Dakota Connection on Tuesday, April 7th from 9:00 a.m.-12:00 noon.

Good luck in the scavenger hunt!

*****

Come to downtown Sisseton and check out “Aliive Again!”

It is a store created by Aliive-Roberts County with sales of second hand items to raise money for the community’s youth.

Check out the news article about the store, and come by on Veterans Memorial Blvd. (Main street) in Sisseton.

*****

The next Reservation-wide animal round-up is scheduled for April 18.

Please be advised, and share with neighbors, the need to have pets registered prior to the round-up.

Last time there was confusion and some of our Oyate had their pets removed from housing.

*****

Elder's Meditation:

"Sacred sites and areas are protection for all people — the four colors for man — and these sites are in all areas of the earth in the four directions." -- Traditional Circle of Elders, NORTHERN CHEYENNE

The Elders say that values come from the Mother Earth. Different places and areas around the Earth have different values. The Water people live in harmony and know the values that correspond to that particular part of the Earth. The Desert people know the values of the desert and respect and live in harmony with that part of the Earth. The Woodland people know the values of their part of the Earth and live in harmony. If you live in harmony with the Earth, you will live a life that is full of values. We should have great respect for the Mother Earth. Grandfather, today, let me learn values from Mother Earth.

*****

Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not 'Eureka!' (I found it!) but 'That's funny ...' Isaac Asimov (1920 - 1992)

My idea of an agreeable person is a person who agrees with me. Benjamin Disraeli (1804 - 1881)

I believe in getting into hot water; it keeps you clean. G. K. Chesterton (1874 - 1936)

The chief value of money lies in the fact that one lives in a world in which it is overestimated. H. L. Mencken (1880 - 1956)

He wrapped himself in quotations - as a beggar would enfold himself in the purple of Emperors. Rudyard Kipling (1865 - 1936)

What you do speaks so loud that I cannot hear what you say. Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

In physics, you don't have to go around making trouble for yourself - nature does it for you. Frank Wilczek (1951 - )

Nothing is really work unless you would rather be doing something else. James M. Barrie (1860 - 1937)

*****

The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or “opinion” letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author’s name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor’s explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Earlier receipt of copy is always appreciated. So, if you are aware of a date or message that needs to be publicized or advertised, please let us know about it in advance of the weekly deadline.

The preferred way to submit typed articles and ads, art and photos, is by e-mail.

The editor can be reached at the following e-mail address:

earthskyweb@cs.com

For more information, leave a message on the Sota production office voicemail (605) 938-4452, or send a fax to the 24-hour dedicated line (605) 938-4676.

-- CDF

Obituaries –

Memorial service for James Carson

Memorial service for James A. Carson, 55, of Sisseton, SD was held on Wednesday afternoon, March 25, 2015 at the St. Antipas Episcopal Church, Redby, MN with Rev. George Ross officiating.

Wake service was held on Monday at the SWO Community Center, Agency Village, SD with Enright Big Horn officiating and Lay Reader JC Crawford.

Pianist was Kay Burshiem and Drum Group was S-Town Boys.

Urnbearers were Jerome Renville Jr. and Brandon Renville.

Honorary Pallbearers and Special Friends: Cheryl Renville, Hopa Crawford, Lola Spider, Rolanda Quinn, Dana and Tony Huntington, Donnette Redbear, Colette White-Amos Family, Nettie Kirk, Karen Williams, Jennie Amos,Adam Lafontaine, Sara Braun, Sherri "Cookie" DeCora, Nona Bobtail Bear, Loren Marks, Todd Marks, Lynelle Haug, Alberta Crawford, Shirley Issac, Johnny Balls One Road, Paula Bossert, Nancy Boswell, Sam Boswell, Wendy Boswell, Franklin Keeble Jr., Sisseton-Wahpeton Housing Authority Employees and all of James' many friends and family and Dakota Partnership members.

Interment is in the St. Antipas Episcopal Cemetery, Redby, MN.

The Cahill Funeral Chapel, Sisseton, SD was in charge of arrangements.

James Arnold Carson was born in Minneapolis, MN to Duane Brown and Georgiana Standingcloud.

He grew up in Minneapolis, MN and attended South High, High School.

After high school he received his CNA certification and worked at various nursing homes in the Minneapolis area and was a Home Health care provider. James moved to Sisseton, SD in the early 80's and worked at the Tekakwitha Nursing Home as a CNA.

Later he worked as a chef at Dakota Connection Casino, Tiospa Zina Tribal School, the Sisseton Wahpeton College and many other places.

James also lived in Red Lake, MN with his niece Angie and worked at the Seven Clans Red Lake Casino and Hotel as a chef also.

In 2012 Uncle James became ill and moved back to Sisseton, SD until the time of his passing.

James never married and had no children of his own but he loved and cared for his nieces, nephews and grandchildren like they were his own. His hobbies were visiting family and friends, "Going for Cruises," going to the casino, reading his daily Star Tribune, but he was best known for his cooking skills and frybread. Uncle always made sure his family and grandkids had their favorite dish (Indian tacos and Sioux dogs) on their special day "Birthday."

James also loved to go Thrift Store shopping and rummaging. He collected crosses and oil lamps; and was always looking for another cake pan, mixing bowl or a big kettle for soup. Even though he had so many already.

James is survived by his dad Duane and Karen Brown of Sisseton, SD; brothers Melvin and Yvonne Strong of Crystal, MN, Wayne Carson of St. Cloud, MN, Bradly and Elizabeth Brown of Sisseton, SD, Erik Brown of Sisseton, SD, Duane (Jose) Brown of Washington, sisters Dorla Hershkovitz of St. Paul, MN, Brenda Renville of Sisseton, SD, and Michelle Brown of Sisseton, SD and many grandchildren.

He was preceded in death by his mother Georgiana Standingcloud, siblings John Carson, Mary Carson, materanal grandson Jerome Renville III, aunt Joyce Boswell, maternal grandmother Mary Jane Standingcloud, maternal grandfather Basil Standingcloud, paternal grandmother Tillie K. Brown.

For James's obituary and on-line registry please visit www.cahillfuneralchapel.com

Funeral services for Lloyd “Buddy” DeMarrias

Lloyd Ray "Buddy" DeMarrias of Duncan, OK went to be with the Lord on March 29, 2015 with his family by his side in Oklahoma City, OK.

Lloyd was born on January 30, 1929 in Veblen, SD to Henry Harold DeMarrias and Ruby Christine Renville in Veblen, SD. He was a member of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate and also was a member of the Heipa District.

His hobbies include Wood Carving, stone carving, fishing, casino, reading, traveling with the Little Ponies, and spending time with his family and friends.

Funeral service will be 11:00 a.m. on Tuesday, March 31, 2015 at Comanche Nation Funeral Home Chapel, Duncan, OK.

He is survived by his daughters: Gloria Menard, Gwen DeMarrias both of Chicago, IL. , Glenda DeMarrias of Lawton, OK ; Vicky DeMarrias of Stroud, OK; son: Jerry Dale Shields of Dallas, TX; brother: Sam Bendickson and wife, Jennifer of Prior Lake, MN; sisters: Ellen Erickson of Veblen, SD, Sally Adams and husband Pat of New Effington, SD, Judy Pourier and husband Delbert of Porcupine, SD; grandchildren: Glen DeMarrias , Rosie DeMarrias, Jason DeMarrias, Anna Enriquez, Alma-Lisa Enriquez all of Chicago, Raylee DeMarrias of Lawton, Ronnie Satepauhoodle of McAlister, ok; great-grandchildren: Felicia DeMarrias, Melanie Cruz, Ralphy Cruz, Aiden DeMarrias, Alivea DeMarrias all of Chicago, Carrie Lynn DeMarrias, Sonny Larue DeMarrias, Jimmy Ray Demarrias, Jr. both of Lawton; nephews, nieces and many friends.

He is preceded in death by his wife: Dorothy; parents: Henry DeMarrias and Ruby Bendickson; son: Michael DeMarrias; brother: Sanford DeMarrias; grandson Sanford DeMarrias.

Michael Buckanaga funeral service on Wednesday

Funeral service for Michael Richard Buckanaga, 31 of Wahpeton, ND will be held on Wednesday, April 1, 2015 at 10:00 a.m. at St. Catherine's Hall, Sisseton, SD.

There will be a wake service at 7:00 p.m. Tuesday at St. Catherine's Hall.

Michael passed away on March 28, 2015 at St. Francis Hospital, Breckenridge, Minnesota.

The Cahill Funeral Chapel, Sisseton, SD is in charge of arrangements. Watch for a complete obituary next week in the Sota.

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor’s note: The following comes from the editor’s column and the Sota “deadlines and policies” statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or “opinion” letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author’s name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and must be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor’s explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Looking for "Class of 1975" alumni

By Michael LaBatte and Shelley (Greseth) Heil

Sisseton High School Class of 1975 Alumni: mark your calendars for July 3rd & 4th!! Our individual Class Reunion banquet will be held July 3rd from 6 to 10 p.m. at the American Legion in Sisseton. Graduating alumni of 1975 and their guests will be brought together for entertainment, food, friendship and laughter. Committee members are diligently selecting party platters for the menu, creating ideas for a memorabilia display, and researching and trying to locate classmates. The Class of 1975 Reunion website is http://www.sisseton.myevent.com. Please RSVP, suggest ideas, forward pictures, or share stories of the past and present. All SHS Class Reunions will commence at 6:00 p.m., Saturday July 4th, in the Practice Facility at the High School.

Classmate, Shelley Greseth Heil and her husband recently moved back to South Dakota after 38 years. She expresses her excitement about attending this year's reunion and shares a few high school memories…

"We had a great class with so many excellent teachers who challenged and encouraged us. We studied hard, competed hard in athletics and a plethora of extracurricular activities, raced our cars hard, and yes, had a lot of fun doing it all. (Some favorite personal memories: Mark Bubak as Don Quixote in our class play; laughing with Julie Fonder in band; hearing Nancy Parisian say "Zing, zing!"; going to debate tournaments with Chris Chase, Lance Pond, and Becky Rice; being the only girl in Ginsbach's physics class and missing all the fun with fruit flies in Advanced Biology; eating lots of Spanish rice; being very disappointed about not going to state in basketball; helping at the Special Olympics in Redfield; and well, just hanging out with friends.)

Since many of us are grandparents now, we'll surely have some good stories to share with one another. After all, who doesn't like to talk about grandkids?! My sincere thanks to you, Mike and the local committee members, for your efforts to make our 40th reunion one that you won't want to miss. See you all there!"

Looking forward to sharing many more school memories of the Class of 1975! If you would like to know more information or have suggestions contact Michael LaBatte Ph. 605-237-2164 or Email: mikel@tnics.com

Poems from the pen of Elden Hayes –

Greed

Greed has made you transparent

evil that a smile cannot hide

owning all of the riches and power

yet you are never satisfied

 

maybe poverty has spurred it

but there are many who have true need

they will always live below the line

because there are some who thrive by greed

 

education will be there to blame

the less you know the more you lack

there are addictions that need eradication

a need to escape brown paper sacks

 

we put up with prejudice

 something that we have always known

we expect to be robbed blind

but it should not be by our own

 

greed is passed down like a heirloom

it feels like generosity has died

poverty will always claim us

because greed has left you unsatisfied.

 

3-25-15

Mirror Of life

The mirror could no longer lie

no matter what the mind might say

reflections that are loaded with truth

age that will not be turned away

 

every line carries a story

although sometimes we have missed the plot

wrinkles that won't be ironed out

pain that's not given a second thought

 

tears have worn a distinct channel

sagging flesh that is in freefall

if you manage to avoid eye contact

you may not notice it at all

 

 years have brought  the soul to the surface

as the light begins to grow weak

there's still a struggle of refusal

the mirror has begun to streak

 

smiles that are turned down at the end

there's happiness that does not reach the eyes

you quickly turn from life's reflection

as the mirrors image begins to die……..

 

10-9-14

Social “helper” column dedicated to young generation Oyate –

Wawokiyape

By Shay Dirtseller

Good morning Oyate, hope all is well. This week I want to talk about a topic that not only affects children but parents as well. BULLYING!

Now, I recently read a story on the internet about a middle school cheerleader that had downs syndrome. This little girl was preforming with her squad when spectators started taunting and making fun of her. The girls squad, along with the basketball team, walked off the court in response to the heinous remarks as a way of showing they would not tolerate their friend being made fun of.

When I read this my faith in humanity was restored! It is good to know that there are people with hearts in the world.

Hate is taught by parents and learned by children. It is not something that is "built in" or that we are born with. I wish more parents would teach their children to respect others with disabilities and not dub them "different, strange or weird".

I have experienced this type of behavior from kids and adults alike with my son when he was younger. My son has CP in his leg which caused high tone and for him to walk on his tip toe. When he was born they said he wouldn't walk and that he would have so many difficulties but he proved the doctors wrong! He walks just fine and he is no different than his twin brother or any other kids!

I say that people with disabilities are the strongest, most amazing people in this world because they fought to be who they are! The little girl in the story, despite her disability, went out for cheerleading and is doing something she loves. And my son, whose dad is a MMA fighter, trains with his dad learning martial arts

All in all, there is nothing that they cannot do and people need to learn to be respectful.  Parents need to teach their kids that it’s not okay to poke fun and most of all remember that everyone is special and BEAUTIFUL in their own way!

Respectfully submitted, Shay.

Vaccines & Preventable Diseases

By Gypsy Wanna

SWO Wellness Coordinator

April 18-25 is National Infant Immunization Week. The Community Health Education program would like parents and grandparents to understand the importance of getting immunizations on time for children.

Vaccines work; they prevent diseases. One disease prevented by a vaccine is measles. In 2000, measles was eliminated from the United States. However, just recently there was an outbreak of measles in the United States. The majority of the children affected were children that were not adequately immunized.

Measles is a disease caused by an extremely contagious virus. It is spread in the air through coughing and sneezing. It causes a rash, cough, runny nose, eye irritation, and fever. Being infected with measles can lead to ear infections, pneumonia, seizures, brain damage, and death.

Protect your children, and the rest of the Oyate by getting your child immunized on time. To find out what immunizations your child needs, you may contact the Public Health Nursing Department or the clinic at the Woodrow Wilson Keeble Memorial Health Care Center at 698-7606. You may also contact the SD Department of Health at 698-4183.

Diabetes Management

By Gypsy Wanna

SWO Wellness Coordinator

What do you think of when you hear the word diabetes?  I work in Community Health Education, so I hear about diabetes all the time.  How often do you hear about diabetes?  Do you know what diabetes is?  I have Type 2 diabetes and am still learning about it.

First of all diabetes is a chronic disease which means it is a long lasting condition that can be controlled.  Diabetes means that your blood sugar (glucose) is too high.  Food is digested and turned into glucose; our cells use the glucose for energy. Insulin, which is made by the pancreas, is needed to help glucose enter the cells.  Sometimes the body can't make enough insulin or the cells resist insulin and glucose can't enter the cell.  When the glucose can't get into the cells, it remains in the blood and the levels increase.  This is diabetes.

Some people can control their diabetes by diet and exercise while others may need medication.  Even with medication, people can still have high blood sugar levels, or may experience high and low blood sugar spikes and may still have a high A1C.  The goal for people with diabetes is to have an A1C of 7% or less.  A1C is the measure of glucose in your blood over a 3-month time period (approximately).  It gives medical providers an indication of how well a person is managing their diabetes.

If you're A1C is too high or you just want to learn how to manage your diabetes better, I suggest taking the BASICS sessions taught by the PHN staff at the Woodrow Wilson Keeble Memorial Health Care Center.  BASICS will teach you about nutrition; carbohydrates, fats, and sodium (salt) and how they affect your diabetes and energy.  You will learn how to keep your blood sugar levels from spiking too high or too low as well as how to make better food choices and most importantly, how to lower your A1C.

BASICS is taught each month at the Woodrow Wilson Keeble Memorial Health Care Center and at the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate administration building. You may call 742-3770 to register.  Bring a friend or another family member.  BASICS is an excellent learning opportunity for every one!

*The next session at WWKMHCC is April 1st or 3rd from 1:00-3:00 p.m.

*Or at the tribal building on April 14th from 11:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. (lunch provided).

Special feature –

Preventing Suicide With A 'Contagion Of Strength'

A suicide prevention program trains middle and high school students as peer mentors — shaping school culture and behavior around pillars of support.

NPR – February 25, 2015 – For Whitney Bischoff, high school was tough. On the first day of her freshman year, a childhood friend committed suicide. Things weren't any better at home — her father died when she was 7 and her mom was an alcoholic with an abusive boyfriend.

She had a hard time making friends.

And when all the stress threatened to overwhelm her, she, too, considered suicide.

"I thought family was everything," Bischoff says. "I thought, if I didn't have family support – what am I going to do? Suicide seemed like the only way out."

As the thoughts persisted, Bischoff started going to group counseling sessions organized by her school in Rapid City, S.D.

But it didn't help. "I felt like it was always so depressing every time we talked," she says. "Having all that negative put to your face as a freshman – it was just a lot to take in."

But then something changed. Rapid City Central High started using a suicide-prevention program called Sources of Strength. The 15-year-old effort is now in more than 250 schools and community centers in 20 states. Researchers and advocates point to it as one of few prevention programs that has research behind it showing it can work.

Strength Is Contagious

I first learned about Sources of Strength last month, when four high schools in the Washington, D.C., suburbs started the program. I headed to Thomas S. Wootton High School — a top performing school in Rockville, Md., with enrollment of just over 2,000 — to see the initial student training.

It's a cold Friday morning in January. There are about 60 students sitting in folding chairs in the school's gymnasium. They're circled up, clustered around Dan Adams, a national trainer with the program. They're talking about the many stresses of high school.

"The stress of boundaries in dating," offers Shelby Ting, a sophomore. "Like what you're willing to do in your first relationship."

"I think we overlook the stress of being social," says Noah Braunstein, a senior. "Finding that group you fit in with is hard, and it's really taken me until senior year to find it."

Adams, in a black T-shirt and jeans, shifts the conversation to strengths: "What are the strengths in your life that help you deal with stress?" he asks.

Music. Friends. Family. Mac and cheese.

The Sources of Strength suicide prevention program is based on eight strengths. This emphasis on strengths is what Sources of Strength is all about: promoting positive behaviors in teens.

The curriculum is rooted in eight "strengths" – factors that research has shown are protective against suicide risk.

Adams walks the Wootton students through these eight strengths — family support, positive friends, spirituality, healthy activities, medical access, mentors, mental health and generosity.

For each category, students offer up examples from their own lives. "I know my really good friends don't put me under peer pressure," says a student. Another shares about how her church family really helped her get through her grandmother's passing.

"Not one of these pieces is enough to save someone from taking their own life," says Adams. "But a bunch of them – now that can make a real difference."

Jeff Brown, the acting principal of Wootton, is watching the training. He says that, like many schools, Wootton has faced issues with suicide. In 2014, the 154,000 student district lost five students to suicide.

And though national suicide rates have remained flat in recent years, it's still the third most common cause of death for 15- to 19-year-olds. And nationwide, 17 percent of American high school students said they had seriously considered suicide, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's 2013 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance.

Teens are highly influenced by their peers – social development, peer acceptance and personal identity are all part of growing up. Researchers note that adolescents look to their peers to define acceptable ways to deal with problems.

"Kids learn from each other a great deal. So when peers are offering each other solutions, there is a greater chance kids are going to try them," says Dr. Jill Harkavy-Friedman, who leads research for the American Foundation of Suicide Prevention. She praised the Sources of Strength program for its methods, naming it as one of the few comprehensive suicide prevention programs that's based on research.

"We knew we had to have a peer component ... to bring teens into the mix," says Scott LoMurray, who runs the Sources of Strength program with his father. Mark LoMurray, Scott's father, developed the program in the late 1990s after working with law enforcement as a crisis-response expert. In a three year period, he attended 30 funerals of teenagers — a number of them due to suicide.

"We couldn't just train adults and expect that to be effective," Scott LoMurry says.

But the peer mentors didn't replace the role of adults. Instead, Sources of Strength uses adult advisers – teachers, parents and administrators – as resources for the peer-leaders.

Harkavy-Friedman says having this combination of peer-to-peer communication with adult backing makes the program stronger.

An Evidence-Based Approach

Over the next five months of school, Wooton High School's newly trained peer leaders will meet with their adult advisers and other students. They'll be talking about the power of positive support and sharing stories of how the eight pillars of strength play out in their own lives.

Administrators at the school are convinced Sources of Strength will have a strong impact on their school culture – and research tends to back that up.

"This is really the first peer-leader program that has shown impact on school-wide coping norms and influence on youth connectedness," says Peter Wyman, a psychiatry professor at the University of Rochester in New York.

Wyman has been studying suicide prevention for the last 12 years. He was one of the authors of a three-year study in the American Journal of Public Health that looked at the effectiveness of Sources of Strength.

The researchers looked at 18 schools in Georgia, New York and South Dakota and found big changes in health-seeking behavior. Students, the study found, started to think that adults in school could be helpful, and peer leaders successfully encouraged friends to seek help from adults. The biggest changes in behavior occurred among students who were, or had been, suicidal.

"Telling their own life stories, about overcoming adversity and people who helped – that seems to be a very potent tool for having an impact on diverse teens, including teens that may not be receptive to other kinds of information," Wyman says.

Schools are catching on — Sources of Strength is expanding programs in Palo Alto, Calif., Idaho and in a number of rural Alaskan villages north of Fairbanks. They're also starting new programs in several communities in Washington state, including one in the Tulalip tribal community.

But the price tag can be a deterrent: It costs close to $5,000 to bring the program to a new school. If a school chooses to spend $4,000 to certify a staff member as an official trainer, then it will cost a school about $500 each year to maintain it.

And despite the research — school counselors sometimes find it difficult to convince schools to make it a priority. Mary Hines-Bone, a prevention specialist for the Cobb County school district, near Atlanta, says it can be tough getting schools to implement it properly. The biggest obstacle in making the program successful: the time commitment.

"It's been a real challenge to get time during school days," says Hines-Bone. "And programs where students meet before and after school don't end up being as effective."

And so schools may turn to less costly and less time-consuming approaches, like suicide-prevention assemblies or presentations that discuss the warning signs and risks of suicide.

Some prevention experts warn that programs emphasizing risks might not work as well, and researchers say there is little evidence that such one-time lectures have any effect. And they say any sustained effort must include adults talking with kids: making students part of the intervention and not the target of it.

"The biggest prevention piece that's out there is connection. When kids feel connected to somebody or their environment they're going to make fewer risky decisions," says Tim McGowan, the school counselor who brought the Sources of Strength program to Rapid City Central High School.

After running the program there for seven years, he says he finally has a student body that has never experienced a fellow student who has died by suicide. He says he gets lots of calls asking for advice, asking how he turned his school around. His best advice: Listen to kids and trust them.

"Sometimes kids tell us things we don't want to hear," McGowan says. "But you have to be open to those – because if you're not open to those, then you lose that opportunity for growth."

Whitney Bischoff, now 21, says she's grateful for that openness. The program gave her a space to feel supported and the ability to recognize that, while her family support wasn't as strong, she had other strengths: her friends from theater, her spirituality and her school mentor — Mr. McGowan.

She says she's come a long way since freshman year. She's on track to graduate this spring from Black Hills State University in Spearfish, S.D., with a degree in Psychology.

"That program saved me," she says, "and it gave me the passion and the confidence to want to pass it on to others."

Back to the Garden

By Richard P. Holm MD and Joanie S. Holm CNP

Mrs. A. was not one to complain. She was a hard working farmer who had recently lost her husband of 59 years and continued to live alone on the farm, though most of her chores were now done by a hired hand.

Pain and stiffness were not new to her, but recently there had been new life-limiting neck, shoulder and pelvic stiffness along with a loss of appetite and weight loss. As she was close to 80 she blamed it to her age, an old mattress and work in the garden, but it had become so bad she was having difficulty getting dressed. Her kids made the appointment to come in and see the doctor.

On the day of her exam, she seemed slower and a bit depressed, had a low-grade fever, and though she did complain of pain as I tested her, the strength in her arms and shoulders seemed excellent for a women her age. The rest of the exam was normal and my suspicion of polymyalgia rheumatic or PMR was validated when a blood test called the erythrocyte sedimentation rate, or sed rate, was high. The sed rate measures how fast red blood cells settle in a test tube, measuring how much inflammation is going on.

The good news is that PMR responds remarkably to low and easily tolerated doses of steroids. I put her on five milligrams of prednisone, and in a week she was a new woman and back in her garden. She stayed on that dose for a couple of years with minimal side effects and finally was tapered off one milligram at a time over a five-month period.

Polymyalgia rheumatica means an immune system problem is causing muscle pain in many muscles and we think it might be a viral triggered process that happens more frequently in certain families. Usually PMR occurs in those greater than 50 years of age, with an average incidence of 70, and occurs more than twice as often in women than in men.

It's important to know that 15 percent of the time, PMR runs with another problem that can cause blindness. So, severe muscle stiffness with vision changes should get immediate medical attention.

That said, most stiffness with age is not PMR and gets better with movement and exercise. However, if there is a new life-limiting neck, shoulder and pelvic stiffness, it could be polymyalgia rheumatica and there might be some help to get you back in your garden.

Standardized claim, appeal forms simplifies application process for SD Veterans

Washington, DC – March 25, 2015 – With the goal of making the application process easier and more efficient for our Veterans, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) now requires Veterans seeking disability benefits to use standardized claim and appeal forms. These standardized forms guide South Dakota Veterans to clearly state the symptoms or conditions for which they are seeking benefits and provide the information necessary for the Sioux Falls Regional Office to start processing their claims and appeals.

“Standardized forms will allow the Sioux Falls Regional Office to provide faster and more accurate decisions to our Veterans, their families and survivors,” said James Brubaker, Director of the Sioux Falls Regional Office. “Standard forms are essential to better serve Veterans, build more efficiency into VA’s processes and bring us in line with other government agencies such as the Social Security Administration.”

The easiest and fastest way for a Veteran to submit an application for compensation is online through the eBenefits (www.ebenefits.va.gov) portal. VA encourages Veterans to work with representatives of Veterans Service Organization (VSO), or South Dakota Department of Veterans Affairs or county representatives, who can assist with filing electronically or in paper form. Standardized forms are a key component of VA’s transformation, which will help achieve the Department’s goal to eliminate the backlog by the end of this year.

There are two claim actions that now require standardized forms:

1. Veterans’ or Survivors’ applications for disability compensation or pension – Specific forms are designed to capture information necessary to identify and support benefit claims.

§ Veterans filing for disability benefits must now use VA Form 21-526EZ, Application for Disability Compensation and Related Compensation Benefits.

§ Wartime Veterans filing for needs-based pension must use VA Form 21-527EZ, Application for Pension.

§ Survivors filing a claim for dependency and indemnity compensation (DIC), survivor’s pension, and accrued benefits must complete VA Form 21-534EZ, Application for DIC, Death Pension, and/or Accrued Benefits.

2. Notices of Disagreement with any aspect of VA’s decision on a disability claim – The standardized Notice of Disagreement form is used when a claimant wishes to initiate an appeal.

§ Veterans disagreeing with a VA compensation decision should use VA Form 21-0958, Notice of Disagreement.

§ Veterans and survivors will not be required to use a standardized notice of disagreement form to initiate appeals of pension or survivors benefit decisions at this time.

VA recognizes that some Veterans may need additional time to gather all of the information and evidence needed to support their claim and therefore established a new intent to file a claim process. Applicants may notify VA of their intent to file a claim in order to establish the earliest possible effective date for benefits if they are determined eligible. An intent to file a claim may be submitted in one of three ways:

1. Electronically via eBenefits or with the support of a Veterans Service Organization (VSO) through the Stakeholder Enterprise Portal.

2. Completing and mailing a paper VA Form 21-0966, Intent to File a Claim for Compensation and/or Pension, or Survivors Pension and/or DIC)

3. Over the phone with a VA call center or in person with a public contact representative.

Veterans may appoint a duly authorized representative, such as a VSO, who can notify VA of a claimant’s intent to file using any of the methods listed above. VA will provide an individual up to one year from the date they submit their intent to file a claim to complete the required application form. Veterans may wish to use this one-year period to gather evidence necessary to support the claim so that evidence can be submitted along with the application form.

VA’s move to standardized claim and appeal forms will make the process easier and more efficient for both VA and the Veterans, and allow VA to establish a quicker, more streamlined benefits delivery system.

VA taking step to improve Rural Health Care Access for Veterans

Washington, DC – March 25, 2015 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today said that a new policy change by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) will better allow veterans living further than a 40-mile driving distance from a local VA health care facility to be able to access care in their communities – a commonsense change to the law that Heitkamp pushed VA Secretary Robert McDonald to change just last month.

Last year, Congress passed a bipartisan bill to help improve access to health care for veterans and provide needed reforms at the VA. The bill gives eligible veterans increased access to health care through the Veterans Choice Card program — an initiative Heitkamp has called for since before she joined the Senate. The card allows veterans who can’t get a timely appointment with the VA or live more than 40 miles from a VA health care facility to seek care from local providers. The policy update announced by the VA this week will change the calculation used to determine the distance between a veteran’s residence and the nearest VA medical facility from a straight line distance to driving distance. Heitkamp pressed the VA Secretary to make such a change so that the distance accurately reflects how far veterans actually need to travel for care.

“Growing up in a town of 90 people, I’m intimately familiar with the struggles folks in rural areas face in accessing necessary resources. But the men and women who come home after serving our country – shouldn’t have to jump through additional hoops to get the care they need,” said Heitkamp. “That’s why I’ve been fighting for better health care access for the veterans who call so many of our rural towns home. The VA heeded those calls by creating a Veterans Choice Card – which I pushed for since before I joined the Senate – and this week the VA announced a commonsense solution I’ve been advocating to better serve veterans. It was an important step that Congress passed a bipartisan bill last June to improve care for veterans, and I’ll keep pushing for practical measures that secure this access for every veteran that has fought to keep this nation safe – no matter where they reside.”

Heitkamp has long fought to make sure veterans living in rural areas have greater access to the health care and services they need. Last July, Heitkamp met with then-VA Secretary Nominee McDonald and reinforced the need for the VA to make sure all veterans, including Native Americans and rural veterans, get access to quality resources and benefits in a timely manner. Later that month, Heitkamp voted to confirm McDonald to help bring about these needed reforms.

Heitkamp helped pass bipartisan reforms to the VA last August that provides eligible veterans with increased access to health care through the Veterans Choice Card program — an initiative Heitkamp has called for since before she joined the Senate. The card will allow veterans who can’t get a timely appointment with the VA or live more than 40 miles from a VA health care facility to seek care from local providers. The bill will also improve access to services, which Heitkamp has been pushing for to help veterans living in rural areas and Native American veterans more easily get care.

To help draw needed attention to the challenges facing Native American veterans and connect Native veterans with resources to help them get support, Heitkamp hosted her first Native American Veterans Summit in Bismarck last June, bringing together about 140 Native veterans, officials from the VA and Indian Health Service (IHS), and other advocates. Native veterans serve in the military at the highest rate per capita of any ethnic group. But studies demonstrate they also disproportionately suffer the health consequences of that service. They also often face many challenges accessing services because so many of them live in rural areas far from VA facilities. Following the summit, Heitkamp launched a new webpage to more easily connect veterans with information about how they can best access benefits and services.

Votes to strengthen Medicare, extends CHIP

Washington, D.C. – March 25, 2015 – Rep. Kristi Noem today helped the U.S. House of Representatives pass a real and permanent fix to Medicare reimbursement rates, which have faced an imminent cliff nearly 20 times in the last 12 years. H.R.2, the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act, is a bipartisan bill to strengthen Medicare for seniors, permanently replace the reimbursement rate, and extend the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP).

“Both my mother and grandmother are on Medicare, so I understand the importance of ensuring patients have access to their doctors and the high-quality care they’ve earned,” said Noem. “The Band-Aid fixes over the last 12 years have resulted in constant uncertainty for both the patients and the doctors and hospitals that serve them. This bill finally provides a real solution that gives seniors peace of mind knowing they’ll continue to have access to the doctors they trust.”

H.R.2 seeks to strengthen Medicare by moving beyond the Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) to reimburse those that serve Medicare patients. Additionally, the bill makes fundamental structural reforms to Medicare, offsetting any new spending without tax increases. Moreover, former Congressional Budget Office Director Douglas Holtz-Eakin writes the reforms “will continue to reap benefits in the years beyond the budget window,” estimating $230 billion in savings in the second decade alone.

In addition to permanently correcting the SGR, H.R.2 extends CHIP, as Rep. Noem and her female House colleagues called for earlier this month.

“CHIP serves more than 8 million children and expectant mothers at any given time,” continued Noem. “I am very proud the House acted to extend CHIP long before its expiration date, giving new parents more certainty as they work to plan their family budgets and doctor visits in advance.”

Included in the package are provisions to help ensure better access to care in rural America. More specifically, H.R.2 extends add-on payment for ground ambulance services in super-rural areas, increased inpatient hospital payment adjustment for low-volume hospitals, and the Indian Health Service’s special diabetes program through 2017.

The latest SGR extension expires on March 31, 2015. With passage in the House, the bipartisan legislation will head to the U.S. Senate.

NDSU Master of Public Health director to receive honor

Fargo, N.D., March 26 – The National Indian Health Board has announced Dr. Donald Warne, director of North Dakota State Uuniversity's Master of Public Health program, will receive the board's first-ever Public Health Innovation Award. He will be recognized during the opening plenary session of the sixth annual Tribal Public Health Summit in Palm Springs, California, April 8-9.

The honor was created to acknowledge individuals, tribes, organizations and programs that have enriched and improved American Indian and Alaska Native public health. The award recognizes excellence, achievement and outstanding innovations.

The organization praised Warne and NDSU's Master of Public Health program for contributions to improve the quality of life for American Indians and Alaska Natives. In a news release, the board said, "With the support of Dean Charles Peterson, Dr. Warne established an American Indian Public Health track – the first of its kind in the United States. Dr. Warne’s vision and the support of Dean Peterson will lead to cadres of students graduating with MPH degrees with specific education in American Indian public health. These future students will help tribal nations achieve health equity for all their people."

“I am deeply honored to receive this award," said Warne, who is a member of the Oglala Lakota tribe. "American Indians suffer from among the worst health disparities in the nation — particularly here in the Northern Plains. Most of the health challenges could be prevented with appropriate public health interventions. At NDSU, we offer the only Master of Public Health in the nation with an emphasis on American Indian Public Health, and we are excited that our graduates will be a part of the solution to these disparities.”

Founded in 1972, the National Indian Health Board is a not-for-profit, charitable organization providing health care advocacy services information and other services to tribal governments. The board also conducts research, provides policy analysis, program assessment and development, national and regional meeting planning, training, technical assistance, program and project management.

Warne, who is an associate professor and holds the Mary J. Berg Distinguished Professorship in Women's Health, earned his Master of Public Health from Harvard School of Public Health and his Doctor of Medicine from Stanford University School of Medicine.

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

2015 SWO Career Day April 13th

The Tribal educational entities and Parks & Rec program have set aside April 13, 2015 for this year’s Career Day.

Everyone is welcome to come and learn about careers. Learn about vocational/technical schools, meet military recruiters.

This event is open to students and others of all ages.

There will be door prizes.

Career Day will be held from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at the SWO Administration building/rotunda.

SWO Dakotah Language scholarship

Dakotah Language Scholarship for $2000 will be awarded to a high school senior who meet the requirements and demonstrates exemplary aptitude in the area of Dakotah Language. The goal of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Dakotah Language Scholarship is to promote, enhance, educate and advance the use of the Dakotah Language.

Requirements: Application, proof of Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Enrollment and essay must be submitted by April 15. Complete a short interview which will be conducted in person for students who reside on the SWO Reservation and for the students who reside off the SWO Reservation there will be a Skype interview.

Applications will be available April 1 and due April 15.

1. Proof of Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Tribal Enrollment.

2. For students who reside on the SWO Reservation, a ½ hour interview will be scheduled between April 15 and May 15.

3. For students who reside off the SWO Reservation, a ½ hour Skype interview will be scheduled between April 15 and May 15.

Contact Information:

Janell Williams SWO Higher Education Program

PO Box 509

Agency Village SD 57262

Email: JanellB@swo-nsn.gov

(605) 742-0150

TZ first graders tour Teal’s Market

The First Grade classes from TZTS taught by Mrs. Halbert and Mrs. Ellsworth visited Teal's Supermarket in Sisseton on Friday, Mar. 27th.

The field trip came about after the students learned about how we get food from Reading lessons in school.

At the store the students learned about the different departments and enjoyed touring the secret rooms in the back of the store.

They watched how milk was delivered by the milk truck and got to see the walk-in freezers.

Jesse Robertson, Autumn Wiggins, and Nikki Bien came along to help out.

Thanks Teal's for a great time.

Tiospa Zina kindergarten class tours Larson farm

Tiospa Zina Tribal School Kindergartener's recently took a field trip to Diantha and Kevin Larson's farm.

MSL Night held at Enemy Swim Day School

By Dawn Johnson

Community Education Coordinator

Enemy Swim Day School

“This year’s MSL Night was held March 19th and themed “Big Bang Theory.” The following stations were hosted:

· Scholastic Book Fair

· Star Lab from SWO College (brought by Max Torres)

· 3D Printer provided by SDSU

· Math and Science booths hosted by Dr. Sherry Johnson, Mrs. Lorensburg, Ellen Robertson and Jennifer Ringkob with SDSU Extension office

· Hands on station including Legos, Rubik cubes and take home duct tape projects

· Wii sports games

· Pie eating contest

· Edible molecule station (fruits)

· Build and launch your own rocket

· Boat races

· ESDS Student Science Fair boards

· National Relief Charities items to take home

Adult FACE students and parents provided the meal for the event.

Here are accompanying photo highlights.

ESDS Adult Learning Center opportunities

Yes! Enemy Swim Day School offers adults of the community a variety of learning opportunities!

Here are some of the learning options:

*GED preparation.

*Computer basics.

*Job readiness.

*Career exploration.

The school’s Adult Learning Center is open weekdays, Monday-Friday, from 8:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.

To discover what opportunity there is for you, contact instructor Renee Kwasniewski at 605-947-4605 extension 3080.

SWO Head Start news

Week of 3/30/15

*Head Start Easter Egg Hunt - April 2nd at Agency Village centers. Head Start (3-5) in the classrooms. Please send your child with a bag to collect eggs. Please inform teachers if your child has a peanut or chocolate allergy.

*No School - April 6th due to Easter holiday.

*2015 Graduation - May 16th at 1:00 PM (location to be announced). Please RSVP so Parent Committee has a number of expected guests by going online to https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/N3NJ2PK

Waubay School observes Kick Butts Day

Submitted by Liz Anderson

Tobacco Prevention Specialist

SWO Community Health Education

Attached are photos from Kick Butts Day last Wed, March 18th. Waubay Public School was happy to take the challenge of participating in some activities on how big tobacco companies target our youth to pick up the habit of smoking. They are very savvey on making flavored tobacco products and how they market to the youth for profit, all they care about is profit!

"Still Seeking Replacements" How Big Tobacco Targets Kids Today, Heavy Marketing and discounting in stores, Slick ads in magazines with large youth readerships, such as Sports Illustrated, ESPN the Magazine, Rolling Stone, Glamour and People. Flavored Tobacco Products - cigars, smokeless tobacco and E-Cigaretts, E-Cigarette marketing that re-glamorizes tobacco use.

Why tobacco companies target kids. Tobacco companies continue to target kids because their business model depends on it: They know that 90% of adult smokers start at or before age 18. Numerous internal tobacco industry documents show that the tobacco companies have long percieved adolescents as a key market, studied their smoking behavior and developed products and marketing campaigns aimed at them. An RJ Reynolds document infamously referred to young people as "the only source of replacement smokers" for those who quit smoking or die from tobacco-related disease. One Philip Morris document stated, "Today's teenager is tomorrow's potential regular costomer." Similarly, a Lorillard Tobacco document stated, "The base of our business is the high school student."

The elementary students participated in "chalk the walk" and posted messages on staying away from tobacco, it was wet and cold so we made a walkway of giant post-its and they used chalk. The high school classes participated in "I am not a replacement" I am (name) and wrote what or who they are, posted it to FaceBook and other Social Media. The group photo is the whole senior class said they were smoke free!! It was great fun for all. I'm really proud of all the students that participated. We also had a secret drawing of the students that participated, the winner was Alex Owens, from the Senior class, he won a $25.00 gift card.

Please remember you are the biggest advertiser for the tobacco companies if you smoke. Our children want to be just like us, be the change you want to see in the world or at home.

Here are photo highlights from the event.

To inspire reading, writing, higher education –

Reaching out to Native American youth

The Young Native Writers Essay Contest is a writing contest for Native American high school students and is designed to encourage young Native Americans to write about their experiences as a member of a Native American community and the culture that inspires them.

The voices that emerge from this program honor the legacy of every Native American who has ever lived. Add your words to the thousands submitted through this project - all writers receive a Certificate of Honor for their submission.

The Holland & Knight Charitable Foundation's goal of promoting education and creating new opportunities for youth has inspired this essay contest. Partnering with Holland & Knight in this endeavor are the National Museum of the American Indian and the National Indian Education Association.

Deadline is April 15, 2015.

High school students responding to this year's writing contest should write an essay of no more than 1,200 words that addresses the following prompt:

2015 Prompt--Images of Native America Write an essay about one or more of the cultural images, symbols, or art forms that have been historically utilized by your community (American Indian, Alaska Native or Native Hawaiian) to serve a specific purpose or to communicate a particular message or value. The essay should:

Describe the image(s), symbol(s) or art forms (hereinafter, collectively, "image");

Explain how the image was historically used by the community. Involve an elder or other a knowledgeable person from the community to lend historical and cultural strength to your essay;

Reflect on your own experience (including your thoughts and feelings) with the image; Suggest why or how the image is still relevant today to the reservation, tribal town or Native community where the image originates.

See contest rules below for complete details and submission requirements.

SOURCES OF INFORMATION: In preparation for writing, students should draw from their own personal knowledge and research information from a variety of sources. Primary and secondary source material could include: historical and reference material, interviews, images, symbols and artwork, personal experiences, oral testimonies, official documents, diaries, letters, autobiographies, newspapers, academic journals, films and television movies, and Internet sources such as http://www.nmai.si.edu/searchcollections/home.aspx.

ELIGIBILITY

The 2015 Young Native Writers Essay Contest is open to Native American high school students currently enrolled in grades 9-12 only. All students participating in the Young Native Writers Essay Contest should have a significant and current relationship with a Native American community (i.e., an American Indian tribe, an Alaska Native community or a Native Hawaiian community).

PRIZES

The following prizes will be awarded to winning essayists:

Five (5) First-Place Winners will each receive an expense-paid trip to Washington, D.C., to visit the National Museum of the American Indian and other prominent sites as part of Scholar Week (July 20 - 24, 2015).

First-Place Winners will receive a special award for display at home or school. In addition, each First-Place Winner will receive a scholarship of $2,500 to be paid directly to the college or university of his or her choice.

Entry Deadline for the 2015 Young Native Writers Essay is Wednesday, April 15, 2015.

OFFICIAL CONTEST RULES

IT IS IMPORTANT TO READ ALL OF THE CONTEST RULES. Entries that do not adhere strictly to these rules and guidelines will not be judged.

SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS: All essays must be submitted by email in PDF format to nativewriters@hklaw.com. Essays sent by mail, fax, or any other method will be disqualified. You must include your full name, email address and contact telephone number in the email. Do not include your name anywhere on any page of your essay. The body of your essay may be NO MORE THAN 1,200 WORDS. The essay must be written in English.

REFERENCES REQUIRED: Every essay must include a Bibliography, Work Cited, or Reference Page.

WORD COUNT: Essays should comprise no more than 1,200 words. When conducting your word count, DO NOT include words contained in your Bibliography, Works Cited, or Reference page.

LANGUAGE: Essays must be in English.

YOUR NAME: You must include your full name, email address and contact telephone number in the email. Do not include your name anywhere on any page of your essay.

RESEARCH IS REQUIRED: While this is a creative writing project, research must be an integral element of the writing process and essays must contain a Bibliography, Works Cited or Reference Page, citing all materials used in the research and writing of the essay (parenthetical documentation must accompany research).

ESSAY FORMAT: The essay must be in prose format and may be a commentary or interpretation of primary and secondary source material such as: historical and reference materials; interviews; eyewitness accounts and oral histories; official documents and other primary sources; readings from diaries, letters, autobiographies, and works of poetry; video, or audiotapes, films, art, and Internet sources. The essay must not be a fictitious story or poem. The essay must be primarily directed toward examining the writing prompt.

JUDGING: Entries will be judged anonymously and will not be returned to students. Submissions that adhere to the guidelines will be judged with special attention to (1) evidence of relevant reading and thoughtful use of resource materials; (2) treatment of the assigned themes; (3) clear and effective language, mechanics and grammar; and (4) a coherent plan of organization.

AUTHOR OF ESSAY: Each essay must be the work of one student and may not be the collective work of more than one student. By submitting an essay, applicants are certifying that their essays are original, authored solely by them, and that in writing their essays, they did not plagiarize or otherwise infringe upon the rights of any third parties.

TEACHERS: It is not necessary for a student to have a sponsoring teacher in order to enter this essay contest. However, high school teachers of Native American students are encouraged to inspire their students to participate, and in doing so, can become eligible to accompany student winners on a Washington, D.C., award trip, with all expenses paid, with the opportunity to take part in teacher seminars.

CERTIFICATES OF HONOR: A Certificate of Honor will be e-mailed to all who submit essays.

NOTIFICATION OF WINNERS: Winners will be notified of contest results by May 15, 2015. The five winners, and two selected certified high school teachers and Holland & Knight chaperones will embark on an all-expense-paid trip to Washington, D.C. for Scholar week (July 20 - 24, 2015.) In addition, each First-Place Winner will receive a scholarship of $2,500 to be paid directly to the college or university of their choice.

SCHOLARSHIPS: Scholarships will be paid to each student's post-secondary educational institution after the student has graduated from high school and upon Holland & Knight Charitable Foundation's receipt of a copy of the student's registration paperwork from said post-secondary educational institution.

POSTING ESSAYS: All essays submitted may be used or published in whole or in part by the Holland & Knight Charitable Foundation or by other parties with its written permission. The Holland & Knight Charitable Foundation, National Museum of the American Indian and National Indian Education Association reserve the right not to publish any essay it deems inappropriate for any reason.

WASHINGTON DC: The winners of the essay contest MUST agree to participate in the entire trip to Washington, D.C., in order to receive a scholarship. In the event that a winner is unable or unwilling to participate in the trip to Washington, D.C., in its entirety, no substitution prize will be awarded.

MOST UNLIKELY: The Holland & Knight Charitable Foundation reserves the right not to award a prize or any prizes when submissions do not meet contest standards or criteria.

For more information, e-mail questions to nativewriters@hklaw.com.

INTERNET RESOURCES

National Museum of the American Indian www.nmai.si.edu

SDSU Extension promotes STEM Careers to Girls During Sioux Falls Women in Science conference

Brookings, SD – SDSU Extension staff were among more than 28 exhibitors to promote science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) careers to more than 660 middle school girls from 19 area schools during the March 11, 2015 Women in Science Conference held in Sioux Falls.

"This event is very much about exposing middle school girls to STEM careers before they sign up for classes in high school," said Christine Wood, SDSU Extension 4-H STEM Field Specialist of the Sioux Falls Women in Science Conference which is one of several conferences hosted throughout South Dakota for this purpose.

Since its inception, the Sioux Falls conference has served more than 5,000 girls. During the event middle school girls are given a card and encouraged to collect signatures from several exhibitors. In order to receive a signature, they first engage with female professionals to learn about their career. Questions are encouraged. Once a card is full, the student is eligible for prizes. The girls also attend six different hands-on workshops where they learn more about STEM-based careers.

"The questions we receive from eighth-graders keep us on our toes," said Wood, who has her degree in Agriculture & Biosystems Engineering.

Wood explained that eighth grade is a crucial point for many girls. "This is when many students are determining where their career interests lie and it is when they make decisions about what classes they will take in high school," Wood said.

She explained that high school classes can impact future careers students can pursue. For example, if students want to be an engineer, then they need to take certain advanced math classes in high school. The same is true for medical careers. If students don't take biology in high school, then they will be behind in college.

The Women in Science event falls in line with what Wood does on a daily basis. As the 4-H STEM Field Specialist with SDSU Extension she trains 4-H staff and community volunteers in how to implement STEM into fun learning activities for youth. For example, she recently trained 4-H staff on how to implement engineering and robotics in to their programming.

Why Middle School Girls Need STEM Exposure Research shows that throughout elementary school girls and boys are equally engaged in STEM-based education, but Wood said something happens in middle school and girls become less engaged as they enter high school. Based on her personal experiences, Wood believes that unless young women are encouraged to explore career fields within science, technology, engineering or math (STEM) they will pursue what is familiar to them.

Connie Strunk agrees with her. The SDSU Extension Plant Pathology Field Specialist has witnessed this with her two young daughters and their friends. "When I ask them what they want to be when they grow up, they say they want to be day care providers, teachers and princesses - you know; the careers they are exposed to. That's why events like Women in Science are crucial," Strunk said. "This event not only puts a female face to STEM-related careers but STEM related careers that are available here in South Dakota."

Like so many of South Dakota's youth, Strunk and Wood grew up in small rural communities, where they didn't see women working in STEM-related jobs. However, because of savvy high school teachers, they were both encouraged to look into STEM-related careers.

Both women emphasize the fact that even if a young girl's academic strengths are not science and math; it's difficult to find a career where STEM is not involved. "There are not many careers that don't involve some sort of science - whether students are on a 4-year university track or a 2-year technical school track following high school," Wood said.

SDSU Extension Food Safety Field Specialist, Lavonne Meyer said this fact was made clear to her only a few days into pursuing her degrees in Home Economics Education and Textile Science. The year was 1972 and Meyer said at that time women were not exposed to many career options. "We knew we could be a teacher, a nurse or a secretary. So, when I decided to go into Home Economics I didn't think much science was involved. I quickly realized everything I was learning was science-based," Meyer said. "Science is what takes my work from just teaching people to can carrots to saving lives by ensuring that the pH levels are where they need to be to prevent food-borne illness."

"Everything we do within SDSU Extension is science-based," Meyer said. "And the women on our team are wonderful role models for young girls to look up to as they learn about science-based careers they can pursue."

To learn more about Women in Science Conferences in your area contact Wood at christine.wood@sdstate.edu or 605.782.3290.

Debt and the Deceased: How should spouses and heirs proceed?

By Jason Alderman

If your loved one died leaving significant debt behind, would you know what to do?

It's a worrisome question for everyone. Young or old, based on particular debt circumstances or geographic location, death with debt can provide significant problems for surviving family members. Depending on state law and the specific credit relationships involved, they might be shocked to learn that they could be legally liable for a deceased relative's outstanding debt – anything from unpaid mortgage balances and medical debt to unpaid credit card balances.

Spouses (http://www.practicalmoneyskills.com/unexpecteddeath) who may share any kind of debt jointly, particularly credit cards in dual name, could face greater challenges. It also may spell problems for co-signers of any kind of loan.

As with all financial planning, the best time to act is before an issue arises. Watching any family deal with extensive debt problems after a spouse or relative passes on illustrates the need for financial transparency while all parties are alive. No matter how difficult a family member's credit circumstances are, spouses and adult children should face those circumstances while options are available to deal with any problems.

Spouses can begin by requesting and sharing their three free annual credit reports (https://www.annualcreditreport.com/index.action) from TransUnion, Experian and Equifax to confirm debt status. Once that information is out in the open, it's time for the couple or family members to deal with specific circumstances related to that debt. For example, a young couple may have different debt issues than an older, retired couple, but both should consider how they would handle the debts of a spouse or legal partner after death. It can be helpful to meet with a qualified financial or estate expert about ways to extinguish or manage debt issues as part of current financial and estate planning.

It is particularly important for borrowers and their executors to know what categories of the deceased's debts will likely need to be repaid after their death and other debts that might be canceled or forgiven. Generally, certain forms of unsecured debt held in the deceased's name alone – like credit cards or federal student loans – may likely be discharged, but check with qualified experts first.

Any kind of debt held in joint name should be evaluated. Spouses, legal partners and family members who have co-signed loans or joint credit accounts of any kind risk payoff responsibility for that debt if their co-borrower dies. Experts can advise how to deal with individual situations.

Experts also may suggest that co-borrowers without credit in their own names apply for a credit card in separate names while their spouse is still alive. A separate credit account, if responsibly managed, can help the survivor qualify for additional credit in their name after a spouse or legal partner dies.

Keep in mind that all debt situations are unique to the individual. For example, a senior who qualifies for nursing home care under Medicaid (public aid) may have family members who will need to sell the senior's home to address certain expenses after he or she has died. It is best to prepare relatives for that possibility in advance. Separately, a healthy senior relative may leave a home to heirs still under mortgage, or there could be a significant tax debt.

Airing and reviewing these issues in advance can either prepare relatives for certain realities or enable them to solve problems while the relative is still alive.

Bottom line: Dealing with a deceased relative's debt can add stress at a particularly worrisome time for spouses and relatives. The best option is transparency while relatives are alive so debt issues can be addressed as part of overall estate planning.

*****

Jason Alderman directs Visa's financial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www.twitter.com/PracticalMoney.

Pollination requirements for Fruit trees

By John Ball

Professor & SDSU Extension

Forestry Specialist

How many fruit trees do I need to plant to have fruit? This question comes up each year as people start thinking about planting fruit trees.

Most have heard you need to plant two trees to have fruit, often assuming you need a "boy" tree and a "girl" tree. This is not quite correct. You do need two trees for producing many tree fruits but it has nothing to do with gender.

Sex of Trees 101 Most fruit trees are neither male nor female as their flowers contain the reproductive structures, stamens and pistils, for both sexes. These flowers are referred to as perfect. However, the individual trees of some fruit tree species will not accept their own pollen and for these, you do need two trees. These are called self-sterile fruit trees and include apples, pears and hybrid plums cultivars.

To obtain fruit from self-sterile trees, you must plant two of them but they must be two different cultivars, not merely two different trees.

If you want fruit from a Haralson® apple for example, you have to plant another apple cultivar near it, ideally within 50 feet. Just having two Haralson® apple trees will not result in apples, only flowers.

To further complicate the process, if you have a Haralson® and a Haralred® apple trees you will still not receive fruit as the Haralred® originated from the Haralson® so they are too closely related to pollinate one another. Two other popular apples, 'Fireside' and 'Connell Red' share the same problem, they cannot pollinate one another.

Another challenge with selecting apple cultivars is the fact that you not only have to select two different and unrelated cultivars, but the trees must be blooming at the same time. For example, a 'State Fair' apple tree, in which the fruit ripens in August, may be finished blooming before a Haralson® tree begins to flower because its fruit ripens in early October.

Usually it is not a good idea to assume an early season apple will pollinate a late season one.

Pears and hybrid plums bloom within a narrow time period, so the flowering of their many cultivars will generally overlap. However, some cultivars are better pollinators than others and some trees do not produce viable pollen at all.

One of the best pollinators for plums is 'Toka' and it is a good choice for any plum orchard. 'LaCresent' and 'Superior' are two popular plums but these share a similar parentage and cannot be used to pollinate one another.

Most pear cultivars are compatible with one another, the two exceptions being 'Gourmet' and 'Luscious' which are pollen-sterile. This means that neither of these trees will serve as a pollen source but will accept pollen from another cultivar.

Apricots are generally not self-sterile but the two cultivars frequently planted in our region 'Moongold' and "Sungold' must be planted together to ensure fruit production. The majority of other apricots are not self-sterile but many are not hardy enough for our region.

There are also fruit trees that are self-fruitful rather than self-sterile. These trees are able to pollinate themselves so you only need one tree to have fruit set. The fruit trees in our region that are self-fruitful include European plums and sour (pie) cherries.

Garden Corner

Submitted by Eric Hanssen

Browns Valley, Minnesota 56219

African violet

One of my favorite house plants that I enjoy. The blooms are just so pretty and with many different colors. Outstanding among small, flowering potted plants, African violets in a good location should flower without interruption for years. In addition to their free-blooming character, they are well adapted to home conditions, easy to propagate and available in a wide range of flower colors.

Miniatures as well as more compact standard varieties are usable in limited space.

Care of the new plant:

· Maintain night temperatures between 65 and 70 degrees Fahrenheit; day temperatures 10 degrees warmer. Do not expose to temperatures below 60 or above 80 degrees Fahrenheit.

· Place in windows with bright light but no direct sunlight. Some midwinter sunlight is not harmful, but avoid it at other times of the year. If no suitable window space is available, plants grow well in fluorescent light. Place about 8 to 12 inches beneath cool white fluorescent tubes lit about 14 hours daily.

· Water frequently enough to keep soil moist, but allow slight drying between waterings. They are easily killed by excess soil moisture. Wick watering is adaptable.

· Humidity is important. In homes with low humidity, place on trays of gravel containing water. Home humidifiers can help.

Reblooming African violets:

African violets rebloom easily in the home. If located properly and watered regularly, little need be done besides occasional fertilization. Use either special African violet fertilizers or a houseplant fertilizer high in phosphorus. A very dilute fertilizer solution at each watering keeps growth constant and eliminates any chances of over fertilization. Pale green leaf color may indicate too much sunlight or low fertility. Do not use water softened by a system using salt in the process. African violets seldom need pots larger than 4 inches in diameter. The danger of overwatering and development of root and crown rots increases if pots are too big.

Old plants sometimes develop long woody stems. The tips of these plants may be cut off and rooted to form new, more compact plants. However, plants developed from leaf cuttings are generally more vigorous and bloom more abundantly.

Information from MU guide Number G 6511 “Care of Flowering Potted Plants” Published by MU Extension, University of Missouri-Columbia. Web site http://extension.missouri.edu/explore/

Legals

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

IN TRIBAL COURT

CASE: D-15-302-125

ORDER AND NOTICE OF HEARING

IN THE MATTER OF THE CHANGE OF NAME OF:

SHANICE BEAUDREAU, Petitioner.

 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Petitioner's request for a change of name from SHANICE ALICE BEAUDREAU to SHANICE ALICE KEOKE  shall be heard before the Honorable B.J. JONES, Chief Judge of Tribal Court, in the Courtroom of the Sisseton Wahpeton Tribal Court at Agency Village, South Dakota at  3:00 P.M. on the 15th day of APRIL, 2015.

Dated this 13th day of March, 2015.

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ B.J. Jones CHIEF JUDGE

ATTEST: E. Pfeiffer CLERK OF COURTS

11-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

IN TRIBAL COURT

CASE NO: D-15-324-147

NOTICE OF HEARING

IN THE MATTER OF: KIRK ARCHAMBAULT, Plaintiff

VS.

TRICIA GILL, Defendant.

TO: TRICIA GILL

Take notice that a hearing will be held at the above named Court, Agency Village, outside the city of Sisseton, County of Roberts, South Dakota, on the of 15th day of APRIL, 2015 at the hour of 1:30 P.M  or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 13th day of March, 2015.

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ B.J. Jones TRIBAL COURT JUDGE

ATTEST: Eileen Pfeiffer Clerk of Courts

11-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 05-476

SWOCSE/ TANF/Amanda Adams, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ERIN EASTMAN, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Amend Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of April, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 18th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 09-018

SWOCSE/ TANF/Elissa Adams, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ERIN EASTMAN, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Establish TANF Arrears and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of April, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 18th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 14-104

SWOCSE/ TANF/Jennifer Adams, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ERIN EASTMAN, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Establish TANF Arrears and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of April, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 18th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 10-009

SWOCSE/ Elliot Barse, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ERIN EASTMAN, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of April, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 18th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 08-072

SWOCSE/ TANF/Jolene Barse, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ERIN EASTMAN, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of April, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 18th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 08-283

SWOCSE/ TANF/Jacquelyn DeMarrias, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ERIN EASTMAN, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of April, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 18th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 15-056

SWOCSE/ Mairiel Stone, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ANTHONY RENVILLE, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of April, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 18th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 13-093

SWOCSE/ Shawn DeMarrias, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LESLIE BARSE, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of April, 2015 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 18th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 12-077

SWOCSE/ Mason Kohl, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LESLIE BARSE, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Establish Arrears and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of April, 2015 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 18th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 11-066

SWOCSE/ Shayne Cook, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LESLIE BARSE, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of April, 2015 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 18th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 06-053

SWOCSE/ Shannon Marshall, PLAINTIFF

VS.

HARVEY CRAWFORD, Sr., DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of April, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 18th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 13-107

SWOCSE/ Susan Pink, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DION WHITE, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of April, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 19th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 13-105

SWOCSE/ CA Foster Care, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LITA BLACKSMITH, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of April, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 19th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 08-102

SWOCSE/ Sherman Kurrasch, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DORCY KURRASCH, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of April, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 19th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 09-015

SWOCSE/ Jerry Hillberg, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LARISSA RENCOUNTRE, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of April, 2015 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 19th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 11-060

SWOCSE/ ND, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SCARLETT LOHNES, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of April, 2015 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 19th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 08-052

SWOCSE/Darlena Jones, PLAINTIFF

VS.

KIPP RENVILLE, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of April, 2015 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 19th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 13-166

SWOCSE/ Troy DuMarce, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ROCHELLE BERNARD, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of April, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 20th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 15-042

SWOCSE/ Donette Crawford, PLAINTIFF

VS.

VIJAY CRAWFORD, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of April, 2015 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 20th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 12-139

SWOCSE/Amber Adams, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MATTHEW PUMPKINSEED, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of April, 2015 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 20th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 00-272

SWOCSE/Kay Bursheim, PLAINTIFF

VS.

KAREN FARMER, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of April, 2015 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 20th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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Trading Post ads

7 Family Rummage Sale

(3 Clouds, Kirk, Marks, Fuentes and Wilson)- April 2, 2015 at Community Center starting at 9:00 am to 5:00 pm. Kids and adult clothing. Living room furniture, 5 piece dinette set, odds and ends Jingle dresses Breakfast Burritos and Fried Chicken Dinner Sales Cash only, please.

In case of Wake or Funeral, the sale will be moved to Old Agency District.

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Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

Job Openings

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate is seeking to fill the following positions(s):

Custodian, Administration Building

Receptionist, Head Start

Director, Head Start

Maintenance I (Must have driver's license), Facilities/Maintenance

Closing Date: April 03rd, 2015 @ 04:30PM

CAA 103 Coordinator, Office of Environmental Protection

Water Quality Technician (seasonal), Office of Environmental Protection

Gaming Commissioner, Gaming Commission

Closing Date: April 10th, 2015 @ 04:30PM

Closing Date: March 27th, 2015 @ 04:30 PM

All interested applicants may obtain application and job description information at the Human Resource Department, of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate or contact Arnold Williams at (605) 698-8238 or Denise Hill at (605) 698-8362. (Tribal preference will apply.)

 

JOB OPENING

The Farm Service Agency has a temporary Program Technician vacancy in the Roberts County Office located in Sisseton, SD. Opening date is April 2, 2015 and the closing date is April 6, 2015. A copy of the vacancy announcement and application packet can be obtained by contacting Sharon Rolstad, CED at 605-698-7639. FSA is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer.

 

Dakota Nation Development Corporation

CEO/Project Manager

Summary:

Working with the Dakota Nation Development Corporation Board of Directors, will provide leadership and oversee tribal non-gaming for-profit business operations to insure production efficiency, quality, services, and cost effective management of resources.

Position Requirements:

Master's Degree in Business Administration or Project Management or Management related with 3 years of successful work experience as manager or a position of equal level of responsibility.

3 years direct work experience in project management/senior management capacity, including all aspects of process development and execution.

Demonstrated experience in personnel management and effective executive level leadership.

Technically competent with various software programs for presentation and analysis.

Knowledge of economic and accounting practice and financial reporting.

Knowledge of and experience with all aspects of 8(a) certification and contracting.

Please contact Dakota Nation Development Corporation for complete a Job Description. 1-605-698-3200 or dndc2@venturecomm.net

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Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

ADMINISTRATION: ASSOCIATE MANAGER (1 PART-TIME). GENERAL FUNCTION: The purpose of this position is to maintain interdepartmental communications to ensure the smooth operation of the property and promote the highest degree of customer satisfaction. REQUIREMENTS: High school diploma or G.E.D. equivalency. Minimum of three years experience in gaming, preferably supervisory experience. Able and willing to work any and all shifts. Thorough knowledge of casino    operations, policies and procedures. Excellent communication skills, both written and oral. Able to handle diverse situations. Able to stand/walk for long periods of         time. Must obtain a Key Gaming License.

This position will close on April 1st, 2015 at 4 pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

HOTEL: FRONT DESK CLERK/NIGHT AUDITOR (1 FULL- TIME) GRAVEYARD GENERAL FUNCTION: Staffs the Front Desk to attend to the needs of the guests throughout their stay. REQUIREMENTS: High School Diploma or GED. Preferred hotel and or accounting experience or equivalent of Three to six months related experience and/or train. Excellent interpersonal skills, both in person and on the telephone. Must meet the requirement of a non-gaming license upon hire.

Opening Date: March 26, 2015

Closing Date: April 1, 2015 at 4:00 PM.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

HOTEL: HOUSEKEEPERS (2 Full-Time) GENERAL FUNCTION: Cleans rooms, halls, restrooms, elevators and stairways according to standards. REQUIREMENTS: 1-3 months related experience. Able to occasionally lift(s) or move(s) up to 25 lbs. Must also meet the Non-Gaming License requirements.

Opening Date: March 26, 2015.

Closing Date: April 1, 2015 at 4:00 pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

Position: Surveillance Manager. Qualifications: High School Diploma or GED. Formal training in law enforcement is preferred, 2 years supervisory experience in Surveillance, 3 years work experience and/or training in security, law enforcement, loss prevention, and/or other related fields. Experience in and documenting the results for criminal proceedings. Ability to maintain strict confidentiality. Mechanical ability and computer experience is required. Knowledge of CCTV, security systems, gaming cheating, concept of operations. Knowledge of Indian gaming. Must be at least 21 years old. Must obtain a Key Gaming License. Hours: Full-time

Opening Date: Thursday, March 26, 2015.

Closing Date: Wednesday, April 8, 2015 @ 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

Store C-Department:

Clerk/Cashier (3) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, includes weekends & holidays. Excellent customer service skills; math skills essential; ability to operate necessary equipment; physical ability to lift moderate amounts of weight; previous experience working with money preferred; strong organizational skills managing various functions; dependable & available to work any & all shifts. Must be at least 21 years old & have a High School diploma or GED.

Security Department:

Officer (2) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, weekends & holidays. Mobility throughout the facility 45% percent of time; will be stooping, bending, walking for long periods of time, able to lift up to 40 pounds, computer skills required for report writing. Will be exposed to noise and tobacco smoke. Appropriate dress code. Must be at least 21 years old & have a High School Diploma or G.E.D. Must be able to obtain a Key License.

Accounting/Cage Department:

Count Team Member (3) part-time will be required to work all shifts as needed, weekends & holidays. Will be responsible for collecting slot drop and bill validators drop, counts, and verifies all boxes. Transports bill validators to the vault. Prepares appropriate paperwork and makes necessary computer entries. Must be physical fit, previous experience working with money preferred; dependable & available to work any & all shifts. Must be at least 21 years old & have a High school diploma or GED. Must be able to obtain a Key Gaming License.

Opening date: Thursday, March 26, 2015

Closing date: Wednesday, April 1, 2015 @ 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.