sota on-line masthead

Picture Picks of the Week

Don't miss out -- Click here
View the best pictures from this week's Sota
In full color!

  Obituaries Editorials Editor's column Education
Legals
Trading post
 

Volume 46 Issue No. 15

Anpetu Iyamni, April 15, 2015

Inside this Edition –

Community youth advocates attend White House session, meetings with IHS, DOJ last week; First-ever youth advocates to meet with Special Assistant to the President on Domestic Affairs

Report to Akicita by Tribal VSO Geri Opsal

Notes from the SWO Research Office

Photo highlights of TERO Jobs Fair held last week at Dakota Connection

Job Fair this Thursday, April 9th at Dakota Connection

Mental health: Feature by Gypsy Wanna, SWO Wellness Coordinator

Deadline for receipt of copy is Friday noon

SWO Youth advocate attends White House meeting; questions top IHS officials

Dustina Gill, project manager of the juvenile justice reform diversion program, the Young Ambassadors Program, met with top Indian Health Service (IHS) officials while in Washington, DC this past week.

Her number one concern the fact that mental health services are not being funded properly resulting in lack of proper services.

Every report being generated out of Indian Country shows the high rate of suicide and depression as a result of traumatic experiences.

“Yet, we aren’t funding or building those resources to meet those needs,” she says.

Dustina said, “We need to move from conversations to concrete solutions.”

She also had the opportunity, along with Sara McGregor-Okroi of Aliive-Roberts County to meet with White House officials regarding juvenile justice reform where she shared the same concerns.

Juvenile justice reform and mental health go hand in hand. You cannot expect to solve one without including the other.

“What we have is a lack of services to teach coping skills in any and every way shape or form across Indian country. It's not an isolated youth issue, it's a family issue, it's a community issue,” she shared.

It is too massive a job for tribes to tackle with the very limited resources they have, and yet it seems too small to be noticed by the proper federal agencies.

Report after report states the same across Indian Country, Native youth are killing themselves at a rate that no other race or demographic area can come close to . . . “and that breaks my heart,” she said.

“I know many people who have committed suicide and the families and lives affected by it and have spent many sleepless nights trying to find a way because there is always a way.”

“What are we doing as leaders, as a people to help with this issue? We need to turn these reports and conversations into action. NOW.”

Besides the White House and IHS meetings, Dustina met with officials of the Department of Justice Juvenile Justice/Detention and National Juvenile Network.

There she explored funding options for diversion programs.

Dustina also called their attention to the recently passed South Dakota Juvenile Justice Bill that excludes tribes from participating in funding opportunities afforded to the counties.

Aliive-Roberts County report

Submitted by Sara McGregor-Okroi

Representatives from Aliive-Roberts County were invited to a meeting with the White House on April 2nd to share community initiatives that have been implemented to address youth issues in Roberts County and the Lake Traverse Reservation.

Sara McGregor-Okroi and Dustina Gill met with the Special Assistant to the President on Domestic Affairs. They were informed at the meeting that they were the FIRST community based youth advocates to have met with this department.

We shared the disparities many youth face and the successes and challenges that have happened in the implementation of the different strategies Aliive has worked to put into action in the communities we serve.

As well as discussing the community-based strategies Aliive currently works with, a portion of this meeting was to introduce an innovative new concept of diversion through the Young Ambassadors Program. The program is a unique approach designed to prevent opportunity youth from being incarcerated. South Dakota has the highest incarceration rate five times over in the nation, causing the Governor to introduce the Juvenile Justice Bill 73 that was recently passed by the state legislature.

The trip also consisted of meeting with the National Juvenile Justice Network, Center for Native American Youth and the Office of Juvenile Justice Delinquency Program.

We were also invited back to attend the White House "Creating Opportunities for Native Youth" Convening, which was co-hosted by Center for Native American Youth to discuss the need to invest in Native Youth.

Aspen Institute co-hosts White House Convening with philanthropies on Native American Youth

First Lady and members of the President’s Cabinet discussed the importance of investing in the lives of Native youth and further introduced the Generation Indigenous initiative

Washington, DC, April 9, 2015 –– On April 8, the Center for Native American Youth (CNAY) at the Aspen Institute and the White House co-hosted a convening of philanthropies, nonprofits, and thought leaders. The convening included remarks from the First Lady Michelle Obama and small group discussions among high level government officials including four members of the President’s Cabinet. The goal of the event was to discuss Generation Indigenous (Gen-I), a national initiative launched by President Obama in December focused on removing the barriers that stand between Native youth, and make the case for increased investments in the lives of the most vulnerable population in this country.

“The lives of Native American youth are largely invisible to most American citizens,” remarked Walter Isaacson, Aspen Institute president and CEO. “The purpose of this convening is to raise their level of awareness by bringing together influential thought leaders, White House and Administration officials, and philanthropists to find ways to invest in the needs of this all but forgotten population.”

During her remarks, First Lady Michelle Obama, highlighted the Generation Indigenous initiative and the need for national partners to get engaged. “We all need to work together to invest deeply – and for the long-term – in these young people,” remarked the First Lady. “These kids have so much promise – and we need to ensure that they have every tool, every opportunity they need to fulfill that promise.”

The First Lady’s full remarks can be found here: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2015/04/08/prepared-remarks-first-lady-michelle-obama-white-house-convening-creatin

From the President’s Cabinet, US Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell, US Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, US Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack, and US Small Business Administrator Maria Contreras-Sweet spoke in smaller group discussions with the philanthropies, nonprofits, and partner organizations about public and private sector investments. The discussions focused on priority needs of Native youth including education, health, social services, juvenile justice, housing, and economic development.

“The fact is Native children do not have the equitable access to resources and opportunity,” said former Senator Byron Dorgan, founder and chairman of CNAY. “I believe we have for too long left Native American children behind and I am proud of the work the Center for Native American Youth is doing with the First Lady and the White House to change and improve lives.”

Dr. William C. Bell, president and CEO of Casey Family Programs, a national foundation based in Seattle, Washington, that works to decrease the need for foster care and ensure that supportive communities nurture the safety, success and hope of every child, emphasized the importance of the convening and Gen-I. "The fact is that the programs that serve Native youth are some of the most under-resourced and we must work together - public and private sectors - to ensure that Native American children have equal opportunities to succeed."

As a part of Gen-I, CNAY has partnered with the White House and Department of the Interior, to launch a National Native Youth Network to expand resources and connections for Native youth and the programs that serve them. Casey Family Programs helped support CNAY's role in the April 8 convening at the White House. In addition, the Bush Foundation contributed $100,000 and Nike, Inc. has made a two-year commitment through the N7 program that includes $200,000 in funding to support youth sports and physical activity in tribal communities. Additional support has come from Novo Nordisk Inc., Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and AMERIND Risk Management Corporation.

As a part of CNAY’s commitment to Gen-I, several youth were included in the event. Rory Wheeler, a 16 year-old from the Seneca Nation of Indians who attended, commented, “it is inspiring to have the First Lady committed to making a difference for us Native youth,” said Wheeler. “Together, we’re working to promote hope in Indian Country.”

To learn more about Gen-I, visit www.genindigenous.com.

Center for Native American Youth is dedicated to improving the health, safety and overall well-being of Native American youth through communication, policy development and advocacy. Founded by former US Senator Byron Dorgan in February 2011, CNAY is a policy program within the Aspen Institute, headquartered in Washington, DC. CNAY works to strengthen and create new connections as well as exchange resources and best practices that address the challenges facing Native youth, with a special emphasis on suicide prevention. Visit CNAY’s website for a comprehensive list of resources available to young Native Americans, tribes and the general public. For more information, visit www.cnay.org

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, DC. Its mission is to foster leadership based on enduring values and to provide a nonpartisan venue for dealing with critical issues. The Institute is based in Washington, DC; Aspen, Colorado; and on the Wye River on Maryland's Eastern Shore. It also has offices in New York City and an international network of partners. For more information, visit www.aspeninstitute.org.

Remarks of First Lady Michelle Obama

Generation-Indigenous Convening

As Prepared for Delivery

Good morning everyone, and welcome to the White House. We are so thrilled to have you here today for our Generation Indigenous convening.

I want to start by thanking Walter Isaacson and Senator Dorgan for their outstanding leadership and for the terrific work that they’re doing at the Aspen Institute.

And as for T.C – there really are no words to express how proud I am of this young man and how impressed I am by his courage, determination and maturity. Barack and I were blown away by T.C. and by the other young people we met when we visited T.C.’s tribe, the Standing Rock Sioux Nation, last June. And I want to start off today by telling you a little bit about that visit.

It began when we arrived in North Dakota, and as we left the airport where we’d landed, we looked around, and all we could see was flat, empty land. There were almost no signs of typical community life, no police stations, no community or business centers, no malls, no doctor’s offices, no churches, just flat, empty land.

Eventually, we pulled up to a little community with a cluster of houses, a few buildings, and a tiny school – and that was the town of Cannon Ball, North Dakota, which is part of the Standing Rock Sioux Nation. And at that school, a small group of young people gathered in a classroom, anxiously but quietly waiting to meet with the President and the First Lady.

These teens were the best and brightest – hand-selected for this meeting – and after we all introduced ourselves, they shared their stories.

One young woman was in foster care because of substance abuse in her household. She talked about how hard it was to be separated from her five siblings. One young man had spent his high school years homeless, crashing on the sofa of his friends, even for a period living in the local community center. Another young man had gotten himself into college, but when he got there, he had trouble choosing the right classes; he realized that he’d never been taught how to properly write an essay; and when family problems arose back home, he struggled to balance all the stress and eventually had to drop out.

And just about every kid in that room had lost at least one friend or family member to drug or alcohol-related problems, or to preventable illnesses like heart disease, or to suicide. In fact, two of the girls went back and forth for several minutes trying to remember how many students in their freshman class had committed suicide – the number was either four or five…this is out of a class of 70.

Just sit with that for a minute: four or five kids out of a class of 70 taking their own lives.

So these are the challenges these kids are facing. This is the landscape of their lives.

But somehow – and this is what truly blew us away – somehow, in the face of all this hardship and all these tragedies, these kids haven’t given up. They are still fighting to find a way forward, for themselves and for their community.

After losing her classmates to suicide, one young woman started volunteering at a youth program to help other kids who were struggling. One young man told us that when his family was struggling, he fended for himself for years, sleeping on friends’ couches until he was old enough to become a firefighter.

And that young man who had to leave college? Well, when he got back home, he discovered that his family problems were worse than he had thought. He found that his stepmother was on drugs and his four younger brothers were wandering the streets alone in the middle of the night. So at the age of 19, he stepped in and took over – and now, he’s back in college while raising four children all by himself.

And then there’s T.C.

He was the last young person to speak that day, and after telling us his story – how he was raised by a single father, how he’s lost so many people he loves, how his family struggles to get by – he then said to my husband “I know you face a lot as President of the United States, and I want to sing an encouragement song for all of us to keep going.”

After everything these young people had endured, T.C. wanted to sing a song for us.

So if you have any doubt about the urgency or the value of investing in this community, I want you to just think about T.C. and all those other young people I met in Standing Rock. I want you to think about both the magnitude of their struggles and the deep reservoirs of strength and resilience that they draw on every day to face those struggles.

And most of all, I want you to remember that supporting these young people isn’t just a nice thing to do, and it isn’t just a smart investment in their future, it is a solemn obligation that we as a nation have incurred.

You see, we need to be very clear about where the challenges in this community first started. Folks in Indian Country didn’t just wake up one day with addiction problems. Poverty and violence didn’t just randomly happen to this community. These issues are the result of a long history of systematic discrimination and abuse.

Let me offer just a few examples from our past, starting with how, back in 1830, we passed a law removing Native Americans from their homes and forcibly re-locating them to barren lands out west. The Trail of Tears was part of this process. Then we began separating children from their families and sending them to boarding schools designed to strip them of all traces of their culture, language and history. And then our government started issuing what were known as “Civilization Regulations” – regulations that outlawed Indian religions, ceremonies and practices – so we literally made their culture illegal.

And these are just a few examples. I could continue on like this for hours.

So given this history, we shouldn’t be surprised at the challenges that kids in Indian Country are facing today. And we should never forget that we played a role in this. Make no mistake about it – we own this.

And we can’t just invest a million here and a million there, or come up with some five year or ten-year plan and think we’re going to make a real impact. This is truly about nation-building, and it will require fresh thinking and a massive infusion of resources over generations. That’s right, not just years, but generations.

But remember, we are talking about a small group of young people, so while the investment needs to be deep, this challenge is not overwhelming, especially given everything we have to work with. I mean, given what these folks have endured, the fact that their culture has survived at all is nothing short of a miracle.

And like many of you, I have witnessed the power of that culture. I saw it at the Pow Wow that my husband and I attended during our visit to Standing Rock. And with each stomping foot – with each song, each dance – I could feel the heartbeat that is still pounding away in Indian Country. And I could feel it in the energy and ambition of those young people who are so hungry for any chance to learn, any chance to broaden their horizons.

Even the smallest opportunity can make such a huge difference for these kids. I saw that firsthand when Barack and I invited the kids we met in Standing Rock to come visit us at the White House.

They arrived one morning last November, and we showed them around, and took them out for pizza and burgers, and spent some time talking and laughing and hanging out. Altogether, their visit to the White House was just one day long, but as we hugged each of those kids goodbye, one young woman said to Barack, “This visit saved my life.”

And given the odds these kids face, I don’t think she was exaggerating. So if we take a chance on these young people, I guarantee you that we will save lives. I guarantee it.

So we all need to work together to invest deeply – and for the long-term – in these young people, both those who are living in their tribal communities like T.C. and those living in urban areas across this country. These kids have so much promise – and we need to ensure that they have every tool, every opportunity they need to fulfill that promise.

So I want to thank you for your commitment to their futures and for everything you have already done for their communities. I want to thank you for coming here today to learn more about Generation Indigenous and how you can help. And I look forward to seeing the extraordinary impact that you all will have in the years ahead.

Thank you so much, and God bless.

Tribes discuss prosecution of non-Indians on Tribal lands

Pilot projects spring up on several reservations

By Ernestine Chasing Hawk

Native Sun News Editor

Rapid City – It was announced in March that all tribes are now eligible to investigate and prosecute not only Indians but also non-Indians who commit crimes of domestic violence, dating violence, or violate a protection order against a Native victim on tribal lands.

Last week representatives from the U.S. Attorney’s Offices of both North and South Dakota and Nebraska met with tribal officials to discuss how to implement the federal guidelines which will enable them to utilize the new provisions of the Violence Against Woman Act.

Also present to discuss the new provisions were BIA Assistant Secretary Kevin Washburn and U.S. Assistant Attorney General Sam Hirsch.

Last month, former S.D. U.S. Attorney Brendon Johnson before leaving his post said he would like to see all South Dakota Tribes implement the Violence Against Women Act and the new provisions allowing for prosecution of Indians as well as non-Indians.

Of the 562 federally recognized tribes in the U.S., five are currently taking advantage of the new provisions.

Three tribes were granted federal approval to initiate pilot projects in 2014—the Pascua Yaqui Tribe of Arizona, the Tulalip Tribes of Washington, and the Umatilla Tribes of Oregon. To date the Tribes have charged a total of 26 Special Domestic Violence Criminal Jurisdiction cases.

Since then two additional tribes—the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation in South Dakota and the Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation in Montana have received pilot-project approval.

Presenters at the conference hosted by the University of South Dakota School of Law and the Department of Justice at the Rushmore Holiday Inn in Rapid City included members of those five tribes.

Shawn Eastman Tribal Attorney for the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate shared the process which enabled the SWO to take advantage of the new provisions.

“It is really new for us,” Eastman said and that SWO was able to take advantage of a grant from the National Congress of American Indians to assist with implementation of the Act.

Alfred Urbina Attorney General for the Pascua Yaqui Tribe in Arizona, who participated in the initial pilot project, was on site to give an overview on the successes and challenges they encountered with enactment of the new guidelines.

One of significant challenges they encountered he said was when the Supreme Court decided the U.S. v Castleman case. The Supreme Court defined domestic violence as “offensive touching” which does not include other crimes that are nonetheless violent and dangerous he said.

“These crimes can include trespassing, threatening and intimidation, tampering with communications, burglary, breaking and entering, stalking, disorderly conduct, unlawful imprisonment, harassment, endangerment, custodial interference and malicious mischief,” Urbina said. “This issue needs to be on the radar and needs to be addressed.”

VAWA 2013 also includes provisions to ensure that defendants have the opportunity for a full and fair trial. In order for a tribe to exercise its authority, it must extend due-process rights, such as providing access to an attorney to the defendant.

He said when his tribe first began to select juries; they used a bingo drum to select jurors. They have significantly improved their jury selection process since then he laughed.

Ann Mousseau, Domestic Violence Instructor for the Oglala Sioux Tribe Department of Public Safety said she does not see the Oglala Sioux Tribe implementing the new guidelines right away because of funding issues. However she agreed that the majority of domestic violence offenses on the Pine Ridge Indian reservation were by tribal members.

Carmen O’Leary Director of Native Women’s Society of the Great Plains said the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe is currently updating their Law and Order Code and working toward implementation of the new provisions of VAWA.

The push to give Indian tribes a more active role in prosecution of Indians and non-Indians on reservations came as a result of an Amnesty International report that revealed the maze of jurisdictional issues left loopholes in the system allowing many offenders to go free.

The report published in 2007 concluded that “More than one in three Native American or Alaska Native women will be raped at some point in their lives.”

“Most do not seek justice because they know they will be met with inaction or indifference. As one support worker said, ‘Women don’t report because it doesn’t make a difference. Why report when you are just going to be re-victimized?’”

The report called sexual violence against Indigenous women “a human rights abuse” and unraveled some of the reasons why, “Chronic under-resourcing of law enforcement and health services, confusion over jurisdiction, erosion of tribal authority, discrimination in law and practice, and indifference.”

Cecilia Muñoz, Assistant to the President and Director of the Domestic Policy Council and Tina Tchen, Assistant to the President and Executive Director of the White House Council on Women and Girls said in a press release: “This Administration has witnessed a new dawn for restorative justice and a stronger nation-to-nation relationship to protect our tribal nations, and the implementation of these critical provisions represents a victory for Indian Country.”

The National Congress of American Indians and the Tribal Law & Policy Institute have developed a Legal Code Resource for implementation of the new provisions at www.TLPI.org.

Notes from the SWO Research Office

By Dawn Eagle

Why is research important, you ask?

Many know the history of historical research and the devastation inflicted on the First Nations People. Natives have been researched to death, literally. One shining black eye on our federal government is the Smithsonian Institute. To this day, thousands of bones and skulls of North American Native peoples lie unclaimed in the Smithsonian Institute. Basic dignity for our people was virtually non-existent. The systematic degradation and inhumane practices was inflicted on First Nations Peoples' skulls, bodies and cultural artifacts all in the name of Science. In the early beginnings of science, questions loomed as to why First Nations Peoples' skulls were bigger and how our bodies ticked, so to speak. Systematic genocide was the name of the game.

In order for our people to rise in the face of such massive historical devastation, we have to assert our power as a Nation. We have to collect our own data and assert our culturally authoritative ability and identify this means as an invaluable strategic resource.

This has huge implications in that we can now be more responsive rather than reactive. Many of our programs collect information for their respective programs for primarily governmental funding agencies. We have a wealth of information gathered in the form of qualitative data. The challenge will be to put our data into a "quantitative" story about our people, our communities, our health, education and welfare. This means quantifying into a numeric format that these agencies understand.

This gives us immense power because we would have the ability to tell our own story from our eyes, our mind, our words, and our hearts. This is data sovereignty! Seems farfetched? Hardly, and let me tell you why. We, as a tribe, can assure for ourselves that research and publication activities ae culturally appropriate clinically, technically, epidemiologically, and statistically. We, as a tribe, can negotiate and require additional or revised procedures, methodologies, and approaches to research and the publications that research put out in mainstream society. We, as a tribe, can call the shots, so to speak.

The primary focus for the SWO Research Office is designing, developing, implementing and safeguarding data infrastructure. This means, as a community, we have to be proactive, and:

1.  Take action to enact a sound Research code.

2.  Develop a Local Research Review Board with rigorous policies and procedures to help guide research activities and provide research activities oversight which ensures basic human dignities of every tribal member within our exterior boundaries.

3. Advance mechanisms that guide research activities whereby maximizing benefits and reducing risks.

Today, funding opportunities are shrinking and becoming highly competitive. Therefore, it is critical for our tribe to utilize strategic electronic data management because then we become the gatekeepers of our own information. Then, we can tell of our own stories by our own people through qualitative and quantitative information in a systematic manner which could guarantee that no one else will manipulate and use our information without our knowledge. By asserting data sovereignty, we can be proactive and responsive by helping to build a promising future for the next seven generations so on that our people may live.

Annual Jobs Fair held at Dakota Connection

TERO hosted its annual Jobs Fair at Dakota Connection last Thursday, April 9th. This is an opportunity for Oyate to come and learn about job and educational advancement opportunities. There were representatives from the casinos, private industry, schools and the SD Department of Labor.

Turnout was light.

Tom Wilson of Tribal radio station KXSW-FM was present throughout the event, broadcasting live and announcing raffle prize winners.

Dakota Connection catered a buffet community meal, featuring soups and build-your-own sub sandwiches.

Here are some photo highlights.

Tribal elder being evicted from home of 37-years

By CD Floro

Sota Editor

This is not an easy commentary for me. I’ve known Clyde “Joe” Williams Sr. for many years and always appreciate his traditional prayers and wisdom. We have shared on these pages often from his knowledge of Dakota history and culture.

He is a gardener, and as long as he’s lived along Lake Traverse every year until now he has tilled the ground and planted.

An archeologist friend once shared with him some 500-year-old squash seeds found at an unearthed site. Joe planted them and successfully harvested squash grown by ancestors living in what is now North Dakota.

He has continued to raise and share them with neighbors, and with other elders at the SWO Tribal Elderly Nutrition Center.

Joe has shared much of his other produce, and has helped neighbors with their gardens.

And he has often been asked to offer traditional prayers in Dakota-ia for ceremonies and public events.

We recall his days on the former SWST Cultural Preservation Committee. He provided meaningful input and insight into cultural preservation issues and groundwork for a tribal media operation.

At first, with assistance from the Campaign for Human Development (and the late Fr. Stan Maudlin, OSB), it was to have been a low power television station. But later it was changed and became the first tribal radio station – forerunner of KXSW-FM.

We have followed Joe’s travels around the country to learn, and share about Indigenous cultures and spirituality.

In recent years, he has turned his attention to the cultural lessons to be learned from the Jeffers Petroglyphs in Minnesota.

We have featured the clear “cradle” symbols and his call for the Oyate to return to their matriarchal roots – placing value upon the sacredness of women, of the mothers.

A movement was begun two years ago, with promised meetings to explore this spiritual journey.

But it has not moved onward.

And we have published no updates.

Sad to see positive momentum brought down by negativity.

Which brings us to the present.

While those of us who live here on the Lake Traverse Reservation may have known, or at least had some notion of a family feud going on along Lake Traverse, few of our readers will have had a clue.

Well, until last week.

One of Joe’s relatives submitted an open letter to the Oyate, publishing it under his Indian name. I asked if people would know him by that name – Akicita Ap'e Wakiyan, Lightning Strikes Soldier. He said they would.

But they don’t.

And we cannot publish an open letter anonymously.

So readers, that letter came from Ken Siyaka and represents the family’s perspective of Joe’s court case and eviction.

What is important is that we all help bring about healing. Escalating emotions, challenges and counter-challenges are only hindering the Oyate’s ability to work together toward overcoming the external and internal oppression.

And this family feud seems clearly an example of internalized oppression.

We appeal to both sides to lower the level of conflict.

Had this already been accomplished, we are certain a standoff could have been avoided.

We have heard both “sides” demonized by the other.

We also are a friend to Joe’s niece Jamie Crawford German, who is apparent legal owner of the homesite property that never was conveyed from the late Sam Max to Joe.

She is acting on her belief that Joe and his family have been squatters and have not had legal authority to continue living on the 2.25 acre site along Lake Traverse.

And the Bureau of Indian Affairs agrees with her.

Court documents show that while Joe fulfilled his obligation with the Sisseton-Wahpeton Housing Authority in construction of his mutual self-help home, the lease agreement for the property was never extended as required by law.

The BIA findings for Tribal Court show that both the SWHA and Joe Williams failed opportunities afforded years ago to assert, if not ownership, the right to maintain his homesite and access.

Last year the SWO Tribal Court decided against Jamie and the BIA and in favor of Joe, allowing him to remain in his home.

Then the BIA ruled that the SWO Tribe and Tribal Court do not have jurisdiction over property ownership on the Reservation.

Tribal Council passed two resolutions affirming the Tribal Court’s decision, as a point of sovereignty. The first was passed by Council under the administration of former Chairman Shepherd. Then a second resolution was passed this year by the current Council.

Last week Jamie argued before Tribal Council that its resolution was unfairly supporting Joe, and Council rescinded the resolution.

Date of eviction was set for last Thursday, April 9, 2015. And the 80-year-old Joe Williams packed his most valuable possessions into his car in the event he would be forced out of his home.

But he remains there, as a legal appeal and other, related lawsuits remain under consideration.

No law enforcement officers, so far, have come to remove him.

Asked last Thursday where he plans to live, Joe replied he doesn’t know.

But he smiled and said he is staying healthy and working in his son’s auto garage in Sisseton to keep busy.

Finally, we respectfully ask everyone to do what you can to lower the level of conflict. No one needs to be vilified, not Joe and his family, nor Jamie and her family.

All are relatives.

"From the desk of Geri Opsal, Tribal Veteran Service Officer"

GeriO@SWO-NSN.gov

Phone 605-698-3388

"The words we use, the words we choose, live on. Words are things. Words have power - to communicate love, to awaken, to motivate, to inspire the inner Champion. I choose thoughtfully, mindfully, the words I use. For words live on, long after they have been spoken." - Maya Angelou

*This next week (April 15) is PURPLE UP day in support of our military children. Let's all make sure we don the purple and show them that they have our support and that we under-stand the price they and their family are paying to ensure our freedom!!! April marks the nation's "Month of the Military Child," a time to honor military youth in our com-munities who have been impacted by deployments and the challenges military families face before, during and after deployments. In tribute to the 7,500 military children in the state, South Dakota's Operation: Military Kids (OMK) Program, part of the 4H Youth Development program of SDSU Cooperative Extension, is inviting everyone to join in and be part of the "Purple Up! For Military Kids Day," being held Wednesday, April 15. Purple is the color that symbolizes all branches of the military, a combination of Army green, Coast Guard blue, Air Force blue, Marine red and Navy blue.

*Tuesday, April 14, to Wednesday, April 15 - The South Dakota Department of Labor and Regulation will host Job Search Assistance Programs (JSAP). JSAP is a workshop for people recovering from job loss or enhancing their job search skills. Trained instructors speak on modern-day techniques used to successfully find employment. Topics covered are: resume and cover letter writing, interviewing etiquette, networking effectively, using social media and much more. JSAP will be offered at the following locations: Wednesday, April 15, 9:30 a.m. - 3 p.m. CDT, Sisseton - at 10 E. Hickory St. For more information, call 605-698-3964 or visit www.sdjobs.org.

*We had a great turnout for the UVA meeting. Planning underway for a Bataan March - to be held on Friday, July 3, 2015. We will be having a planning committee meeting on Wednesday May 6th, 2015 @ 6PM at the UVA office if anyone is interested in getting on the committee please call me at 698-3388. We are doing this in honor of our 2 Bataan Death March Veterans Winfield Thompson, Sr. and Louis Williams. And if people want to walk/run/march in honor of others that's fine. We want to honor ours who sacrificed and endured so much for our FREEDOMS. Remember Freedom isn't (hasn't - won't ever be) FREE.

*Honoring for Oliver Wanna: is scheduled for Friday, May 8th, 2015 at the Tribal Rotunda at 1:00P M. We will be displaying his Bronze star that was awarded that his nephew Doc Wanna holds for safekeeping. PFC. Oliver J. Wanna, US Army WWII served in the 137th Infantry regiment and received a BRONZE star that was sent to him in March 1984. He received this for meritorious achievement in ground combat against the armed enemy during WWII in the European-African-Middle Eastern Theater of Operations. Please join us in honoring Oliver's family and viewing his Bronze star medal. Contact me at the office 698-3388 if you have any questions.

*REMEMBER: We are here to serve you our fellow Veteran, widows, dependents. Call us at 698-3388 or cell 268-0502.

*I will be on travel this week Monday through Friday. Our office will be staffed by Delano Renville, per UVA motion and he will be in the office Monday-Tuesday-Wednesday and Friday. I will be back in the office on Monday, April 20th. 2015. I can be contacted via cell 268-0502 by text if you have any questions. I will miss all of you that stop in and you all know this but I will be back.

*REMEMBER: We are here to serve you our fellow Veteran, widows, dependents. Call us at 698-3388 or cell 268-0502.

*American Legion Post #314- Delano Renville, Commander Cell:# 268-0354 / Vietnam Veterans Kit Fox Society - Dayton Seaboy, Commander Phone:# 698-3901 ask for Doc / Desert Era Veterans - Danielle DeCoteau, Commander Cell#: 268-1765. For GAS ASSISTANCE: Geri Opsal 698-3388

Have a good week.

Geri Opsal, Tribal VSO.

We must look for the opportunity in every difficulty instead of being paralyzed at the thought of the difficulty in every opportunity." -Walter E. Cole, Korean War Veteran.

SD Legislative Wrap-up

By Rep. Steven McCleerey

District 1

As South Dakota's 90th Legislative Session comes to a close, discussion about the new laws has begun. When reviewing the bill passed, there were three bills the governor did not like and vetoed. These bills included SB 100, SB 159, and SB 136. Senate Bill 100 created a leased residential property classification. Senate Bill 159 exempted certain amateur sports coaches from sales and use tax. The Senate did not override either of these vetoes. Senate Bill 136 excluded certain municipal taxes from the gross receipts used to determine the tax liability for customers served by electric cooperatives and electric utilities. Customers recently started getting taxed on top of a tax because the current law was being interpreted a different way. The Senate and the House were both able to get a 2/3rds vote to override the governor's veto.

Representative Feickert, Senator Frerichs, and I met in Roslyn last week for their annual township association meeting and we also met in Aberdeen with the Brown County Democrats. The roads and bridges bill and health care were two main topics in Roslyn. Water management, roads and bridges, the 80 mph interstate speed limit increase, and the youth minimum wage were talked about with the Brown County Democrats. Senator Frerichs and I also met with the municipalities in New Effington for their annual meeting.

A recurring topic was SB 1, the roads and bridges bill. Something needed to be done to fix our roads, but I am disappointed that this was the best bill to fix the problem. The most disappointing parts are the 80 mph speed limit increase on interstate highways and the tiered property tax portion of the bill. Hopefully next year we can go back and fix the tiered property tax issue. I have heard numerous complaints about the speed limit increase, including from state employees. The money spent on the implementation of increasing the speed limits could have had better uses elsewhere. The state's limited resources should not be used to fund ideas that are not properly vetted. With the funding of the roads and bridges issue taken care of, hopefully next year we can focus on education and Medicaid expansion.

One surprise that the end of the session brought was the resignation of the Senate Majority Leader Tim Rave and the Assistant Senate Majority Leader Dan Lederman. Rave resigned to accept a position with Sanford Health as enterprise vice president for public policy. Lederman announced he was retiring to spend more time with his family. These two individuals always treat me with respect and were great to work with.

Another surprise happened when the Speaker of the House Dean Wink called me last Thursday and asked me to be on the water shed task force created by SB 2. Senate Bill 2 provides for the establishment of river basin natural resource districts. I am very appreciative to be chosen as one of the eight members of the legislature to be on this task force. This will be a promising experience.

The Secretary of Health, Kim Malsam-Rysdon, visited my area to take a tour our hospital in Sisseton on Thursday. I was glad she could come see all our great facility has to offer. The CEO of our hospital, Michael Coyle, was recently appointed to the EMS task force.

I would like to thank all the votes that have allowed me to represent them in District 1. Thank you for electing me and for all of your support. Serving you has been a privilege.

Rep. Steven McCleerey.

Editorials –

Sota guest editorial –

Oceans facing Carbon rates which spurred Mass Die-off 250 million years ago

University of Edinburgh researchers warn that the carbon emissions that drove a mass extinction event some 252 million years ago were released at a rate similar to today

By Sarah Lazare, staff writer

(Published on Friday, April 10, 2015 by Common Dreams.)

In case you weren't already worried about the current and rapid acidification of the world's oceans, a new report by leading scientists finds that this very phenomenon is to blame for the worst mass extinction event the planet earth has ever seen—approximately 252 million years ago.

The findings, published this week in the journal Science by University of Edinburgh researchers, raise serious concerns about the implications of present-day acidification, driven by human-made climate change.

"Scientists have long suspected that an ocean acidification event occurred during the greatest mass extinction of all time, but direct evidence has been lacking until now," said lead author Dr. Matthew Clarkson in a statement. "This is a worrying finding, considering that we can already see an increase in ocean acidity today that is the result of human carbon emissions."

The paper looks at the culprit behind the Permo-Triassic Boundary mass extinction, which wiped out more than 90 percent of marine species and two-thirds of land animals, making it even more severe than the die-off of the dinosaurs.

The scientists evaluated rocks in the United Arab Emirates that, 250 million years ago, were on the bottom of the ocean. Researchers then employed a climate model to determine what drove the extinction.

A summary of the researchers' findings explains the mass die-off "happened when Earth’s oceans absorbed huge amounts of carbon dioxide from volcanic eruptions. This changed the chemical composition of the oceans—making them more acidic—with catastrophic consequences for life on Earth."

The kicker? The carbon that drove this process during the Permian-Triassic Boundary extinction was "released at a rate similar to modern emissions," the report summary concludes. "This fast rate of release was a critical factor driving ocean acidification."

Over the past 200 years alone, international oceans have become dramatically more acidic, putting coral reefs and sea life at risk, and even, in some cases, causing snails' shells to dissolve.

As Dr. Rachel Wood of the University of Edinburgh told the Independent, "The important take-home message of this [report] is that the rate of increase of CO2 during the Permian mass extinction is about the same rate as the one to which we are exposing the ocean to today."

(Editor’s note: More tolling of the bell, but let’s not be bothered. Let’s go along with the corporate/government conspiracy fracturing our land with toxic chemicals and destroying our aquifers, poisoning our streams, rivers and oceans, spilling petroleum and other wastes here and at offshore drill sites. Why not? Why not keep pumping carbon dioxide into the air? Clinging to the old energy habits makes profit for the one percent and hey … we are all bound to get trickled down upon. Right? What about all the money our tribal relatives were supposed to have been making in the Bakken – where poisons are already coming down into our aquifers. Is it worth it? Really?)

Brief editorial comments from the editor’s desk –

On and Off the Lake Traverse Reservation

Each day we ought to commit to pausing the mechanics of living and working, for whatever span of time is required. Otherwise, we get caught up in a vast, fast-moving swirl of complexities.

This is not a black-or-white existence but a multi-colored multi-dimensional journey. And it is a journey unique to each of us.

My experience is not yours.

Yes, we can have common concerns and shared perspectives.

And while we look out and see visible realities, all is comprised of dancing energy. We are streaks of lightning in the cosmos.

When I look at desecration of our Oyate through external and internalized oppression – embezzlement, and including meth and alcohol addiction, human trafficking – and systemic corruption of the beautiful gifts of land, water and air how can I not fall to tears!

Yet, holding onto the ugly pictures of what is happening only lowers our vibration. So low that we can be paralyzed and unable to act in positive ways.

One of my friends from youth is on a spiritual quest, spending five years in the Himalayas with Buddhist monks. We rarely communicate; the last time was when he was embarking on a six month period of silence.

In silence he makes discoveries helpful for his journey.

Those of us busy with our work and families and communities can do the same thing, although perhaps not to such an extreme.

A moment can open to an infinity of discovery.

And so we might spend time in reflection, meditation, prayer. Whatever you choose to call it depending upon ways you identify your spirituality.

This way we can come together to cleanse our Reservation, our Oyate, and reach out to help cleanse other people and other places. We must begin by cleansing ourselves.

*****

Pidamiya do Dustina Gill and Sara McGregor-Okroi for taking concerns of our community’s youth to the White House and other agencies in Washington, DC last week!

It is noteworthy that our local youth advocates are the very first ones from across the country to meet with the Special Assistant to the President on Domestic Affairs!

Please read reports on their meetings on page one.

*****

Plan to participate in the Annual Earth Day Walk on Wednesday morning, April 22nd, 2015.

Sign-in is at 10:30 a.m. at the SWO Head Start Middle Building, Agency Village, SD.

Besides the annual walk, the SWO OEP will provide a demonstration of how to create compost in the garden. T-shirts will be given to participants, and there will be a scavenger hunt.

Watch for more Earth Day details next week in the Sota.

*****

The SWO has an annual garden project, assisting Oyate with tilling their gardens, providing seeds and starting plants.

Seeds will be ready to pick up at the Tribal admin building beginning on Wednesday, April 15th.

Plants will be provided at a later time.

For information, contact Rainee at 605-698-8353.

Let’s encourage more gardening and decreased dependency on outside sources of our fresh foods we can grow ourselves.

*****

The next Reservation-wide animal round-up is scheduled for this Saturday, April 18.

Please be advised, and share with neighbors, the need to have pets registered prior to the round-up.

Last time there was confusion and some of our Oyate had their pets removed from housing.

*****

The public is invited to attend a presentation by author and speaker Dawn Eden Tuesday, April 21st, at 7:00 p.m. at St. Catherine’s Hall, Sisseton.

Dawn Eden share her personal journey of healing from trauma through childhood sexual abuse with the help of her faith.

Everyone is welcome to attend.

*****

An honoring is planned for Oliver Wanna for Friday, May 8th in the rotunda at Tribal headquarters.

Watch for more information from SWO TVSO Geri Opsal in the Sota.

*****

Ken Siyaka has called our attention to a report on modernization and budgeting for the US All-Volunteer Uniformed Military Services.

It is lengthy but worth reading.

Here is the link:

http://www.mcrmc.gov/public/docs/report/MCRMC-FinalReport-29JAN15-HI.pdf

****

Elder's Meditation:

"Together we can end the Holocaust against the environment." -- Haida Gwaii, Traditional Circle of Elders

We are all familiar with the Holocaust against the people. When this happens we feel bad and we vow never to let it happen again. We need to seriously examine what human beings are doing to the Earth and the environment. Many species are extinct and many more will become extinct during the next 10 years. We are methodically eliminating life that will never return again. Today, we should take time to pray real hard so we wake up before it is too late.

Great Spirit, today, I pray for us to awaken to what we are doing.

*****

Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

A pessimist sees only the dark side of the clouds, and mopes; a philosopher sees both sides, and shrugs; an optimist doesn't see the clouds at all - he's walking on them. Leonard Louis Levinson

Until you've lost your reputation, you never realize what a burden it was. Margaret Mitchell (1900 - 1949)

It is hard to believe that a man is telling the truth when you know that you would lie if you were in his place. H. L. Mencken (1880 - 1956)

People who have what they want are fond of telling people who haven't what they want that they really don't want it. Ogden Nash (1902 - 1971)

There will always be a part, and always a very large part of every community, that have no care but for themselves, and whose care for themselves reaches little further than impatience of immediate pain, and eagerness for the nearest good. Samuel Johnson (1709 - 1784), Taxation No Tyranny

The truth is more important than the facts. Frank Lloyd Wright (1869 - 1959)

The greatest use of life is to spend it for something that will outlast it. William James (1842 - 1910)

No tyranny is so irksome as petty tyranny: the officious demands of policemen, government clerks, and electromechanical gadgets Edward Abbey (1927 - 1989)

*****

The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or “opinion” letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author’s name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor’s explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Earlier receipt of copy is always appreciated. So, if you are aware of a date or message that needs to be publicized or advertised, please let us know about it in advance of the weekly deadline.

The preferred way to submit typed articles and ads, art and photos, is by e-mail.

The editor can be reached at the following e-mail address:

earthskyweb@cs.com

For more information, leave a message on the Sota production office voicemail (605) 938-4452, or send a fax to the 24-hour dedicated line (605) 938-4676.

-- CDF

Obituaries –

Services held for Terry St. John

Terry L. St. John, age 44 of Minneapolis “Southside” passed away on April 5, 2015.

Internationally known Native American Musician, Artist and Teacher.

Preceded in death by brother, Danen St. John; grandparents, Willard Yellow Bird Sr., Edward and Celeste St. John; granddaughter, Gianna White Cloud- Yellow Bird and several aunts and uncles.

Survived by mother, Cheryl Yellow Bird; father, Philip St. John Sr.; brothers, Philip Jr., Tonche and sisters, Tamara, Danielle and Shelley.

All night wake was held at the Minneapolis Native American Center on Monday, all night wake Tuesday at Veterans Memorial Gym in Agency Village, SD and Wednesday at the Ralph Wells Memorial Center, White Shield, ND.

With Mass of Christian Burial on Thursday morning.

Interment Sacred Heart Catholic Cemetery.

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor’s note: The following comes from the editor’s column and the Sota “deadlines and policies” statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or “opinion” letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author’s name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and must be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor’s explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Native Arts and Culture Foundation announces artist open call

 (VANCOUVER, Wash.) – Artists residing in North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota or Wisconsin who are creating visual or traditional arts and are enrolled members of Native Nations located in these states are invited to apply for the 2015 Native Arts and Cultures Foundation (NACF) Regional Artist Fellowship. The fellowship award includes support ranging up to $20,000 per artist to allow them to create powerful new works that transform communities.

“The NACF fellowship was an amazing gift that has allowed me to take a breath and begin focusing on the non-utilitarian aspect of my work,” said Kevin Pourier (Oglala), 2014 NACF Regional Artist Fellowship recipient in the traditional arts category.

Open Call 2015 NACF Regional Artist Fellowship Artists may apply online beginning April 9 at http://your.culturegrants.org and submissions must be completed by 5 p.m. (Pacific Time) on Monday, June 15. For more information about fellowship criteria, please visit www.nativeartsandcultures.org or for specific assistance in applying contact NACF Program Associate, Wendy Red Star, M-F, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Pacific Time: by phone 360-314-2421, or email at wendy@nativeartsandcultures.org.

Free Presentation in Fargo Tuesday, April 14, 3:30 p.m. The Plains Art Museum, 704 First Ave. N., Fargo, N.D., (701) 551-6100 To register to attend via Skype, contact: andre@nativeartsandcultures.org.

To learn more about applying for the fellowship, please attend the free presentation with NACF Program Officer Andre Bouchard at 3:30 p.m. on Tuesday April 14 at The Plains Art Museum in Fargo, N.D. Virtual seats are available for individuals living outside of traveling distance to Fargo to attend via a Skype video call-in. To register for the Skype video call-in, contact andre@nativeartsandcultures.org.

Additional presentations in the region will be announced via social media at: http://www.facebook.com/nacfmedia and http://www.twitter.com/nacfmedia.

Last year’s 2014 NACF Regional Fellowship awards went to: Delina White, Traditional Art, Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe from Minn.; Star Wallowing Bull, Visual Art, Minnesota Chippewa; Kevin Pourier, Traditional Art, Oglala of S.D.; and Jennifer Stevens, Traditional Art, Oneida of Wisconsin. To view the compelling works of these artists, and other artists and projects funded by NACF, visit: www.nativeartsandcultures.org. The 2015 Regional Artist Fellowship awards will be announced in Fall 2015.

About the Foundation

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation (NACF) is a national Native-led nonprofit dedicated to supporting American Indian, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian arts and cultures through grant making and cultural programming. With contributions from Native Nations, art patrons and foundation partners, NACF has supported more than 125 Native artists and organizations in more than 24 states. To learn more or to donate, please visit: www.nativeartsandcultures.org.

Social “helper” column dedicated to young generation Oyate –

Wawokiyape

By Shay Dirtseller

Dear shay,

When is generosity to much???

I am a very giving person. I try to help others when I can but some days it seems I get taken advantage of  … especially by family. My cousin is one of these people. She asks for rides to and from, asks to borrow money, food, clothes and sometimes even my car.

I try to help because she does have it hard sometimes but on days when I am busy and I don’t allow her to do this she throws tantrums, posts about it on Facebook and makes it seem like I am a horrible person when in fact I am far from that. How do I stop people from taking advantage of my kind nature without feeling guilty?

From, Kind hearted.

Dear Kind Hearted,

It is okay to say NO. You are a good person with a giving nature and that is a rare thing but sometimes, especially in this situation, it is okay to say NO to your cousin.

If someone knows they can take advantage of you like that and get away with it they will continue to do so. My advice would be to tell your cousin that you do not appreciate the way she treats you and that you cannot help her any futher.

Remember, you’re not here to please others, you are here to make yourself happy. You are not your cousin’s caretaker, she is grown and capable of doing thing on her own. Be strong, stay positive and know that it is alright to say "NO."

Good luck and God bless!

Shay.

Healthy Kids –

Language Acquisition

Babies and Toddlers are the experts

By: Sonia J. Magat, D.O., Ph.D.

The process of learning a native or a second language is something that young children do successfully without formal lessons. Adults often take this process of language acquisition for granted. Possessing a language differentiates humans from animals and children's acquisition of language has always fascinated scientists. Some old and new thoughts on how children learn a language are:

1.  Children are born with an innate ability for language acquisition. Babies brains begin processing speech sounds and auditory forms and pieces that make up a word well before they start talking at 12 months. By 12 to 14 months, children learn groups of words rapidly, also termed as "data mining" by researchers at Indiana University (February, 2008 article)

2.  Language acquisition occurs through interaction of children with people and the environment. Children from different countries learn their native languages equally well. It was shown that 6 to 8 month-old American and Japanese babies are able to differentiate "ra" from "la" equally well.  With Japanese babies, the ability becomes less by 10 to 12 months, while American babies become more adept at this age. It is interesting to know that when American babies at 9 months of age were exposed to Chinese language for a total of 5 hours, they performed equally well as Chinese children of the same age. In general, parent's speech serves as a stimulus to learning a language.

3.  There is a critical period (or window of opportunity) for language acquisition. During this period, the input or environmental exposure is needed. The critical period is before 6 years of age and ends around age 12 years, after which language acquisition is not normal or functional. This is why a toddler can be fluent in any language while a college student learning a second language may find it difficult to converse in a second language.

With language acquisition follows language development. This is the ability to learn, to listen, understand what is said and communicate with others. One predictor of a child's vocabulary development is the amount and diversity of input that the child receives. Language, being unique to humans, it defines different cultures and nationalities. Lately there has been a general incentive for the acquisition of the Dakota language by adults and children in the community. Knowing what language acquisition involves, the following suggestions may be applied:

1.  It would be beneficial for children to begin learning the Dakota language before 6 years of age. Toddlers have the innate ability called "language acquisition devise"(LAD) in their brains.

2.  Parent's input is important. If parents do not speak the Dakota language at home, children can be taught the language in a language immersion school, where they can be exposed to the language partially or completely. Curriculum is taught in the native language alone or together with English language.

3.  Although the process of language acquisition is more difficult for adults, parents can learn the language with their children.

4.  There is a need for teachers who are fluent in the Dakota language, who will serve as the core team for the development of an immersion school.

5.  Learning a second language wll improve children's cognitive skills, increase their self-esteem and teach them to respect their native language.

6.  Partnership and collaboration between parents, school and community leaders should happen for the Dakota language acquisition.

If not now, when? 

A personal note from the author: My native language is Filipino, from my country, the Philippines. I learned this language from birth and communicate with my family and citizens of the Philippines. I started English language acquisition from kindergarten. Curriculum was taught in English and continued through my school years, beyond college, graduate and postgraduate schools. Spanish language acquisition was started in grade school and continued to college. French language was learned in graduate school. I understand written language in Spanish more than in French, but have difficulty conversing fluently in both Spanish and French.

This is one of a series of articles written for the Early Childhood Intervention Program. Your questions and comments are welcome.

From the WWKMHCC-Mental Health Department –

Caring for Your Mind and Body

We all know about the importance about taking care of our health-eating right, getting enough sleep, exercising. Healthy habits positively influence how a person feels and how their body functions.

But good health involves not only caring for our body, but also our mind.

The fact is our mental health is integral to our overall health. Far too many Americans fail to incorporate a principal component into their health choices. Yet overall health and wellness are not possible without it.

What is mental health? If you were to ask your office mate, spouse or neighbor, they may respond that it is a "state of mind," "being content with life" or "feeling good about yourself." Simply put, mental health is the ability to cope with daily life and the challenges it brings.

When a person has "good" mental health, they deal better with what comes their way. By contrast, "poor" mental health-such as feeling overwhelmed by stress -can make even day-to-day life difficult.

Poor mental health can also significantly harm a person's physical health. For instance, research shows that stress is closely linked to high blood pressure, heart disease and obesity. It also shows that people who feel depressed or chronically stressed may have a greater risk of physical illnesses.

The good news is there are many healthy choices and steps that individuals can adopt to promote and strengthen mental health-and overall health and well-being.

A healthy lifestyle can help to prevent the onset or worsening of depression, anxiety and other mental health conditions, as well as heart disease, diabetes, obesity and other chronic health problems. It can also help people recover from these conditions.

May is Mental Health Month, Woodrow Wilson Keeble Memorial Healthcare Center, is raising awareness of the role mental health plays in our lives and providing tips and resources so anyone can take steps to promote good mental health.

These include building social support, eating with your mental health in mind, recognizing the signs of stress, and knowing when to reach out for help.

Just as Americans have learned there are things they can do to reduce their risk of heart disease and other illnesses, WWKMHCC-Mental Health Department wants to help people learn what they can do both to protect their mental health in tough times and also to improve their mental well-being throughout their lives.

We need to care for both our body and mind.

Vaccines and Preventable Diseases

By Gypsy Wanna

SWO Wellness Coordinator

April 18-25 is National Infant Immunization Week. The Community Health Education program would like parents and grandparents to understand the importance of getting immunizations on time for children.

Last week I had a short article about measles. This week is about Pertussis which is also known as whooping cough. Whooping cough is a very contagious disease of the respiratory tract. (the passage formed by the mouth, nose, throat, and lungs, through which air passes during breathing). It is caused by bacteria called Bordetella pertussis and is found in the mouth, nose, and throat of an infected person.

Whooping cough (pertussis) starts with a mild infection that resembles a cold. Symptoms include sneezing, runny noses, low fever, and a mild cough. However within 2-weeks, the cough becomes severe causing violent coughing spells followed by vomiting or "high pitched whoops", which can last for several weeks. The coughing spells make it difficult for an infant to eat, drink, or breathe. Complications from pertussis include pneumonia, brain damage, seizures, or death, especially in babies under the age of 1.

Pertussis is spread by the droplets from coughing or sneezing of an infected person. The best way to prevent the spread of pertussis is by getting your child immunized (getting their shots). We will be sponsoring a Baby Fair on April 22, 2015 from 5pm to 7pm at the Woodrow Wilson Keeble Memorial Health Care Center. Please see the flyer printed elsewhere in this edition.

To find out what immunizations your child needs, you may contact the Public Health Nursing Department or the clinic at the Woodrow Wilson Keeble Memorial Health Care Center at 698-7606. You may also contact the SD Department of Health at 698-4183.

Information from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Diarrhea dilemma

By Richard P. Holm MD

A twenty-something gentleman presented to the walk-in clinic a few years ago with severe diarrhea. He was working at a feed-lot where he was exposed to cattle and all their byproducts, and he admitted that his hand-washing skills were not ideal. He had been ill for a few days, was getting dehydrated, and now there was blood in the stool, more than you would expect from just hemorrhoids.

An estimated two to five billion episodes of diarrheal illness occur every year worldwide, mostly from infection in infants. In 2013 more than one and a quarter million people, mostly babies, died from dehydration due to diarrhea, the consequence of contaminated water.

It is in the amazing small intestine and colon is where roughly two gallons of fluid flow-through daily only to be reduced to about a half-a-cup of fluid that exits in the stool, that is unless something goes wrong. The word diarrhea literally means through-flow.

The electrolyte explanation for what causes diarrhea runs-on like a chemistry teacher on too much caffeine. But suffice it to say that we are still learning the complexities of such a system that, when working correctly, turns the stuff we shove into our mouths into micronutrients and water and then carries the necessary parts of this slurry into the blood stream in order to keep us alive and working.

The diagnosis for diarrhea is made primarily from the patient's history or story. Non-infectious causes of diarrhea include problems like shortened bowel, partial blockages, immune problems like Crohn's disease and Ulcerative Colitis, and intolerance to certain foods like milk products and the gluten in grain.

Historical clues for an infectious cause can include attending a day care or anywhere diarrhea illness is present; working where there is exposure to animals; eating undercooked or spoiled food; and traveling to another country south of the border. Antibiotics are rarely needed to treat infectious diarrhea, and in contrast, life-threatening diarrhea can result from an exposure to antibiotics.

The most challenging cause for diarrhea comes when a person is burdened with a very nervous and sensitive bowel, called Irritable Bowel Syndrome or IBS. This diagnosis is made when everything else is ruled out. A professional should evaluate any diarrhea lasting longer than a week and produces internal bleeding.

I admitted my patient to the hospital for IV fluid hydration, the diarrhea resolved spontaneously without antibiotics, and he vowed to do better with washing his hands.

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

New Art teacher at TZTS

Please welcome our new Art teacher (Amy Woolston) to Tiospa Zina. She has jumped right in and immediately is making a positive impact with our kids.

TZTS high school students take field trip to Unity Square

Thirteen TZTS high school students and four chaperones traveled to Milbank, South Dakota on Friday, March 27th.

This was an incentive field trip, earned by:

1) 80% or better attendance.

2) 3.0 or high grade point average (GPA) for 3rd quarter.

3) 2 or fewer behavioral interventions (write-ups).

The students had to have met two out of the three requirements to be eligible for this trip.

Unity Square was the destination the students chose.

While there, the students swam, sat in the hot tub, played basketball, used the weightlifting equipment and ran on the track.

All of the students had fun and seemed tired at the end of the trip.

The students who attended this event were: Tre Neilan, Jameson Shepherd, Brandon Redday, Duane Brown, Robert Laughter III, Samantha Crawford, Elliott Crawford, Anthony Genia, Christian Heminger, Westen Hill, Peyton Bernard, Alvan Jackson and Terrance Robertson Jr.

Accompanying the students were Mike Durkin, Tom Lewno, Dr. Jen Heath and Karen Fink.

ESDS Community Education sponsors Easter Egg Hunt

The ESDS community Easter Egg Hunt was held this year on March 28th. Here are photo highlights of the fun.

Audition for MCT production

An audition will be held for the Missoula Children’s Theater (MCT) production of ALADDIN on Monday, April 27, 2014 from 3:45 – 5:45 pm for K-12 students of the Sisseton Public School District. Those auditioning should arrive at 3:45 and plan to stay for the full two hours. Some of the cast members will be asked to stay for the first rehearsal immediately following the audition. MCT Tour Actor/Directors will conduct rehearsals throughout the week from 3:45 – 8:15 pm each day. A public show of ALADDIN will presented on Friday, May 1st at 7:00 pm. The MCT residency in Sisseton is brought to you by the Sisseton Arts Council, Sisseton Public School District, National Endowment for the Arts, South Dakota Arts Council, and Montana Arts Council. For more information, call Alexis Monroe at 605-698-7613 x 2.

The Missoula Children's Theatre (MCT), the nation’s largest touring children’s theatre, has been touring extensively for 41 years now from Montana to Japan, and will visit nearly 1,200 communities this year with up to 47 teams of Tour Actor/Directors. A tour team arrives in a given town with a set, lights, costumes, props and make-up, everything it takes to put on a play...except the cast. The team holds an open audition and casts 50-60 local students to perform in the production. The show is rehearsed throughout the week and one public performance is presented on Friday. All MCT shows are original adaptations of classic children’s stories and fairytales . . . a twist on the classic stories that you know and love. Also included in the residency are three enrichment workshops presented by the Tour Actor/Directors. Creativity, social skills, goal achievement, communication skills and self-esteem are all characteristics that are attained through the participation in this unique, educational project. MCT's mission is the development of lifeskills in children through participation in the performing arts.

NDSCS, NDSU partner for student success

Agreement offers seamless transfers to encourage degree completion

Fargo, N.D., April 7, 2015 – North Dakota State College of Science and North Dakota State University announced a new partnership that will give students an additional opportunity to use credits they have earned to complete a degree.

NDSCS and NDSU entered into a Reverse Transfer Agreement today. It is the first of its kind in the state of North Dakota and will give students access to a seamless system by which they can receive an associate degree.

“This innovative partnership will provide students in a variety of situations a flexible option to obtain an associate degree,” said NDSCS President John Richman. “We are pleased to collaborate with NDSU to offer another path for student success.”

Under the agreement, students who transfer from NDSCS to NDSU before completing a degree will have an opportunity to apply credits from both institutions toward an associate degree. The students will qualify when they have earned at least 36 credits from NDSCS and at least 15 credits from NDSU.

The agreement establishes a policy and process for NDSU students to transfer their NDSU coursework to NDSCS for the purpose of obtaining an associate degree.

“NDSU is proud to partner with NDSCS to better serve our students. This collaboration offers a smooth path to transfer for degree completion,” said NDSU President Dean L. Bresciani. “North Dakota wins when we educate more citizens.”

The agreement aligns with the State Board of Higher Education’s mission and vision for the system. “Its five-year strategic plan, the NDUS Edge, launched in January and serves as the roadmap to implementation of the Board’s vision,” said Larry C. Skogen, interim chancellor of the North Dakota University System. “Today’s agreement supports all of the plan’s goals, especially helping students succeed by increasing graduation rates and using the strengths of the system in a focused way to provide a clear path to a degree.”

Fights to strengthen funding for Tribal colleges

Senator Tester: A good education is the key to a good-paying job

Big Sandy, Mont. – April 10, 2015 – Knowing that getting a college degree is key to landing a good-paying job, Senator Jon Tester is fighting to increase funding for Tribal colleges and universities across Indian Country.

Tester, vice-chair of the Senate Indian Affairs Committee, sent a letter to the Interior Appropriations Subcommittee urging them to provide stronger funding for Tribal colleges and universities. In his letter, Tester highlighted the impact that inadequate funding for Tribal Colleges and Universities has on the families and communities.

“This is not simply a matter of appropriations falling short of an authorization,” Tester wrote. “Inadequate funding impedes these institutions from having the necessary resources to enhance their programs in response to the changing needs of their students and communities they serve.”

Federal appropriations are the primary source of funding Tribal colleges and universities and the key component in their growing technical assistance and job training programs. But according to the American Indian Higher Education Consortium, federal funding for tribal colleges and universities is significantly lower than non-tribal schools that receive as much as three times the amount per student as tribal colleges and universities.

“Every day, we witness the extraordinary differences Tribal colleges and universities make to improve the lives of tribal students and families. These institutions are positive agents of change and the key to a brighter future for Indian Country.” Tester wrote.

Unlike other public higher education institutions, because tribal colleges are located on federal trust lands, states have no obligation to fund Tribal Colleges and Universities.

In Montana, the state invests less than half of the amount per student provided to Montana’s Community Colleges.

Tester also noted in his letter that in many cases, the college or university is the primary employer in tribal communities.

There are over 30 Tribal colleges and universities across the nation, including seven in Montana.

Funding Head Start on Turtle Mountain Reservation

Bismarck, ND – April 6, 2015 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today announced a total of nearly $2.9 million in federal funding over the course of five years for Early Head Start and Head Start programs on the Turtle Mountain Indian Reservation.

Specifically, these funds will support the Turtle Mountain Early Head Start and Head Start programs as the tribe works to improve its governance, health and safety of their children, and provide comprehensive high-quality early education services to improve school readiness for Native American children.

“By introducing bipartisan legislation, holding committee hearings, and providing increased resources, I’ve been working to make sure we give Native American youth the support they were promised and equal opportunities to succeed,” said Heitkamp. “Bolstering Early Head Start and Head Start programs in Turtle Mountain is an important part of accomplishing these goals because they help the tribe improve quality services that focus on health and safety, and help make sure Native American children and families who participate in the program receive the best possible support. These funds show a commitment to Native American children, but there is still much we need to do. That’s why I’ll continue to push for my bipartisan bill to stand up for Native American youth and do all I can to bring to light the challenges faced by Native American children and families.”

These funds are distributed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Head Start.

Garden Corner

Submitted by Eric Hanssen

Browns Valley, Minnesota 56219

Pruning Flowering Shrubs

Flowering shrubs require pruning to look their best. Forsythias and spireas, both noted for their bountiful sprays of blooms lining every cane, may gradually be reduced to a few sporadic flowers if these shrubs are not routinely pruned. This does not necessarily mean annual pruning but this task should be performed at least every two to three years since flowering occurs on the younger wood. Pruning not only benefits flowering but can also enhance bark color for shrubs with colorful canes. The dogwoods, prized for their vibrant red or yellow canes, can become thickets of gray stems if pruning is neglected since the younger canes have the brightest colors. Most shrubs arise from multiple canes, which are long, relatively unbranched stems. The best means of maintaining an attractive and natural appearance to these shrubs is to prune with heading cuts. This is a type of pruning cut that stubs off the cane at about 2-inches above the ground. These heading cuts result in the formation of numerous new shoots that arise just below the cut and quickly grow as long canes. The heading cuts should be made cleanly and straight across the cane; cutting at an angle is not necessary. While flowering is enhanced by this pruning, the timing is critical. Spring-flowering shrubs bloom from flower buds formed the previous summer. These shrubs should be pruned immediately after they finish flowering. If instead, they are pruned during the fall or winter, the flower buds will be removed. Summer-flowering shrubs bloom from flower buds formed during the current year, meaning their flower buds are formed the same season they bloom. Summer-flowering shrubs should be pruned during the dormant season, usually just before bud-break, sometime during March or early April. While shrub pruning is accomplished by heading cut, the number of canes removed may varies depending on the objective. If the shrub is overgrown, almost choked-out by an excessive number of canes and flowering poorly, all the canes can be pruned out, a technique referred to as rejuvenation pruning. Rejuvenation pruning can be done every dormant season for low-growing summer-flowering shrubs such as bumalda spireas and potentillas. Overgrown shrubs, regardless of size or flowering time, can be pruned in this manner. However, pruning a 15-foot common lilac to 2 inches will mean forfeiting flowers for several years while the plant recovers. Loppers are the best tools to make these cuts as the long handles provide the leverage to cut through thick canes, however, on small canes, those less than 1/2-inch in diameter, a hand-pruner may be used. If the plant is not overgrown, then renewal pruning can be applied. Renewal pruning involves removal of about 1/5 to 1/3 of the oldest and largest canes by heading cuts. If this task is performed annually, than over a three to five-year time period, the entire shrub will be completely renewed. The season to do renewal pruning depends whether the shrub is spring or summer flowering. Spring-flowering shrubs should be renewal-pruned right after they finish flowering. Summer-flowering shrubs should be pruned during the dormant season.

Information in this article comes from professor John Ball, SDSU Forestry Specialist in his Pest Update publication available online at http://sdda.sd.gov/legacydocs/Forestry/educational-information/PDF/pest-alert-2015-Apr-1.pdf.

Legals

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 05-476

SWOCSE/ TANF/Amanda Adams, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ERIN EASTMAN, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Amend Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of April, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 18th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 09-018

SWOCSE/ TANF/Elissa Adams, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ERIN EASTMAN, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Establish TANF Arrears and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of April, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 18th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 14-104

SWOCSE/ TANF/Jennifer Adams, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ERIN EASTMAN, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Establish TANF Arrears and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of April, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 18th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 10-009

SWOCSE/ Elliot Barse, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ERIN EASTMAN, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of April, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 18th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 08-072

SWOCSE/ TANF/Jolene Barse, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ERIN EASTMAN, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of April, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 18th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 08-283

SWOCSE/ TANF/Jacquelyn DeMarrias, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ERIN EASTMAN, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of April, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 18th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 15-056

SWOCSE/ Mairiel Stone, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ANTHONY RENVILLE, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of April, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 18th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 13-093

SWOCSE/ Shawn DeMarrias, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LESLIE BARSE, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of April, 2015 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 18th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 12-077

SWOCSE/ Mason Kohl, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LESLIE BARSE, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Establish Arrears and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of April, 2015 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 18th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 11-066

SWOCSE/ Shayne Cook, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LESLIE BARSE, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 22nd day of April, 2015 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 18th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 06-053

SWOCSE/ Shannon Marshall, PLAINTIFF

VS.

HARVEY CRAWFORD, Sr., DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of April, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 18th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 13-107

SWOCSE/ Susan Pink, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DION WHITE, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of April, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 19th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 13-105

SWOCSE/ CA Foster Care, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LITA BLACKSMITH, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of April, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 19th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 08-102

SWOCSE/ Sherman Kurrasch, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DORCY KURRASCH, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of April, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 19th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 09-015

SWOCSE/ Jerry Hillberg, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LARISSA RENCOUNTRE, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of April, 2015 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 19th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 11-060

SWOCSE/ ND, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SCARLETT LOHNES, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of April, 2015 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 19th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 08-052

SWOCSE/Darlena Jones, PLAINTIFF

VS.

KIPP RENVILLE, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of April, 2015 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 19th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 13-166

SWOCSE/ Troy DuMarce, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ROCHELLE BERNARD, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of April, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 20th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 15-042

SWOCSE/ Donette Crawford, PLAINTIFF

VS.

VIJAY CRAWFORD, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of April, 2015 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 20th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 12-139

SWOCSE/Amber Adams, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MATTHEW PUMPKINSEED, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of April, 2015 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 20th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 00-272

SWOCSE/Kay Bursheim, PLAINTIFF

VS.

KAREN FARMER, DEFENDANT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 24th day of April, 2015 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 20th day of March, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

13-3tc

Trading Post ads

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

Job Openings

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate is seeking to fill the following positions(s):

Program Manager, ET Demo (Employment Training)

Closing Date: April 17th, 2015 @ 04:30 PM

All interested applicants may obtain application and job description information at the Human Resource Department, of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate or contact Arnold Williams at (605) 698-8238 or Denise Hill at (605) 698-8362. (Tribal preference will apply.)

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

JOB ANNOUNCEMENT

Teller/Loan Processor Part Time position

Duties and Responsibilities: Prepare applications for loans, type and disperse loans to members, receive and disperse shares to members, open new accounts, sell and process money orders, assist in month and quarterly reports, print quarterly reports to members, handle incoming and outgoing mail transactions, must be able to handle large amount of cash and be accountable for personal bank, must be able to type, must be knowledgeable of computers, must have good customer service. Assist in other areas as directed by immediate supervisor, Vice-President or President.

Starting wage:  $8.00

A complete job description is available at the SWFCU office.

Applications will be accepted until 3:00pm Friday, April 24, 2015.

 

Dakota Nation Development Corporation

Fuel Inc. - General Manager

Summary: Responsible for the leadership, growth, and development of the propane, fuel and HVAC departments of Fuel Inc. in addition to the Agency C-Store. Ensures efficient asset use, cost controls, and establishes benchmarks for performance of Fuel Inc. and Agency C-store.

Supervision: Fuel Inc. and Agency C-Store personnel.

Position Requirements: Demonstrates experience in personnel management and effective leadership 5 to 7 years direct work and leadership experience in a propane company or similar business. Ability to effectively prioritize and execute tasks in a high-pressure environment is crucial. Experience in strategic planning, contracting and negotiating. Experience in formulating policy, developing and implementing new strategies and procedures. Ability to develop financial plans, manage resources and interpret financial data. Work requires professional written and verbal communication, interpersonal skills and ability to communicate with officials at all levels of government. Must pass a background check, drug test and must be culturally sensitive.

Qualifications: Bachelor's Degree in Business Administration or Management preferred. Associate's Degree in Business Administration or Management related field required with 3 years of successful work experience as manager or a position of equal level responsibility. Please contact Dakota Nation Development Corporation for complete a Job Description. 1-605598-3200 or dndc2@venturecomm.net

 

Dakota Nation Development Corporation

Fuel Inc. Senior Bookkeeper

Summary: Responsible for the accounting operations of Fuel Inc. and Agency C-Store including the production of periodic financial reports, maintenance of accurate systems of accounting records, and a comprehensive set of controls designed to mitigate risk and enhance the accuracy of the companies' financial results in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. Assists the General Manger with the Human Resources functions of Fuel Inc. and Agency C-Store.

Position Requirements: Experience and proficiency with accounting software programs, inventory programs and Microsoft Office programs. Flexible and motivated. Strong written and oral communication skills. Ability to effectively prioritize and execute tasks in a high-pressure environment is crucial. Technically competent with various software programs for presentation and analysis. Must pass a background check, drug test and must be culturally sensitive.

Qualifications: Bachelor's Degree in Accounting or Finance preferred. Associate's Degree in Accounting or Finance required. 5 to 7 years direct work experience performing accounting functions in a propane company or similar business.

Please contact Dakota Nation Development Corporation for complete a Job Description. 1-505-698-3200 or dndc2@venturecomrn.net

 

Employment Opportunity

GROW South Dakota is seeking a Full or Part-time Program/Loan Associate to be based in Sisseton, SD. Applications will be taken until Monday, May 4, 2015. To request a job application and job description, contact GROW SD, 104 Ash St. E., Sisseton, SD 57262 or call (605)-698-7654 or 1-888-202-4855. EOE

15-2tc

 

Sisseton Wahpeton College

Has the following vacancies:

Behavioral Science Instructor

Sisseton Wahpeton College has an opening for a full time Behavioral Science Instructor. Must have a Master's Degree in one of the behavioral science fields (psychology, anthropology, sociology, or political science. Previous teaching experience. Position is open until filled. Visit our website www.swc.tc for a full job description and application or contact the HR office at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118.

Director of Institutional Advancement

Sisseton Wahpeton College has an opening for a full time Director of Institutional Advancement. A Bachelor's Degree with a minimum of 3 years' experience is required. (This is not a grants writer position.) Position is open until filled. Visit our website www.swc.tc for a full job description and application or contact the HR office at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118.

Nursing Instructor, RN

Sisseton Wahpeton College has an opening for a full time Nursing Instructor needed. Must possess current SD nursing license, BSN is required, Master's Degree preferred. Position is open until filled. Visit our website: www.swc.tc for a full job description and application or contact the HR office at 605/698-3966, ext. 1118.

 

Tiospa Zina Tribal School

Employment Opportunities

2014-2015 School Year Vacancies:

Substitutes needed for custodial, kitchen, teaching, and transportation - starting at $10/hr, varies per position Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma (please contact the HR office for more information) Applications are accepted on an on-going basis Vacancy: Elementary Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for an Elementary Teacher Opening Date: January 22, 2015 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Reading Coach Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Reading Coach Opening Date: October 30, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Bus Monitor ($13/hr) Qualifications: High School Diploma/GED+; currently has/willing to obtain CPR and First Aid certification Opening Date: November 21, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

2015 Summer Program Vacancies - Program Dates are June 8-25:

Vacancy: Teacher (10) Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification. Opening Date: April 10, 2015. Closing Date: April 24, 2015.

Vacancy: Paraprofessional (6) Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma and 461+ points on the Paraprofessional Praxis; 48+ College Credits. Opening Date: April 10, 2015. Closing Date: April 24, 2015.

Vacancy: Bus Driver (2 for dates from June 8 to July 9) Qualifications: Current Bus Driver CDL with Passenger and Air Brakes endorsement and 1 year directly related experience. Opening Date: April 10, 2015. Closing Date: April 24, 2015.

Vacancy: Special Education Teacher (3) Qualifications: Current South Dakota Special Education Teacher Certification. Opening Date: April 10, 2015. Closing Date: April 24, 2015.

Vacancy: Custodian Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma and 1 year directly related experience. Opening Date: April 10, 2015. Closing Date: April 24, 2015

Vacancy: Cook (June 1-July 24) Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma and 1 year directly related experience. Opening Date: April 10, 2015. Closing Date: April 24, 2015.

Vacancy: Assistant Cook (2) (June 1-July 24) Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma and 1 year directly related experience. Opening Date: April 10, 2015. Closing Date: April 24, 2015.

2015-2016 School Year Vacancies:

Vacancy: Dakota Studies Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for Dakota Studies Instructor Opening Date: March 12, 2015 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Elementary Art Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for an Elementary Art Teacher Open Date: March 13, 2015 Closing Date: Open until filled

2015-2016 Coaching Vacancies:

A. For List of Coaching Positions Below:

Proof of all SDHSAA coaching requirements at the time application is submitted. Requirements are to complete the following courses through the National Federation of High School Sports (NFHS): Fundamentals of Coaching, and First Aid and Safety for Coaches. Must also submit a letter of intent that answers the questions found on form Athletics Coaching Questionnaire. OPENING DATE: April 10, 2015. CLOSING DATE: April 24, 2015.

Head Volleyball Coach Assistant Volleyball Coach

If interested please submit an application and Advisor Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School. Opening Date: September 11, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filledIf you would like to apply to be a part of the TZ tiwahe you may pick up an application from the TZTS HR office located at #2 Tiospa Zina Dr. Agency Village, SD 57262. Applications may also be printed off the HR web page by downloading from links under employment forms to the left. Completed applications may be sent to PO Box 719, Agency Village, SD 57262. Faxed to: 605-698-7686. For further information call 605-698-3953 ext. 208. Indian Preference employer. At will employer. All applicants are subject to a Background Check and Pre-Employment Drug Test, pursuant to SWSB policy.

 

Enemy Swim Day School

FACILITIES ASSISTANT - The Enemy Swim Day School has an opening for a Facilities Assistant. The Facilities Assistant will assist the Facility Manager in maintaining the appearance, safety, efficient operation and cost effective utilization of the entire campus. Must have knowledge and abilities in the areas of building maintenance, equipment usage, cleaning techniques, minor electrical and plumbing practices. Must be physically able to perform duties and operate equipment as required. Must possess a valid SD driver’s license. Please visit www.esds.us for an application and job description. Call (605) 947-4605 or (888) 825-7738 and ask for Ed to inquire about the position. Indian preference policies will be followed. Closing date is April 30, 2015.

 

Dakota Nation Development Corporation

CEO/Project Manager

Summary:

Working with the Dakota Nation Development Corporation Board of Directors, will provide leadership and oversee tribal non-gaming for-profit business operations to insure production efficiency, quality, services, and cost effective management of resources.

Position Requirements:

Master's Degree in Business Administration or Project Management or Management related with 3 years of successful work experience as manager or a position of equal level of responsibility.

3 years direct work experience in project management/senior management capacity, including all aspects of process development and execution.

Demonstrated experience in personnel management and effective executive level leadership.

Technically competent with various software programs for presentation and analysis.

Knowledge of economic and accounting practice and financial reporting.

Knowledge of and experience with all aspects of 8(a) certification and contracting.

Please contact Dakota Nation Development Corporation for complete a Job Description. 1-605-698-3200 or dndc2@venturecomm.net

13-4tc

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

FOOD SERVICE: COOK II (2 FULL-TIME). GENERAL FUNCTION: The purpose for this position is to assist the Cook I, Cook III, and shift supervisor. Safely prepare quality food products for customers and employees. Maintain interpersonal communications to ensure the smooth operation of the property and promote the highest degree of customer satisfaction. REQUIREMENTS: High school diploma or G.E.D. equivalent. One year of institutional cooking. Able to stand for long periods of time. Will be stooping, bending, standing for long periods of time, or lifting up to 50 lbs. Must be able to work night shifts and weekends. Cooking and food handling experience is required. Must able to obtain a Non-Gaming License.

This position will close on April 15, 2015 at 4 pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

FOOD SERVICE: COOK III (1 FULL- TIME). GENERAL FUNCTION: The purpose for this position is to assist the Cook I, Cook II, and shift supervisor. Safely prepare quality food products for customers and employees. Maintain interpersonal communications to ensure the smooth operation of the property and promote the highest degree of customer satisfaction. REQUIREMENTS: High school diploma or G.E.D. equivalent. One year of institutional cooking. Able to stand for long periods of time. Will be stooping, bending, standing for long periods of time, or lifting up to 50 lbs. Must be able to work night shifts and weekends. Cooking and food handling experience is required. Must able to obtain a Non-Gaming License.

This position will close on April 15, 2015 at 4 pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

SLOTS: SLOT Department Supervisor (1 FULL TIME). Reports To: Slot Manager. GENERAL FUNCTION: Maintains authority/supervision over Slot Personal as instructed. REQUIREMENTS: High school diploma or G.E.D. equivalent. Minimum of two years slot experience. Minimum of two years supervisory experience. Effective communication skills. Ability to handle diverse situations and or people. Must obtain a Key Gaming License upon hire.

This position will close on April 22, 2015 at 4pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

FOOD SERVICE: BUFFET WAIT STAFF (3 FULL-TIME) ROTATING SHIFTS GENERAL FUNCTION: To greet customers immediately, provide excellent customer service, and to make sure the customer has a wonderful dining experience. REQUIREMENTS: High School Diploma or GED required. Customer Service experience. Operate cash register, wait tables and counting money. Must be licensable by DNGE Non-Gaming. Stooping, bending, standing for long periods of time, or lifting up to 50lbs. Required to rotate shifts, work holidays and weekends.

This position will close on April 15, 2015 at 4 pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.