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Volume 46 Issue No. 9

Anpetu Iyamni, March 4, 2015

Inside this Edition –

Notice of Election; REB announces candidates certified for SWO Tribal Secretary Election

SWO represented at State-Tribal Relations event at SD Capitol

Support comes from four directions for Lakota 57

Dakota Scavenger Hunt: Week 1 Clues

Intertribal Marijuana Conference held on Tulalip Reservation

SWO Dakotah Language Institute seeking photographs

2015 SWO Career Day April 13th at Administration Building/Rotunda

Deadline for receipt of copy is Friday noon

Certification of SWO Tribal Secretary candidates deadline last Friday

Deadline for the Reservation Election Board to certify candidates for the 2015 SWO Tribal Secretary election was last Friday afternoon, February 27, 2015.

Watch for a list of those certified to run, and announcement of the election date in the next Sota.

Services Friday for Joseph Wanna

Joseph Lee Wanna passed onto his spirit journey on February 26, 2015.

Funeral Mass will be held on March 7, 2015 at 10:30 AM at St. Catherine's Catholic Church, Sisseton, SD.

There will be an all-night Wake on Friday, March 6, 2015 at 7:00 PM at St. Catherine's Hall

Joseph passed away on February 26, 2015 at Douglas County Hospital, Alexandria, MN.

Week one –

Dakotah Language Scavenger Hunt clues

Submitted by Eric L. DuMarce

Participants in our Dakotah Language Scavenger Hunt: Please keep all acquired items until the end of the scavenger hunt so they can be turned in at one time.

Watch for further instructions as to where we will be stationed at the final week to take all submissions.

Week 1 Clues:

Waniyetu tona Ateyapi Tipi heta?ha? iyayapi. Tukted hmiya? icag?o kag?api ed. Wowapi icag?o hed wa?ji icu (wo).

Chairman Renville leads SWO delegation at State-Tribal Relations Days at Pierre

Here are photo highlights from the South Dakota State-Tribal Relations Day events held last week, Wednesday and Thursday, at the State Capitol.

SWO Tribal Chairman Bruce Renville attended the two-day event, with Administrative Aide Nicolette Knudson and Tribal Planner Ella Robertson. Sisseton Wahpeton College was represented by Steve Farmer.

Tom Wilson, KXSW Radio Station Announcer, attended with students from Enemy Swim Day School and Tiospa Zina Tribal School. The students shared their Dakota culture in song and dance for Governor Dennis Daugaard and state lawmakers.

Special feature –

Support comes from four directions for Lakota 57

Sota photos by John Heminger

“These cards (on the Caring Tree) come from across the US and around the world. It’s really sad.” – John Heminger

By CD Floro

Sota Editor

“These are our children too!”

This is a resounding statement being spoken in many places, in all four directions from American Horse School in Allen, SD, on the Pine Ridge Reservation.

The January 24th assault and harassment, including pouring beer on their heads and taunting the 57 students with racial slurs at the Rushmore Civic, has ignited support from many from on and off our reservations.

To say that Rapid City government, law enforcement and media were “slow” to acknowledge the incident at the Rush hockey game would be a gross understatement.

The Journal even went so far as to blame the victims for somehow not being patriotic enough – when we know how very much our relatives honor the American flag and sacrifice of veterans.

We thank our Reporter/Photographer John Heminger for spending time at the school and sharing these unique photos of the Caring Tree wall.

Hundreds of cards show support from across the land. Cards from children, teachers, relatives and non-relatives who have been touched by the blatant racism aimed at these innocent and high-achieving Oglala students.

As we have already written, this incident has torn the scab off a wound that has never healed. It is time to look at what it is, confront it. Continued denial will just cause further injury to future generations of our precious Oyate children.

Take a look around.

Even here on our Lake Traverse Reservation.

We must not continue to be blind to racism.

Statement by John: “These cards (on the Caring Tree) come from across the US and around the world.” It’s really sad.”

Indian country representatives travel to Washington state for intertribal marijuana conference

John Heminger attended for the Sota

Tulalip, WA – The Department of Justice announced late last year that the federal government will allow tribes to legalize and regulate marijuana on their reservations.

Since then, tribes have been weighing the pros and cons of hemp and/or marijuana production.

There were representatives from about 75 tribes registered for a two-day conference last week at the Tulalip Indian Tribes’ resort and casino. The conference was organized by Robert Odawi Porter, a former president of the Seneca Nation in New York, and Seattle marijuana business attorneys Hilary Bricken and Robert McVay.

According to Porter, some legal issues remain, especially related to tribal sovereignty. He said that about 17 states have some criminal jurisdiction over tribal lands and if tribes are in those states, and those states prohibit marijuana, tribal members could face state criminal prosecution if they legalize or regulate marijuana.

“A great deal more are considering this than I thought would be considering it,” said Ken Meshigaud, chairman of the Hannahville Indian Community, a band of the Potawatomi Tribe on Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.

“From an economic standpoint, it may be a good venture the tribes can get into.”

Tulalip Vice Chairman Les Parks called it “a dream of another point of self-sufficiency on our reservations.”

“That’s what marijuana can do for us,” he said.

The Justice Department has already said it wouldn’t block tribes if they decide to approve marijuana for medical or recreational use.

The DOJ said tribes must follow the same law enforcement priorities laid out for states that legalize the drug, including keeping marijuana out of the hands of children and criminal elements.

“We have to take a look at it,” said Seth Pearman, an attorney for the Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe. “The economic opportunity is just astronomical – it would be almost negligent to miss out on this.”

He said tribal leaders already are drafting regulations for a marijuana industry, and they toured some Washington state dispensaries on their trip.

The approach being taken by many tribes is one of caution. Some are seeking input from health and law enforcement agencies. In the case of medical use, making pot accessible could possibly cut down on abuse of meth and/or prescription drugs.

“We’re looking at what the benefits are, not only with revenue but with the medical relief we can give to our elders,” said Lewis Taylor, chairman of the St. Croix Tribe of Wisconsin.

Organizers proposed creation of a Tribal Cannabis Association, an alliance of American Indian tribal leaders and tribal citizens dedicated to:

*Protecting tribal sovereignty by ensuring that American Indian nations and tribes have a full and equal opportunity to participate in the developing cannabis-based medicinal and commercial marketplace.

*Promoting greater understanding and research of cannabis and its medicinal and commercial applications in Indian Country.

*Working collaboratively in the development of cannabis-based medicinal and commercial applications in Indian Country.

*Developing model tribal laws and regulations to support tribal cannabis-based medicinal and commercial applications.

*Advocating before the U.S. federal and state governments for acceptance of tribal government self-regulation of marijuana and cannabis products, as well as changes in law and regulation necessary to support and protect tribal cannabis-based medicinal and commercial applications.

Also last week, the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) hosted a closed-door panel discussion with Justice officials on legalization of marijuana.

The topic also is on the agenda of RES 2015, a major tribal economic summit in Las Vegas next month.

Other Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate members in attendance include former SWO Tribal Chairman Robert Shepherd, Travis (Renville) One Road, Richard TallBear and Kimberly Craven.

Protesters march on Rapid City Hall for racial equality

By John Lee McLaughlin

Rapid City Journal – February 26, 2015 – In frigid, windy but sunny conditions, more than 100 protesters Thursday marched on the Rapid City-School Administration Center downtown as part of a movement calling for government accountability to resolve social injustices toward Native Americans.

The Thursday march coincided with the release a 12-page report by the Lakota People's Law Project, "Native Lives Matter," which asserts the U.S. justice system is responsible for those injustices.

Prominent topics noted in the report include police brutality, namely that Native Americans are the most likely to be killed by law enforcement; that Native American children make up 1 percent of the nation's youth population but account for 70 percent of youths committed overall to the Federal Bureau of Prisons; and that Native Americans are victims of violent crimes at twice the rate of all other U.S. residents.

"The roots of these problems are money and racism," according to the report.

Chase Iron Eyes, attorney for the Lakota People's Law Project, led the march, which started at the Rushmore Plaza Civic Center band shell in Memorial Park, traversed the Memorial Park Promenade, stopped traffic on Omaha Street and ended in front of the City-School Administration Center at 300 Sixth Street downtown.

"My relatives, I'm at a tipping point," Iron Eyes told the crowd that massed Thursday despite the blustery weather. "I know you're at a tipping point because we can't take this any longer."

If those in power had their way, Iron Eyes said, "We would exist in the margins of poverty for the next 100 years," he said. "They would sentence us to death by poverty if they had their way."

Iron Eyes said the fatal police shooting of 30-year-old Allen Locke in December was the most recent incident between Native Americans and the Rapid City Police Department. The U.S. Department of Justice cleared the officer involved in the shooting, though many in the Native American community have protested that the incident was improperly investigated.

Iron Eyes said there have been too many Native Americans killed by Rapid City Police, and there have been too many Native Americans found dead along Rapid Creek.

"We felt that was a crisis situation and that we needed more than just rhetoric at rallies," Iron Eyes said of the origin of the Native Lives Matter report.

He said economic empowerment is the only way to compensate for injustices toward Native Americans.

Iron Eyes said Lakota People's Law Project, in conjunction with the group Native Lives Matter, will be reaching out to state, Pennington County, Rapid City and tribal governments for an economic analysis of the fiscal impact of Native Americans on the region.

The numbers would include not only money spent by Native Americans, but also what health care funding is brought into the state or any sort of institutional spending on behalf of the tribes, Iron Eyes said.

"We want all those numbers because currently there is a stereotype that Natives don't pay taxes," he said. "Well, we're paying at least 4, 8 percent, or whatever the sales, excise, use, alcohol, tobacco, vehicle (taxes) — any kind of taxes that we pay to the Rapid City economy, we would like a percentage of that."

Bryan Brewer, a former president of the Oglala Sioux Tribe and director of the Lakota Nation Invitational event, said during the march that the community will have to stride together to erase racism.

But Brewer said city leadership needs to present a plan for a fix moving forward, especially if LNI is to continue its decades-long presence in Rapid City.

“The Lakota Nation Invitational, right now, we don’t want to leave Rapid City. This is our home also," he said. "We've been here for 38 years, and we want to stay and fight this issue. We don’t want to run. But if we have to, we will. We will be out of Rapid City.

“The (LNI) board, the schools: We’re going to be looking to see what Rapid City does, what plans that they have to make sure all of our children are safe when we come to Rapid City, and I just can’t say enough that we have to work together."

Revised ICWA guidelines

Guidelines clarify tribal authority, responsibilities of state courts and agencies in Indian child custody proceedings to protect tribal children and their families

Washington, DC – February 24, 2015 – In keeping with President Obama’s commitment to supporting Indian families and building resilient, thriving tribal communities, Assistant Secretary – Indian Affairs Kevin K. Washburn today announced action the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) has taken to help prevent the further dissolution of American Indian and Alaska Native families through the misapplication of the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) of 1978 (Public Law 95-608).

“For too many years, some of Indian Country’s youngest and most vulnerable members have been removed from their families, their cultures, and their identities,” said Assistant Secretary Washburn. “Congress worked hard to address this problem by enacting the Indian Child Welfare Act. Yet, today too many people are unaware of this important law and, unfortunately, there are some that work actively to undermine it. Our updated guidelines for state courts will give families and tribal leaders comfort that the Obama Administration is working hard to provide better clarity so that the courts can carry out Congress’ intent to protect tribal families, preserve tribal communities, and promote tribal continuity now and into the future.”

In his address to the National Congress of American Indians at its winter session in Washington, DC, the Assistant Secretary announced that the BIA will publish this week its revised BIA Guidelines for State Courts and Agencies in Indian Child Custody Proceedings to support the full implementation and purpose of ICWA – the first such update since it was issued over 35 years ago.

Congress enacted ICWA after hearings which found that an alarmingly high percentage of Indian families had been broken up when public and private agencies subjected Indian children to unwarranted removal, most of whom were eventually placed in non-Indian homes.

ICWA set forth a federal preference for keeping American Indian and Alaska Native children with their families, including extended families, and deferring to tribal judgment on matters concerning the custody of tribal children. In initially carrying out Congress’ intent, the BIA published on Nov. 26, 1979, Guidelines for State Courts; Indian Child Custody Proceedings to inform state courts and agencies of ICWA’s requirements in Indian child custody proceedings. Until today, those guidelines had not been updated.

The guidelines will provide long-overdue guidance to state courts as they work daily to ensure full implementation of the law. BIA’s updated guidelines build upon the good work of states like New Mexico and Wisconsin that are actively working to implement ICWA as Congress envisioned. In Wisconsin, the state codified ICWA into state law to facilitate implementation. New Mexico is working with tribes to review its implementation of, and compliance with, ICWA. As part of this effort, the New Mexico Tribal-State Judicial Consortium developed an ICWA Judicial Bench Card that provides reference materials for tribal and state judges as they handle ICWA cases. The BIA guidelines issued this week will serve as another resource for state and tribal courts and agencies.

Several long-term studies have been conducted of Native American adult adoptees. Despite socioeconomic advantages that many of them received by virtue of their adoption, long term studies reflect that these adoptees experienced increased rates of depression, low self-esteem, and suicide. In addition, many adult adoptees continue to struggle with their identities and have reported feelings of loneliness and isolation. Today, the number of Native American children in foster care alone is still alarmingly high, and they are still more than twice as likely to be placed in foster care overall.

The United States Department of Justice is taking action in states like South Dakota to ensure that Native children and families receive the full protection of ICWA. These guidelines will assist those efforts to ensure that states fully implement the federal law enacted to protect tribal communities. In enacting ICWA, Congress recognized that this was not a tragedy only for American Indian and Alaska Native families and children, but also for tribes who have lost generations of future members and leaders. In enacting ICWA, Congress sought to carry out the United States’ trust responsibility for protecting Indian children and the stability and security of American Indian and Alaska Native tribes and families. Protecting Indian children reflects the highest ideals of the trust responsibility to Indian tribes and the guidelines issued today are a part of this Administration’s broader approach to ensuring compliance with ICWA.

In 2014, the Department of the Interior invited comments to determine whether to update its guidelines and what changes should be made. The Department engaged in a process that included three listening sessions with tribes and two listening sessions with judicial organizations across the country to hear comments on how the guidelines should be updated. The Department received comments from those at the listening sessions and also received written comments, including comments from individuals and organizations interested in Indian child welfare. An overwhelming proportion of the commenters requested that Interior update its ICWA guidelines and many had suggestions for revisions that have been included. The Department reviewed and considered each comment in developing these revised guidelines.

In his remarks, Assistant Secretary Washburn noted instances in which the ICWA law and BIA guidelines were not followed, preventing the goals of ICWA from being realized. These circumstances continue to alarm tribal leaders, Indian families, and Indian child welfare advocates.

The updated guidelines will help ensure tribal children are not removed from their communities, cultures and extended families. The guidelines clarify the procedures for determining whether a child is an Indian child, identifying the child’s tribe, and notifying its parent and tribe as early as possible before determining placement. The updated guidelines also now provide comprehensive guidance on the application of active efforts to prevent the breakup of the Indian family. They also provide clarification that ICWA’s provisions carry the presumption that ICWA’s placement preferences are in the best interests of Indian children.

The Assistant Secretary – Indian Affairs oversees the BIA, which is headed by a director who is responsible for managing day-to-day operations through four offices – Indian Services, Justice Services, Trust Services, and Field Operations. These offices directly administer or fund tribally based infrastructure, economic development, law enforcement and justice, social services (including child welfare), tribal governance, and trust land and natural and energy resources management programs for the nation’s federally recognized American Indian and Alaska Native tribes through 12 regional offices and 81 agencies.

The Office of Indian Services Division of Human Services administers the BIA’s ICWA regulations at 25 CFR Part 23 and the Guidelines for State Courts. For more information, visit http://www.indianaffairs.gov/WhoWeAre/BIA/OIS/HumanServices/IndianChildWelfareAct/index.htm.

Revelation in Mette Rape Scandal

Lakotalaw – February 25, 2015 – One of the principle investigators in South Dakota levied serious accusations against South Dakota Attorney General Marty Jackley and former Brown County State’s Attorney Kim Dorsett, alleging they both covered up for a child rapist in order to protect their financial interest and do favors for campaign contributors.

Mark Black, who was the lead investigator on a case against attorney Brandon Taliaferro and Shirley Schwab, issued a statement on Feb. 23 that alleged criminal wrongdoing committed willingly by the highest law enforcement official in South Dakota — Marty Jackley.

“I remind you the real victims are the Mette children, who have been failed by the system set up to protect them,” said Black in a prepared statement. “The most shameful consequence being that they were returned to an adopted mother who did not protect them and this was as a result of the actions of Kimberly Dorsett and Marty Jackley whose true motivation was financial gain for Dorsett personally and the financial gain of Jackley’s largest political contributors.”

The background of the case begins in 1999, when Richard and Wendy Mette, a white couple living in Aberdeen, South Dakota, had seven Lakota siblings placed with them by the South Dakota Department of Social Services.

The Mettes then began a pattern of sexual and physical abuse that defies the imagination and despite a preponderance of evidence that showed the children were subjected to horrendous living conditions the state DSS continued to allow the children to stay in the home.

Finally, in 2010, when a doctor noticed signs of abuse on one of the children and alerted law enforcement the police raided the house and discovered the children had been abused consistently for the past decade.

The case was given to Brandon Taliaferro and Shirley Schwab, however, after the two officials began to openly question the DSS’s competence in the case they were summarily removed by Taliaferro’s boss Kim Dorset and replaced by a different attorney, Mike Moore.

Moore promptly dropped 22 of the 23 counts against Richard Mette and all 11 counts against Wendy Mette in exchange for a plea.

If this wasn’t horrible enough, the Brown County State’s Attorney then filed charges against Taliaferro and Schwab, the only officials who had protected the children, accusing them of perjury. In January 2013, Judge Gene Paul Keen tossed the case against Taliaferro and Schwab out of court and admonished the prosecution for even bringing charges with such lacking evidence.

Yesterday, Black issued a statement that accused Dorsett of illegally embellishing an affidavit that said the Mette children lied about Wendy Mette’s involvement in their prolonged abuse. He further asserted that Dorsett lied as an effort to protect her $75,000 annual contract she had with South Dakota Department of Social Services.

“Dorsett’s embellishment of the affidavit for the removal of Schwab, withholding of the Wendy Mette plea agreement, the misinformation about the unsigned document and her request that I lie with respect to a friendship, is not mere happenstance or carefully crafted incompetence, but rather an obvious attempt to see that Schwab and Taliaferro were prosecuted unjustly to protect (her contract),” Black said.

Black then said that having the children placed back with Wendy Mette would subvert the Mette children’s civil lawsuit against the state DSS.

Jackley has long maintained that he was not privy to the details of the case, but Black asserted in his statement that Jackley’s two largest campaign contributors had a direct financial interest in ICWA funds. Those contributors and Jackleg maintained a vested interest in the state DSS continual seizure of Lakota children, which had been happening at an unprecedented rate beginning in the 1990s.

“Schwab and Taliaferro’s attempt to raise issues surround the ICWA funds potentially jeopardized the money these contributors received,” Black said. “I think we can put two and two together that if Jackley’s corporate political contributors are benefiting financially that benefits Jackleg and his future political ambitions.”

Black also said he was order to keep the Attorney General’s office updated on the progress of the case against Taliaferro and Schwab.

“For Jackley to say that he was not involved in the decision making process with respect to my investigation is ludicrous,” Black said.

Black said he has since been subjected to the same official retaliation that Taliaferro and Schwab received and called upon the U.S. Attorney’s Office and the South Dakota Bar Association to open an investigation into the actions of Dorsett and Jackleg with respect to obstruction of justice, tampering with evidence and violation of civil rights and the abuse of power and public corruption.

For more visit Lakota People’s Law Project’s initial investigation into the case here:

http://docs.lakotalaw.org/Abandoned-and-Forgotten-abbreviated.pdf

SWO Dakotah Language Institute seeking photographs

The SWO Dakotah Language Institute is looking for approximately 150 photographs for illustrations to be used in its Dakotah Language dictionary, which has been created with the help of elders of the Tribe.

Some example pictures may be: ant, church, evergreen, hat, lighter, sage, cookie, sweet corn, tiller, tractor, watch, and steak.

Deadline to submit photographs is May 1st, 2015.

Printed photographs (on photo paper) may be submitted, but digital images are preferred. Images must not show brand names on any items.

Rights to these pictures will go to the Tribe and may be used in future projects.

For more information, please see the notice elsewhere in this issue or contact: Tammy DeCoteau or Eric DuMarce, SWO Dakotah Language Institute, 605-698-8302 or in person at the SWO Dakotah Language Institute Office in the Tribal Administration Building, Agency Village, SD.

SD Legislative updates

Week 7 Report from Sen. Jason Frerichs

Northeast South Dakota and the persistent problem of excess surface water received strong support in the State Senate with passage of SB2. This bill originated from our regional watershed taskforce after studying the issue for three years. SB2 creates nine river basin natural resource districts that cover the entire state for water management. Included in the legislation is a pilot project to take a hands-on look at a potential water and natural resources management plan for a basin district. An oversight legislative taskforce is one more component of SB2 which will draw the boundaries for the districts, identify the framework for water management plans, and identify the necessary powers and duties of the river basin natural resource districts. I serve as the prime sponsor of SB2 and have enjoyed garnering strong support from legislators all across the State. Even more important is the fact that over half of the prevailing votes on SB2 in the Senate came from legislators representing the two largest cities - Sioux Falls and Rapid City. Respect for the need to tackle the problem of water management on an entire basin approach is real, and as a rural legislator, I will continue to build bridges with my urban colleagues. SB2 will be up for a hearing in the House agriculture and natural resources committee and appears to have widespread support.

Wind energy is a growing industry in our state with various projects operating and all of them exceeding the efficiency expectations. Since the federal production tax credit was renewed last fall, there is interest among wind developers to build their projects. In our area, there are a handful of wind farm opportunities that could benefit from SB180 which adjusts the production taxes assessed to a wind generation facility. We passed this bill out of the Senate with strong support, and the issue will continue to be addressed on the House side to find the right tax obligation to compete with our neighboring windy states.

I continue to work with my fellow legislators to encourage more local funding support in a possible road funding bill. SB1 is the legislation that passed out of the Senate and is on the House side for debate in committee. I voted against this bill on the Senate floor because I am not convinced the current version sends adequate new tax revenue to the local roads and bridges. I am of the belief that more of the new dollars should not go to Pierre for state roads but should be sent back to our county and townships to rebuild our infrastructure.

Medicaid Expansion and increased teacher pay continue to be on my wish list of tasks that we as a legislature need to tackle soon. I am pleased that the medical provider industry is willing to explore all options to make Medicaid Expansion a reality; unfortunately, our Governor is not willing to accept the federal investment to provide healthcare coverage to these working poor individuals.

I am disappointed we haven't been able to have a true discussion about opportunities to increase the teacher pay to attract more young people into the profession. We are dealing with a crisis among our school districts to find qualified teaching professionals to fill the positions to educate our young people. Speaking of education, I am hopeful that SB189 will be defeated even though it narrowly passed the Senate. The proposed bill provides insurance company tax credits for investments in private schools. Options for families and students are important when choosing the education system; but I don't feel we should divert public tax dollars to support private schools.

Tribal relations day was recently celebrated in the Capitol with a strong focus on the relationship between agriculture and our Native American reservations. I enjoyed the presence of Chairman Renville and his staff from the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate. Our state department of agriculture is looking for more ways to partner with young farmers and ranchers who need access to credit both on and off the reservation.

As we wind down these final weeks of the 90th legislative session, I welcome all of you to contact me on the issues important to you, especially as we finalize the state budget. I am planning to attend the cracker barrel in Aberdeen on the morning of March 7th, along with an afternoon forum that all are welcome to attend. Thank you for the privilege to serve northeast South Dakota, and feel free to contact me at 949-2204 or sen.frerichs@state.sd.us.

Week 7 Report from Rep. Dennis Feickert

Only a couple week left in the 90th Legislative Session of the South Dakota Legislature. The committees on which I serve (House Agriculture and House Transportation) are focused now on Senate Bills which have been approved by the other body and now need approval or rejection by the House.

In this press release, I'd like to focus on a topic which is always of great interest to me: agriculture. Ag is our state's number one industry accounting for $25.6 billion, or more than 30% of South Dakota's total output. This includes both production agriculture and all of our related agri-businesses like food processing, manufacturing of farm machinery, chemicals and fertilizer. Taking these jobs into account, combined with farmers and ranchers, means 115,651 jobs for South Dakotans. That's 1 in every 5 jobs in our state. Let's take a look at these statistics more closely. Crop farming =$13.3 billion and 70,104 jobs Livestock farming = $8.6 billion and 30,303 jobs Many counties are highly dependent on agriculture. In fact, 37 0f South Dakota's 66 counties derive at least one half of their total output from ag and ag-related industries. According to Census data, there are 31,989 farms in SD with an average of 1,352 acres. While we always hear that BIG AG is increasing and pushing the small farmers out of business, statistically the average SD farm is 49 acres less than it was in 2007. However this is in part due to a change in the definition of the word "farm." A "farm" is any operation that produces for sale at least $1,000 worth of ag commodities or even "would produce" $1,000 worth of primary agriculture commodities for sale in a normal year. The majority of farms in SD are family farms, although the majority of farms classified as corporations are still family held operations. I am increasingly dismayed over the treatment of South Dakota's farmers and ranchers in this state legislature. The latest example of state government's disregard for agriculture happened Wednesday when urban Republican lawmakers voted against an effort to study a valuation concept known as "actual use," a term that would ensure that prairie grasslands be taxed as grasslands whether or not the soils are deemed capable of being planted to crops.

Tax policy shouldn't force farmers and ranchers to plow up native prairie. I recognize that there are differing opinions on 'actual use' but certainly it is an important issue to farm country that deserves a full study to determine the implications. That's all Senate Bill 4 asked for - a review so we can make a good decision.

There's another disturbing trend in Pierre. Through the past few years, we've seen a continual effort to shift local and particularly school responsibilities to property taxpayers. The state has cut its share of K-12 education and encouraged opt-outs for struggling schools. This year, there are specific efforts by the administration and some lawmakers to redo the long-agreed upon 53-47 ratio of state spending vs. local support for the schools' general funds.

Property taxpayers contribute more than their fair share of our K-12 costs. Remember our farmers and ranchers actually pay more than 18% of the schools' general fund property tax revenues, not including their owner-occupied residences. State government could strangle what has been a golden goose for South Dakota. The strong agricultural economy carried us through the great recession of 2009 with ease. But anyone familiar with agriculture knows that the high prices won't last forever, and we could do a lot of damage if we try to squeeze too much.

Finally I'll point to an effort in 2010 by the administration to apply sales tax on straw and bedding. I was a prime sponsor on the bill which led to an exemption for straw. Cattlemen and dairy farmers showed up to testify and were able to convince a majority of lawmakers to give up that idea. But I still hear from colleagues who think the answer to tax reform is to tax seeds, fertilizers, machinery parts and other farm expenses and input. Our farmers and ranchers are unique in that they often operate on a very low margin, and they can't just raise their prices to cover additional taxes. Their income is subject to the whims of the marketplace. They can't pass taxes onto consumers like many other businesses. So we need to be fair.

We must carefully watch the Roads and Bridges bill in these final weeks. I'm still concerned that too much of the burden for road and bridge repairs may be shifted onto property taxes. It's often said out here that houses don't drive. We need to find the right balance between property taxes and other taxes and fees as we reach a compromise on the roads bill. Agriculture is our number one industry, but sometimes we treat it like a cash cow, and we'd just like to make sure that our family farmers and ranchers get a fair shake out here.

Thank you so much for the opportunity to serve you, the residents of District 1. Please feel free to contact me at rep.feickert@state.sd.us or call me at 605-216-3451 with any questions, concerns or comments. If you plan to travel to Pierre during the legislative session, please let me know as I would be honored to meet with everyone from back home in District 1.

Week 7 Report from Representative Steve McCleerey

On Monday the 23rd of February, I visited the elementary school in Sisseton to have dinner with my two oldest grandchildren, Spencer and Connor, who are in the 4th grade and 1st grade. What a great experience to see and learn from a legislator's point of view! What an event, to see all those kids with such high energy levels at their noon meal break! The best learning moment was the conversation with them on the quality of food that was served for the noon meal.

To my astonishment, from what I had heard prior to this visit, is that they were so happy and joyful with the quality of food. According to my grandchildren, it was "yummy;" they kept saying things like, "Grandpa, we love it!" Overall, the school cafeteria had a great variety of choices plus a fresh salad bar. It was a very positive experience. What a great job was done by the teachers and personnel caring for all these children in the lunchroom and hallways. The many educators in my district need to be thanked over and over for their continuous dedication to their occupation and our children's upbringing and life from pre-school to high school. Thank you!! This has gotten to be a heart driven occupation!! Don't be surprised if I stop at your school in the future.

After a pleasant dinner with my grandchildren, it was back to work!

I was in the minority in voting nay on HB 1201. This bill allows counties with zoning laws to allow/issue conditional use permits with a simple majority votes. Conditional use permits are granted for unique property usages like heavy manufacturing facility/agriculture usages like confined livestock. With current SD law, county commissions can only grant conditional use permit with a 2/3 vote of county commission (5 person board, 4 votes to approve use; absent/abstaining bodies counts against them). This bill would allow a county/municipal to adopt a simple majority for conditional use permits if the county wants to. The bill also touches on the certification process; if a county wants to they can adopt a certification process. This process would pre-approve sites for conditional use permitted projects.

The Health and Human Services Committee heard a bill that I sponsored. HB 1166 prohibits the use of tanning beds by minors. The risk of melanoma drastically increases the younger a person is when they use these tanning devices. Using a tanning bed is not worth getting cancer over. A compromise was unable to be obtained. This bill failed on the House floor. I just do not understand how it failed; trying to make cancer and small business equal is not a strong argument.

One bill I wish would have passed the House floor was HB 1221, which authorizes unilateral consent in certain divorce proceedings. HB 1221 brings South Dakota law in line with almost every other state. An abused spouse will not be forced to testify in front of their spouse that there are irreconcilable differences. Unilateral divorce laws reduce physical threatening situations for both men and women.

Highway funding-still frustrating. Where it will end up? Who knows? We are still trying to get more funding back to local and county government. Stay tuned. The battle lines are being drawn.

Thank you for your support. It has been a great privilege to serve you in Pierre. I look forward to your communications with me in any way you can. This has been a great learning process to be here and to represent all of you. Feel free to contact me at Rep.McCleerey@state.sd.us.

P.S. Thanks Alexandra Farber for her service as a page and the great job she did. I hope her recovery from her car accident goes well. God bless her recovery.

Editorials –

Sota guest editorial –

Majority of Americans agree fighting Climate Change a 'Moral Obligation'

New poll shows majority of Americans believe human activity causes rising greenhouse gases and that people are ethically responsible to address it

By Nadia Prupis, staff writer

(Published on Friday, February 27, 2015 by Common Dreams.)

A majority of Americans believe they are "morally obligated" to fight climate change, a new poll by Reuters/IPSOS has found.

Of the 2,827 people surveyed in the poll, 66 percent said world leaders are ethically bound to reduce carbon emissions, while 72 percent believed that responsibility lay with themselves as well. In addition, 64 percent believe that rising greenhouse gases, which drive climate change, are caused by human activity.

The poll was conducted to parse the impact of moral language in the climate debate and the results suggest that an ethics-based appeal to address environmental issues may be the key to shifting the debate on the topic.

"When climate change is viewed through a moral lens it has broader appeal," Eric Sapp, executive director of the American Values Network, a grassroots organization that mobilizes faith-based communities on politics and policy issues, told Reuters.

"The climate debate can be very intellectual at times, all about economic systems and science we don’t understand," he continued. "This makes it about us, our neighbors and about doing the right thing."

The poll indicates Americans may be responding to recent comments on climate change by religious leaders, including Pope Francis, who in December urged all Catholics to take action against global warming on moral and scientific grounds as "Climate change, the loss of biodiversity and deforestation are already showing their devastating effects in the great cataclysms we witness." In January, he also said that it is "man who has slapped nature in the face."

Pope Francis also criticized world leaders ahead of environmental discussions in Lima, Peru last December for their lack of initiative in addressing climate change and other calamities, calling the issue a "grave ethical and moral responsibility" and warning that "the time to find global solutions is running out."

The pope is scheduled to address Congress later this year, where he is expected to deliver a similar appeal.

Brief editorial comments from the editor’s desk –

On and Off the Lake Traverse Reservation

Our thanks to John Heminger for providing coverage last week of the Moccasins on the Ground anti-establishment rally in Dupree, South Dakota, and for putting on several extra miles since then.

This week we feature photos of the “Lakota 57” support for the 57 students of American Horse School in Allen, SD on the Pine Ridge Reservation.

How tremendous to see the outpouring of support flowing from all four directions, across this country and from overseas.

We also welcome his coverage of the intertribal marijuana conference held in Washington state this past weekend.

While in Seattle he also took photos of the beautiful Native American outdoor murals defaced by vandals. We support the effort to restore the murals.

If anyone still believes racism is a thing of the past … we haven’t far to look to see the wounds have not healed.

*****

While we’ve been focused on efforts by the multinational corporations to have their bought-and-paid-for lawmakers in Congress push through the Keystone XL pipeline project we’ve been missing something else – just as harmful if not more so.

This same “partnership” between corrupt multinational corporations and politicians has been hammering out a new “free” trade deal.

NAFTA is the acronym for the corporate-friendly North American Free Trade Agreement.

And it is headed for passage in Congress.

NAFTA, for instance, makes disputes by even foreign companies against the US to be handled by corporate-picked “arbitrators.” This means that if, for example, a Canadian energy company wants to construct pipelines ON US SOIL it would be illegal to deny that same privilege because our US energy companies have that right.

NAFTA had its twentieth anniversary last year, an opportunity many watchdog groups seized to spotlight the trade deal's devastating consequences.

"Outside of corporate boardrooms and D.C. think tanks, Americans view NAFTA as a symbol of job loss and a cancer on the middle class," Lori Wallach, director of Public Citizen’s Global Trade Watch, said at the time.

"NAFTA’s actual outcomes prove how damaging this type of agreement is for most people, that it should be renegotiated and why we cannot have any more such deals that include job-offshoring incentives, requirements that we import food that doesn’t meet our safety standards or new rights for firms to get taxpayer compensation before foreign tribunals over laws they don’t like.”

*****

Elder's Meditation:

"The beginning is purification, that's the first step. And purification means purification of body and mind. You don't purify the body without cleansing the mind; that's the way it works." -- Rolling Thunder, CHEROKEE

If we have bad thoughts or poison in our minds, they will eventually show up in our bodies in the form of headaches, pains, and stomach problems. It works this way because we are interconnected. Our minds and our bodies are one system. So when we start to grow, or commit to the Red Road, we need to start cleaning up our thoughts and start showing respect for our bodies. We start purifying our minds by prayer and meditation, and we start cleansing our bodies by getting the right amount of sleep and developing good eating habits. Today, I'm going to observe my thoughts. Will my thoughts be clean today? Great Spirit, let me focus on Your love today so my mind will be pure.

*****

Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

Women who seek to be equal with men lack ambition. Timothy Leary (1920 - 1996)

I am certain there is too much certainty in the world. Michael Crichton (1942 - 2008), State of Fear

It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle (384 BC - 322 BC)

I have discovered that all human evil comes from this, man's being unable to sit still in a room. Blaise Pascal (1623 - 1662)

Freedom of the press is limited to those who own one. A. J. Liebling (1904 - 1963)

There are only two kinds of people who are really fascinating: people who know absolutely everything, and people who know absolutely nothing. Oscar Wilde (1854 - 1900)

The only thing that makes life possible is permanent, intolerable uncertainty; not knowing what comes next. Ursula K. LeGuin

*****

The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or “opinion” letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author’s name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor’s explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Earlier receipt of copy is always appreciated. So, if you are aware of a date or message that needs to be publicized or advertised, please let us know about it in advance of the weekly deadline.

The preferred way to submit typed articles and ads, art and photos, is by e-mail.

The editor can be reached at the following e-mail address:

earthskyweb@cs.com

For more information, leave a message on the Sota production office voicemail (605) 938-4452, or send a fax to the 24-hour dedicated line (605) 938-4676.

-- CDF

Obituaries –

Funeral services for Baron Walker

Funeral services for Baron G. Walker, 60 of Veblen, SD were held at the Cahill Funeral Chapel, Sisseton on Tuesday morning, February 24, 2015 with the Rev. Bob Beasley officiating

 Organist was Carol Beasley.

Honorary Pallbearers were Eric Walker, Eli Janise, Sierra Gomez, Victor Simon Jr., Lita St. John, and Elmer St. John.

Visitation was held at the Cahill Funeral Chapel on Tuesday morning to service time.

The Cahill Funeral Chapel, Sisseton, SD is in charge of arrangements.

Baron Gene Walker was born on June 6, 1954 in Phoenix, AZ to Clarence Walker and Delia LaCroix.

In 1960 he attended school at the Tekakawitha Orphanage, Sisseton, SD. He moved to Lincoln, NE for several years before moving to Fort Collin, CO, where he met and married Cynthia Tooantu.

In 2011 he moved back to Sisseton where he remained until his death.

Baron enjoyed being around his friends and going to the Casinos, but most of all he enjoyed his family. Family picnics, outings, family dinners, holiday get-togethers, and we enjoyed him.

Baron lived his life the way he wanted and that was to get everything out of it.

He was very much loved and will be missed by his family.

Baron passed away on Friday, February 20, 2015 at the Coteau Des Prairies Hospital, Sisseton, SD.

Baron is survived by his mother Delia and step father Frank Welch of Sisseton; one sister Crystal Walker of Sisseton; one brother Kenneth Walker of Sisseton; two step-sisters Danielle (John) Two Stars of Peever, and Denise (Ben) Red Horse of Sisseton; nephew Eric Walker of Hankinson, ND, and niece Sierra Gomez of Denver, CO and a lot of nieces and nephews; and a special friend Lita St. John of Veblen.

Baron was preceded in death by his father, Clarence Walker; maternal grandmother, Cora LaCroix and paternal grandmother, Winnie Mireau.

For Baron's obituary and on-line registry please visit www.cahillfuneralchapel.com

Funeral services in Pine Ridge for Farrel Phelps

Farrell Phelps passed away on his journey February 19th, 2015.

Funeral services were held Tuesday morning, February 24, 2015 at the HeSapa New Life Church in Rapid City, SD. A burial service was held that afternoon at the Black Hills National Cemetery in Sturgis, SD.

Officiating was Pastor Larry Salway. Traditional Lakota services were conducted by Mr. Steve DuBray.

Two night wake services were held at the HeSapa New Life Church in Rapid City, SD.

Date of Birth: Wednesday, May 8th, 1957.

Survivors include his brothers Verland “Dusty” Phelps and Ted (Alice) Phelps both of Thunder Valley, Byron Phelps and Matthew Phelps both of Kyle, and Stacy Phelps of Rapid City; sisters Peggy Phelps of Pine Ridge, Charlene Phelps, Ladonna Phelps, Debra Phelps, and DeAnn Phelps, and Lisa Phelps all of Rapid City; numerous nieces and nephews.

Farrel was preceded in death by his parents, Theodore and Marlene Phelps; brother, Myron Phelps, and sisters, Valerie Arcoren and Eleanor Phelps.

Arrangements entrusted with Sioux Funeral Home of Pine Ridge, SD.

Funeral services for Evelyn Mae Renville

Funeral services for Evelyn Mae Renville were held at the Sisseton-Wahpeton Tribal Community Center on Friday afternoon, February 27, 2015. Pastor Milton Owen officiated, with special music by Butch Felix.

Pallbearers were Chase Renville, Brandon Harwood, Desiree German and Leila Redday. Honorary Pallbearers were Blythe Renville, Lilith Renville, and all of Evelyn’s Grandparents, Aunts, Uncles and Cousins.

Interment is in Buffalo Lake Presbyterian Cemetery, rural Eden, SD.

Wake service was held at the Community Center on Thursday evening.

The Cahill Funeral Chapel, Sisseton, SD is in charge of arrangements.

Evelyn was born on February 20, 2015 at Sisseton, SD to Chase Renville and Chantel German.

Evelyn passed away on February 20, 2015.

Evelyn is survived by her parents, Chase Renville and Chantel German of Browns Valley, MN; two sisters, Blythe Renville and Lilith Renville of Browns Valley, MN; maternal grandfather, Wayne German of Peever, SD, maternal grandmother Jane Barse of Browns Valley, MN; maternal great-grandmother Lorraine German of Peever, SD; paternal grandmother Crystal Renville, of New Effington, SD; paternal grandfather Nowell Renville Sr. of New Effington, SD; paternal great-grandmother Carole Iron Moccasin of Sisseton, SD; and paternal great- grandmother Caroline Renville of Milbank, SD.

Evelyn was preceded in death by her maternal great-grandparents and paternal great-grandfathers.

For Evelyn’s obituary and on-line registry please visit www.cahillfuneralchapel.com

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor’s note: The following comes from the editor’s column and the Sota “deadlines and policies” statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or “opinion” letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author’s name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and must be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor’s explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Cherrelle Goodsell graduates from Basic Combat training

During nine weeks of training, US Army Private Cherrelle M. Goodsell studied the Army mission, history, tradition and core values, physical fitness, and received instruction in basic combat skills, military weapons, chemical warfare and bayonet training, drill and ceremony, marching, rifle marksmanship, armed and unarmed combat, map reading, field tactics, military courtesy, military justice system, basic first aid, foot marches, and field training exercises.

Cherrelle Goodsell is the daughter of Trish E. LaFontaine and Todd W. Goodsell, both of Sisseton.

She is a 2010 graduate of Sisseton High School.

Resiliency, Strength, Sacrifice

By Rep. Kristi Noem

February 27, 2015

When a service member joins the military, their spouse and family serves beside them. And just as our military stand ready to respond to crisis here and abroad, their families must be prepared for their loved ones to be sent into harm’s way.

Last week, the Sioux Falls-based 1742nd Transportation Company of the Army National Guard received the 2014 Department of Defense Reserve Family Readiness Award. The Pentagon honors just one Army National Guard Company with this award each year. South Dakota has taken top honors each of the last three years. In 2013, the 235th Military Police Company in Rapid City was recognized, and in 2012, the 842nd Engineer Company in Spearfish was honored. Each of these awards is an incredible tribute that speaks to the integrity and value-system of the South Dakota National Guard and their leadership.

Demands over the last decade have demonstrated the critical role families play in mission success. More so than in previous military engagements, the War on Terror has required our men and women in uniform to be deployed multiple times, meaning far too many American troops have missed not only one Christmas, birthday or anniversary, but two, three or more. Family readiness for deployment, then, is essential. As one Naval Commander put it, deployment is “so much easier when you know that your spouse and your kids are all taken care of.”

For any of us, if there are financial or family problems at home, it can be next to impossible to concentrate on the work that must be done at the office. For men and women in uniform, that distraction could be a matter of life and death. As an Air Force Major wrote, “Without the support of the military family, I find it would be nearly impossible to be in a right state of mind to allow an individual to focus on mission accomplishment when the call comes.”

The most successful family readiness programs don’t start when the family finds out a loved one is going to be deployed. The most successful programs begin long before that and continue throughout the deployment and long after the service member returns home. That is something the 1742nd Transportation Company was recognized for last week.

I had the opportunity to help welcome the 1742nd Transportation Company home from their last tour in the Middle East. Seeing husbands, wives and children rush to their loved ones in uniform sent chills down my spine and tears to my eyes. The families in the auditorium that afternoon are resilient, strong, and courageous. I deeply respect each of them and admire their sense of duty. Each family there has made tremendous sacrifices so our guardsmen and women can defeat evil and protect the freedoms you and I exercise every day.

I will be forever grateful to our service members and their families for the sacrifices they’ve made.

Social “helper” column dedicated to young generation Oyate –

Wawokiyape

By Shay Dirtseller

Dear Shay:

I work at one of these casinos and I swear it has been stressing me out a lot.

It’s like I stepped out of being an adult and walked into a high school.

There is so much gossiping, rumors and cliques. Even the older women aka "elders" do some of the gossiping and arguing.

I have been accused of flirting with someone’s boyfriend by the girls I work with but when I see them they smile in my face like they haven't said a thing behind my back.

Another thing is that because I have friends who are male I, apparently, am having an affair with them and a couple girls even took it upon themselves to tell my husband this B.S!

Why are these places so catty and when a complaint is filed management doesn’t do a damn thing about it?

Signed, Fed Up.

Dear Fed Up:

Well, I think that happens anywhere you work.

There will always be gossiping, rumors and little cliques. You don’t need to be a part of it and you do not have to respond to these people. Remember the saying that …

"Rumors are carried by jealousy, listened to by fools and believed by idiots."

If these people have to talk and start rumors as old as they are then they are the ones who need to grow up!

As for the catty females you work with, just smile and be kind because they obviously jealous of you.

So keep doing your job and ruse above the petty BS. It’s not worth stressing over or losing sleep on.

With that being said have a good day and let the haters keep hating.

Signed, Shay.

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

2015 SWO Career Day April 13th

The Tribal educational entities and Parks & Rec program have set aside April 13, 2015 for this year’s Career Day.

Everyone is welcome to come and learn about careers. Learn about vocational/technical schools, meet military recruiters.

This event is open to students and others of all ages.

There will be door prizes.

Career Day will be held from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at the SWO Administration building/rotunda.

TZTS holds Parent Training

Tiospa Zina Tribal School held a Parent Training last Tuesday, February 24th.

Title was: "Weaving Behaviors from School to Home," and presenter was Heather Robbins.

Participants were actively engaged in strategies to help them reinforce with children the SOAR (Safety, Ownership, Achievement, Respect) expectations used daily at Tiospa Zina.

Thanks to Sam Crawford, Sylvana Flute, Peggy Peters, Lori Wiley, Nita Rae Jones, and Melanie Jorgenson for attending.

The next parent training will be held on March 24 from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at Tiospa Zina.

For more information, please contact Dr. Jen Heath at 698-3953 extension 209.

ESDS students earn ski trip by community service

By Dawn Johnson

ESDS Community Education Coordinator

Students, grade 6th through 8th at ESDS were given the opportunity to earn a skiing/snowboarding/tubing trip.

The following students attended Great Bear on February 13th: Wakanyan Inazin Bertsch, Elijah Goodbird, Kye Goodsell, Storm Aguirre, Xavier Aguirre, Destinee Bunner, Luci Valtierra, Tatianna Rencountre, Destiny Gill, Akisa Manning-Peters, Sabrina Miller and Owemaza Owen.

Students completed 7 hours of community service by being an OST leader during drum group, helping in facilities, shoveling snow in the community, being a teacher’s aide, tutoring students in the SPED department, managing concession stands during games, participating in reading buddies during OST or creating service projects that were sent to community members and the elderly.”

Head Start News

Week of 3/2/15

Dr. Seuss Appreciation Week - Students are encouraged to dress up on the following days:

*Monday, March 2nd - Dr. Seuss Character Day.

*Tuesday, March 3rd - Hat and Shades Day.

*Wednesday, March 4th - Backwards Day.

*Thursday, March 5th - Pajama Day with a Dr. Seuss movie.

Common Sense Parenting Class

Encouraging Good Behavior - March 2nd at 5-7 PM at Head Start in Agency Village. This session teaches attendees about giving "kid" reasons, effective praise, and parents as communicators. Open to the public. Contact Danielle if attending 698-3103, x. 20. Snacks and care packages provided. Child care not provided this session.

Agency Village HS Graduation Parent Meeting

March 3rd at 5 PM at Head Start in Agency Village. We are seeking donations of candy for Easter candygrams. We will be assembling candygrams and could use an extra hot glue gun this night.

Graduation Raffle Fundraiser

Luck O' the Irish Raffle for the month of March. Three opportunities to win. Week 1 drawing for $50 Friday, March 6th; Week 2 drawing for $50 Friday, March 13th; and St. Patrick's Day 50/50 raffle. Tickets are $1.00 each or 6 for $5.00. Purchase from parents of HS graduates or contact Wahca Ackerman, Parent Coordinator or Jermaine Eastman, Parent Co-Coordinator.

Westside Elementary hosts theatre artist

Submitted by Dr. Michelle Greseth

Director of Special Education

Sisseton School District 54-2

Local students from Sisseton's Special Education Department will have the opportunity to work with a professional artist as a part of a school residency at Westside Elementary next week.

Theatre Artist Fran Sillau will conduct workshops for local students as part of the South Dakota Arts Council's Artist in Schools & Communities program. The artist will work with students with disabilities in grades K - 8 during the residency in Sisseton from March 9 through March 12th.

During the weeklong residency, students will explore themselves and the world around them through a variety of theatre arts educational activities. Sillau's workshops range from dramatic activities based on historical events to help students learn about history to full-fledged productions written, directed, acted, and produced by students. Another focus of Sillau is in teaching workshops specifically for youth with physical and developmental disabilities. In this work, he uses theater as a tool to help every child, disabled or not, to see the good and power within themselves.

Over the past decade, Fran Sillau has served as a teacher, writer, director, actor, and producer. With an extensive background in Theatre for Youth, Sillau has worked for both Lexington Children's Theatre and Omaha Theater Company. Sillau has received project funds from The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.

This program is sponsored by the Sisseton School District and the Sisseton Arts Council, with support provided by the South Dakota Arts Council with funds from the State of South Dakota, through the Department of Tourism and the National Endowment for the Arts.

 

Making sure loved ones are prepared for their retirement years

By Jason Alderman

What if a sudden, debilitating illness, fraud or economic downturn affected your senior family member's retirement, estate or long-term care issues? Would you be prepared to take over?

If the answer is no, you're not alone. According to 2013 research (http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2013/07/18/as-population-ages-more-americans-becoming-caregivers/) from the Pew Research Center, four in 10 U.S. adults are caring for a loved one with significant health issues.

Don't wait for a crisis to initiate this conversation. Starting early can help you plan and even safeguard your own career and retirement planning. Here are some suggestions for starting the conversation:

Identify the missing links. Find information gaps you need to fill to help your senior relative plan for retirement. If key financial information – investment and banking accounts, legal documents or doctors' contact information – is missing, list any and all unknowns to be researched and compiled.

Schedule a family financial meeting. Schedule a specific day and time and create an agenda that meets the needs of your senior relative. It is not always necessary to involve all direct family members in a preliminary discussion, but make sure that relevant individuals are aware of the meeting. After helping your senior relative assess his or her financial situation, make sure to identify next steps and responsibilities.

Locate important financial documents. Ask your senior relative to show you where his or her key documents and accounts are, such as retirement and pension information, checkbooks, investment statements, insurance policies and legal and estate data. Find out where incoming bills are kept in case you have to step in and help manage monthly bills.

Consider seeking financial counseling. Any number of reasons, from illness to fraud, may explain losing control of personal finances. If your relative has been working with a qualified financial or tax advisor, the family team should consider meeting with him or her if a need arises. If outside tax, financial or legal help is needed, the team and your senior relative should discuss who those professionals should be, what their fees are and what you expect them to do.

Make and agree on a plan. After all the information gathering and discussion is complete, make a plan – in writing, if possible – to review the senior's wishes, set an action plan and assign responsibilities as necessary. As mentioned above, you should review this plan every year. And if problems emerge in any topic area from retirement to health issues, you'll find guidance throughout the Practical Money Skills for Life website. (http://www.practicalmoneyskills.com/personalfinance/)

Bottom line: Asking older relatives about retirement, estate and long-term care preparations can be an uncomfortable conversation. Making a plan and initiating early conversations to involve the right people can ease the financial strain and stress on everyone involved.

*****

Jason Alderman directs Visa's financial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www.twitter.com/PracticalMoney.

Garden Corner

Submitted by Eric Hanssen

Browns Valley, Minnesota 56219

Now is the time to place your order in for trees.

I see many of the conservation districts have their lists out for landowners to order trees for spring. Ash, due to the looming threat of emerald ash borer to our state, is now absent from many of these lists and landowners are looking for possible substitutes for this tree in their belts.

One ash is still a possibility and it is being offered by some of the districts. This tree is the Manchurian ash. This ash species is native to the same region of Asia as the emerald ash borer and since the two have a close evolutionary history, the borer is not a serious threat to the tree. However, the borer will attack Manchurian ashes which are stressed and this ash species is not as drought tolerant as our native green ash. If Manchurian ash is planted on drought soils it may be vulnerable to emerald ash borer whenever it arrives in that particular location.

The two trees commonly looked upon as ash substitutes are hackberry and Harbin pear.

Hackberry is a relatively fast-growing, hardy tree that is adapted to much of the state. It is native to South Dakota expect north of the Cheyenne to the Missouri River, though I have seen fine trees growing in this area and they line the bank along the south side of the Cheyenne. While this tree is typically a bottomland species, similar to green ash, it also performs well on drier sites but not nearly as droughty as those ash can tolerate. There are two concerns with hackberry. First, it is susceptible to a number of pest problems, though most are more cosmetic, such as hackberry nipple gall, rather than being a serious threat to the tree’s health. Hackberries also require training (pruning) for the first few years after planting as they tend to develop low canopies with long branches. I have seen them grow out, more than up, if they are not pruned to a single stem. However once corrected, hackberries can reach heights and spreads similar to those attained by green ashes.

The other tree, Harbin pear, does not reach the same height as ash.

Most of our mature Harbin pears are only 25 to 35 feet tall (with an equal spread) but they can be an ash replacement in certain situations. The tree is very hardy and is adapted to a wide range of soil pHs and textures. However, it does not tolerate saline soils. Since it is a pear, the tree will be covered with white flowers in the spring. I have seen belts that are almost a ribbon of white in early May. There will also be small, hard, pears in the fall. These small, somewhat rounded, fruits can be used for jams and jellies, but best to let the fruit go through a few frosts first. There is also a wide range of flavors, from mild to bitter, so you may have to taste-test a row to find a tree or two that provides palatable fruit.

Information in this article comes from professor John Ball, SDSU Forestry Specialist in his Pest Update publication available online at

http://sdda.sd.gov/legacydocs/Forestry/educational-information/PDF/pest-alert-2015-Jan-21.pdf.

 

Legals

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATGE

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

IN TRIBAL COURT

CASE NO.: D-15-229-052

In the matter of Jessica Culkins, Plaintiff

vs

Andrew Culkins, Defendant

NOTICE OF HEARING

TO: Andrew Culkins

Take notice that a hearing will be held at the above named Court, Agency Village, outside the city of Sisseton, County of Roberts, South Dakota, on the 23rd day of March, 2015 at the hour of 3:00 p.m. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the Clerk will provide you with a copoy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 12th day of February, 2015.

By order of the Court:

/s/ BJ Jones, Tribal Court Judge

ATTEST: Eileen Pfeiffer, Clerk of Courts

9-3tc

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE: D-15-251-074

IN THE MATTER OF THE CHANGE OF NAME OF:

GRACELYNE BIDDELL, Minor Child,

And concerning:

MINERVA KEOKE, Petitioner.

ORDER AND NOTICE OF

HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Petitioner's request for a change of name from GRACELYNE MARY-ROSE BIDDELL to GRACE MARY LEBEAU shall be heard before the Honorable B.J. JONES, Chief Judge of Tribal Court, in the Courtroom of the Sisseton Wahpeton Tribal Court at Agency Village, South Dakota at _11:30 A.M. on the 11th day of MARCH, 2015.

Dated this 11th day of February, 2015.

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ B.J. Jones, CHIEF JUDGE

ATTEST:

E. Pfeiffer, CLERK OF COURTS

7-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE: D-15-254-077

IN THE MATTER OF THE CHANGE   OF NAME OF:

LANAY DAVILA-FAYANT, Minor Child,

And concerning:

CHARITY DAVILA, Petitioner.

ORDER AND NOTICE OF

HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Petitioner's request for a change of name from LANAY TSIDORA DAVILA-FAYANT to LANAY TSIDORA DAVILA shall be heard before the Honorable B.J. JONES, Chief Judge of Tribal Court, in the Courtroom of the Sisseton Wahpeton Tribal Court at Agency Village, South Dakota at _11:00 A.M. on the 11th day of MARCH, 2015.

Dated this 11th day of February, 2015.

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ B.J. Jones, CHIEF JUDGE

ATTEST:

E. Pfeiffer, CLERK OF COURTS

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE: D-15-254-077

IN THE MATTER OF THE CHANGE

OF NAME OF:

LANAY DAVILA-FAYANT, Minor Child,

And concerning:

CHARITY DAVILA,

Petitioner.

ORDER AND NOTICE OF HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Petitioner's request for a change of name from LANAY ISIDORA DAVILA-FAYANT to LANAY ISIDORA DAVILA shall be heard before the Honorable B.J. JONES, Chief Judge of Tribal Court, in the Courtroom of the Sisseton Wahpeton Tribal Court at Agency Village, South Dakota at _11:00 A.M. on the 11th day of MARCH, 2015.

Dated this 11th day of February, 2015.

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

B.J. Jones, CHIEF JUDGE

ATTEST:

E. Pfeiffer, CLERK OF COURTS

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE: D-15-251-074

IN THE MATTER OF THE CHANGE

OF NAME OF:

GRACELYNE BIDDELL, Minor Child,

And concerning:

MINERVA KEOKE, Petitioner.

AMENDED

ORDER AND NOTICE OF HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Petitioner's request for a change of name from GRACELYNE MARY-ROSE BIDDELL to GRACIE MARY KEOKE shall be heard before the Honorable B.J. JONES, Chief Judge of Tribal Court, in the Courtroom of the Sisseton Wahpeton Tribal Court at Agency Village, South Dakota at _11:30 A.M. on the 11th day of MARCH, 2015.

Dated this 11th day of February, 2015.

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ B.J. Jones, CHIEF JUDGE

ATTEST:

E. Pfeiffer, CLERK OF COURTS

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 12-057

SWOCSE/ TANF/Michelle Blue, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ANTHONY RENVILLE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Establish Child Support Arrears and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 18th day of March, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 18th day of February, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 08-005

SWOCSE/ Daisy Hare, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ANTHONY RENVILLE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 18th day of March, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 18th day of February, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 09-089

SWOCSE/ Shirley Bird, PLAINTIFF

VS.

STEVEN SHARPFISH, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Amend Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 18th day of March, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 18th day of February, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 11-028

SWOCSE/ Cecily Horne-Goodsell, PLAINTIFF

VS.

STEVEN SHARPFISH, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 18th day of March, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 18th day of February, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 07-156

SWOCSE/ Diane Keeble, PLAINTIFF

VS.

STEVEN SHARPFISH, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Amend Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 18th day of March, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 18th day of February, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 13-076

SWOCSE/ TANF/Irene Renville, PLAINTIFF

VS.

STEVEN SHARPFISH, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 18th day of March, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 18th day of February, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 03-018

SWOCSE/ Marcella Haug, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LESLIE GUNDERSON, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 18th day of March, 2015 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 18th day of February, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

9-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 03-152

SWOCSE/ Ramona St. John, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LESLIE GUNDERSON, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 18th day of March, 2015 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 18th day of February, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 11-078

SWOCSE/ Tanya Renville, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MARTIN BELL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 19th day of March, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 19th day of February, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 15-035

SWOCSE/ Danette Kirk, PLAINTIFF

VS.

EMILY TROTTIER, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 19th day of March, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 19th day of February, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 14-075

SWOCSE/ Tiffany Schaack, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MIKA RONDELL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 19th day of March, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 19th day of February, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

9-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 07-088

SWOCSE/ Kimberly Keeble, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CLAUDE KEEBLE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 19th day of March, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 19th day of February, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

9-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 15-029

SWOCSE/ Lorelei Brave, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MEMOREE THOMAS, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Recognize a Foreign Order and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 19th day of March, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 19th day of February, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATEIN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 15-031

SWOCSE/ Kimberly Minor, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MEMOREE THOMAS, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 19th day of March, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 19th day of February, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

9-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 13-112

SWOCSE/ Dacia Shepherd, PLAINTIFF

VS.

STEVEN SHARPFISH, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Amend Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 20th day of March, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 20th day of February, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

9-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 14-216

SWOCSE/ Bessie Genia, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CHRIS BLUE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Amend Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 20th day of March, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 20th day of February, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 13-176

SWOCSE/ Sherielle DuMarce, PLAINTIFF

VS.

VINCENT PEREZ, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 20th day of March, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 20th day of February, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 13-150

SWOCSE/ Myrriah Gray Eagle, PLAINTIFF

VS.

TYSON LUFKINS, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 20th day of March, 2015 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 20th day of February, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 14-190

SWOCSE/ Shelby Renville, PLAINTIFF

VS.

EAMMON BARSE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Paternity. Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 20th day of March, 2015 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 20th day of February, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

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SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION 

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 03-269

SWOCSE/ Gordon Redday, PLAINTIFF

VS.

BETHEL GILL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 20th day of March, 2015 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 20th day of February, 2015

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

9-3tc

Trading Post ads

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

Job Openings

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate is seeking to fill the following positions(s):

Project Director/Outreach Coordinator, Realty

Outreach Worker, Realty

Teacher (4-positions),   Early Head Start

Bailiff/File Clerk, Tribal Court

Police Officer (2-positions), Law Enforcement

Closing Date: March 13th, 2015 @ 04:30 PM

All interested applicants may obtain application and job description information at the Human Resource Department, of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate or contact Arnold Williams at (605) 698-8238 or Denise Hill at (605) 698-8362. (Tribal preference will apply.)

 

Sisseton Wahpeton College

Has the following vacancy:

Sponsored Programs Specialist Full time, BA in Accounting, Business Administration, other relevant field, or a combination of education (an Associate’s Degree in Accounting or Business Administration) and at least 2 years of relevant work experience.

Closing date: March 9, 2015 at 4:30 p.m. Please visit our website at www.swc.tc for a complete job description and application.

 

Tiospa Zina Tribal School

Employment Opportunities

2014-2015 School Year Vacancies:

Substitutes needed for custodial, kitchen, teaching, and transportation - starting at $10/hr, varies per position Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma (please contact the HR office for more information) Applications are accepted on an on-going basis

Vacancy: Art Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a K-12 Art Teacher Opening Date: July 1, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Elementary Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for an Elementary Teacher Opening Date: January 22, 2015 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Reading Coach Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Reading Coach Opening Date: October 30, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Bus Monitor ($13/hr) Qualifications: High School Diploma/GED+; currently has/willing to obtain CPR and First Aid certification Opening Date: November 21, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

If interested please submit an application and Advisor Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School. Opening Date: September 11, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filledIf you would like to apply to be a part of the TZ tiwahe you may pick up an application from the TZTS HR office located at #2 Tiospa Zina Dr. Agency Village, SD 57262. Applications may also be printed off the HR web page by downloading from links under employment forms to the left. Completed applications may be sent to PO Box 719, Agency Village, SD 57262. Faxed to: 605-698-7686. For further information call 605-698-3953 ext. 208. Indian Preference employer. At will employer. All applicants are subject to a Background Check and Pre-Employment Drug Test, pursuant to SWSB policy.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

UNIFORMS: UNIFORM ATTENDENT (1 FULL- TIME). GENERAL FUNCTION: Responsible for all aspects of issuing, cleaning, and/or replacing uniforms for all uniformed employees. REQUIREMENTS: High School Diploma or GED. Effective communication skills. Basic skills. Ability to handle diverse situations and/or people. Lifting up to 40 pounds at a time. Pushing, pulling, turning hampers weighing up to 115 pounds. Reaching, bending, and standing. May be on feet for long periods of time. Able to work with soap and other cleaning chemicals. Must obtain a Non-Gaming license upon hire.

This position will close on March 4th 2015 at 4pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

C-Store Department:

Deli Attendant (1) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, includes weekends & holidays. Ability to operate necessary equipment. Physical ability to stand for long hours, clean, lift heavy objects up to 30 lbs., and restock inventory; 6 mos. previous cooking experience preferred, 6 mos. working with the public. Knowledge of food preparation safety requirements. Must be dependable & available to work any & all shifts. Must be at least 18 years old & have a High School diploma or GED.

Clerk/Cashier (1) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, includes weekends & holidays. Excellent customer service skills; math skills essential; ability to operate necessary equipment; physical ability to lift moderate amounts of weight; previous experience working with money preferred; strong organizational skills managing various functions; dependable & available to work any & all shifts. Must be at least 21 years old & have a High School diploma or GED.

Opening date: Thursday, February 26, 2015

Closing date: Wednesday, March 4, 2015 @ 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

Position: Surveillance Manager

Qualifications:  High School Diploma or GED. Formal training in law enforcement is preferred, 2 years supervisory experience in Surveillance, 3 years work experience and/or training in security, law enforcement, loss prevention, and/or other related fields. Experience in and documenting the results for criminal proceedings. Ability to maintain strict confidentiality. Mechanical ability and computer experience is required. Knowledge of CCTV, security systems, gaming cheating, concept of operations. Knowledge of Indian gaming. Must be at least 21 years old. Must obtain a Key Gaming License.

Hours: Full-time

Opening Date: Thursday, February 26, 2015

Closing Date: Wednesday, March 11, 2015 @ 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.