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Vol. 47 Issue No. 29

Anpetu Iyamni, July 20, 2016

Inside this Edition –

Self-Governance: "How to" guide

SWO work crews assist in cleanup of Browns Valley storm damage

Committee report on 149th annual SWO Wacipi in this edition

Meth support group to host guest speaker next Monday

Off-grid solar furnace project underway

S-W Federal Credit Union announces annual meeting

Next week: Highlights of Korean Veterans honoring ceremony

Note to candidates: New Sota discounted rates, pre-payment policy

Deadline for receipt of copy is Friday noon

What is the step-by-step "How-to" to be a Self-Governance Tribe?

Submitted by the SWO Self-Governance Work Group

Some of the questions the Tribal members ask have to do with the process, the "How-to," of entering the Self-Governance program. Many are more familiar with writing a grant. The compacting process is different. Recognizing the sovereignty of Tribal Governments, the Indian Self-Determination and Educational Assistance Act (P.L. 93-638) provides a process that respects and upholds the government-to-government relationship.

1.  Planning. To begin the process, a Tribe conducts planning. Planning typically includes gathering information from IHS and studying that information to determine whether to assume IHS programs and activities.

2.  Eligibility Determination. The Tribe also requests a determination from the IHS Office of Tribal Self-Governance on whether the Tribe satisfies the eligibility criteria for financial stability and financial management capability.

3.  Tribal Action to Request Participation. After receiving a determination that the Tribe meets those criteria and is qualified to participate in Self-Governance, the Tribe must pass a resolution: (1) to confirm or declare its planning process was completed to its own satisfaction; and (2) to formally request participation in the Self-Governance Program. IHS will provide technical assistance as the Tribe prepares to participate in the program, including coordination of meetings with IHS program offices.

4.  Negotiations. Once the Tribe has completed the planning phase to its satisfaction and formally requests participation in the program, the Tribe and IHS negotiate a draft Compact and Funding Agreement. Assisted by a Federal negotiation team, the Agency Lead Negotiator ("ALN") reviews the draft and works together with the Tribe to reach agreement on the final documents.

5.  Compact and Funding Agreement Approval. Upon signature by the Indian Health Service and Tribal leadership, the Tribe is able to assume operation of the programs and activities.

Where is SWO in this process? Planning phase. The Tribe has engaged an expert consultant team to assist in completing the planning study this summer. A great deal of information has been requested - and received - from the Indian Health Service. The information includes budgetary and financial, staffing plans, policies and procedures, population, and workload. The expert consultant team is preparing a draft report for the Tribe that should be available by the end of the month. It is expected to summarize the planning that has been done so far, include a financial analysis, and lay out options for consideration. According to Law, the planning phase has to be completed to the satisfaction of the Tribe, so this is the critical step that will determine next steps, if any.

The purpose of the planning phase is to explore whether health care services, health status, and access for the Oyate would improve under Tribal operation. Another purpose of the planning phase is to assess the Tribe's readiness for operating programs in addition to those it already operates under Title I. of the Act. Title V, also known as "Self-Governance", is another authority under the same Act. The Law provides that Tribes may contract Programs, Functions, Services and Activities (PFSAs), currently operated at Service Unit, Area and Headquarters levels of the Indian Health Service.

So what options may the Tribe consider for Self-Governance?

1.  Stay as is with health care dually operated by IHS/Federal and Tribe/638 Title I

2.  Tribe converts existing 638/Title I contract to 638/Title V compact

3.  Tribe retrocedes its 638/Title contract so health care is 100% Federally operated and services can be better integrated

4.  Tribe assumes one or more additional Programs, Functions, Services or Activities (PFSAs) under Title I

5.  Tribe assumes one or more additional PFSAs (to those it currently operates) under Title V

6.  Tribe employs a phased approach to gradually assume additional PFSAs under Title I or Title V over a span of time

7.  Tribe assumes all Federal PFSAs under Title I or Title V by a certain target date

If the Tribe decides to enter Self-Governance, the Tribe determines which programs and services it will take over. The Tribe can select those programs and services that the Tribe feels it can run that will improve health care services, health status and health care access for the people.

Off-Grid Solar Furnace project underway; Note deadlines approaching

Submitted by SWO Planning Department

The Tribal Energy Office (TEO), is offering to the SWO elderly the opportunity to attain solar heating systems in their homes.

By completing an application, you are requesting to receive a free supplemental off-grid solar furnace, paid for by the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate. If you are selected you will have to provide monthly statements from your electric company for the previous year and monthly electric statements for one- year following the off-grid solar air furnace installation.

Only ten homes will be selected for this project.

The applications are provided at the Planning Department Office in the Sisseton-Wahpeton Administration Building and are due at Friday, July 29th, 2016 at 4:30 p.m.

Requirements of applicant must be a home owner who is at least 55 years or older. In addition to the TEO office providing the off-grid solar furnace to the SWO elderly, it is also accepting applications from all members who are interested in learning how to assemble and install the off-grid solar furnaces. Limited applications will be selected to 20-participants. The deadline in submitting the application will also be July 29th, 2016 at 4:30 p.m.

For more information please contact Hazen T. LaMere at the Planning Office:

Phone: 605-698-8212

E-mail: hazenl@swo-nsn.gov.

S-W Federal Credit Union announces annual meeting

The annual meeting of members of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Federal Credit Union will be held on Thursday, August 18, 2016 at 5:00 p.m. at the Tribal Elderly Center, Agency Village, SD.

Here is the agenda:

1. Financial report.

2. Committee reports.

3. Election of three (3) board members. (Note: This is a voluntary board, no stipends.)

4. Other business.

5. Door prize drawings

Any member of the SWFCU, 21 years of age or older with knowledge about the Credit Union or willing to learn can run for a position by filing a notice of intent at the Credit Union office by 3:00 p.m. on Thursday, August 18, 2016 and must be current on any obligations at the Credit Union.

To be eligible for the door prizes, you must be a member of the Credit Union by 3:00 pm on Thursday, August 18, 2016 and current on any obligations to the Credit Union.

Small business grant awarded

Submitted by SWO Planning Department

Nick's Wood & Lawn Service is owned and managed by Edwin "Big Nick" Crawford, an enrolled member of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate.

Nick's Wood & Lawn Service is a successful seasonal business that has been providing quality services to businesses and community members since 2004.

The business does lawn maintenance for Sisseton-Wahpeton Housing Authority, District Centers, and individual Tribal members.

Services include lawn maintenance, overgrowth trimming, and trash pick-up. In addition to the lawn services, the company provides wood during the winter months to tribal members who use wood burning stoves and/or traditional inipis.

Nick's Wood & Lawn Service applied for the Planning Department's Small Business Grant with the objective to upgrade equipment which is currently being used and to purchase new equipment to continue the quality of labor they provide and meet the demand of the growing business.

The Small Business Grant was created to provide funds for small businesses like Nick's Wood & Lawn Service. Therefore, after reviewing Big Nick's application and business plan, the Planning Department was honored to assist him in his endeavors to move forward in reaching his entrepreneurial goals.

With any questions in regards to Nick's Wood & Lawn Service, you may contact them at (605)-742-1061 or (605)268-1122.

SWO crews assist in Browns Valley storm cleanup

Responding to calls for assistance from Oyate living at Browns Valley, SWO Tribal Chairman Dave Flute called out Tribal workers to help clean up storm damage.

Lake Traverse District Councilman Francis Crawford assisted in identifying Tribal member homes that needed help.

A severe thunderstorm on Saturday, July 9th with high winds caused lots of downed limbs, toppled many trees, and knocked down several power lines.

Tribal Maintenance crews went out on Sunday to begin assisting alongside Browns Valley city workers and other volunteers, then returned Monday morning.

On Monday, they were joined by workers from SWO Tribal Roads.

Despite the severe damage to trees, there were no reports of extensive damage to homes or injuries.

Several garages were damaged by falling trees, and there was isolated flooding – but thankfully not a repeat of the flood that occurred in 2006.

Here are photo highlights of some of the damage.

Senator Heitkamp aide visits SWO

SWO Tribal Chairman Dave Flute met last Thursday with Clint Bowers, Legislative Assistant to North Dakota U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp from Washington, DC.

The Chairman visited with Mr. Bowers and gave him a tour of the Tribal administration building.

The Senator's aide said he intends to work closely with the SWO Tribe.

Sisseton School District hires new superintendent

Long-time Superintendent Dr. Stephen Schulte has stepped down from that office after serving for many years, and the Sisseton School Board had hired Dr. Neil Terhune to fill the position.

Dr. Terhune is a veteran, having served in the Vietnam War and Gulf War during a 24-year military career.

He retired from the military in 1994 with the rank of Major.

His service included serving as squad leader (at the age of 19) and (later) serving as field engineering instructor to graduate-level Army officers at the US Army Engineer School. He also trained young soldiers in a variety of vocational schools.

Since then, he has had a long career in civilian education, as a teacher and as a superintendent.

"I have had the rare privilege of commanding three engineer companies," he told the Sisseton Courier.

"Many of my soldiers were fresh out of high school. I know what those students are preparing for."

It's worth noting that Dr. Terhune's work in education has been in districts with a predominantly Native American student enrollment – such as the Sisseton public school district.

Terhune is married to his high school sweetheart, Theresa. They have a large family that includes five children, 31 grandchnildren, and two great-grandchildren.

He plans to count his new school district as "family," as he leads it.

"I have considerable experience leading organizations in change and do so in a positive, steady and conscientious manner," he said.

"I understand and am happy to immerse myself 24/7 in this job. This is the standard both in the military and as a school or administrator. The unit or school becomes my family and I wouldn't have it any other way."

(Note: Content taken from the Sisseton Courier.)

C-store robbery remains under investigation

An undisclosed but large amount of cash was stolen from the Agency Village C-Store safe the weekend of the July 4th pow wow.

No details are available from officials, but the crime remains under investigation by the SWO Criminal Investigator and FBI agents.

Speaker coming next Monday to SWO meth support group

Meth support group to bring guest speaker to SWC 6 p.m. next Monday

Brandi Eastman, organizer of local meth support group meetings, has announced that a guest speaker will be coming to the Lake Traverse Reservation next Monday, July 25th.

Brandi says, "Look who we got coming to Sisseton!"

"I'm super excited about this. She has a powerful story…."

Jannette R. Norum is coming from Pierre, SD, to share her story.

She will talk about overcoming IV meth addiction.

The support group has arranged to host Jannette at the Sisseton Wahpeton College omniciye tipi at 6:00 p.m.

Everyone interested in being part of the solutions please come if you can.

Legislation would place federal lands at Black Hills under state management

(Editor's note: It's difficult to see why placing federal lands in the sacred Black Hills under state management would be a good thing for Indian country.)

Washington, DC – July 14, 2016 – U.S. Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.) today introduced legislation cosponsored by Sen. Mike Rounds (R-S.D.) that would facilitate a federal-state land exchange that includes nearly 2,000 acres of federally owned land in the Spearfish Canyon and Bismarck Lake areas and nearly 2,000 acres of land in four separate state-owned parcels. U.S. Rep. Kristi Noem (R-S.D.) introduced a companion bill in the House of Representatives. The delegation introduced its respective bills in response to a request from Gov. Dennis Daugaard (R-S.D.).

"The state of South Dakota has proven time and again that it can preserve and protect South Dakota's natural resources while providing unparalleled outdoor experiences that attract people from across the state and nation," said Thune. "I'm confident this track record will lend itself to creating similar opportunities in the Spearfish Canyon and Bismarck Lake areas once this land exchange is completed."

"Tourists come from all over the world to catch a glimpse of our unique landscape and natural resources," said Rounds. "This exchange will allow the state to manage more land near two popular tourist sites in the Black Hills—Custer State Park and Roughlock Falls, located near the Spearfish Canyon Lodge. I thank Sen. Thune and Rep. Noem for their work on this legislation, and I look forward to continuing to work with them and the state of South Dakota to see this transfer through."

"Like so many families in South Dakota and across the nation, ours is enamored with Spearfish Canyon," said Noem. "In the busy chaos of life, you can find peace and serenity there that is unmatched. South Dakota has shown over and over again that we can provide access to sites like this while preserving them for our children and grandchildren to enjoy as well. I'm proud to work with Senators Thune and Rounds to bring this state treasure under local control."

The land exchange would include 1,468 federally owned acres in the Spearfish Canyon area and 484 federally owned acres in the Bismarck Lake area, which includes Camp Bob Marshall, land leased by the U.S. Forest Service to the Western Dakota 4-H Camp Association for youth camps. The state-owned portion of the exchange includes approximately 1,954 acres of land in separate parcels.

Legislation to help businesses, jobs in Indian country

Washington, DC – July 14, 2016 – Senators Jon Tester (D-Mont.), Maria Cantwell (D-Wash.), and Tom Udall (D-N.M.) today introduced legislation to help launch businesses and create more jobs in Indian Country.

Their bill, the Native American Business Incubators Program Act, will establish and fund business incubators in Indian Country to help start-up and cultivate Native American-owned small businesses.

"Starting a business is a challenge anywhere, but folks in Indian Country face even more obstacles when they try and get a business off of the ground," Tester said. "This bill will provide critical tools to Native American entrepreneurs so they can strengthen tribal economies and hire folks in their communities."

"Many of the Northwest Tribes are in isolated regions of our state. This incubator program helps them build skills and expertise that can help create jobs in our rural communities. This bill helps provide tools and training to help Native American-owned businesses thrive and strengthen the communities around them," said Cantwell.

"Small businesses create jobs and opportunity and empower people to shape their own future, and that's why I'm doing all I can to support New Mexico's entrepreneurs, especially in Indian Country," Udall said. "This bill will help Native American business owners navigate obstacles, cut through red tape, and get access to start-up funding. These important tools will help promising entrepreneurs get off on the right foot so they can launch their businesses — and stay in business."

Businesses often struggle in Native American communities because entrepreneurs must deal with regulatory uncertainty, remoteness, and difficulty accessing capital.

Tester, Cantwell, and Udall's bill will create an annual $5 million competitive grant initiative within the Interior Department to establish or maintain business incubators that serve Native American communities.

"The economic contributions of tribal businesses and enterprises have proven positive impacts to tribes, their surrounding communities, states, and the national economy. NCAI applauds the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs for introducing the Native American Business Incubators Bill, which will become a vital tool for tribal businesses and entrepreneurs to spur job creation and economic growth in our communities and elsewhere," said Jacqueline Pata, Executive Director, National Congress of American Indians.

"We endorse and welcome the introduction of this important legislation that responds favorably to many requests over the years for Congress to create a business development program tailored specifically to Indian Country's unique sovereign and business characteristics and capabilities, and focused on incubation and access to capital challenges," said Gary Davis, President and CEO of the National Center for American Indian Enterprise Development.

Tribal business incubators will create a one-stop-shop for Native American entrepreneurs so they can get assistance developing a business plan navigating federal, tribal, and state regulations; and attracting outside investment. The incubators will also provide entrepreneurs a connected workspace and professional networking opportunities.

To be considered for a grant, the applicant must serve one or more tribal communities, submit a three-year plan, provide a physical workspace, offer business skills training and education, and meet other specific requirements. Tribes, Tribal Colleges or Universities, and non-profit organizations are eligible to operate a business incubator. The Native American Business Incubators Program Act will also provide oversight to business incubators and ensure they are delivering on their commitment to Native American entrepreneurs.

According to the National Congress of American Indians, 39 percent of Native Americans living on reservations are in poverty and the unemployment rate is 19 percent—more than three times the national average. Additionally, almost half of working age Native Americans living on reservations in certain states said there is a lack of jobs in their community.

Bipartisan Bill to protect Veterans' credit scores

Pierre, SD – July 15, 2016 – U.S. Sens. Mike Rounds (R-S.D.) and Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) announced today they have introduced bipartisan legislation that would protect the credit ratings of veterans wrongly penalized by delays in reimbursements for medical bills by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). In addition to experiencing long wait times and issues making appointments through the Veterans Choice Program, veterans are also getting billed inappropriately for services because the VA has failed to pay health care providers in a timely fashion. These bills, which should be covered by VA benefits, can create financial hardship for veterans and damage their credit scores.

The Protecting Veterans' Credit Act would delay for one year medical debt from being reported to credit agencies for veterans who have accessed services through the Veterans Choice Program and other similar VA community care programs. This would allow time for payment issues to be resolved without impacting veterans' credit scores.

"No veteran should have to worry about a lower credit rating and all the costs associated with it because of delays in payment and processing from the VA," said Rounds. "Our legislation makes certain that veterans do not suffer financial hardship – through no fault of their own – when they choose to use a private health provider through the Choice program. Our veterans should be focused on proper treatment and recovery; not whether receiving care will affect their credit rating."

"Hoosier veterans and their credit ratings can be harmed as a result of delays by the VA, which can make it harder to buy a house, rent an apartment, buy a car, or even get a job," said Donnelly. This bipartisan bill would provide relief directly to the men and women who served our country with honor and distinction. They deserve access to quality and timely health care services and the benefits they have earned, without worrying it will lead to financial ruin."

Several advocacy and veterans' advocacy organizations have expressed their support for the legislation including the Vietnam Veterans of America, the Paralyzed Veterans of America, and the National Patient Advocate Foundation.

"Medical debt wrecks disaster on patients and their families," said Alan Balch, CEO, National Patient Advocate Foundation & Patient Advocate Foundation. "No one deserves to be a casualty of the effects of medical debt, but veterans least of all. The provisions in the Protecting Veterans Credit Act will help defend our veterans from the toxicity of medical debt and its long-term impacts, and ensure they do not suffer a credit loss incurred through no fault of their own when fighting an unpredictable or unforeseen illness. A lowered credit rating or bankruptcy should never be the collateral damage of a veteran seeking medical care."

Congressman John Delaney (MD-06) recently led the introduction of bipartisan companion legislation in the U.S. of House of Representatives.

Williams calls for Senator Thune to debate

Yankton, SD – July 12, 2016 – Jay Williams, South Dakota's Democratic U.S. Senate candidate, is calling for Senator John Thune to debate him. In past years, Dakotafest in Mitchell has been the unofficial kickoff to the political debate season. This year, Senator Thune has told Dakotafest sponsor IDEAg Group that he has no plans to debate this year. Mr. Williams is calling for Senator Thune to change his position and agree to a series of debates.

Mr. Williams issued the following statement calling for Senator Thune to debate him:

"There are major issues challenging the United States and South Dakota. Senator Thune has a responsibility to debate me and tell the voters of South Dakota his views on these issues. The voters of South Dakota deserve to hear how the incumbent Senator and his challenger stand on the issues. Senator Thune has voted repeatedly to repeal the Affordable Care Act. This in spite of the fact that the Indian Health Care Improvement Act (IHCIA), the cornerstone legal authority for the provision of health care to American Indians and Alaska Natives, was made permanent as part of the Affordable Care Act. This is just one of several issues where Senator Thune and I disagree. We differ on how to address the income inequality in our country and on the importance of eliminating fossil fuels as our source of energy. Senator Thune needs to explain why he endorses the racist, self professed greedy real estate mogul, Donald Trump for President. Let's have a series of debates to discuss these and other issues important to South Dakota voters."

Mr. Williams is calling on media outlets throughout South Dakota to provide a venue for debates. Even if Senator Thune refuses to attend, Williams promises he will show up and answer questions.

Investments in IHS, Wildfire Prevention; Stop WOTUS, DC Booth Closure

Washington, DC – July 14, 2016 – Rep. Kristi Noem today joined the U.S. House of Representatives in passing new investments into the Indian Health Service (IHS) and wildfire prevention efforts, while also preventing the DC Booth Fish Hatchery from closing and stopping the EPA from completing its controversial Waters of the U.S. (WOTUS) rule. Despite increased support for many South Dakota priorities, the legislation reduced overall spending $64 million below FY2016 levels and $1 billion below the President's budget request.

"While not perfect, this legislation moves us closer to a model that does more good with fewer dollars," said Noem. "The EPA's bloated budget and overreaching regulatory policies have made it more difficult for many in South Dakota. I'm proud to have made significant cuts to EPA funding and reduced spending overall, while also offering needed support for IHS, wildfire prevention, the PILT program and other critical South Dakota priorities."

The FY2017 Interior and Environment appropriations bill includes:

· 5% increase in support for the IHS, bringing funding to $5.1 billion for FY2017 of which $6 million has been specifically targeted to IHS facilities facing accreditation emergencies, like those in Rosebud and Pine Ridge

· Fully funds wildland firefighting and prevention programs, dedicating more than half of the U.S. Forest Service budget to fire prevention and suppression

· Prevents the DC Booth Fish Hatchery from closure in FY2017

· Fully funds Payment in Lieu of Taxes (PILT), which helps states like South Dakota that have large areas of federal lands fix roads, hire teachers, pay police officers and provide other vital services

· Prohibits the EPA from completing the WOTUS rule, which could expand the agency's regulatory jurisdiction over small ditches, prairie potholes, and even seasonally wet areas

· Reduces funding for the EPA's regulatory programs by 6% and brings EPA staffing to lowest point since 1989

· Directs agencies to collaborate to finish needed upgrades to the Mni Wiconi Rural Water Project

· Prevents the Fish and Wildlife Service from placing the sage grouse on the Endangered Species List

(Editor's note: As with all of our Congressional delegates, Rep. Noem's priorities are a mixed bag; some support our Oyate's concerns, others clearly do not. Of special note here are those which favor corporate interests over the environment.)

Bill to Stand up for Native children unanimously passes in U.S. House committee

Washington, DC – July 14, 2016 – U.S. Senators Heidi Heitkamp (D-ND) and Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) today announced that their bipartisan bill to improve the lives of Native American children unanimously passed in the U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources – the final step before a vote in the full U.S. House of Representatives. Their bill passed in the Senate last year.

In May, Heitkamp testified before the Committee about the urgent need to pass their bill to implement solutions that would address the overwhelming obstacles Native children face – including experiencing levels of post-traumatic stress similar to newly returning veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan dramatically increased risks of suicide, and lower high school graduation rates than any racial or ethnic demographic in the country. Heitkamp and Murkowski's bill would work to address these and other challenges with lasting policies and resources to promote better outcomes for Native youth.

Specifically, Heitkamp and Murkowski's bill would create a Commission on Native Children to identify the complex challenges facing Native children in North Dakota, Alaska, and across the United States by conducting an intensive study on these issues – including high rates of poverty, staggering unemployment, child abuse, domestic violence, crime, substance abuse, and dire economic opportunities – and making recommendations on how to make sure Native children get the protections, as well as economic and educational tools they need to thrive.

"Too often, Native young people are overlooked when it comes to federal resources and attention, even though they face some of the greatest obstacles to overcome," said Heitkamp. "No child in America should be left to beat the odds alone – and today, our bill took another important step forward and is continuing to build momentum to help confront the disproportionate challenges Native children face. From living in dilapidated homes with scant educational and economic opportunities, Native young people experience some of the highest rates of suicide and post-traumatic stress in the country, yet they are often forced to overcome these barriers on their own. It's my hope that as the full House considers this bill, it does so with the urgency of these problems in mind. Together, we can promote the better outcomes Native young people deserve."

"This bill will create a commission to make recommendations on how to ensure that Native children are better taken care of and given the opportunities needed to thrive," said Murkowski. "I am immensely proud of this legislation that bears the namesake of Reverend Dr. Walter A. Soboleff, a treasured Native elder and culture-bearer who fought for education, human rights, and for upholding traditional native values. I thank Congressman Young for his support in the House as this critical piece of legislation moves closer to being signed into law."

As a member of the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, Heitkamp first introduced the bill in 2013 to create a Commission on Native Children as her first bill in the U.S. Senate where it quickly gained bipartisan momentum. In June 2015, Heitkamp's bill unanimously passed in the U.S. Senate and was introduced by both Republican and Democratic members of the U.S. House of Representatives.

Since her time as North Dakota's Attorney General, Heitkamp has been committed to working with both sides of the aisle to develop policies that advance Native American priorities and improve the lives of Native youth for generations to come.

The Alyce Spotted Bear and Walter Soboleff Commission on Native Children, named for the former Chairwoman of Mandan, Hidatsa & Arikara Nation in North Dakota, and Alaska Native Elder and statesman, respectively, has gained widespread praise by a cross-section of tribal leaders and organizations from North Dakota, Alaska, and around the country. It has been lauded by former Chairman of the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs Byron Dorgan, the National Congress of American Indians, and the National Indian Education Association, among others.

Background:

Conditions for young people in Indian Country are tragic. For example:

· More than one in three American Indian and Alaska Native children live in poverty.

· Suicide rates for Native children ages 15-24 years old are 2.5 times the national average and is the second-leading cause of death in that age group.

· While the overall rate of child mortality in the U.S. has decreased since 2000, the rate for Native children has increased 15 percent.

· At 67 percent, American Indian and Alaska Native students had the lowest four year high school graduation rate of any racial or ethnic group in the 2011-2012 school year.

· 60 percent of American Indian schools do not have adequate high-speed internet or digital technology to meet the requirements of college and career ready standards.

Tribal governments face numerous obstacles in responding to the needs of Native children. Existing programmatic rules and the volume of resources required to access grant opportunities stymie efforts of tribes to tackle these issues. At the same time, federal agencies lack clear guidance about the direction that should be taken to best address the needs of Native children to fulfill our trust responsibility to tribal nations.

To help reverse these impacts, the Commission on Native Children would conduct a comprehensive study on the programs, grants, and supports available for Native children, both at government agencies and on the ground in Native communities, with the goal of developing a sustainable system that delivers wrap-around services to Native children. Then, the 11-member Commission would issue a report to address a series of challenges currently facing Native children. A Native Children Subcommittee would also provide advice to the Commission. The Commission's report would address how to achieve:

· Better Use of Existing Resources – The Commission will identify ways to streamline current federal, state, and local programs to be more effective and give tribes greater flexibility to devise programs for their communities in the spirit of self-determination and allow government agencies to redirect resources to the areas of most need.

· Increased Coordination – The Commission will seek to improve coordination of existing programs benefitting Native children. The federal government houses programs across numerous different agencies, yet these programs too often do not work together.

· Measurable Outcomes – The Commission will recommend measures to determine the wellbeing of Native children, and use these measurements to propose short-term, mid-term, and long-term national policy goals.

· Stronger Data – The Commission will seek to develop better data collection methods. Too often Native children are left out of the conversation because existing data collection, reporting, and analysis practices exclude them.

· Stronger Private Sector Partnerships – The Commission will seek to identify obstacles to public-private partnerships in Native communities.

· Implementation of Best Practices – The Commission will identify and highlight successful models that can be adopted in Native communities.

US and Navajo Nation agree to 2nd phase in abandoned uranium mines cleanup

Washington, DC – July 15, 2016 – Today, in a settlement agreement with the Navajo Nation, the United States agreed to provide funding necessary to continue clean-up work at abandoned uranium mines on the Navajo Nation. Specifically, the United States will fund environmental response trusts to clean up 16 priority abandoned uranium mines located across the Navajo Nation. The agreement also provides for evaluations of 30 more abandoned uranium mines, and for studies of two abandoned uranium mines to determine if groundwater or surface waters have been affected by those mines.

The work to be conducted is subject to the joint oversight and approval of the Navajo Nation Environmental Protection Agency and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The United States previously provided funding for evaluations at the 16 priority mines in a "Phase 1" settlement executed in 2015.

"This second phase agreement takes the next step in ensuring the cleanup of abandoned mines that pose the most significant risks to people's health and initiates the evaluations of additional mines for future cleanup," said Assistant Attorney General John C. Cruden for the Justice Department's Environment and Natural Resources Division. "Addressing the legacy of uranium mining on Navajo lands reflects the commitment of the Justice Department and the Obama Administration to fairly and honorably resolve the historic grievances of American Indian tribes and build a healthier future for their people."

"We're very pleased to continue this vital work to address the legacy of uranium mining on the Navajo Nation," said Acting Regional Administrator Alexis Strauss for the EPA's Pacific Southwest office. "In the last decade, the EPA has remediated 47 homes, provided safe drinking water to 3,013 families in partnership with the Indian Health Service and conducted field screening at all 523 mines."

The Navajo Nation encompasses more than 27,000 square miles within Utah, New Mexico and Arizona in the Four Corners area. The unique geology of the region makes the Navajo Nation rich in uranium, a radioactive ore in high demand after the development of atomic power and weapons at the close of World War II. Approximately four million tons of uranium ore were extracted during mining operations within the Navajo Nation from 1944 to 1986. The federal government, through the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), was the sole purchaser of uranium until 1966, when commercial sales of uranium began. The AEC continued to purchase ore until 1970. The last uranium mine on the Navajo Nation shut down in 1986.

Many Navajo people worked in and near the mines, often living and raising families in close proximity to the mines and mills. Since 2008, federal agencies including EPA, the Department of Energy, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Department of the Interior, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Indian Health Service have collaborated to address uranium contamination on the Navajo Nation. The federal government has invested more than $100 million to address abandoned uranium mines on Navajo lands. EPA has also compiled a list of 46 "priority mines" for cleanup and performed stabilization or cleanup work at 9 mines. Further, EPA work cleaning up mines has generated 94 jobs for Navajo workers.

This settlement agreement resolves the claims of the Navajo Nation pertaining to costs of engineering evaluations and cost analyses, and cleanups, at the 16 priority mines for which no viable responsible private party has been identified, as well as the costs of evaluations at another 30 such mines, two water studies, and modest costs for pre-assessment of natural resources damages. In April 2014, the Justice Department and EPA announced in a separate matter that approximately $985 million of a multi-billion dollar settlement of litigation against subsidiaries of Anadarko Petroleum Corp. will be paid to EPA to fund the clean-up of approximately 50 abandoned uranium mines in and around the Navajo Nation, where radioactive waste remains from Kerr-McGee mining operations. EPA commenced field work with the proceeds from this settlement earlier this year.

Editorials –

Sota guest editorial –

Our Revolution: What's Next on Bernie Sanders' Horizon

'The goal here is to do what I think the Democratic establishment has not been very effective in doing,' said Sanders

'…will help address issues that came into sharp focus on the campaign trail, such as "heartbreaking" issues facing Native Americans, and possible solutions the campaign discovered to address their health care needs,' said Jane Sanders

By Deirdre Fulton

Staff Writer

(Published on Friday, July 15, 2016 by Common Dreams.)

The next phase of Bernie Sanders' political revolution starts now.

The Democratic presidential candidate and U.S. senator, who endorsed one-time rival and presumptive nominee Hillary Clinton on Tuesday, told USA Today in an exclusive interview published Friday that he plans "to launch educational and political organizations within the next few weeks to keep his progressive movement alive."

Additionally, according to the newspaper:

Sanders plans to support at least 100 candidates running for a wide range of public offices—from local school boards to Congress—at least through the 2016 elections. And he'll continue to raise funds for candidates while campaigning for them all over the country. He said he probably will campaign for Tim Canova, a progressive primary challenger to Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz of Florida, who chairs the Democratic National Committee.

These efforts will be organized under the new Sanders Institute; the Our Revolution political group; and a third organization that USA Today writes, "may play a more direct role in campaign advertising."

USA Today reports:

The Sanders Institute will focus on elevating issues and ideas—through media and documentaries—that Sanders said the "corporate media" fails to focus on, including the disappearing middle class, "massive" income inequality, horrific levels of poverty and problems affecting seniors and children.

Jane Sanders, Sanders' wife and political adviser, said the organization will help address issues that came into sharp focus on the campaign trail, such as "heartbreaking" issues facing Native Americans, and possible solutions the campaign discovered to address their health care needs.

"It would be ridiculous for us to learn and not convey that information," she said.

Former Sanders aide and deputy senior advisor to his campaign Shannon Jackson will head up Our Revolution.

Sanders told the paper: "If we are successful, what it will mean is that the progressive message and the issues that I campaigned on will be increasingly spread throughout this country. The goal here is to do what I think the Democratic establishment has not been very effective in doing. And that is at the grassroots level, encourage people to get involved, give them the tools they need to win, help them financially."

Sanders' statements are in keeping with a lengthy email he sent to supporters following Tuesday's announcement, in which he declared:

In the coming weeks, I will be announcing the creation of successor organizations to carry on the struggle that we have been a part of these past 15 months. I hope you will continue to be involved in fighting to transform America. Our goal will be to advance the progressive agenda that we believe in and to elect like-minded candidates at the federal, state and local levels who are committed to accomplishing our goals.

Meanwhile, as Clare Foran reported Thursday for The Atlantic, "Sanders supporters are also actively working to carry on the revolution. Brand New Congress is one example."

However, she said, "all this points to a central tension of the Sanders campaign. Sure, Bernie said it wasn't about him. But for so many of his loyal followers, he has been the source of inspiration for political engagement. Sanders is poised to continue agitating for a revolution. But it remains to be seen how much the so-called revolution's energy and enthusiasm can be sustained once the campaign has reached an end."

St. Martin's Press also announced Thursday that the democratic socialist is writing a book—Our Revolution: A Future to Believe In—to be published November 15, 2016, one week after the general election.

Brief editorial comments from the editor's desk –

On and Off the Lake Traverse Reservation

Please watch for a story next week on the Korean War Medals which were given in a ceremony Saturday afternoon, July 16th at Anderson Park in Sisseton.

Roberts County had the highest number of medals awarded of any county in the state of South Dakota.

We will have a list of names of veterans honored with the medals and a report by Tribal VSO Geri Opsal.

*****

We are excited to see such a swell of support for our Oyate meth support group.

Organizer Brandi Eastman has arranged the first in a series of guest speakers to come and share experiences. These talks are designed to encourage our Oyate with similar addictions to break from the chains of their habits.

The first speaker, Jannette Norum, will be speaking next Monday evening at SWC.

*****

Congratulations to Deb Flute!

Deb took the oath of office and is now seated on the Sisseton Public School Board.

It's good to see her in a position to have a positive impact on the local public education system.

*****

The Reservation Election Board has announced the names of candidates with preliminary certification for office in the upcoming primary election.

Primary election is scheduled for October 4, 2016.

See more information in the REB notice in our legals section.

*****

Please read the new Sota policy concerning political advertising.

The rates reflect a greater discount rate for full, half and quarter page advertisements – as much as 70 percent off the commercial rate, depending upon size of the ad.

Full page: $180.

Half page: $100.

Quarter page: $50

Smaller sizes will still be discounted, but will be charged $2.50 per column inch: for example, 2 col. x 10" ad (20 col. inches) would cost $50, the same as a quarter page; another example, 2 col. x 5" ad (10 col. inches) would cost $25.

The policy is a re-statement that all political advertising must be pre-paid. No exceptions.

Advertising copy can be mailed with an accompanying check or money order to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279; or placed in the Sota mailbox at Tribal headquarters (no postage required).

If an advertisement is sent electronically, by e-mail or fax, then a check must be mailed to the Sota, either at headquarters or through the postal service.

There can be no exceptions.

*****

Elder's Meditation:

Grandfather, Great Spirit, once more behold me on earth and lean to hear my feeble voice. You lived first, and You are older than all need, older than all prayer…You are the life of all things." –Black Elk, OGLALA SIOUX

Great Spirit – Sometimes I don't feel like praying. Sometimes when I have done something wrong, I'm ashamed to come to You. Even though You have always been there for me, I sometimes choose to stay away. It's hard for me to understand what all knowing is. Sometimes it's hard for me to see how much You really care. But I know if I take a few minutes and think about what I know to be true about You, the things change and I am able to realize Your power and Your love. Today, I'll start by thinking of You. I'll think about all the times You have helped and guided me in the past. You are life, You are love, You are power, You are desire, You are truth, You are principle, You are intelligence, You are courage. With You I am everything; without You I am nothing.

Creator, thank You for allowing me to start my day with You.

*****

Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

The whole problem can be stated quite simply by asking, 'Is there a meaning to music?' My answer would be, 'Yes.' And 'Can you state in so many words what the meaning is?' My answer to that would be, 'No.' Aaron Copland (1900 - 1990)

Advice is what we ask for when we already know the answer but wish we didn't. Erica Jong

Everyone has a purpose in life. Perhaps yours is watching television. David Letterman (1947 - )

It is not worth an intelligent man's time to be in the majority. By definition, there are already enough people to do that. G. H. Hardy (1877 - 1947)

You can't have a light without a dark to stick it in. Arlo Guthrie (1947 - )

The scientists of today think deeply instead of clearly. One must be sane to think clearly, but one can think deeply and be quite insane. Nikola Tesla (1857 - 1943), Modern Mechanics and Inventions. July, 1934

An inventor is simply a fellow who doesn't take his education too seriously. Charles F. Kettering (1876 - 1958)

*****

The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Earlier receipt of copy is always appreciated. So, if you are aware of a date or message that needs to be publicized or advertised, please let us know about it in advance of the weekly deadline.

The preferred way to submit typed articles and ads, art and photos, is by e-mail.

The editor can be reached at the following e-mail address:

earthskyweb@cs.com

For more information, leave a message on the Sota production office voicemail (605) 938-4452, or send a fax to the 24-hour dedicated line (605) 938-4676.

-- CDF

Obituaries –

Memorial service for Keith Richard Gill

Memorial service for Keith Richard Gill, 65, of Waubay, SD was held on Saturday morning, July 16, 2016 at Cahill Funeral Chapel, Sisseton, SD.

Urnbearers were Chris Gill Jr., Sonny Gill and Gayle Gill.

Honorary urnbearers were of Keith's nieces and nephews.

Inurnment will be at a later date.

The Cahill Funeral Chapel, Sisseton, SD is in charge of funeral arrangements.

Keith Richard Gill born January 2, 1951 in Sisseton, SD and passed away July 10, 2016 at the Strand Kjorsvig Living Center, Roslyn, SD.

Keith grew up around the Sisseton area before moving out to California.

Upon his return to South Dakota, Keith worked as a mechanic and handyman, helping out family and friends.

On September 28, 2012 Keith entered the Strand Kjorsvig Living Center where he resided until his death.

Keith enjoyed spending time with his family and also enjoyed the company of his many friends. He also liked picnics and spending time down by the lake.

Keith is survived by his brothers Chris Gill Jr., Sonny Gill, Gayle Gill and also by many nieces and nephews.

He was preceded in death by his brother Alvin Gill and sisters Myrna Auchteberg, Patricia Fuentes, Sandra Burnett and Henrietta Hopper; also by his parents Christopher and Margaret (White) Gill.

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor's note: The following comes from the editor's column and the Sota "deadlines and policies" statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or "opinion" letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author's name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and must be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor's explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Open letter to the Oyate

Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe or Sisseton-Wahpeton Dakota Nation or Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate (however you want to identify yourselves, depending on how wakan you think you are after you watched Dances With Wolves):

I believe there is some unfair things happening against our relatives who live off the reservation. I strongly believe it's unfair to not let our off reservation voting age members not vote by absentee ballot.

I hear some say it's too late to change this. Well how much do we have to live and act like white man? White man gave us this bullshit form government, that doesn't even work for them.

Well I think were acting too White if we think we have to wait for this change.

Don't like it, speak up.

You feel like you're being treated unfairly, speak up.

But I do not believe we have to wait to change this.

Those of you who live on the reservation, what do you have to lose by letting those who live off the reservation run for office or Vote? You and your family must have many things at stake and are unwilling to lose by not letting ALL our People who are of voting age vote.

It seems so senseless, It seems so unfair to all.

If you were to put us all in one room, and we were to raise our hands, to let our off reservation's tribal members run for office and vote, I betcha an overwhelming majority will vote in favor of letting them run for office and vote.

John Heminger.

Open letter to the Oyate

No justice for Castile. Minnesota killing, stopped, killed, because he's black.

While corrupt KKK police are still killing people of color. The mind of a killer cop is I'm killing a nigger today, or if they are in Indian country, they are killing a dirty drunk Indian today. People say police need to communicate bull, you can't communicate when the evil KKK white devil killer cops hate people of color. Turn on your TV. News people say police committed misconduct. Bull, the KKK white devils committed (murdered). These cops killed a boy 12 years old because he had a water gun, black man got out of his car and ran, cop shot him in the back. These cops are on video, killing blacks. That's murder. They're all on paid leave. The (suspect) in Dallas, killed by a bomb. No evidence he shot anyone. The cops killed him while the killer cops are on paid leave.

Can you believe paid leave.

My opinion, you got yours, let's hear it.

Larry Nerison, Oyate.

P.S. If police offered the suspect paid leave he would have thrown down his weapons. He could be watching the news on TV, having a beer, just like the killer cops.

Poem from Harry O. Renville

For there are three that bear witness in Heaven

The Father, the Word, and the Holy Spirit;

and these three are one.

-1John5:7

Matthew 28:19-20

Genesis 2:4

John 20:28

Exodus 3:14

John 8:58

Class Is In Session

Deliver those who are drawn toward death,

and hold back those stumbling to the slaughter.

Ifyou say, "Surely we did not know this,"

Does not He who weighs the hearts consider it?

He who keeps your soul,

Does He not know it?

And will He not render to each man according to his deeds?

Now God came to His own but they were too blinded to see,

So the hope of salvation has come to you and me;

And until the last gentile is called there is still hope my friends,

But woe to those who've still rejected Christ when this age ends.

Today still some just won't accept that God came down from on high,

To give His life for the world's sins so we don't have to die;

But should we physically die one day we'll rise again too,

On that glorious day when Christ returns for me and you.

There are some who've never even opened God's Holy Word,

They must just assume it's always the truth which they have heard;

Luke 10:16

John 14:6-14

Romans 8:26-34

Col. 3:17

Isaiah 52:13-53:12

Ephesians 2:8-9

Titus 3:4-7

The last time I remember meeting you I still could see,

In those dark days of life when those addictions still had me;

But even though the site I once had has now slipped away,

Because I live for Christ, it seems it is a brighter day.

I still am not perfect and on earth T never will be,

But with Christ in my life day by day He now strengthens me;

And since Pm only human I will sin now and then too,

And when I have, P11 confess it and repent when I do.

Long before we were born my friend, God knew what we would be,

I believe I found the work now that was predestined for me;

Due to the gifts that I've received I now have a new goal,

I seek to teach and redirect a misinformed lost soul.

For we are His workmanship, created in Christ Jesus

For good works,

Which God prepared beforehand that we shall walk in them?

Philippians 3:13-14

Romans 7:15-25

Philippians 4:1

Isaiah 14:9-11

Matthew 18:5-6

Luke 16:19-31

Romans 14:11-12

John 14:1-3

Hebrews 13:16-17

Revelations 21:1-7

Let me know what you think

By Sen. John Thune

Each week the Senate is in session, I travel back and forth from my home in Sioux Falls to Washington, D.C., for hearings, votes, and other meetings. While I love representing South Dakotans in Washington, it's no secret that I'm happiest when I'm home in South Dakota, hearing directly from you. So, as I head back to spend several weeks traveling the state and connecting with you, I wanted to share some of the big things we've accomplished in the Senate over the last 18 months and look forward to hearing what you think.

Our top priority has been to focus on policies that boost America's economic security and strengthen our national security. We passed the first significant education reform bill since 2002, the first major trade promotion authority bill since 2002, the first significant reforms to Social Security since 1983, and the first major environmental law reauthorization since the 1990s. We worked hard to pass legislation that prevents states from imposing unworkable mandates on the food supply and protected the homeland by passing the National Defense Authorization Act, key cybersecurity reforms, and sanctions against the North Korean regime.

I knew serving as chairman of the Senate Commerce Committee would give South Dakota's interests the national attention they deserve, and the results speak for themselves.

Congress passed and the president signed my bipartisan bill that makes landmark reforms to the Surface Transportation Board, the federal agency that oversees our nation's rail system. These reforms will make the agency more accountable to the people who depend on rail transportation, like our agriculture producers. The president also signed the first multi-year highway bill since 2005 – the longest since 1998. And all Americans will benefit from the aviation security reforms I authored as well as the consumer protection provisions included in the bipartisan aviation bill that I helped get to the president's desk. All of that is good news for states like South Dakota where a safe, reliable, and effective transportation system is critical.

While a lot was accomplished, there's a lot more we tried to do. Unfortunately, Senate Democrats and President Obama have made it difficult to approve must-pass bills like the Department of Defense appropriations bill, which would fund our troops, and the Military Construction/Veterans Affairs appropriations bill, which would fund key infrastructure programs and support our veterans. Despite bipartisan attempts to reach an agreement, Democrats opposed a $1.1 billion funding bill that would have helped tackle the nationwide Zika threat. I'm most disappointed, though, that amid all of the threats we face from terrorist groups like ISIS, President Obama has yet to lay out a concrete and comprehensive plan to defeat the group and its radical ideology. These are important issues, and they deserve to rise above politics.

If our paths cross this summer, please stop and say hello. I can't do my job without knowing what's important to you, and your feedback on what I'm working on in the Senate is invaluable. If we don't catch up in person, you can always call my office, write me a letter, or send me an email. Either way, I look forward to hearing from you this summer.

Reception scheduled for local artist

The Sisseton Arts Council will host an artist reception with George Frerck at the Nicollet Tower on Thursday, July 28 from 4:00-600 p.m.

More than twenty of George's paintings are on display at the Tower from late June through August.

George is a versatile artist, at home with both abstract and realistic paintings. This exhibit tends toward realism, depicting familiar scenes in Roberts and Marshall County, with much of the subject matter coming from within two miles of the Frerck home on Buffalo Lake.

George prefers to work in oils to capture the wildlife and landscapes that he enjoys painting.

"To collect my subject matter I take walks in the country and bring a camera," Frerck says. "I use the photos as a reference to create a more realistic painting. I may change color, value or add and subtract subject matter to enhance the composition of my work."

As a long-time art instructor at Sisseton High School George influenced and inspired many students. The reception on July 28 provides an opportunity for the public to visit with George and view some of the work he has created in recent years.

A weekly column for the Sota –

Wawokiyape

Good morning Oyate! I hope all is well with everyone.

Well, this week's topic comes from a conversation I had with someone about their views on addiction and our community. The question that stuck with me was this: "How can you expect someone to report meth use and distribution in this kind of environment/community? if you report a crime some of the police officers are warning certain relatives of theirs in advance before they respond, and the real criminals are getting let go and treated like victims?"

That question really got me thinking because it's a question that I have heard come up a lot in past letters and conversations as well.

Now, some may beg to differ, saying that Tribal programs and the police department are doing the best they can to crack down on meth in our area. And that probably is true, who am I to second guess it.

But others, like the person I spoke with, have very different views on the validity of the above statement.

In our community, we are supposed to be able to count on the police department to be honest parties in all matters, correct? But how can we be expected to trust them when hypocrisy plays a big role in all matters such as this.

The saying "Do as I say, not as I do" comes to mind when people tell me about their run-ins with certain officers, advocates and Tribal workers.

Now, we have all heard rumors of drug use at different levels in our community.

But how much of it is true?

We can't count on gossip of others but what if someone has proof of wrong doing? Proof such as pictures or perhaps a video?

How can the people of this community be asked to trust in our leaders when they have seen and experienced dishonesty and hypocrisy at every turn.

One lady who wrote to me said she called the anonymous tip line about her neighbor for being high and high volumes of traffic in and out of her housing house.

After the lady reported her neighbor, the neighbor somehow had knowledge of the lady's complaint because she had a relative at the police department.

Another story came from an elderly woman who said she also tried to report a woman who was verbally abusing her kids and was "outed" by the officer who responded so the woman she reported came to her front door and yelled at her to "mind her own business."

My very own sister had multiple incidents happen leading up to her reporting people she lived by to the police, but the person she was trying to report was a Tribal Police Officer's daughter. My sister reported these individuals to the police to protect my nieces and nephews, along with the addict's kids and it only led to physical violence against her, which happened because of the breach of confidentiality. The ones who physically assaulted my sister can be heard saying "They seen the police reports" in a video of her altercation taken by an unknown party.

I could go on and on about the horror stories I have heard about certain officers and their misconduct but what's the point?

In closing, I say instead complaining about it behind closed doors, we need to start bringing things like this to the light. Start taking our concerns to the Chairman, And if he is a good man like I have heard, then he will look into these matters personally and thoroughly.

Respectfully, Sherielle "Shay" Dirtseller.

Statement on reopening Rosebud Hospital ER

Washington, DC – July 14, 2016 – U.S. Senator Mike Rounds (R-S.D.) today issued the following statement on the reopening of the emergency department at the Rosebud Indian Health Service (IHS) hospital, which had been closed since December 2015. IHS announced today that the hospital is set to reopen tomorrow, July 15, 2016, and will resume 24-hour, 7-day-a-week care.

"The news that IHS and the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services have agreed to reopen the emergency department at the Rosebud IHS hospital is a positive step toward better and timely health care for patients," said Rounds. "Emergency room services are an essential part of any hospital. However, there is still much work to be done to make certain our tribal members are receiving adequate and timely care. The problems within the bureaucracy of IHS, along with the lack of adequate consultation with tribes, are ongoing. I still believe that an outside audit is the best first step toward making significant, systemic changes at IHS."

Rounds sent a letter this month to the Department of Health and Human Services Inspector General requ

Noem statement on reopening of Rosebud ER

Washington, DC – July 14, 2016 – Rep. Kristi Noem today issued the following statement in the wake of a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services announcement that the Rosebud Hospital emergency department would reopen on Friday, July 15, and resume operations 24 hours a day, seven days a week:

"The dangerous conditions within the emergency department and the resulting diversionary status put too many lives in jeopardy. Today is a day of hope, but it is not the end of our work. So much still needs to be done. The problems that led to the grave conditions in Rosebud remain. Expansive reforms, such as giving tribes a role in running IHS facilities and reformulating how purchased-referred care dollars are allocated, must be made if we are going to see the lasting improvements tribal communities deserve."

In June 2016, Noem introduced the Helping Ensuring Accountability, Leadership, and Trust in Tribal Healthcare (HEALTTH) Act. (See separate news article on HEALTTH Act hearing).

Noem's IHS reforms debated in House committee

"The Indian Health Service is beyond broken and fixing it is literally a matter of life and death," said Noem.

Washington, DC – July 12, 2016 – Rep. Kristi Noem's Helping Ensuring Accountability, Leadership, and Trust in Tribal Healthcare (HEALTTH) Act was debated today before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Indian, Insular, and Alaska Native Affairs. The hearing brought tribal members and organizations as well as IHS leadership before the Subcommittee to discuss Noem's proposed Indian Health Service (IHS) reforms.

"The Indian Health Service is beyond broken and fixing it is literally a matter of life and death," said Noem.

"The HEALTTH Act reforms an agency in desperate need of change by giving tribes a seat at the table, addressing recruitment and retention problems, and ensuring we can get more services out of every dollar, among many other things. All in all, it takes a step toward getting IHS out of the hospital business, which is ultimately what tribal communities want and deserve."

"Adequate healthcare is one of the most important issues to American Indian and Alaska Natives; however the system is deficient, inadequate, and is simply failing areas of the country that need help the most," said Chairman of the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Indian, Insular, and Alaska Native Affairs Don Young. "H.R. 5406, the HEALTTH Act, is intended to make reforms to the Indian Health Service to help their broken direct care system. It is a step in the right direction for Indian Country."

Today's hearing served as a necessary next step in moving the HEALTTH Act forward. Leaders from the Rosebud Sioux Tribal Health Board, Great Plains Tribal Chairmen's Health Board, and National Indian Health Board, among others, were able to weigh in on the legislation. IHS Principal Deputy Director Mary Smith was also questioned by the Members of Congress. A video of the hearing in full and copies of the written testimonies are available here.

Introduced in June 2016, Noem's legislation:

+ Gives tribes a seat at the table to encourage better, longer-term contracts by allowing for a partnership among IHS, tribal communities and healthcare stakeholders to collaborate throughout the contract negotiating process, rather than leaving those decisions solely to IHS.

+ Addresses the current recruitment problem – for both medical staff and hospital leadership – by putting provisions in place to:

· Allow for faster hiring.

· Make the existing student loan repayment program tax free, as an added incentive for high-quality employees.

· Provide incentives to attract competent and well-trained hospital administrators as well as medical staff.

+ Reforms the Purchased/Referred Care (PRC) Program by, among other things:

· Requiring IHS to develop a new formula for allocating PRC dollars. Under Noem's bill, IHS would be required to develop a formula based on need, population size, and health status to ensure those areas that have the greatest need receive a greater portion of the funding.

· Requiring IHS to negotiate Medicare-like rates for services it pays for with private providers. IHS currently pays a premium for PRC services. Noem's proposal would bring payments in line with what Medicare pays to stretch every dollar further.

· Requiring IHS to address the backlog of PRC payments to private providers. Private hospitals in the Great Plains Area have long expressed concern because IHS has failed to pay their bills. Noem would require IHS to put a strategy in place to get these hospitals paid what they are due.

+ Restores accountability through strategies, such as:

· Require IHS to be accountable for providing timely care.

· Require the Government Accountability Office to report on the financial stability of IHS hospitals that are threatened with sanction from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

The legislation has been endorsed by the Rosebud Sioux Tribe, the National Indian Health Board, Avera, Rapid City Regional Health, Sanford Health, the South Dakota Association of Healthcare Organizations, the South Dakota State Medical Association, the South Dakota Dental Association and others.

For more information, visit www.noem.house.gov/IHS.

Audit of IHS is necessary to improve health care of tribal members

By Senator Mike Rounds

Washington, DC – July 8, 2016 – Over the past year, my office has been looking into the financial, structural and administrative problems at Indian Health Service (IHS) so that we can better understand how to reform the agency and provide better health care for tribal members. As our tribal members know all too well, the IHS has been failing to live up to its trust responsibility to provide health care to Native Americans. Its shortcomings have been documented in a number of Government Accountability Office (GAO) reports, yet there has never been a systemic review of IHS to address the health care crisis currently going on in the Great Plains Area, which includes South Dakota. Furthermore, IHS fails to adequately consult with the tribes when making decisions about their health care.

I recently requested an audit by the Office of the Inspector General (OIG) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to review the financial aspects of hospital and health care, medical services and overall financial management at IHS. Based on my office's discussions with tribal leaders, we believe an audit is the appropriate first step toward identifying areas of concern and finding solutions to fix the ongoing problems at the agency.

The audit is supported by both tribal members and officials within HHS. The Great Plains Tribal Chairman's Association recently passed a resolution calling upon Congress to demand an audit of IHS. Additionally, during the Senate Indian Affairs Committee field hearing in Rapid City on June 17, 2016, that I participated in, HHS Acting Deputy Secretary Mary Wakefield said that HHS "would welcome" an audit of IHS.

As I wrote in my request, despite the agency's well-documented history of failing to meet trust obligations by not providing quality health care, there has never been a systemic review of IHS to address and ultimately reform these issues in attempt to improve health outcomes for tribal members. Furthermore, there has been a continuing lack of consultation with the tribes. I believe an audit - similar to what was recently conducted at the Veterans Health Administration, which identified shortfalls and recommended solutions - is a potential model for addressing these critical financial and quality issues within IHS.

The problems at IHS are serious. The Great Plains Area IHS has the second highest mortality rate among all IHS regions. We also have the highest diabetes death rate, more than triple the average among IHS facilities. Our life expectancy rate is the lowest of all IHS regions, at 68.1 years. The U.S. average life expectancy is nearly a decade longer at 77.7 years. It is clear the IHS is failing our tribal members, who are suffering and in some cases dying due to this inadequate and disgraceful care. We are hopeful that the audit will show us specific areas we can focus on to begin making significant changes.

"Fact sheet" from the White House –

Administration takes more action against prescription drug, opioid and heroin epidemic

Plans include expanding role of IHS intervention

Washington, DC – July 6, 2016 – As Congress moves to conference on legislation related to the prescription opioid and heroin epidemic, the Obama Administration is taking additional actions to expand access to treatment, strengthen prescription drug monitoring, enable safe disposal of unneeded drugs, and accelerate research on pain and opioid misuse and overdose.

The President has made clear that addressing this epidemic is a priority for his Administration. While Federal agencies have been using their authority to take every available action they can, Congress needs to take action on what is most urgently needed now – additional funding to make lifesaving treatment available to everyone who seeks it. The President has called for $1.1 billion in new funding to help Americans who want treatment get it wherever they live. These maps show how much new funding for treatment each State could potentially qualify for if Congress passes what the President has requested.

Every day that passes without Congressional action to provide these additional resources is a missed opportunity to get treatment to those who want it, help prevent overdoses and support communities across the country impacted by this epidemic. Recovery from opioid and other substance use disorders is possible, and many Americans are able to recover because they get the treatment and care they need. But too many still are not able to get treatment. That's why the President has called on Congress to provide the resources needed to ensure that every American with an opioid use disorder who wants treatment can get it and start the road to recovery.

Expanding Access to Treatment:

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), through the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, is issuing a final rule to increase from 100 to 275 the number of patients that qualified physicians who prescribe buprenorphine for opioid use disorders can treat. Providers, policymakers, advocates, and experts have pointed to the current 100 patient limit for buprenorphine prescribing as a barrier to opioid use disorder treatment. The rule aims to increase access to medication-assisted treatment and associated behavioral health supports for tens of thousands of people with opioid use disorders, while preventing diversion.

Improving Prescription Drug Monitoring by Federal Prescribers:

· Indian Health Service: While many Indian Health Service (IHS) clinicians already utilize Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs (PDMPs), IHS will now require its opioid prescribers and pharmacists to check their State PDMP databases prior to prescribing or dispensing any opioid for more than seven days. The new policy is effective immediately for more than 1,200 IHS clinicians working in IHS federally operated facilities who are authorized to prescribe opioids. Checking a PDMP before prescribing helps to improve appropriate pain management care, identify patients who may have an opioid use disorder and prevent diversion of drugs. This policy builds on other IHS efforts to address the opioid epidemic. In December, IHS announced that it would provide hundreds of Bureau of Indian Affairs law enforcement officers with the lifesaving opioid overdose-reversal drug naloxone and train them how to use it.

· Department of Veterans Affairs: As part of its efforts to prevent and treat opioid use disorder among Veterans, VA is releasing a new policy for its health care providers who prescribe controlled substances that requires them (or where allowed their delegate) in most cases to check State PDMPs prior to deciding to prescribe a new controlled substance to determine if a patient is receiving opioids or other controlled substances from another provider and document that in the electronic patient record. These checks will occur at a minimum once a year and/or when clinically indicated for each renewal or continuation of therapy. VA provides health care services to approximately 8.3 million veterans at 150 medical centers, nearly 1,400 community-based outpatient clinics, community living centers, Vet Centers and Domiciliaries.

· Department of Defense: By the end of November 2016, DOD will have conducted an evaluation of its prescription drug monitoring program to assess its ability to capture community providers and use of cash transitions; identify any gaps in comprehensive use of prescription drug monitoring strategies; and make recommendations for closing those gaps.

Advancing Prescriber Education:

One of the ways HHS is working to stem the overprescribing of opioids is by providing prescribers with access to the tools and education they need to make informed decisions. Today HHS is releasing a Request for Information that seeks provider, consumer and other public comments on current HHS prescriber education and training programs and proposals for potential future activities through programs such as Medicare.

Encouraging Safe Pain Management Approaches:

HHS continues to work to better educate providers and patients about safe pain management. Health care providers have expressed concern that scores on the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey pain management questions are tied to Medicare payments to hospitals, even though those payments currently have a very limited connection to the survey's pain management questions. However, to prevent any potential confusion on the part of providers, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is proposing to remove the HCAHPS survey pain management questions from the hospital scoring calculation. This means that hospitals would continue to use the questions to survey patients about their in-patient pain management experience, but these questions would not affect the level of payment hospitals receive.

Accelerating Research on Pain and Opioid Misuse and Overdose:

HHS is launching more than a dozen new scientific studies on opioid abuse and pain treatment to help fill knowledge gaps and further improve the Administration's ability to fight this epidemic. As part of this announcement, the Department will release a report and inventory on the opioid abuse and pain treatment research being conducted or funded by its agencies in order to provide policy-makers, researchers, and other stakeholders with the full scope of HHS activities in this area.

Expanding Telemedicine in Rural America:

Last week, the Department of Agriculture announced nearly $1.4 million for five Distance Learning and Telemedicine (DLT) grant awards to Kentucky, Tennessee and Virginia to help rural areas address the opioid epidemic. USDA plans to announce funding for additional DLT projects this summer. In addition to DLT investments, USDA Rural Development has funded rural hospitals and health care clinics from its Community Facilities and Business and Industry Guaranteed Loan Programs. These projects provide communities with much-needed services to help address health care, including overdose and opioid use disorder.

Safely Disposing of Unneeded Prescription Opioids:

The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has announced it will hold its 12th National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day on Saturday, October 22, providing a safe, convenient, and responsible way of disposing of unneeded prescription drugs. More than 6.4 million pounds of medication have been collected over the last eleven Take Back Days. Local communities and some pharmacies are also establishing ongoing drug take-back programs.

Improving Housing Support for Americans in Recovery:

The Department of Housing and Urban Development, in partnership with the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness and HHS, is identifying best practices to support individuals using medication-assisted treatment in programs funded through HUD's Homelessness Assistance Grants to promote replication of best practices throughout the country. HUD also will work with its Continuums of Care partners to help individuals with prescription opioid or heroin use disorders and use housing to support recovery.

Statement by Press Secretary on passage of S. 524

White House – July 13, 2016 – The Administration has consistently said that turning the tide of the prescription opioid and heroin epidemic requires real resources to help those Americans seeking treatment get the care that they need. We continue to believe this bill falls far short. That's why the Administration strongly supported Democratic efforts to add $920 million in funding for states to provide treatment for Americans struggling with opioid addiction. Every day that Republicans stand in the way of action to fund opioid treatment means more missed opportunities to save lives: 78 Americans die every day from opioid overdose. While the President will sign this bill once it reaches his desk because some action is better than none, he won't stop fighting to secure the resources this public health crisis demands. Congressional Republicans have not done their jobs until they provide the funding for treatment that communities need to combat this epidemic. The President and Administration officials will continue to press Republicans to respond to this crisis.

Statement from Ag Sec. Vilsack on America's Opioid Misuse Epidemic

Washington, DC – July 13, 2016 – Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack issued the following statement today in response to Congressional action aimed to address the opioid misuse epidemic in the United States.

"Recently during a visit to New Hampshire, Gregory and Linda Drugan shared with me the painful story of the death of their son, Greg. Opioid addiction ended his life far too soon at the age of 30. Greg is one of thousands each year who lose their lives to opioid misuse. From 1993 to the 2013, opioid use has increased by 400 percent, exceeding 250 million prescriptions per year. And, opioids can start a journey down a horrible path that leads to heroin. In fact, 80 percent of recent heroin users are introduced to heroin through opioids.

Opioid use often starts innocently enough with a prescription for pain from a doctor. Or a family member or a friend shares pain medication. We need to act to address opioid use disorders and overdose, while ensuring that individuals with pain receive safe, effective treatment. Today, however, according to the NIH, more than 10 million Americans report misusing prescription opioids and about 2 million Americans have a substance use disorder related to prescription opioid pain medicines.

This crisis costs all of us dearly. In fact, according to NIH, the epidemic costs us $72 billion in unnecessary health costs each year. Those costs pale in comparison to the lives lost too soon – 28,648 deaths in 2014 alone. The crisis is everywhere and impacts everyone regardless of zip code, gender, race, ethnicity, or income.

Tonight Congress passed legislation aimed at the crisis. While well intentioned, the legislation provides no new resources to fund these efforts. Democrats worked to amend the legislation to provide critical funding for treatment but unfortunately Republicans – including some who called for funding in recent weeks – refused to support funding in the end. Without new, targeted resources to give the law some teeth and ensure that every American who seeks treatment can get it, the law falls far short of what is needed to defeat this crisis. The President's budget proposes new funding in excess of $1 billion to support states in expanding treatment options. These new, targeted resources would also help to support more health professionals in the field – something desperately needed in rural areas.

Laws alone do not save lives from addiction. Prevention save lives. Treatment saves lives. More trained professional save lives. Supportive communities save lives. Drug courts save lives. But none of these things will be possible without new, targeted resources.

We are now deep in the throes of an opioid crisis in the United States and there is no more time to lose. That is why I am calling on Republicans to back its promises with the commitment of new resources. The time to invest in treatment and start saving more lives is now.

The Obama-Biden Administration has aggressively used the tools at its disposal to stem the tide. The strategy focuses on investing in prevention, treatment, recovery, and promoting criminal justice reform. The CDC recently published new guidelines for health care providers on when to use opioids appropriately. The FDA has proposed a new warning about the serious risks, including of addiction for immediate-release opioid pain medications. Over 75,000 doctors have already received prescriber training. Over 60 medical and nearly 200 nursing schools have pledged to incorporate prescriber education, in line with the CDC guidelines, into their basic curriculum.

With limited resources, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) recently expanded the availability of overdose reversal drugs like Naloxone to first responders and is helping to increase access to more medication assisted treatment (MAT). To that end, HHS is issuing a rule to increase from 100 to 275 the number of patients that qualified physicians who prescribe buprenorphine for opioid use disorders can treat. Providers, policymakers, advocates, and experts have pointed to the current 100 patient limit for buprenorphine prescribing as a barrier to opioid use disorder treatment. The rule aims to increase access to medication-assisted treatment and associated behavioral health supports for tens of thousands of people with opioid use disorders, while preventing diversion.

The faith-based community is also helping to create communities supportive of recovery efforts. Faith leaders can encourage an environment where people struggling with addiction feel free to talk about their struggle and take steps to seek treatment. On the criminal justice side more communities are realizing that treatment is a better option than incarceration. Drug courts are now being staffed to create that option.

Despite this good work, more effort is needed. Republicans are set to leave town this week for the summer. While they will be celebrating their efforts to pass legislation, there isn't much to celebrate for the families who desperately need resources in their communities to battle this crisis. When Republicans return in September they should move quickly to keep their promise to these families by swiftly providing the funding needed to ensure every individual seeking treatment gets the care they need. We simply cannot afford to let another day go by."

Bipartisan Bill to combat Opioid Abuse positive, but much work remains

Washington, DC – July 13, 2016 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today helped the Senate pass bipartisan, compromise legislation to take preliminary and necessary steps toward comprehensively tackling the nation's heroin and opioid addiction. The bill already passed in the U.S. House of Representatives and will now go to the president's desk for his signature.

Heitkamp has long been working to stem the rising tide of heroin and opioid abuse across North Dakota. The bill the Senate passed today is compromise legislation to reconcile similar bills to combat opioid abuse that passed in the Senate, which Heitkamp also supported, and the House. While the final bill does not offer new federal funding, it does take a critical step forward in combating the nation's opioid and heroin abuse crisis by using existing resources to offer needed tools for law enforcement and first responders, as well as state prescription drug monitoring programs.

Across the country, 47,000 Americans succumbed to opioid and heroin abuse in 2014. In North Dakota, heroin and opioid abuse has become endemic. Heroin treatment cases skyrocketed from 17 people in July 2013 to 198 people last December, while statewide reports of heroin use have increased every single month from mid-2013 through 2015. According to the Centers for Disease Control, opioid-induced fatalities in North Dakota increased by 125 percent from 2013 to 2014 alone.

"Like tens of thousands of Americans across this country, too many North Dakota families in recent years have suffered as addictive poisons, like heroin and opioids, seeped into their lives – taking hold of their loved ones and too often costing them their lives," said Heitkamp. "By passing bipartisan, comprehensive legislation today in the Senate, we are taking important steps to shine a light on this epidemic and seek solutions. To combat the heartbreaking stories and statistics as opioid-related deaths spiked by 125 percent in North Dakota, this bill would expand the tools law enforcement and first responders need, as well as resources on the ground aimed at beating addiction. But we need to keep fighting – together and in the open – to dedicate more resources to this fast-growing and deadly crisis so all of our communities are protected."

After the bill is signed into law, the availability of anti-overdose drugs to law enforcement and first responders will be greatly expanded, and prescription drug monitoring programs would be improved to prevent individuals from accessing more prescription drugs than they need. The bill also works to shift resources to destigmatize addiction, in part by identifying and treating – rather than just criminally punishing – those incarcerated who are suffering from addiction.

In May, Heitkamp convened Burleigh County public health professionals, law enforcement officials, treatment specialists and educators in Bismarck where she unveiled her new bill to provide needed federal funds for opioid intervention and treatment resources. At the meeting, Heitkamp and the local leaders discussed how her bill would help make sure the federal government is doing its part to help communities like theirs across the state to mitigate and combat the state's opioid and heroin abuse crisis.

Background

Since serving as North Dakota's Attorney General in the 1990s, Heitkamp has played a leading role in supporting and protecting North Dakota communities, by:

· Bringing national drug control leaders to North Dakota to help combat crimes across the state: Heitkamp brought current and former White House Office of National Drug Control Policy's (ONDCP) directors to North Dakota – in 2013 to address major increases in drug crimes in the oil patch with law enforcement and tribal officials, and in 2014 to announce a new national strategy combatting drug crime, with a particular focus on North Dakota. Following the former ONDCP director's visit in 2013, the agency named Williams County a High Intensity Drug Trafficking area, making it eligible for federal support.

· Securing federal anti-drug crime resources to North Dakota: In 2013, Heitkamp welcomed news of a special prosecutor in western North Dakota to help fight drug-related crimes in the state's oil patch. The following year, Heitkamp brought together leaders from the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa to focus specifically on drug abuse and trafficking on the reservation.

· Hearing firsthand about the opioid and heroin abuse challenges across North Dakota: This spring, Heitkamp met with facility leaders, medical staff, and tribal leaders during her visits to MHA Nation's Circle of Life Drug Treatment Center and Mercy Hospital in Devils Lake where she heard about the unique challenges they face in treating skyrocketing cases of heroin, methamphetamine, and opioid abuse on rural and tribal lands – often due to a lack in the types of recovery resources.

· Fighting for legislation to equip communities with addiction and recovery resources: In May, Heitkamp unveiled her Budgeting for Opioid Addiction Treatment (LifeBOAT) Act to provide communities with funding for the tools they need to address addiction and recovery. Her bill would establish a one-cent fee on each milligram of active opioid ingredient in prescription pain pills – with certain exceptions – to help establish strong investments in prevention and treatment for this epidemic, so that families and individuals can access the care they need to beat opioid abuse.

· Providing federal law enforcement with tools to tackle international drug crime: In May, the president signed into law the bipartisan Transnational Drug Trafficking Act which Heitkamp helped introduce and pushed for, that unanimously passed in the Senate. The bill will work to close federal loopholes preventing law enforcement from going after and prosecuting drug traffickers who concoct substances that they know – or believe will be – used to peddle illegal narcotics within the United States, before the drugs reach our shores. Too often these products end up in North Dakota as drug abuse and crime have drastically risen in the state.

· Engaging statewide community in collective fight against drug crime and abuse: Last fall, Heitkamp hosted a Strong & Safe Communities Summit with 150 statewide leaders where they discussed ways to combat growing instances of drug crime, particularly in western North Dakota. Heitkamp launched her Strong & Safe Communities Initiative in 2014 to address challenges facing North Dakota, including drug crime increases, to make sure North Dakota communities are strong and families are safe in their homes.

Herd immunity for pneumonia

By Richard P. Holm, MD

The word pneumonia was said by Hippocrates himself to have been "named by the ancients" before him. As old as it is, pneumonia is still a cause of great human suffering, but we now have better weapons to fight it.

In a small percentage of cases, especially in the immunocompromised, a bacterial lung infection can follow several days after a common cold. Symptoms then would change from a dry cough into a productive cough, creamy-sometimes-rusty-sputum, shaking chills and sweats, and chest pain. It's important to note that antibiotics for the common cold DO NOT prevent a secondary bacterial pneumonia, but antibiotics started after the bacteria grab ahold can be life-saving. It's all about the timing.

About 50 percent of pneumonia is due to the pneumococcus bacteria, now named Streptococcus pneumoniae. Sir William Osler said in the late 1800s that pneumonia is "the captain of the men of death." Prior to antibiotics, more than 30% of all those hospitalized for a bacterial infection of the lung would die. With antibiotics, that number dropped precipitously, but still people do die of pneumonia. Mostly they are very young or very old, related of course to their undeveloped or weakened immune systems.

This July, the New England Journal of Medicine reported since 2000 there has been a huge drop in hospitalizations for pneumonia, with 12,000 fewer deaths every year especially in those older than 85. What's most amazing is it happened since the advent of routine childhood Streptococcus pneumoniae vaccination also called PREVNAR.

Although a similar and effective pneumonia vaccine, PNEUMOVAX, is available and highly recommended for those older than 65, or younger with lung disease or diabetes, it has not become routine. The authors of the study claim that it is the routine vaccination in children that's responsible for most of the reduction of pneumonia in the elderly. They call it herd immunity. Children vaccinated against pneumonia certainly are benefited, but also it profoundly protects the immune deficient adults around them.

Take home message: it is wise to have children and adults vaccinated against the dreaded Strep pneumoniae. Indeed, the "captain of the men of death" has been demoted by antibiotics and vaccinations; both modern developments of science fighting against an ancient disease.

USDA helps fund Distance Learning, Telemedicine projects in SD

Huron, SD, July 15, 2016 – Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack recently announced funding for 81 Distance Learning and Telemedicine (DLT) projects in 32 states. These projects will help increase access to health care, substance abuse treatment and advanced educational opportunities in rural communities nationwide.

"Using technology for educational opportunities and medical care can provide services that are often unavailable in rural areas," Vilsack said. "USDA's Distance Learning and Telemedicine Program helps communities better meet the needs of their residents."

USDA is awarding nearly $23.4 million in DLT grants in this announcement for 45 distance learning and 36 telemedicine projects. Two DLT projects in South Dakota received a total of $610,963 as part of the announcement.

Some of the awards will help communities provide services to address opioid misuse, a problem that is especially prevalent in rural areas. Secretary Vilsack is leading an interagency effort to address the rural opioid crisis. He held a town hall meeting in Abingdon, Va., on June 30 to address how the crisis is affecting rural America and parts of Appalachia and announced funding for five DLT projects in rural Kentucky, Tennessee and Virginia to respond to the issue.

In South Dakota, Avera Health, based in Sioux Falls, was selected to receive $494,518 to integrate 18 rural, under-staffed hospitals with Avera's ePharmacy network. A pharmacist will provide prescription review and pharmacy support 24 hours a day. An automated dispensing machine will be deployed at each hospital to reduce medication errors & to improve patient safety. The project will serve counties including in South Dakota Bon Homme, Charles Mix, Grant, Gregory, Hand, Jerauld, Kingsbury, Lincoln, Minnehaha, and Moody; in Iowa Plymouth and Sioux; in Nebraska Knox; and in Minnesota Hutchinson, and Pipestone.

Mount Marty College, based in Yankton, was selected to receive $116,445 to purchase video conferencing equipment to provide Master's in Education curriculum to Tribal colleges. This project will help train current and future teachers as well as provide professional development through distance learning.

USDA Rural Development has provided $213 million for 634 DLT projects in rural areas nationwide since 2009. USDA's Rural Utilities Service, which administers the DLT program, also offers infrastructure programs that bring broadband, safe drinking water and improved wastewater treatment facilities to rural communities.

Since 2009, USDA Rural Development (@USDARD) has helped bring high-speed Internet access to nearly 6 million rural residents and businesses; invested $31.3 billion in 963 electric projects that have financed more than 185,000 miles of transmission and distribution lines serving 4.6 million rural residents; helped 1.1 million rural residents buy homes; and funded nearly 7,000 community facilities such as schools, public safety and health care facilities. USDA also has invested $11 billion to start or expand 103,000 rural businesses. For more information, visit www.usda.gov/results.

Ripple Effect –

Healthy Lawn, Healthy Environment

A green, lush lawn is usually the envy of the neighborhood. Did you know that the average suburban lawn receives as much as 10 times as much chemical pesticide per acre as farmland? This is according to the US National Wildlife Federation which also states that over 70 million tons of fertilizers and pesticides are applied to U.S. residential lawns and gardens annually. Fertilizers and pesticides that run off of the landscape and into our rivers and streams can have damaging effects on animals, aquatic species and reduce the quality of water.

By reducing our dependence on chemicals used in our lawns and gardens, we can do many things to naturally improve the health of our lawns.

Eartheasy.com outlines some "Healthy Lawn Basics" that can help you achieve this:

1. Improve the Soil

The first step is to test the soil's pH - it should read between 6.5 and 7.0, which is slightly acidic. Soil that is too acidic will need a sprinkling of lime; sulfur can be added to soil which is not acidic enough.

Lawns grow best in loamy soils that have a mix of clay, silt and sand. Too much clay in the soil mix, or heavy use, can compact the soil and prevent air and nutrient flow. Organic matter, such as compost and grass clippings, will benefit any type of soil; it lightens soil which is heavy in clay, and it builds humus in sandy soils, which helps retain water and nutrients.

2. Choose a Locally Adapted Grass Grasses vary in the type of climate they prefer, the amount of water and nutrients required, shade tolerance and the degree of wear they can withstand. Ask your local garden center to recommend grass which is best adapted to your area.

3. Mow Often, but Not Too Short

Giving your lawn a "Marine cut" is not doing it a favor. Surface roots become exposed, the soil dries out faster and surface aeration is reduced. As a general rule, don't cut off more than one-third of the grass at any one time. Most turf grass species are healthiest when kept between 2.5 and 3.5" tall.

4. Water Deeply but Not Too Often

Thorough watering encourages your lawn to develop deep root systems which make the lawn hardier and more drought-resistant. Let the lawn dry out before re-watering; as a rule of thumb, the color should dull and footprints should stay compressed for more than a few seconds. The best time for watering is early morning - less water will be lost to evaporation.

5. Control Thatch Build-Up

Thatch is the accumulation of above-soil runners, propagated by the grass. This layer should be about 1/2" ( 1.25cm) on a healthy lawn, and kept in balance by natural decomposition, earthworms and microorganisms. Too much thatch prevents water and nutrients from reaching the grass roots.

Once you have followed these basic steps to improving the health of your lawn, you can maintain your healthy lawn using a few of these simple techniques:

• Leave clippings on the lawn.

• Observe the weeds.

• Sharpen mower blades at least once a year.

 If you fertilize your lawn, fertilize once or twice a year and use a fertilizer with time-released, water insoluble nitrogen.

• Convert your lawn to a drought-resistant, low-maintenance eco-lawn.

• 'Spot-treat' weeds with vinegar to minimize herbicide use.

These are just a few suggestions on how to maintain your healthy lawn. For more information on improving the health of your lawn, sustaining that health and helping improve water quality, please visit www.eartheasy.com for additional solutions for sustainable living.

*****

The RRBC is a grassroots organization that is a chartered not-for-profit corporation under the provisions of Manitoba, North Dakota, Minnesota, and South Dakota law. Our offices in Fargo, ND and Winnipeg, MB can be reached at 701-356-3183 and 204-982-7254, or you can check out our website at www.redriverbasincommission.org.

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

Roberts County 4-H News

By Tracey Lehrke

Youth Program Advisor

4-H youth throughout Roberts County are following the 4-H slogan Learn By Doing and are working on their projects for the 2016 Roberts County Achievement Days that will be held July 25-27th. Over 800 exhibits are pre-registered for this annual event that is held at the 4-H Grounds in Sisseton. The Dog Show Contest will begin Achievement Days on Monday, July 25th at 6 p.m. On Tuesday, July 26th the rabbit, poultry and cat shows will be held. Static exhibits can be viewed by the public on Wednesday, July 27th from 10 AM- 8 PM. The large animal shows will begin at 10 AM on Wednesday. The show order will be swine, sheep, meat goat, dairy goat, dairy, and the afternoon will end with the beef show.

4-H Community Building Update Meeting - The 4-H building committee will be holding a public meeting at 4:30 p.m. on Wednesday, July 27th. Members of the building committee will give a short presentation and will be available to answer any questions on the 4-H Community Building project. The meeting will be held in the 4-H building. Anyone who wants to learn more about the upcoming plans for the new 4-H Community Building is invited to attend.

Public Presentations - Starting at 4:45 on Wednesday, the public is invited to watch the youth give their purple ribbon presentations. This is a chance to see the hard work that goes into this 4-H Youth-in-Action Event. The schedule will be:

4:45 Abby Steen-Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

5:00 Emmalee Nielsen-Don't Thump Your Melon

5:15 Evelyn Fritz- Water Bombs

5:30 Kennedy Hanson & Elliot Hortness-Yummy Homemade Ice Cream

5:45 Rachel Richards-Country Trail Mix

6:00 Mollie Anderson-Leadership

6:15 Colter Hanson-Tundra Biome

4-H BBQ, Style Show & Premium Livestock Sale - Also on Wednesday, July 27th from 5-7 p.m. the public is invited to attend the 4-H BBQ where you can dine in or carry out. At 6:45 the graduation 4-H members will be recognized in the 4-H building. Thirty outfits will be modeled at the Style Show at 7 p.m. and in the show ring the Premium Livestock sale will start at 7:30 p.m.

Roberts County 4-H youth work hard each year to follow the 4-H motto To Make the Best Better. They would enjoy having the public come and see everything they have accomplished in 2016!

Roberts Co. Conservation report

By Dean E. Shultz Jr.

Roberts County Conservation Officer

Well, hello again! I would like to take this time and remind everyone about a couple of things that are happening in the field of wildlife and fisheries.

Well, it seems like summer just started and now it seems that we are winding down summer and getting ready for fall. The first big inclination that fall is just around the corner is, we have applications that will be coming due already. Remember the deadline dates are for the paper applications and you have until the following Tuesday at 8 A.M. for internet applications.

Here's a list of deadlines that are fast approaching; Custer State Park Antelope is Aug. 12, Firearms Antelope is Aug. 12, East River Deer (resident) & East River Landowner Deer is Sept. 2, Muzzleloader Deer is Sept. 2, National Wildlife Refuge Deer is Sept. 2, Prairie Fall Turkey (All) is Sept. 16 and Tundra Swan is Aug. 12.

The second indicator that fall is around the corner is that we are starting our run on late summer and early fall Hunt Safe Courses. Please take a moment and go to the Game, Fish, and Park website www.gfp.sd.gov and look under the outdoor learning tab and then go to the hunter education link to find the course listing. Once you found the course you would like to have your child attend, there will be a register online tab. You will have to register your child there. If you have any question give your local Conservation Officer a call and they will help you through it.

Just as a reminder there will be no August Management take for Canada Geese this year, in this area. The Canada goose season will kick off September 3rd and run though December 18th, 2016, for this area, which is Unit 1. Unit 1 consists of the counties of Aurora, Beadle, Brookings, Brown, Butte, Campbell, Clark, Clay, Codington, Corson, Davison, Day, Deuel, Douglas, Edmunds, Faulk, Grant, Haakon, Hamlin, Hand, Hanson, Harding, Hutchinson, Jackson, Jerauld, Jones, Kingsbury, Lake, Lawrence, Lincoln, McCook, McPherson, Marshall, Meade, Mellette, Minnehaha, Moody, Miner, Roberts, Sanborn, Shannon, Spink, Todd, Turner, Union, Walworth, Yankton, and Ziebach, that portion of Dewey County north of Bureau of Indian Affairs Road 8, Bureau of Indian Affairs Road 9, and the section of U.S. Highway 212 east of the Bureau of Indian Affairs Road 8 junction, that portion of Potter County east of U.S. Highway 83, that portion of Sully County east of U.S. Highway 83, portions of Hyde, Buffalo, Brule, Charles Mix, and Bon Homme counties north and east of a line beginning at the Hughes-Hyde county line on State Highway 34, east to Lees Boulevard, southeast to the State Highway 34, east 7 miles to 350th Avenue, south to Interstate 90 on 350th Avenue, south and east on State Highway 50 to Geddes, east on 285th Street to U.S. Highway 281, north on U.S. Highway 281 to the Charles Mix-Douglas county boundary, that portion of Bon Homme County north of State Highway 50, and that portion of Perkins county west of State Highway 75 and south of State Highway 20.

The daily limit is 15 Canada geese from Sept. 3 through Sept. 30 and 8 Canada geese from Oct. 1 through Dec. 18 with a possession limit three times the daily limit, taken according to daily limit. From Sept. 1-30 nonresidents may not hunt in Beadle, Brookings, Hanson, Kingsbury, Lake, Lincoln, McCook, Miner, Minnehaha, Moody, Sanborn, Turner and Union counties.

If you have any questions about the information in this article or any other topic please feel free to give me a call at 605-881-3773.

Good luck, on your next outdoor adventure.

UTTC Powwow set for September 9-11

BISMARCK (UTN) – The 47th Annual United Tribes Technical College Powwow is set for September 9-11 at Lone Star Arena on the college campus in Bismarck.

This is the summer season's last, large outdoor event on the Northern Great Plains powwow circuit. It's open to the public and everyone is invited and welcome.

CONTEST EVENT

Known as "Home of the Champions," this contest powwow offers over $130-thousand in prize money to the top singing groups and dancers in two dozen competitive categories. Prize money for the top drum is $10,000. Following three days of judging, champions are announced and prizes awarded Sunday, September 11. Day money is provided for non-contest drums and tiny tots.

Upwards of 1,000 participants from the northern Plains, around the country – and across the border in Canada – make this one of the premier cultural events in North Dakota.

POWWOW SCHEDULE

The first grand entry is set for Friday, September 9 at 1 p.m. (Central Time). The point system is in effect.

Subsequent Grand Entries are Friday evening at 7 p.m., Saturday at 1 and 7 p.m. and Sunday at 1 p.m.

A $20 entrance fee guarantees admission for all three days. Daily admission is $10. Seniors (65 and over) and children (5 and under) enter free.

Admission wrist bands may be purchased in advance through August 26 at the college's finance dept. Group rates provided for 10 or more. Contact Ella Duran 701-255-3285 x 1214, eduran@uttc.edu.

Camping may begin Tuesday, September 6. Space is available free of charge in designated locations on campus. Round-the-clock security is provided and access to facilities. No drugs or alcohol allowed and no pets.

United Tribes is a "tobacco free campus." The college keeps tobacco sacred by allowing its use for ceremonies only. Other uses of tobacco in all forms are prohibited.

HEAD STAFF

Master of Ceremonies: Lawrence Baker (Hidatsa/Mandan/Rincon Band of Luiseno Mission) and Vince Beyl (White Earth Ojibway); Arena Director: Rusty Gillette (Arikara/Hidatsa); Head Singing Judge: Frankie Graves (Ojibwe Nation); Head Women's Dance Judge: Cassie Lasley (Ho-Chunk Nation); Head Men's Dance Judge: Wylee Bearstail (Mandan-Hidatsa-Arikara Nation).

POWWOW VENDOR FAIR

Powwow vendors ring the dance arbor, creating a lively atmosphere catering to the needs of smart shoppers. Everything powwow is available from hides and antlers, to beads, finished clothing, bumper and window stickers and powwow collectibles.

The powwow food court offers a wide variety, from oriental and barbeque to the ever-popular 'Indian Taco.' Arts and Craft Vendors contact Donna Belgarde, dbelgarde@uttc.edu; Food Vendors contact Robert Fox 701-221-1384, rfox@uttc.edu.

YOUTH DAY

Fourth grade school classes are invited to Youth Day at the Powwow. The event includes music and cultural presentations, singing and drumming, tribal dance and audience participation. Starts at 11 a.m. Friday, September 9, runs through the morning. Chaperoned school groups admitted free. Contact Erik Cutler 701-221-1769, ecutler@uttc.edu.

TRIBAL LEADERS SUMMIT

20th Annual United Tribes "Tribal Leaders Summit" precedes the powwow September 6-8 at the Bismarck Event Center. Tribal, federal and state leaders gather for meetings and presentations and professional development and networking. The event also includes a trade fair. Summit and trade fair contact: Sacheen Whitetail Cross 701-221-1374, scross@uttc.edu.

GOLF TOURNAMENT

"Teeing Off for Academic Excellence" benefit golf tournament starts at 1 p.m. Friday, September 9 at Apple Creek Country Club; proceeds go to student scholarships. Contact Sam Azure 701-221-1842, sazure@uttc.edu.

HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT

High-school hoops action in the UTTC Gymnasium: Contact Pete Conway 701-221-1361, pconway@uttc.edu.

DIAMOND LEGENDS SOFTBALL TOURNAMENT

Diamond Legends Softball Tournament: all-Indian and mixed competition; teams and spectators from around the country. September 9-11; double elimination in both women's and men's divisions. Contact Steve Shepherd 701-226-3987, sshepherd@uttc.edu, www.facebook.com/unitedtribesdiamondlegends.

THUNDERBIRD RUN

A 10K and 5K run/walk hosted for runners and walkers of all ages beginning at 9 a.m. Saturday, September 10. Online and on-site registration. Contact Brienna 701-221-1367, bschwab@uttc.edu.

BUFFALO FEED

United Tribes honors you with the cultural tradition of a buffalo meal at 4 p.m. Sunday, September 11. Dancers, singers and visitors invited to partake free of charge. Buffalo courtesy of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate, one of the college's governing tribes. Chairman Mark Fox of the Mandan-Hidatsa-Arikara Nation hosts a free BBQ feed Saturday, September 10 at 4:30 p.m.

POWWOW EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Russ McDonald, UTTC President; Sacheen Whitetail Cross, UTTC Events Coordinator; Angelique Gills, President; Kathy Dye-Chapin, Vice-President; Ella Duran, Treasurer; Kim Reynolds, Secretary; Charisse Fandrich, Fundraising Coordinator; Joelle Bearstail, Volunteer Coordinator.

The theme of the 2016 powwow is: Empowerment Through Unity.

COLLEGE GOVERNING TRIBES

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate, Spirit Lake Tribe, Standing Rock Tribe, Three Affiliated Tribes of the Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara Nation, Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa.

MORE INFORMATION

Sacheen Whitetail Cross 701-221-1374, scross@uttc.edu.

Website: http://www.unitedtribespowwow.com/.

Lodging: www.discoverbismarckmandan.com

Drivers license exams

Driver license examinations are held in Sisseton at the City Hall, 406 2nd Ave.

Examikners are there from 8:15 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. each Wednesday of the month.

Important:

File application at least one hour in advance of scheduled closing hours if you wish to complete the exam on the same day.

Driver license applicants should bring one item to prove identity, date of birth and lawful status (such as certified birth certificate, etc.); one document to prove Social Security number; and two documents to prove residential address.

If your name is different from the name on your identity document, you need to bring additional proof of your legal name, such as a certified marriage certificate, certified adoption document, or court order authorizing a name change.

The examiners must be able to trace from your birth name to your current name.

No driving tests will be given from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

For more information, call 1-800-952-3696 or visit the website at dps.ed.gov

Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community donates $50,000 to AICF

Donation benefits programs to provide access to higher education for Native American students

Denver, Colo. – July 12, 2016 – The Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community (SMSC) has made a donation of $50,000 to the American Indian College Fund (the College Fund), the nation's largest and highest-rated American Indian scholarship organization. This donation is being used to improve American Indian access to higher education through scholarship support.

"In order for Native communities to prosper, we need to invest in our children and grandchildren's higher education," said SMSC Chairman Charlie Vig. "The American Indian College Fund is an excellent investment in making that priority a reality."

The SMSC has contributed $2.74 million to the American Indian College Fund over the past 20 years. These gifts have endowed the College Fund's Sovereign Nations Scholarship Fund, established the SMSC Tribal College Scholarship Program, and most recently helped to support a nationwide campaign, Stand with Native Students, geared to create equity in higher education amongst American Indian students. Currently only 13% of American Indians age 25 and older have a college degree, compared to 29.3% of the overall population and the College Fund is working to increase that number.

Established in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation's largest charity supporting Native higher education for more than 25 years. The College Fund believes "education is the answer" and has provided more than 100,000 scholarships since its inception and an average of 6,000 scholarships per year to American Indian students. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.

Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said, "With their continued support of the College Fund, the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community shows they are committed to the importance of 'education is the answer' and to solving the challenges that Native peoples face as tribal citizens. With an education, American Indians can provide for themselves and their families; improve health and wellness; and promote quality programs and services. We are honored to be a partner in their commitment to higher education for Native students."

About the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community

The Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community is a federally recognized, sovereign Indian tribe located southwest of Minneapolis/St. Paul. Making its top priority to be a good neighbor, the SMSC is the largest contributor to Native American Indian tribes and causes across the country. It also focuses on being a strong community partner and a leader in protecting and restoring natural resources. The SMSC's government, Gaming Enterprise, and various other enterprises are collectively the largest employers in Scott County.

BBB Warning: Enjoy Pokémon GO with caution

July 12, 2016 - In just a few days, Pokémon GO has become the most downloaded phone app in the U.S. The app, which uses mapping software to create a virtual reality game, is getting children and adults out and about in their neighborhoods to catch the game characters as they pop up on phone screens from various locations.

Although the game can be a blast, BBB is warning players and parents to be aware of some nuances that go with GO.

Expenses: It's possible to play completely cost-free by winning PokeCoins (the app's currency) through gameplay, but you can also purchase the coins through an in-app purchase. The longer you play, the more spending money you need to store to train your gathered characters. The app also requires constant GPS access, and it uses a lot of data. After playing for hours every day, consumers with limited data plans may find themselves with a hefty bill at the end of the month.

Privacy: In order to play the game, users must allow the app to access other applications, such as maps and camera. Many users sign in with a Google account, and that has caused some concerns about privacy. The Android version of the game only accesses limited data (such as the user's email address), but the iOS version for the iPhone can access all Google data. Niantic, the game's maker, says no personal information has been accessed, and it is issuing a bug fix to correct the problem.

Niantic's website states, "We recently discovered that the Pokémon GO account creation process on iOS erroneously requests full access permission for the user's Google account. However, Pokémon GO only accesses basic Google profile information (specifically, your User ID and email address) and no other Google account information is or has been accessed or collected. Once we became aware of this error, we began working on a client-side fix to request permission for only basic Google profile information, in line with the data that we actually access. Google has verified that no other information has been received or accessed by Pokémon GO or Niantic. Google will soon reduce Pokémon GO's permission to only the basic profile data that Pokémon GO needs, and users do not need to take any actions themselves."

Users can create an account through the app itself rather than using an email address to access the game.

Malware: So far, the app is only available in the U.S., Canada, Australia and New Zealand, which has given cybercriminals an opportunity to capitalize on the demand. A malware version of the game has been found online; although no known infections have been reported. Users should only download the app through official app stores, not third-party sites.

Safety: Players should use the same safety precautions while playing the game that they would in any other outdoor setting, including caution in strange locations. A Missouri police department reported robbers using a secluded PokeStop location to rob unsuspecting game players. Players should be cautious as pedestrians and obey all traffic laws, and drivers should be on the lookout for children who may be distracted by the game. The app also drains phone batteries, so users should be careful not to get stranded far from home.

Infringement: PokeStops are supposed to all be on public property (or cooperative private sites), but at least one homeowner has reported that his historic house is mistakenly a PokeStop. Players should be respectful of others? private property. Future commercial opportunities are anticipated, where stores can offer rare or unique characters to add to the game.

*****

ABOUT BBB: Better Business Bureau has been assisting U.S consumers and businesses since 1912. It is a private, nonprofit organization dedicated to advancing trust in the marketplace. In 2015, people turned to BBB more than 165 million times for BBB Business Reviews on more than 4.7 million businesses and Charity Reports on 11,000 charities, all available for free at bbb.org. Today, BBB serving Nebraska, South Dakota, The Kansas Plains and Southwest Iowa is supported by approximately 10,000 Accredited Businesses that have voluntarily committed to adhere to BBB's Standards of Trust.

Legals

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 11-037

SWOCSE/ April Thompson, PLAINTIFF

VS.

BRUCE GERMAN, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Review Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 16-110

SWOCSE/ Michelle Blue, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ANTHONY RENVILLE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 08-005

SWOCSE/ Daisy Hare, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ANTHONY RENVILLE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Dismiss Child Support and Establish Arrears, Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 16-104

SWOCSE/ Lucille Eastman, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CARSON LABATTE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 07-169

SWOCSE/ Orvella Bird, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CARSON LABATTE, Sr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 16-105

SWOCSE/ SD/ David Potts, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ELSIE CAMPBELL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 09-008

SWOCSE/ Marlena DuMarce, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CARSON LABATTE, Sr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 28th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 14-075

SWOCSE/ Tiffany Schaak, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MIKA RONDELL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  I: 16-123

SWOCSE/ Jeff Salinas, PLAINTIFF

VS.

RHEA ROCKWOOD, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 29th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 16-102

SWOCSE/ Dustin Locke, PLAINTIFF

VS.

BELINDA LOCKE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 16-128

SWOCSE/ Gerald Thompson, Jr., PLAINTIFF

VS.

FAUSTINE HISGUN, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 16-124

SWOCSE/ Linda Cantu, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SONYA LADWIG, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 16-120

SWOCSE/ Jewel Bearhill, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CHELSEA HEMINGER, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 16-118

SWOCSE/ Jewel Bearhill, PLAINTIFF

VS.

RYAN HILL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 16-216

SWOCSE/ Winona Thompson, PLAINTIFF

VS.

FAUSTINE HISGUN, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Establish Arrears and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 11-022

SWOCSE/ Holly Renville, PLAINTIFF

VS.

BENJAMIN YANKTON, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Review Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 16-122

SWOCSE/ Linda Cantu, PLAINTIFF

VS.

BENJAMIN YANKTON, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Establish Paternity and Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 9:00 o'clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 16-134

SWOCSE/ Kevin Farmer, PLAINTIFF

VS.

TORENNA MACCONNELL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 16-088

SWOCSE/ Elizabeth Janisch, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CICILY JANISCH, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 16-136

SWOCSE/ Amanda Hanson, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CICILY JANISCH, DEFENDANT

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 16-126

SWOCSE/ Carlton Crawford, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ELIZABETH HANSON, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO.  CS: 16-112

SWOCSE/ Alexis Renville, PLAINTIFF

VS.

FELIX JOHNSON, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Establish Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of July, 2016 at the hour of 1:00 o'clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing.  Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 30th day of June, 2016

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/S/

Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Carlson, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

28-3tc

Trading Post ads

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

Job Openings

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate is seeking to fill the following positions(s):

Administrative Assistant, Dakotah Language Institute

Closing Date: July 22nd, 2016 @ 04:30 PM

Director, Early Childhood Intervention

Adult Daycare Provider, Tribal Elderly

Director, Office of Environmental Protection

Closing Date: July 29th, 2016 @ 04:30 PM

All interested applicants may obtain application and job description information at the Human Resource Department, of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate or contact Arnold Williams at (605) 698-8238 or Denise Hill at (605) 698-8251. (Tribal preference will apply).

 

SWO Fuels Inc.

Manager

Job Summary:

The Fuel Inc. manager is responsible for day to day store operations, including scheduling, report writing, maintenance deadlines, DOT and insurance specifications, and supervising employees and assistant manager.  The manager is responsible for the profits, and all controllable expenses including labor, inventory levels, and cash and inventory shortages.

List of Responsibilities for Fuel Inc. and C-store

*Motivate, encourage, and challenge employees.

*Promote and resolve customer complaints, in a timely and professional manner.

*Maintain quality brand image standards as pass evaluations.

*Supervise and discipline all employees (and assistant manager/supervisor) according to company policy.

*Monitor daily retail gasoline competitors and sending the prices to the corporate office in a timely manner as established by management.

*Complete daily paperwork and computer entry in a timely manner as established by management.

*Monitor cash over/short, inventory shrinkage and drive offs daily.

*Conduct store meetings as needed with employees. (A minimum of one monthly)

*Have the physical ability to perform all duties as needed.

*Understand all information in the daily reporting of store operations.

*Follow and enforce all Company Policies and Establish Procedures in the store Operations.

*Implement Monthly promotions, insure all POS advertising/signage is properly posted at the proper time.

*Communicate and perform all price changes, mark downs /mark ups as requested by manager.

*Maintain pricing in price book of Red River program when needed.

*Implement and enforce all merchandising and vendor policies and procedures.

*Enforce all Safety and Security Issues and report any and all unsafe conditions.

*Conduct regular safety and security meeting and document with employees attending signatures.

* Report and process all employee and/or customer incidents or accidents following company procedure.

*Maintain all Mandatory UST records and related equipment.

*Perform other Duties as assigned by Management.

Education/ Experience: High School Diploma or General Equivalency Diploma (GED) recommended.

Open until filled.

For more information, or to apply, contact SWO Fuel Inc., 2202 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262; phone 605-698-3521.

 

Sisseton Wahpeton College

Has the following vacancies:

Facilities/Custodian

There is an opening for a temporary full-time Custodian in our Facilities Department at SWC. Requirements are: High School Diploma or GED. Previous janitorial experience required. Physically able to perform moderate to heavy manual labor under various conditions, as necessary. Position closes at 430 p.m. on July 28, 2016. Visit our website www.swc.tc for a complete job description and application or contact the HR office at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118.

Facilities/Shuttle Drivers

There are openings for two (2) part-time Shuttle Drivers in our Facilities Department. Requirements are: High School Diploma or GED. Must be at least 25 years of age, have a valid driver's license and a clean driving record. Position closes at 4:30 p.m. on July 28, 2016. Visit our website www.swc.tc for a complete job description and application or contact the HR office at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118.

Extension Coordinator

There is an opening for a full-time Extension Coordinator at SWC. Requirements are: Bachelor's degree in Agriculture or related field. Position closes at 4:30 p.m. on July 28, 2016. Visit our website www.swc.tc for a complete job description and application or contact the HR office at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118.

Comptroller

There is an opening for a full-time Comptroller at SWC. Requirements are: Master's degree in accounting or bachelor's degree with five years' experience in accounting. Certified Public Accountant (CPA) preferred. Three (3) years' experience in a supervisory role in a business office of an educational institution is preferred. Position closes at 4:30 p.m. on July 28, 2016. Visit our website www.swc.tc for a complete job description and application or contact the HR office at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118.

Science Instructor

There is an opening for a full-time Science Instructor at SWC. Requirements are: Master's degree in Nutritional Food Science. Previous teaching experience. Position closes at 4:30 p.m. on July 28, 2016. Visit our website www.swc.tc for a complete job description and application or contact the HR office at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118.

Enrollment Management Coordinator

There is an opening for a full-time Enrollment Management Coordinator at SWC. Requirements are: BA/BS degree. Experience working with students preferred. Marketing and sales experience preferred. Position closes at 4:30 p.m. on July 28, 2016. Visit our website www.swc.tc for a complete job description and application or contact the HR office at 605-698-3966, ext. 1118.

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Tiospa Zina Tribal School

Job Openings

Current Vacancies:

Substitutes needed for custodial, kitchen, teaching, and transportation - starting at $10/hr, varies per position Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma (please contact the HR office for more information) Applications are accepted on an on-going basis

2016-2017 School Year Vacancies:

Vacancy: High School Science Teacher ($2,000.00 Sign-on Bonus) Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a High School Science Teacher Opening Date: January 29, 2016 Closing Date: open until filled

Vacancy: Career and Technical Education Teacher ($2,000.00 Sign-on Bonus) Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Career and Technical Education Teacher Opening Date: March 11, 2016 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Middle School Social Studies Teacher ($2,000.00 Sign-on Bonus) Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Middle School Social Studies Teacher Opening Date: April 22, 2016 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Middle School 6th Grade Classroom Teacher ($2,000.00 Sign-on Bonus) Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Middle School 6th Grade Classroom Teacher Opening Date: June 21, 2016 Closind Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Gear-Up School Based Coordinator (Part-time) Qualifications: Current South Dakota Teaching Certificate and possess a valid South Dakota drivers license Opening Date: May 23, 2016 Closing Date: Open until filled

2016-2017 Coaching Vacancies- Closing Date: Open until filled

Proof of all SDHSAA coaching requirements at the time application is submitted. Requirements are to complete the following courses through the National Federation of High School Sports (NFHS): Fundamentals of Coaching, and First Aid and Safety for Coaches. Must also submit a letter of intent that answers the questions found on form Athletics Coaching Questionnaire. **Do not need SDHSAA/NFHS Coaching Requirements.

Head Wrestling Coach

Head Girls Basketball Coach

Head High School Track Coach

**Jr. High Boys Basketball Coach

**Jr. High Girls Basketball Coach

**5/6 Grade Boys Basketball Coach

**Jr. High Football Coach

Jr. High/Assistant Track Coach Assistant Varsity Boys Basketball Coach

Assistant Varsity Girls Basketball Coach

Assistant Volleyball Coach

Assistant Wrestling Coach

Assistant Track Coach (2) Assistant Varsity Football Coaches

2016-2017 Extra-Curricular Vacancies-Closing Date: Open until filled

Horse Club Adviser

Science Club Adviser

Close-up Foundation Adviser

Destination Imagination Coach

Drum Adviser

Junior Class Adviser

Military Club Adviser

Senior Class Adviser

Classroom Substitute Information:

Tiospa Zina classroom substitutes must complete substitute training before they can substitute for teaching staff. If you are interested in Substitute Teaching you either have to attend and complete the Substitute Teacher training offered by Tiospa Zina or register with STEDI.org and complete the Substitute Teacher training offered online. If you choose to take the online training all furnishings and costs are the trainees' responsibility. The button below is the link to the online training. The button is also the link to subscribe to STEDI.org, free of charge, which gives you access to substitute teacher tools, resources, newsletters, and trainings.

If you would like to apply to be a part of the TZ tiwahe you may pick up an application and background check form from the TZTS HR office located at #2 Tiospa Zina Dr. Agency Village, SD 57262. Applications may also be printed off the HR web page. Completed applications may be sent to PO Box 719, Agency Village, SD 57262. Faxed to: 605-698-7686. For further information call 605-698-3953 ext. 208. Indian Preference employer. At will employer. All applicants are subject to a Background Check and Pre-Employment Drug Test, pursuant to SWSB policy and United States Code Title 25 Chapter 34 - Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention. United States Code Title 25 Chapter 34 - Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention.

 

Enemy Swim Day School

Vacancies

Bus Monitors

Enemy Swim Day School has openings for bus monitors for the 2016-2017 school year. This is a part-time position with a minimum of 4 hour per day on school days. Requirements: HS Diploma/GED, pass a background check. If interested please pick up an application from the business office or visit our website: www.esds.us. Call (605) 947-4605 or (888) 825-7738 and ask for Ed Johnson for details. Indian preference policies apply. Open until filled.

After School Group Leaders

Enemy Swim Day School has openings for Group Leaders for our afterschool program for the 2016-2017 school year. Schedule: Monday-Thursday 12:30-5:30 pm and occasional scheduled evenings. Hourly wage. Indian preference will apply. Call Rebecca Dargatz at 947-4605 or (888) 825-7738 for more details. Applications available on-line at www.esds.us or at the school.

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Dakota Magic Casino

Job Openings

Foods Department:

Cook II (3 Full-Time & Part-Time) Day/Swing

Housekeeping Department:

Porter (12 Full-Time or Part-Time) as needed

Hotel Department:

Room/Laundry Attendant (Full-Time or Part-Time) 8:00 am-finish

Closing Date: July 22, 2016 at 4:00 p.m.

Starting Wage: D.O.E.

High School Diploma or GED required for most positions

Two identifications documents required upon hire

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department, 16849 102nd Street SE, Hankinson ND 58041.For complete Job Description contact James Neconish 701-634-3000 ext. 2582 Indian Preference will apply / EEO. (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment). Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

ADMINISTRATION: ADMINISTATIVE ASSISTANT (FULL TIME). GENERAL FUNCTION: Serves as Administrative Assistant to the General Manager and performs a variety of functions which involve the activities of clerical and office personnel. POSITION REQUIREMENTS: High school graduate or G.E.D. equivalent. Minimum of three years secretarial experience. Thorough knowledge of Business English, Spelling, Punctuation, Office Practices, Procedures and equipment. Knowledge of the principles and practices of supervision. Proficient typing skills required. Must have computer knowledge. Able to work independently and exercise independent judgments. Able to meet and deal effectively with associates and the general public. Able to sit for long periods of time and perform repetitious computer work. Must obtain a Non Gaming License.

This position will close on July 28th, 2016 at 4 pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

SECURITY: SECURITY OFFICER (FULL-TIME) ROTATING SHIFTS GENERAL FUNCTION: The security officer protects company assets and provides a safe environment for customers and employees. Exhibit a friendly, helpful and courteous manner when dealing with the customers and employees. Maintains security activities and performs credit transactions adhering to company, Tribal, State and Federal guidelines. Work closely with Casino & Hotel Management. REQUIREMENTS: High School Diploma or GED equivalent. Must have basic computer skills. Ongoing training through Dakota Nation Gaming Enterprise and respective security department policy and procedures. Complete departmental training program including CPR, first aid, and TAM. Must complete a 90 day probation period. Must be licensable by SWO Gaming Commission. Must be able to work irregular hours. Must be dependable, punctual, some knowledge in handheld radios, and writing reports. Law Enforcement, Military, Security experience preferred. Must not have a felony on your record. Must be physically fit and able to lift 40+ lbs. Must complete all security certifications within a year of hire in accordance with the Gaming Commissions rules and regulations.

This position will close on July 20th, 2016 at 4 pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

FOOD SERVICE: BUFFET CASHIER (FULL-TIME) ROTATING SHIFTS GENERAL FUNCTION: To seat Buffet customers and operate cash register. REQUIREMENTS: High school diploma or G.E.D. is required, total responsibility for cash bank and cash receipts for your shift, Able to stand for prolonged periods of time, Customer courtesy a must, will have to work weekends, holidays and rotating shifts. Must obtain an Non- Gaming License upon hire

Positions will close on July 20, 2016 at 4 pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

GIFT SHOP: GIFT SHOP CLERK (1 FULL TIME). GENERAL FUNCTION: Must have excellent customer service background. Meet and greet customers and varies venders entering establishment. Must have good communication skills. REQUIREMENTS: Must have a High school diploma or G.E.D. equivalent. Must be neat in appearance, must have working knowledge in retail sales operation. Operate Micros system cash register, receive varies payment types. Must be able to lift, bend and use a step ladder. Must be 21 years old. Must obtain a Non-Gaming License upon hire.

This position will close on July 20, 2016 at 4 pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

Facilities/Maintenance Department:

Porter (3) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, includes weekends & holidays. Good customer service skills; ability to operate necessary equipment and the physical ability to lift heavy objects up to 20 lbs or more. Have physical mobility throughout facility & surrounding grounds; dependable & available to work all shifts. Must be at least 18 years old.

C-Store Department:

Clerk/Cashier (1) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, includes weekends & holidays. Excellent customer service skills; math skills essential; ability to operate necessary equipment; physical ability to lift moderate amounts of weight; previous experience working with money preferred; strong organizational skills managing various functions; dependable & available to work any & all shifts. Must be at least 21 years old & have a High School diploma or GED.

Opening date: Thursday, July 14, 2016

Closing date: Wednesday, July 20, 2016 @ 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

Slot Department:

Slot Technician (1) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, weekends & holidays, and the ability to work flexible hours. Excellent customer service skills with both external and internal customers. Math skills are essential, mechanical skills, and the physical ability to lift heavy objects. Knowledge of other gaming related equipment. Will be exposed to noise and tobacco smoke. Appropriate dress code. Must be at least 21 years old, have a High School diploma or GED, must be able to obtain a Key Gaming License.

Security Department:

Officer (1) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, weekends, holidays, and the ability to work flexible hours. Mobility throughout the facility 45% percent of time; will be stooping, bending, walking for long periods of time, able to lift up to 40 pounds, computer skills required for report writing. Will be exposed to noise and tobacco smoke. Appropriate dress code. Must be at least 21 years old, have High School Diploma or GED, must be able to obtain a Key License.

Opening date: Thursday, July 14, 2016

Closing date: Wednesday, July 27, 2016 @ 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 
 

 

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