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Sota Volume 45 Issue No. 42

Anpetu Iyamni, October 22, 2014

Inside this Edition –

Proposed Measures for General Council Ballots in this week’s Sota; Oyate will vote on 8 Measures

SWO Elderly Program invites SWO Executive Candidates to attend Public Forum Oct. 28th

SWO honored with Tribal National Veterans Cemetery Grant in the amount of $3.1 million

Dedication of new SWO akicita monuments is October 24th

Oyate stand in solidarity with others at Treaty Rights Rally in Pierre

Shoni Schimmel Day in Agency Village last Saturday!

Update: Oyate honey bee project is making progress!

SWO educators attend NIEA conference in Anchorage, Alaska: See report next week

Next week: Photo highlights of Wambdi football parents night

Deadline for receipt of copy for consideration is 12:00 noon Fridays

SWO lady veterans take part in regional conference in Sioux Falls last week

Historic Get Out the Native Vote 2014!

By CD Floro

Sota Editor

GOTV 2014 and the Rez Tour logged lots and lots of miles last week and were not going to be finished until the end of the day this Monday, October 20th. That is the final day for registering to vote before the November 3rd General Election.

SWO Legislative Assistant Dustina Gill is the prime force behind this milestone event, but she will be the first to say it could not have happened without lots of support – from within and from outside our Oyate community.

While on the tour, Dustina posted the following comments about what motivates her to do what she is doing:

From Dustina’s blog:

Today I was asked. Why do you do what you do? Why do you want to get out the vote?

Well... There's so many reasons why and if you’re on my friends list I know you know exactly what I mean.

In a nutshell. Our voice is our vote. Our weapon is our vote. Today our voice needs to be heard more so than ever. There is an impending shift in every level of politics that will determine our fate. From the state stealing our children to a potential republican congress thinking these damn Indians need to assimilate already and these reservations need to be dissolved. Treaty rights? Get over it. Melt into the pot already we did.

And right there is my point. They willingly came over and willingly melted. Our ancestors were forced, do or die thru annihilation, assimilation and acculturation. Why do you think we cling so furiously to who we are as an individual, a people and as a nation. We can only get stronger and we are getting stronger in each and every way. This week I was among relatives at each reservation and learned so much and felt that much more empowered. Why do I do this? Our ancestors sacrificed and fought so that we could live. We do the same for our future generations and it is in the form of a vote. Yesterday's buffalo is today's education and yesterday's weapon is today's vote.

A vote is a vote to ensure our future generations are protected. We vote so they can live. "Damakotah! And I Vote"

Here are some photo highlights from the Rez Tour, but watch for a comprehensive report and follow-up next week.

Rally held on steps of SD Capitol building on Native American Day –

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate join in SD Native American Rally for Treaty Rights

Report for the Sota

By John Heminger

Native American Day was observed last Monday, October 13th in South Dakota with a Native American Rally for Treaty Rights. Hosted by Dakota AIM and the International Indian Treaty Council, the rally was held on the steps of the state capitol in Pierre.

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate need to stand in solidarity against the XL Pipeline. It’s time to unify.

Mni Wiconi.

Hecetu.

SWO notified VA plans to award grant in FY 2015 to establish a veterans cemetery in Agency Village

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has notified SWO Tribal Chairman Robert Shepherd that the VA plans to award a grant in fiscal year 2015 to establish a state veterans cemetery in Agency Village.

Actual award depends upon the President’s FY15 budget request for the VA and Congressional approval.

Local contact person for the grant will be Tribal Veterans Service Officer Geri Opsal.

The grant amount of $3.1 will cover establishing a cemetery to serve as final resting place for SWO veterans and their families. It will also cover repatriation of remains to bring deceased members back to be with their fellow Oyate veterans.

The SWO Tribe is making plans and finding an engineer and contractor for the project.

The location is a 19-acre site three miles west of Sisseton (west of the Valley View Country Club) on the south side of SD Highway 10.

If the funding is approved, construction will begin early next spring, with the goal of having the cemetery ready to use in August 2015.

SWO educators participate during National Indian Education Association conference –

US Education department takes school environment listening tour for Native American students to Anchorage, Alaska

The White House Initiative on American Indian and Alaska Native Education (WHIAIANE), in partnership with the First Alaskans Institute and the First Alaskans Elders and Youth Conference, will conduct the second session of the WHIAIANE School Environment Listening Tour last week in Anchorage, Alaska.

The goal of this first-ever school environment listening tour is to hear from students, schools and communities on ways to better meet the unique educational and culturally-related academic needs of Native American students. The listening sessions are focusing on school environment - bullying, student discipline and offensive imagery and symbolism. WHIAIANE will gather feedback during the tour and consider how it can inform future action to ensure Native American students receive a high quality education.

The first stop on the tour was held on Oct. 10, in Franklin, Wisconsin, at the Indian Community School of Milwaukee. Future sessions this fall will be held in Lacrosse, Wisconsin; Seattle, Washington; East Lansing, Michigan; Tulsa, Oklahoma; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; Troy, New York, and Los Angeles, California.

“We hope these sessions will serve as a meaningful resource to the Native community as my office and the Administration work to ensure that American Indian and Alaska Native students have equitable educational opportunities in healthy learning environments,” said William Mendoza, executive director of the White House Initiative on American Indian and Alaska Native Education. “Indian students have unique education challenges as they strive to preserve their native cultures and languages, while ensuring that they are college and career ready.”

During his visit to Standing Rock Indian Reservation in North Dakota on June 13, 2014, President Obama affirmed the Administration’s commitment to strengthen Native American communities through education and economic development. His initiative, “My Brother’s Keeper,” ensures that schools can provide the social, emotional, and behavioral supports for all youth—including boys and young men of color—that will enable all students to graduate from high school ready for college and careers.

WHIAIANE and the Department’s Office for Civil Rights (OCR) are committed to supporting school districts, states, tribes and other organizations as they seek to better serve Native American students and ensure that all students have equal opportunities and resources in order to learn and succeed in school, careers and in life. OCR recently released guidance to educators on Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to ensure that all students have equitable access to the resources that they deserve – and that are their right – such as academic and extracurricular programs, strong teaching, facilities, and instructional materials. Administration officials and U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan have engaged directly with tribal officials on a range of educational issues important to Indian Country.

(Editor’s note: Watch next week for news and photos of our educators who represented the Oyate at the National Indian Education Association meetings and the listening tour session in Alaska.)

Shoni Schimmel Day last Saturday on the Lake Traverse Reservation

By CD Floro

Sota Editor

The Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate were visited by arguably the top modern sports hero of Indian country last Saturday, October 18th, when Shoni Schimmel came to give a basketball camp at the Tiospa Zina Tribal School gym and speak at a community rally for her later in the day, also in the Wambdi gym.

Shoni Schimmel, born May 4, 1992 is a Native American professional basketball player. She was an All-American college player at the University of Louisville and a first round draft pick of the WNBA's Atlanta Dream.

She has captured the hearts of fans across not only our Indian country but others who have watched her strong hearted competitiveness.

After the camp, giving tips to young Oyate basketball players, she spoke to them and to the community telling everyone to work to achieve the great potential that is in them.

Afterwards, she posed for pictures and signed autographs.

Shoni also visited with SWO Tribal Chairman Robert Shepherd and Vice-Chair Sara Lincoln, and met with representatives of the GOTV Rez Tour.

She was interviewed live by announcer Tom Wilson on KXSW, answering questions posed by listeners.

Thank you, pidamiya Shoni, for sharing with our Oyate. May your spirit help encourage our young ones to follow a path to their dreams.

We are putting together more information and photos taken at the basketball camp and later that day at the community rally for a feature in next week’s Sota.

Rezheadz present Anti-Bullying workshop at SWC

The Rezheadz gave a presentation on bullying awareness to families and children at the Sisseton Wahpeton College omniciye tipi last weekend.

It was an emotion-packed event.

Presenter Jason "Smoke" Nichols is a direct lineal descendent of "Mato Ska" - Tom Frosted of the Lower Yanktonai Sioux Tribe.

Smoke is a multiple Award winning Motivational speaker, recording artist and business owner! Smoke is a dynamic performer and contagious motivational speaker. He engages his audience and inspires with humor and clarity as well as a practical example for positive action. He motivates people to find greatness within themselves and teaches them to share these qualities with others. He inspires our youth to harness their full potential without bowing to peer pressure and shows that through perseverance and dedication one can gain freedom from fear and destroy discouragement.

Smokes’ presentation describes memorable experiences for his success, which include strategies for dealing with stress and abstaining from drug and alcohol use.

Here are a few photo highlights from the presentation.

SWO Sex Offender Registry presents “Inner Journey”

The SWO Sex Offender Registry, with support from the Department of Justice, presented an “Inner Journey” last Thursday, October 16, at the Sisseton Wahpeton College log cabin.

There was a good turnout for the event, which was held “to inspire, empower and educate people of any age who has or had a history of sexual abuse, lives with a survivor of sexual abuse, or works with victims of sexual abuse.”

Presenter was Tohonoa O’odham Nation’s Caroline Felicity Antone. Caroline is a domestic violence/sexual assault counselor and substance abuse counselor.

Besides the log cabin presentation, Caroline also spoke to students at Tiospa Zina Tribal School on the subject of domestic violence and sexual assault.

View photos here courtesy of Michael LaFontaine Sr.

Community Corner –

Honey Bee Project

By Ella Robertson

Community Planner

This year the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate ventured into the business of Honey Bees!

With the help of Victoria Ranua from the Shakopee Mdewakaton Sioux Community, Wozupi we started 20 beehives and set them up at the Buffalo Farm.

Through the summer they have grown and are now 3 boxes high!

Steve Owen, Tribal member, is our “bee man” and has managed our beehives thus far. Natural Resources lent us a helping hand and has started to learn about beekeeping and has been very instrumental in getting this project off the ground.

The honeybees will be wintered here, unlike commercial bees that get shipped south for the winter, a system introduced to us by Ms. Ranua.

At the rate our bees are growing we can expect to double our beehives to 40 next spring. The bees will use the honey they produced this year to feed for the winter and next year those first 20 hives will produce honey for harvesting.

We will be selling this surplus honey come next summer.

The Honey Bee Project is managed by the SWO Planning & Economic Development Department.

Here are photos of the bee project.

Reminder to use blacktop road detour –

Subject: BIA 7 Closure and Detour

This is just a reminder of the closure of BIA Route 700 and the use of Roberts Co. 34 (Old 81), Roberts Co. 5 and South BIA 700 as the access to and from Agency Village. We see that many cars during the day are still using BIA Route 706 before Barker Hill to cut across and we ask that you please pass the word to all local members and visitors to use the specified detour route. We have many unnecessary issues arising along BIA 706 such as:

1. Existing poor condition of the road itself with potholes, large rocks and simply the design of the gravel road even if up to design standards and adequate thickness of gravel is not made to handle 3,000 cars and heavy trucks per day.

2. Excessive use will only deteriorate the life of this road even faster and as I stated before all entities in the area have limited funds to maintain, let alone reconstruct these roads.

3. Excessive vehicle traffic means many more drivers are driving too fast through the housing areas of the roadway and also higher traffic is creating an excessive amount of dust and poses a safety concern with drivers being able to see each other when approaching head on.

Construction should last only until around the end of October and should have an asphalt surfaced north section of BIA 700 to use over the winter before the road being closed again in the Spring of 2015 to construct the remaining 2.5 miles.

If you happen to be curious the construction will consist of widening the roadway, just as you see at the south end section near the Pow Wow Grounds with each lane being 12’ wide and having 8’ shoulders. New box culverts will be installed, some of the sags and hills along the stretch will be filled or flattened out for better sight distance and more trees, shrubs and material will be cleared within the Right of Way.

Once again please pass the word to as many people as you can and please use the detour as much as possible.

Thank you.

David A. Spider, Manager, SWO Construction Management.

Progress, new challenges combatting domestic violence in Bismarck/Mandan and Indian country

Bismarck, ND – October 14, 2014 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today highlighted the urgent need to address domestic violence as a public health crisis in North Dakota. By gathering community advocates and victims services professionals during Domestic Violence Awareness Month, Heitkamp was able to hear from officials, advocates and law enforcement in Indian Country and the Bismarck/Mandan area who see the impact of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) in the western part of the state and on tribal lands every day.

During her conversation with participants from Bismarck/Mandan and the Native American community, Heitkamp heard more about how the Violence Against Women Act – which she implemented at a state level as North Dakota’s Attorney General when it was first enacted 20 years ago – has developed in the wake of the state’s economic boom. Together, Heitkamp and leaders in Bismarck/Mandan and Indian Country discussed new challenges, and the ways public officials locally and federally can combine resources and training efforts to continue to aggressively fight domestic violence and abuse as a crime, not as a domestic dispute.

“Violence against women and children is unacceptable, no matter where it occurs,” said Heitkamp. “Our state has reaped many rewards from the oil and gas boom, but the new challenges its presented too often leave our state’s most vulnerable by the wayside. We simply cannot afford to lose momentum just when we have started to unmask the insidious problem of domestic violence to reveal what it really is—a crime and public health issue. Too many North Dakotans are counting on us not to give up on them now—especially on our tribal lands. That’s why I wrote the provision in the latest Violence Against Women Act to make sure Native leaders have the authority to prosecute non-Native perpetrators who commit these crimes on tribal land. And it’s why I’ll never quit on the victims of these crimes, because it’s up to us as a community to end the cycle of abuse.”

Heitkamp’s visit builds on the success of her roundtable discussion in Fargo last week on fighting domestic violence with local law enforcement and community advocates, as well as her visit to the Abused Persons Outreach Center, a victims services facility in Valley City.

From an early stage as Attorney General, Heitkamp worked to change public perception of domestic violence from a culture of debilitating silence, to one of public denouncement. According to the Justice Department, the annual incidences of domestic violence have fallen more than 60 percent since 1993 nationally. But much work remains, which is why Heitkamp pushed for a key provision in the reauthorization of VAWA, which strengthens the existing programs and provides tribal governments the ability to prosecute non-Indian perpetrators who commit these crimes on tribal land.

Building on her work to combat domestic violence, Heitkamp has expanded her efforts to also reducing human trafficking, which is a growing problem in North Dakota, especially in the western part of the state. Since the fall of 2013, Heitkamp has been a leader in Congress working to combat human trafficking by holding Senate hearings, introducing legislation to crack down on human trafficking and support victims, setting up training sessions for North Dakotans on identifying human trafficking, and coordinating with lead advocacy organizations to raise awareness about this problem.

Last month, Heitkamp launched her Strong & Safe Communities Initiative to address emerging challenges throughout North Dakota in the wake of the state’s energy boom. Specifically, Heitkamp is leading a Strong & Safe Communities Task Force comprised of experts, advocates, and officials throughout the state who have a strong understanding of some of these new challenges in the state, including the recent rise domestic violence and challenges facing Indian Country. The Task Force will also look into increases in drug-related crime, human trafficking, infrastructure stress, the increased transportation of crude oil by rail, as well as other issues. This group will provide recommendations to Heitkamp over the next five years on the best ways to address issues including domestic abuse and violence, so that Heitkamp can work toward policies that keep our communities strong and families safe in their homes.

Funding to help ND families heat their homes during Winter

Bismarck, ND – October 15, 2014 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today announced more than $23 million in federal energy assistance funds to help North Dakota’s low-income families, Native American tribes, and seniors heat their homes during the coming winter months.

The funding, which includes nearly $5.6 million for North Dakota’s Native American tribes, is made available through the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP). Earlier this month, Heitkamp and a bipartisan group of senators pressed U.S. Secretary of Health & Human Services Sylvia Burwell to release this funding as quickly and at the highest level possible. This funding helps families and seniors heat their homes and pay their energy bills. Eligible families outside Indian reservations must apply directly to the State of North Dakota to receive LIHEAP funding. For eligible families living on Indian reservations, their tribes need to directly apply to the State of North Dakota to receive LIHEAP funding, which is then distributed to those on the reservation who qualify.

“It’s no secret that North Dakota winters can be brutal, especially for low-income folks across the state,” said Heitkamp. “I’ve long been a supporter of programs that help some of our least fortunate families and seniors heat their homes because we should never leave people out in the cold. These funds are essential because they will help eliminate the decisions some families may have been forced to make, including deciding whether to heat their homes or put food on the kitchen table. As we move through the coming winter months, I will continue to work closely with the Department of Health and Human Services and the North Dakota Department of Human Services to make sure our state’s families, Native American tribes, and seniors have the resources they need to stay warm and safe.”

North Dakotans can learn more about home heating assistance eligibility and apply for assistance by clicking here. To ask questions or to receive help filling out an application, individuals not living on Indian reservations can contact their local County Social Service Office. Individuals living on Indian reservations can contact their local tribal offices.

Heitkamp has consistently been a leader in pressing the Administration to release this vital support. In November 2013, after Heitkamp and a group of bipartisan Senators sent a letter to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services requesting the release the maximum amount of LIEHAP funds, the Administration distributed 90 percent of the dedicated funds, including $222,900 to North Dakota. In January 2014, Heitkamp then announced more than $3.4 million in LIHEAP funds for the winter season in North Dakota.

LIHEAP is a block grant program under which the federal government gives annual grants to states, territories, and Indian tribal organizations to operate home energy assistance programs for needy households. The program receives funding from two sources: contingency funds and regular funds. Contingency funds are allocated to states at the discretion of the President and the Secretary of Health and Human Services. These funds may be released at any point in the fiscal year to provide additional home energy assistance. Regular funds are allocated in the annual appropriations bill.

Native Asset-Building Summit coming to St. Paul

Register now for the HUD Office of Native American Programs-sponsored "Asset-Building: A Pathway to Economic Self-Determination National Summit" November 12-13, 2014, in St. Paul, Minnesota.

Participants will exchange ideas about asset-building in Indian Country and learn strategies that support residents as they move on their path toward self-sufficiency. More information is available at http://nativeassets.com/. Just click on one of the tabs at the top for the different sections, such as Registration, Hotel Information or Agenda.

There will be workshops on Financial Education, Credit Counseling, Rental Readiness & Homeownership, Workforce Development, "18 monies," Youth Entrepreneurship, Asset-Building and Health, and VITA/EITC. This summit is great for those involved in tribal housing, planning, TANF, higher education, workforce development and Native nonprofits.

Register at: http://www.hud.gov/emarc/index.cfm?fuseaction=emar.addRegisterEvent&eventId=2153&update=N.

Regional artists to create new Native art

Vancouver, WA – October 16, 2014 – From an open call to American Indian artists of Wisconsin, North Dakota, South Dakota or Minnesota, four American Indian artists have been selected to receive NACF Regional Artist Fellowships by the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation (NACF).

Kevin Pourier (Lakota) of Scenic, S.D., Jennifer M. Stevens (Oneida/Lakota) of Green Bay, Wis., Star Wallowing Bull (Ojibwe/Arapaho) of Moorehead, Minn. and Delina White (Ojibwe) of Walker, Minn. carry the honor of being the first artists to receive the award.

“We are proud to announce four talented American Indian artists who demonstrate continual innovation in their growth as culture makers in this diverse region, “ said NACF President/CEO T. Lulani Arquette (Native Hawaiian). “We look forward to the creative new works these four artists will be presenting as they engage communities and share their art.”

2014 NACF Regional Artist Fellows: Traditional Art -Kevin Pourier (Lakota), Scenic, S.D. – Oglala Sioux Tribe Jennifer Stevens (Oneida/Lakota), Green Bay, Wis. – Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin Delina White (Ojibwe), Deer River, Minn. – Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe Visual Art -Star Wallowing Bull (Ojibwe/Arapaho), Moorhead, Minn. – White Earth Band of Chippewa.

The regional fellowship includes support ranging up to $20,000 per artist to help them complete ambitious projects and present them to communities in their home states over the next year. The four regional fellows will also be supported in completing a professional development opportunity of their choice to further their ongoing career trajectory.

To view artworks by these four talented artists, please visit: www.nativeartsandcultures.org.

About the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation (NACF) is a national nonprofit dedicated to supporting the appreciation and perpetuation of American Indian, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian arts and cultures. With the support of Native Nations, arts patrons and foundation partners, the Vancouver, Wash.-based organization has supported 89 Native artists and organizations in 23 states with $1,667,000 in assistance.

About the NACF Regional Artist Fellowship Program

This summer, the foundation accepted proposals for the regional award from artists in the four states who were enrolled members of one of the 37 tribes located in the region and practiced in the fields of traditional art or visual art. Foundation staff and peer panels reviewed applications from artists who applied online by the July 10 deadline. The award will be offered in the region again in 2015. These awards are made possible by generous support from the Margaret A. Cargill Foundation.

Editorials –

Sota guest editorial –

Invader-States hijacked UN World Conference on Indigenous Peoples

By Glenn Morris

Indian Country Today – Oct. 16, 2014 – While watching the fraudulently-labeled United Nations World Conference on Indigenous Peoples (HLPM/WCIP) on UN WebTV on September 22-23, I was reminded of the famous quote from Thomas Pynchon: "If they get you asking the wrong questions, they don't have to worry about the answers." The UN meeting was full of state members who had convinced a fair number of indigenous attendees to ask a multitude of the wrong questions. Unfortunately, whatever questions the indigenous people asked, the answer was always the same: the forces that invaded our homelands are firmly in charge at the UN.

Worse yet, the room at the UN contained indigenous people who attended the meeting from a position of fear, not from the courageous stance that defined the birth of the contemporary international movement for indigenous peoples' rights forty years ago. The indigenous spectators seemed to be attending because of insecurity that they were going to be left out of something big. They weren’t sure what, but they weren’t going to miss it. They refused to assert their most fundamental rights, for fear of irritating the UN members -- the very states that invaded our territories, slaughtered our people, and attempted to exterminate our cultures. It was a sorry spectacle, indeed.

The meeting proved to be a predictable success for invader-states of the United Nations. It also marked a retreat from the forty years of international struggle towards indigenous peoples' self-determination that took hold after the 71-day liberation of Wounded Knee in 1973. What most indigenous people around the world did not know about the HLPM/WCIP was that, ridiculously, the final conclusions, or as they called it the “Outcome Document” (OD), of the WCIP had already been completed by the states -- before the conference ever began. The meeting was a charade, with the outcome pre-determined. There was no need for any discussion, let alone debate. In fact, there was no need for the meeting, at all – except as an example of self-serving kabuki theatre, to allow states to perpetrate the fraud that they care anything about indigenous peoples.

The meeting was a retreat for indigenous peoples because the international indigenous peoples’ movement over the past forty years has been influenced largely through four essential, strategic priorities. These four positions were consciously excluded, or were rendered meaningless, in the final Outcome Document (OD) of the meeting:

1. Self-Determination. The right of self-determination for indigenous peoples, that is, the international legal right of indigenous nations freely to determine our political status and freely to pursue our economic, social and cultural development, is a hallmark of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) (Article3). Self-determination is mentioned nowhere in the OD.

2. The international personality of indigenous nations, and the international character of treaties between indigenous nations and invader states. This principle is an extension of self-determination – and insists that indigenous peoples are not conquered nations and are not rightfully under the domination of, or occupation by, invader states. Similarly, the principle asserts that treaties between indigenous peoples and invaders must be accorded international respect and be subject to impartial, international arbitration, as alluded to in Article 37 of the UNDRIP. There is no mention, whatsoever, of treaties between indigenous nations and states in the OD.

3. The right of Indigenous peoples to control our territories, natural resources and traditional knowledge. There are no guarantees in the OD to secure the free, prior and informed consent (FPIC) of indigenous peoples prior to state or corporate invasions of indigenous peoples’ territories. There is no mention of state's commitment to enforcing FPIC. On the last day of the conference Canada explicitly stated that it would not support FPIC because Canada refuses to relinquish its presumed supremacy over indigenous nations. Canada’s colonial arrogance was not unique; Canada simply admitted it with the greatest blatancy. References to FPIC in the OD are gratuitous, having been rendered sterile by state pillaging of the substantive meaning of FPIC.

4. Dismantling the Doctrine of Christian Discovery. The legal bedrock upon which the U.S., Canada, and most other settler states rationalize their invasion, domination and destruction of indigenous peoples. This legal doctrine, the foundation for all US federal Indian law, legitimizes Christian, white supremacy and the theft of entire continents. The ongoing legitimacy of the doctrine in settler-state law violates the UN Charter, both UN human rights covenants, and the Conventional for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. Yet, the “World Conference” OD ignored the issue entirely, and left the Doctrine of Discovery completely unexamined, and in tact.

States can make no pretense of forthright implementation of the UNDRIP while ignoring each of these four essential areas. Similarly, the indigenous people in the meeting can hardly claim the mantle of "leadership" after volunteering as props in a sham process, while allowing states to declare the meeting a success. The HLPM certainly proved to be a success for states - in their expanding domination and domestication of indigenous peoples. The “world conference” process permitted states to evade all accountability for their crimes against humanity, for genocide, and for their persistent, ongoing destruction of indigenous peoples, in the name of civilized progress, development, and globalization.

The state-controlled HLPM/WCIP process utilized three time-honored tactics against indigenous peoples, in achieving the deception of effective indigenous participation and consent in its ersatz “world conference”:

1. Divide and conquer

2. Exclusion of the opposition

3. Ingratiation

Certain UN members, (and the UN bureaucracy itself, which operates first and foremost to protect state interests) were masterful in establishing indigenous gatekeepers within the UN system, and in privileging those who were in favor of the HLPM/WCIP as the "good/reasonable Indians," while marginalizing those who had criticisms of it as the "bad/hostile Indians." By legitimizing the indigenous gatekeepers, the UN provided a level of insulation between the state parties who wanted the appearance of indigenous peoples' buy-in to the HLPM/WCIP, and those indigenous peoples who rejected state manipulation, who demanded respect and equal participation, and who refused to lend their consent to a counterfeit “world conference”

As it became clear that the indigenous gatekeepers could not achieve a global consensus for indigenous peoples' collaboration in the HLPM plan, the UN simply began to exclude and silence the opposition. When the North American Indigenous Peoples' Caucus (NAIPC) decided that it was not going to accept subordination and inequality in the “world conference” design, NAIPC representatives (both adult and youth) were systematically excluded from any debates or decisions regarding the meeting. The UN surreptitiously began to marginalize “bad Indians” and empower “pragmatic Indians,” who agreed to comply with the world conference program. The "reasonable Indians", like the representatives from the Indian Law Resource Center (ILRC), the Native American Rights Fund (NARF), the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI), and the International Indian Treaty Council (IITC) were validated by being allowed to remain in the UN communications loop; they were rewarded with information, access, and sometimes even funding, to facilitate their continued participation. This tactic took the form of explicitly denying funding to opposition delegates, while funding supportive ones, leading to the censoring of oppositional voices in planning meetings for the WCIP. Delegates critical of the WCIP were denied credentials, silencing their voices in the HLPM/WCIP. The states’ strategy was to provide the deception of indigenous consensus by excluding those who might have blocked consensus through the expression of critical or contrary perspectives.

The third tactic, ingratiation, was used flagrantly by certain indigenous delegates from the US and Canada to circumvent the NAIPC “bad/hostile Indians”, and to solicit the US and Canadian governments. In the US, the ILRC, NARF, NCAI, and IITC met and/or communicated directly with the US State Department representatives a number of times prior to the WCIP. In an apparent quid pro quo for the U.S. indigenous NGOs agreeing to follow the game plan at the HLPM, the US government tossed them a few crumbs. The crumbs came in the form of cosmetic support for uncontroversial postures from the NGOs that in no way challenged the supremacy of US plenary power in domestic Indian law and policy. The “good Indian” organizations will, of course, reject these characterizations, but the record speaks for itself. They allowed themselves, and cajoled several “tribal government” reps, to be exploited as extras in the states’ kabuki theatre. For their trouble, they came away from the meeting with absolutely nothing of substance.

One specific reflection of these cozy relations can be found in US representative Keith Harper's presentation to the WCIP on September 23. Harper, a Cherokee but speaking for the United States government, was named this year by Obama to be the US ambassador to the UN Human Rights Council. The number of similarities between Harper’s address, and the positions being circulated by the ILRC/NARF/NCAI alliance defies coincidence. Certainly, the “pragmatic Indians” are jubilant that Harper mentioned the US’ consideration of the possibility of a place for Indian "tribal governments" somewhere, sometime in the UN system. The “reasonable Indians” (just like those “good Indians” of previous eras) would be well advised not to hold their breath for the U.S.’ artifice to be realized, any more than the thousands of other promises that litter the historical relationship between the US and indigenous nations.

In the debates over the past two years, about whether NAIPC should withdraw from the HLPM/WCIP, a defense of participation from North America was offered, based on the premise that it was important for indigenous peoples to participate in the HLPM/WCIP because, "if you're not at the table, then you're probably on the menu." In other words, to protect the gains of the past forty years, we must continue to participate in the UN process even, apparently, under conditions that might be disrespectful, unequal and destructive.

While watching the HLPM on the UN webcast, I thought of those debates and of the “menu” slogan. Another culinary paraphrase came to mind, this time from the great Uruguayan author Eduardo Galeano: "your participation in this process allows you only to suggest the sauce with which you will be eaten." Unfortunately, the most that came out of this UN meeting for indigenous peoples was, as Galeano cautioned, the “opportunity” for indigenous peoples to participate in a process that allows us only to suggest the sauce with which we will be eaten by the invader states and corporations. We have been warned.

*****

Glenn Morris (Shawnee) is a member/spokesperson for the Leadership Council of the American Indian Movement of Colorado. He is a professor of political science at the University of Colorado at Denver, where he directs the 4th World Center for the Study of Indigenous Law and Politics. He has been active in the defense of Native nations at the United Nations since 1981.

Sota guest editorial, a video interview –

An Unprofitable Disease: In the Political Economy of Ebola, Who Lives and Who Dies?

By Amy Goodman and Nermeen Shaikh

Democracy Now – October 17, 2014 – We look at the political and economic circumstances of the spread of Ebola with science writer Leigh Phillips, who calls for a socialization of pharmaceutical research and production. Phillips says that using revenues from profitable drugs to subsidize research for unprofitable drugs would reduce the costs of vaccines and their development. He also argues the decimation of the healthcare infrastructure is linked to the same free market policies and austerity measures pushed by Western countries and the International Monetary Fund that impoverished the West African countries where the Ebola outbreak has occurred. "We need to begin to ask whether capitalism itself is not pathogenic," says Phillips, whose recent article for Jacobin magazine is "The Political Economy of Ebola."

TRANSCRIPT:

AMY GOODMAN: We bring in Leigh Phillips now into this conversation—Michelle speaking to us from Atlanta. He’s a science writer and European Union affairs journalist. His writing has appeared in Nature, The Guardian, Scientific American. His recent piece for Jacobin is headlined "The Political Economy of Ebola." What do you mean by this, "the political economy of Ebola," Leigh Phillips?

LEIGH PHILLIPS: Well, I think we need to look at the political and economic circumstances, particularly around this particular disease both in the United States and Western countries in terms of the funding for research, where that’s coming from, and in terms of austerity in Europe, but also austerity in West Africa, as well. There’s sort of two prongs to this. The first, of course, was that, you know, over the last few months we’ve seen over and over again people from the CDC, senior figures from the WHO, even John Ashton, the head of the U.K. Faculty of Health, who have said, basically, that the knowledge is there, the know-how is there—we have five candidate vaccines, there’s a number of other different treatments that, you know, are well in hand—but there just hasn’t been any buy-in from the major pharmaceutical companies. John Ashton, as I was saying, from the U.K. Faculty of Health, you know, sort of the doctor-in-chief, if you will, in the U.K., described this as "the moral bankruptcy of capitalism." It sounds, you know, quite vituperative there, quite explosive language, but it really expresses the anger that a lot of the researchers feel about how, look, we know what to do here, but this is just an unprofitable disease.

NERMEEN SHAIKH: So, could you elaborate, Leigh Phillips, on the point that you make in your article about why it is that pharmaceutical companies are more interested in funding medications that people have to take over a long term, rather than investing in one-off medicines like vaccines?

LEIGH PHILLIPS: It’s fairly straightforward, and it’s not—the argument is not that the major pharmaceutical companies are somehow evil or malevolent. This is just the way that the free market works. If Ebola, like many, many other unprofitable diseases, is something that—basically, if we’re going to resolve the situation, we’re going to basically cure it. We’re not going to handle it for the long term. We want something that—some drug or some vaccine or some treatment that people are going to take once, twice, maybe for a short period of time, but then that’s it. We don’t want to be dealing with this for the rest of—somebody doesn’t want to be dealing with this, obviously, for the rest of their lives.

And compare that to the situation with, say, insulin for diabetes or other drugs that people might need to have to take every day for the rest of their lives. Any sort of major pharmaceutical company, if you—they’re trying to decide where they’re going to invest their, you know, roughly, maybe around a billion dollars’ investments into any new drug. Are they going to invest that money in a product that is going to have a very low return on investment or not much of a return on investment at all, or something that is much more likely to have quite a high return on investment? It’s a bit of a no-brainer where they’re going to allocate the bulk of their money.

And so, what we see here is, this is—Ebola, in many cases, is just an example of a wider problem that we have with pharmaceutical research. Antibiotic resistance right now is a very, very frightening situation, where we are facing a sort of 30-year—what’s called in research journals a "discovery void," that is, that pharmaceutical companies have for about three decades now refused to engage in any—the development of any new classes of antibiotic. And we’re really coming towards the edge—the end of the efficacy of the antibiotics that we have in the cabinet at the moment. And we have about five to 20 years left before we see a sort of fairly rampant increase in deaths from bacterial infections.

AMY GOODMAN: Leigh Phillips, I just wanted—

LEIGH PHILLIPS: The bulk of modern medicine—

AMY GOODMAN: I wanted to just—Leigh?

LEIGH PHILLIPS: Sorry, yes?

AMY GOODMAN: I just wanted to ask—you’re speaking to us from Vancouver, Canada.

LEIGH PHILLIPS: That’s right, yeah.

AMY GOODMAN: Vancouver, Canada, where you have a public healthcare system.

LEIGH PHILLIPS: That’s right.

AMY GOODMAN: The piece you wrote is called "Socialize Big Pharma." So can you talk about—I mean, you’re saying that for private drug companies, for these mega-multinational corporations, to invest in a vaccine, for example, for Ebola, doesn’t—is not profitable for them. So what then is the solution? This, of course, is really magnifying this issue on a global stage, how public health systems in the United States and all over have so deteriorated. Can you talk about your point, socializing Big Pharma?

LEIGH PHILLIPS: Absolutely. I think if we look at most Western countries in the postwar period—’40s, '50s and ’60s—most Western countries nationalized their healthcare systems to a greater or lesser degree. And the United States is one of the only sort of countries that hasn't done this yet, but it’s still pretty much—we’re moving—the United States is, even there—is moving in that direction. But this is basically half of the task. The other half of the task is to bring in the pharmaceutical sector into the public sector, for exactly the same reasons, that it is simply too dangerous an issue for this to be left to the vagaries of the profit motive within the market. What we can do is—

AMY GOODMAN: And so, what would that look like?

LEIGH PHILLIPS: —recognizing that this is a market failure. And this is not just some, you know, far-left analysis; this is recognized right across the board, that there is a major market failure within the pharmaceutical sector. The companies themselves recognize this. The solution is one of two things: either a fairly major public intervention to fill that gap or, as I argue, just much more simply is, if we can use the profits from profitable—the revenues from profitable drugs to subsidize the research and development and commercialization of unprofitable diseases, we’re going to, as a society, spend far less to solve this problem anyway. So, that’s the simple calculus there.

NERMEEN SHAIKH: Leigh Phillips, another point that you make in your article is that it’s not coincidental that Ebola is affecting some of the poorest countries in the world. So could you talk about some of the collapse of the infrastructure, public infrastructure, in Liberia and in Sierra Leone that has allowed this virus to spread as rapidly as it has? And what contributed to that collapse of public facilities?

LEIGH PHILLIPS: Absolutely. I think that—I mean, one of the really, really frustrating things with this particular issue is how it really demonstrates the—as John Ashton wrote in the U.K., the moral bankruptcy of capitalism, not just on the one end in terms of research, but in West Africa, as well, and in Spain. We see that the same processes, the same free-market-driving ideology that has reduced these countries to real dire poverty. These three countries are some of the most poor countries in the world. And when I say "most poor countries in the world," I mean really right at the bottom of the global league tables. And their public healthcare infrastructure has been utterly decimated, not merely by civil war but by a series of processes that are imposed by Western countries, international financial organizations like the International Monetary Fund. The International Monetary Fund itself recognizes this, because just last week Christine Lagarde, the head of the IMF, said to West Africa, "Look, now is not the time to be worrying about your spending. Go ahead, increase your spending," and she finished her comments by saying, "We don’t normally say this." Well, this is exactly true. The sort of structural adjustment that has been imposed in these countries, and many other countries, as well, is what is responsible for the decimation of the healthcare infrastructure in these countries.

And we’re seeing it in—in fact, this exact same process is in Spain. The European Union has imposed, you know, since the economic crisis, since the eurozone crisis, a series of absolutely brutal austerity programs in the southern flank—in Spain, Italy, Greece, Portugal—and in Ireland, as well. Part of the response—the result of this has been, again, a real deterioration of public health infrastructure. Spain has seen basically a quarter of its spending on healthcare cut for the last few years annually. So you see nurses and other medics marching in the streets in Spain—they call them these white ties, because people are wearing their white lab coats—protesting what’s happening with austerity. The hospital where we’ve seen the cases in Spain, their isolation ward was shut down directly as a result of the imposition of austerity by Brussels and the decisions in Madrid.

It is on both ends; both the market failure in terms of pharmaceutical research and the decimation of public healthcare infrastructure, both in West Africa and in Europe, it’s two sides of the same coin. They both put capitalism in the dark here. There’s a friend of mine who’s a phylogeographer, Rob Wallace. He has this wonderful phrase about this, about how pathogens follow inequality and expropriations like water falls—follows cracks in ice. I think that’s absolutely correct. I think we need to begin to ask whether capitalism itself is not pathogenic, whether neoliberalism is not pathogenic.

AMY GOODMAN: Leigh Phillips, we’re going to have to leave it there. We thank you so much. Science writer, European Union affairs journalist, joining us from Vancouver, Canada. We’ll link to your piece in Jacobin headlined "The Political Economy of Ebola" at democracynow.org.

(Editor’s note: How much suffering comes as a consequence of greed? How much better off would everyone be in a world that relied upon compassion?)

Brief editorial comments from the editor’s desk –

On and Off the Lake Traverse Reservation

We are in “overload mode” while we put together this week’s Sota. We have had so many newsworthy events over the past week there are too many to attempt to cover in a single issue!

At the top of our list is the meteoric GOTV Rez Tour.

We cannot express enough gratitude for the tireless efforts of the organizers and road crew.

We have photos of this historic venture to get out our Native vote across our South Dakota reservations, but expect more next week as the final day for voter registration is this Monday, October 20th.

Pidakmiya do those who supported GOTV Rez Tour! Your getting out the vote on our reservations could make a real difference at the polls this November!

Early and absentee voting is underway now. You can cast an early ballot at your county courthouse now.

We encourage all our Oyate to vote in the SWO and state General Elections in November.

You can make a difference, and your participation is vitally important.

So, yes, expect to see expanded coverage next week, and coverage of the NIEA conference in Alaska; we are waiting for information and pictures from our education delegation for that coverage.

We do have coverage of the abuse survivor and bullying prevention workshops held last week at Sisseton Wahpeton College – both extremely important events. In the case of the survivor workshop, we believe this is a first-ever for our community. How vital it is to have survivors come forward and help get these awful secrets out into the open so that we truly might work toward being a community intolerant of domestic abuse and sexual violence!

Our Oyate lady veterans participated in a regional women veterans workshop in Sioux Falls last week. Watch for details from Geri Opsal.

And what about having the number one modern-day sports hero of Indian country coming here to the Lake Traverse Reservation!

Shoni Schimmel came on Saturday and spent hours in the Wambdi gym encouraging and training our young Oyate basketball players. Later in the day she spoke to the community, encouraging people to strive to achieve the great potential they have!

And she posed for pictures and signed autographs.

What a great moment for all our Oyate.

So many events over the past week … far too many to cover in a single newspaper!

Wow!

*****

There are eight (8) Ballots for Proposed Amendments to the SWO Constitution which will be included in the Fall 2014 SWO General Election.

Please read them in this week’s edition of your Sota.

*****

How wonderful that our SWO akicita are being recognized with a grant to fund a cemetery in their honor.

See details provided by Tribal VSO Geri Opsal in this week’s Sota.

And don’t forget the honoring ceremony for our new akicita monuments at Tribal headquarters planned for October 24th!

*****

Please read about our Oyate honey bee project.

Ella Robertson of the Planning Office has provided a report and photos which we are pleased to publish this week.

So far, the project is making great headway!

*****

Our 147th annual SWO Wacipi photo gallery is online.

Check it out on our website:

http://www.earthskyweb.com/news.htm

*****

Please read our Legal notices section.

The Reservation Election Board has posted important information about the process for the upcoming general election.

*****

Candidates:

Also note that the Sota is returning to a former policy of ONLY PUBLISHING PAID IN ADVANCE POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENTS.

This policy must be followed because of not being able to collect on outstanding invoices.

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We urge you to plan accordingly so that you are not telephoning or messaging at the last minute to have an ad placed without pre-payment.

Pidamiya!

*****

Elder's Meditation:

"But we have to stick by the wisdom of our ancestors..." -- Paula Weasel Head, BLOOD

A long time ago the Elders and our ancestors learned to walk on the Earth and to live in harmony. They were taught the Laws which govern everything, and they were taught traditional values. This wisdom should be made available to the younger generations. We need to speak to the Elders and learn from them. We need to do this so we can pass the knowledge on to our children.

My Creator, help me learn the wisdom of my ancestors.

*****

Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

Honesty pays, but it doesn't seem to pay enough to suit some people. Kin Hubbard (1868 - 1930)

The secret of success is sincerity. Once you can fake that you've got it made. Jean Giraudoux (1882 - 1944)

A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone. Henry David Thoreau (1817 - 1862)

Do you realize if it weren't for Edison we'd be watching TV by candlelight? Al Boliska

He who asks is a fool for five minutes, but he who does not ask remains a fool forever. Chinese Proverb

Genius may have its limitations, but stupidity is not thus handicapped. Elbert Hubbard (1856 - 1915)

Too bad the only people who know how to run the country are busy driving cabs and cutting hair. George Burns (1896 - 1996)

Speak the truth, but leave immediately after. Slovenian Proverb

I like to believe that people in the long run are going to do more to promote peace than our governments. Indeed, I think that people want peace so much that one of these days governments had better get out of the way and let them have it. Dwight D. Eisenhower (1890 - 1969)

*****

The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or “opinion” letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author’s name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor’s explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Earlier receipt of copy is always appreciated. So, if you are aware of a date or message that needs to be publicized or advertised, please let us know about it in advance of the weekly deadline.

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-- CDF

Obituaries –

Note –

There are no obituaries reported in this week’s Sota.

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor’s note: The following comes from the editor’s column and the Sota “deadlines and policies” statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or “opinion” letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author’s name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and must be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor’s explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Open letter to the Oyate

Preserving Quarter Blood Enrollment

I am writing with regard to opposing the Constitutional Amendment about enrolling those who are less than one quarter Sisseton-Wahpeton, other Sioux, or Native American blood. While I understand the various circumstances involved with those who are born from a tribal member and yet do not have one quarter Native blood to qualify for enrollment, I am concerned about the possible growing trend and increased numbers of those wanting to enroll who are less than one quarter Native blood.

I also understand that the entire process of enrollment came from a time of oppression, when enrollment was used to control, contain, and confine our people to the reservation, until fairly recent times. I also know that tribal enrollment in time became a means of assuring tribal members of their opportunity to own trust lands and home sites and access treaty-mandated services, including education, housing, and social services.

My concerns come from the fact that I am only the fourth generation from those of our grandfathers who signed the Sisseton Wahpeton Treaty of 1867. Those great grandparents paid a heavy price in blood, hardship, and sacrifices so that they and their descendants could have a permanent homeland and Dakota way of life here on the Lake Traverse Reservation, on what was once a million acre home for our people. While the acreage has diminished, we nevertheless have a good land base, viable communities, and we are growing in strength and numbers as Sisseton-Wahpeton Dakota people.

From my earliest years, I learned from my parents, grandparents, and elders the cultural ways and language of our people, that they fought so hard to foster, protect, and pass on to us, our children, and grandchildren. I am told that these experiences are called patrimony and legacy, which are inherent ingredients of our Sisseton-Wahpeton identity and values. With each passing day and year, now, I am becoming fearful that these ways also are beginning to diminish, and may become lost. Loss of our beautiful Dakota language seems imminent. With these losses, what are we to become? Is it our fate to become linguistically and culturally extinct?

I am sorry if I have hurt any one's feelings and I apologize for so doing, however I feel compelled to enunciate these convictions. I do so on behalf of my 97 year-old mother, Alma, my beloved Okanah Jim and Kunsi Nora Wanna, who in their life time taught me the very best of their traditional Dakota ways, and showed me the path to a good way of living in the warmth and security of family and tiospaye. I hope and pray that I will never have to grieve for the loss of those ways.

In conclusion, I would ask that the voters consider seriously the merits of whether lowering the blood quantum to less than one quarter blood would be worthwhile for our people and the future generations.

Marsha Renville.

From the SD Democratic Party –

First report on Bollen deposition reveals disturbing new facts about Mike Rounds

Wednesday, October 15, 2014 – From Zach Crago:

1) Governor Mike Rounds' team intervened in Board of Regents affairs to protect Joop Bollen and most importantly the "train" of EB5 money propping up Mike Rounds' top political priorities like the Northern Beef Packing plant.

2) Rounds employee Joop Bollen regularly reported to Governor Mike Rounds' office in stark contrast to previous assertions by Mike Rounds.

3) With legal turmoil afoot, the Board of Regents orchestrated Joop Bollen's resignation from SDRC Inc and Bollen's eventual return to SDRC Inc all while Bollen was a Rounds employee.

4) The Governors Office of Economic Development, Board of Regents, and the Attorney General's office have no excuse left to continue withholding Bollen's deposition, legal correspondence, exhibits, memoranda and other deposition transcripts from the EB5 litigation.

5) Nothing in the report exonerates Mike Rounds. In fact, the report further incriminates Mike Rounds as the EB5 scandal engulfs his campaign.

The report further reinforces the indisputable facts in the EB5 scandal.

1) Mike Rounds' employee Joop Bollen signed an illegal contract with a company he owned to manage the EB5 program, a key component of the Rounds economic development strategy.

2) As a result of the illegal contract, Joop Bollen walked off with a $108 million in EB5 fees that belong to the people of South Dakota.

3) Mike Rounds knew about his employee's illegal activities, and Mike Rounds didn't fire Joop Bollen; Rounds rewarded him with a sweetened no-bid contract in December of 2009.

4) When asked questions about the EB5 scandal by a legislative committee, Mike Rounds submitted testimony that the Rapid City Journal quickly found to be untrue. Submitting false testimony as Mike Rounds did is a class 6 felony in South Dakota.

5) Even now after everyone agrees that Rounds employee Joop Bollen had an illegal contract that enriched himself over $100 mil, Mike Rounds continues to protect and cover up for his employee.

In Case You Missed It

Bollen's deposition explains how EB-5 became privatized Management shifted from NSU campus to Rounds' administration in 2009 Aberdeen American News, Bob Mercer Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Pierre, SD – The EB-5 controversy raging in South Dakota’s U.S. Senate race began with an obscure episode seven years ago on the other side of the world.

Joop Bollen flew to China to help inform potential investors about a fish-raising business proposed near Pierre.

During that trip, Bollen concluded the tilapia farm’s promoters didn’t adequately vet its finances. The project flopped.

At the time — late 2007 — Bollen was director for the South Dakota International Business Institute at Northern State University.

He wasn’t allowed to sign contracts on behalf of the institute, such as those necessary to look into a project’s underpinnings.

A private company that could work directly with banks, lawyers and recruiters was the answer, he decided.

So, in January 2008, Bollen formed one of his own, called SDRC Inc.

But the next year, according to Bollen, university officials seemed uncomfortable with his activities overseas and they were reluctant to approve travel.

That’s not how state government felt however, specifically Richard Benda.

Benda was the secretary of tourism and state development for then-Gov. Mike Rounds. Benda wanted to keep Bollen in the field.

Their solution was a state contract for SDRC Inc. to privately manage the EB-5 immigrant investor program for South Dakota for the next five years.

The secret contract allowed SDRC Inc. to collect fees from the immigrant investors.

A provision in the contract called for a small portion of the fees to flow into several special accounts to help pay for state government’s expenses involved in EB-5 and to protect the state government against possible financial damages.

EB-5 is a program run by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. At its simplest, EB-5 is a way for people from foreign countries to buy permanent residency in the United States for themselves and for their immediate families, including unmarried children up to age 21.

EB-5 allows people to qualify for two-year visas to be in the United States if they invest or loan at least $500,000 apiece for a project intended to create or save at least 10 jobs per each EB-5 investor. An investor then can apply for permanent U.S. residency before the two-year visa runs out. USCIS officials determine if the 10-job requirement was met and whether the investor and family get permanent residency.

The story of how Joop Bollen came to head the EB-5 program for South Dakota was outlined in a deposition Bollen gave in April as part of a lawsuit related to the tilapia project.

A California company brought the lawsuit over its brief involvement with a South Korea law firm that worked with Bollen at the institute.

An arbitrator ruled last month that none of the sides — recruiter Darley International, Hanul legal corporation nor the institute — had any liability for damages to any of the others.

Other than the deposition, Bollen has repeatedly declined to publicly answer questions about the EB-5 operation since current Gov. Dennis Daugaard quietly terminated the SDRC Inc. contract in September 2013.

Darley’s president, Robert Stratmore, sent a copy of the deposition in response to a reporter’s questions about parts of the case.

Officials for the state Board of Regents, who provided legal representation for Bollen in the case, meanwhile have refused to release the deposition.

“I am interested in transparency, and the replies and attitude of the officials in South Dakota (are) antithetical to good government and continue to play a hoax on the public,” Stratmore said Tuesday.

Benda was found dead Oct. 22, 2013. Investigators determined he died Oct. 20 from a self-inflicted shotgun wound to his abdomen, with a stick used to move the trigger.

After Benda’s death, details emerged about the contract cancellation and about $550,000 of extra state funds that allegedly were routed to Northern Beef Packers, an EB-5 project at Aberdeen.

Northern Beef paid the $550,000 to a SDRC Inc. escrow account. Benda went to work for SDRC Inc. in January 2011 when he wasn’t retained by the incoming Daugaard administration.

South Dakota Attorney General Marty Jackley investigated Benda at Daugaard’s request after Daugaard’s office received a subpoena from a federal grand jury in March 2013.

Jackley disclosed on July 29 this year that he had scheduled a state grand jury to meet on the Benda investigation for later in October 2013.

Rounds, the Republican nominee in the U.S. Senate election this fall, has attempted in recent months to portray Bollen as an employee of the state Board of Regents.

The regents govern the state university system and are appointed by the governor.

In his deposition, Bollen repeatedly said he answered to Clyde Arnold, NSU business dean, before Arnold retired and that the Governor’s Office of Economic Development helped fund the institute’s activities while Bollen was still with the institute.

He said he didn’t go into details with Arnold. Bollen said he gave GOED monthly reports on his activities and that Arnold received copies of those reports.

Bollen said university officials’ attitudes changed after they learned of the lawsuit brought by Darley International. He said he didn’t discuss with Arnold anything regarding the relationship between the Darley and Hanul firms. Bollen said he discussed with Arnold the formation of SDRC Inc. as “just a very rough micro view of what was happening.”

Bollen said he didn’t provide any documents to Arnold regarding the memorandum of understanding Bollen signed between the South Dakota International Business Institute, where Bollen was still director, and SDRC Inc. in 2008.

Signing for SDRC Inc. was a Hanul lawyer, James Park, who Bollen temporarily designated as the representative for SDRC Inc.

Bollen said he couldn’t recall whether he or Park wrote the memorandum.

On April 3, 2009, Park registered himself as SDRC Inc. president on company documents filed with the South Dakota Secretary of State.

Bollen explained why Park did so. Bollen said there was “a lot of turmoil” about the lawsuit: “So off the recommendation of NSU counsel, they thought it was better for me to step back and —.”

At that point a lawyer representing the regents during the deposition cut off Bollen with an objection about client-attorney privilege.

More of the answer came later in the deposition from a different angle.

Bollen said Park registered as president without communicating with Bollen. He said he told Park “around March 2009” that he — Bollen — couldn’t function in the NSU atmosphere any longer. He said he told Park he needed “a temporary caretaker to make sure the project wouldn’t die.

“The moneys were going to come. Somebody needed to take care of this as I could not in the interim. There was too much chaos,” Bollen said.

On June 1, 2009, another change was filed with the secretary of state restoring Bollen as president for SDRC Inc.

Here was Bollen’s explanation in the deposition:

“By that time it became clear that the university had no interest in this program anymore.

“Again, everything froze, no discussions were being made, my travel was not being approved, and the writing was on the wall that the board of regents did not no longer want to be part of the international activities of SDRC Inc., and it also by the time was clear that the governor’s office, even though they wanted to take the management back to the state, but they realized that they could not effectively manage it themselves, and it became more and more clear that there was a good chance that SDRC Inc. would enter into a separate agreement with the state to manage the program as a private were going to let it die, but the moneys from the project were real.

“They started to flow, so the train was coming. It was going to be a train wreck because action needed to be taken,” Bollen said.

The deposition

The story of how Joop Bollen came to head the EB-5 program for South Dakota was outlined in a deposition Bollen gave in April as part of a lawsuit related to the tilapia farm project. Darley International, a California company that served as recruiter for the project, brought the lawsuit. Darley’s president, Robert Stratmore, sent a copy of the deposition in response to a reporter’s questions about parts of the case.

Poem by Harry O.

"His Arms Are Open"

I am the Lord, and there is no other... Woe to him who strives with his maker... Isa. Chp. 45 V. 5-9

Ake, my Father and Creator, I glorify You,

Savior, not only of white men, but of we natives too; (1) Some may make a mockery of me but I have to try,

For God loves us so much not willing that any should die. (2)

For those still bound by addictions every morning I pray,

As mom was concerned for me I'm concerned for you today; (3)

In fact as she used to cry for me I now cry for you, For I know how hard it is, I lived that life once too.

It was so hard for me to quit too, my L.R.

I will never judge you instead I will always pray, (4)

Remember never give up turn to Jesus my niece,

He'll give you the freedom you seek, he will give you peace. (5)

We don't believe in white mans sin or hell I heard on day (6) From one seeking to practice the traditional way;

He knew I was there yet he put down teachings I've learned, Taught by Him who gave me what I had for so long yearned.

Freedom from those addictions that for years had me bound, Now my Tahansi I found my happy hunting ground; Through these pages I now hunt for those who've gone astray, Those who've once attended worship but have lost their way.

Uncle Aaron taught the Word to Tahansi and me, My cuz went his way but I still believe in Christ you see; My tahansi I won't shame you by speaking your name, But no matter what you've done He loves you just the same.

You laugh now and make a mockery of whom I believe,

I can only pray that someday Jesus you'll receive;

But truly cuz one day it will be too late for some,

The trumpet will sound and all will know the Lord has come. (7)

Not to earth yet He will be seen by all in the air (8)

The dead in Christ will rise first them we will join him there (9)

But I pity those whom lying wonders will deceive (10) No I'm not perfected but I know in whom I believe. (11)

Tahansi you who used to attend worship with me, to strayed for many years but I've come back you see; Like the prodigal son, He will welcome you home too, Come back cuz what he's done for me he'll do for you.

Now all my old friends from the past I'm speaking to you, You've known my past but my trust in Christ has made me new, Which doesn't make me better, yet now I have true love; Reaching out for you that someday we to will meet above.

 We're all appointed to die once then the judgment my friends, (I2) To all that I've hurt this is my way of making amends; One day every tongue will confess and every knee will bow, If some have not heard, it's best to receive Christ as Lord now.

Though some laugh or mock it doesn't matter I had to try, For God loves us so much not willing that any should die; All my relatives His arms are open waiting for you, Oh my Father Creator of all I glorify You.

Harry-0 10/10/2014

Brethren, I do not count myself to have apprehended, but one thing I do, forgetting those things that are behind and reaching forward to those things that are ahead, I press toward the goal of the prize of the upward call of God in Christ Jesus. Phil. 3:13-14

1.    John 3:16 John 12:47 II Car. 5:15 ITimothy 4:10

2.    John 3:16 II Peter 3:9

3.    Phil_ 2:3-4I Thes. 5:14

4.    Eph.6:17-18 I Timothy 2:1

5.    John 8:32&36 John 14:27

6.    Proverbs 14:9 Romans 6:23 I John 1:10 Proverbs 15:11 Isaiah 14:9 Proverbs 15:24

7.    I Thes. 13:18

8.    Matthew 24:27

9.    John 17:21-26 II Cor. 13:5 Col. 1:27

10.  II Thes. 2:9-12

11.  John 6:29 3:16 Acts 16:30-311 Timothy 4:10 I I Timothy 1:12

12.  Hebrews 9:27

13.  Isaiah 45:23 Romans 14:11 Phil. 2:10

Social “helper” column dedicated to young generation Oyate –

Wawokiyape

By Sherielle “Shay” DuMarce

Dear Shay:

Well where do I start? I guess I'll get to the point.

I have been with the love of my life for the past 5 years and we built a family, home and relationship that most young people our age would only dream of.

But in the last month or two my husband has lost his job and he is starting to be more distant. In a relationship everything is supposed to be equal. I want him to hurry up and get up and work but it just seems like he doesn't want to and its getting hard and I let him slack for 2 months now I am getting frustrated.

All I want is a happy family but he sees it as me nagging him or trying to be his mom but that’s not it at all.

How do I get my point across to him and just let him know that I want him to get a job and I want things to go back to the way they were before without sounding like I'm nagging him?

At this point any advice that you give would be appreciated because I'm out of options please help!

Signed, Desperate Wife.

Dear Desperate Wife:

I can honestly say you are where I was a year and a half ago. I was in the same situation only differences is maybe you and your husband have a fighting chance to getting back to the way you were.

Now, you said he lost his job which could be one of the reasons for his behavior and why he's being so distant. The loss of a job can put the vow for "better or worse" to the test.

Nobody likes to be unemployed so for the spouse who did lose his job, he may have suffered a serious blow to his identity or worth in the relationship. Men are always looked at as the provider or bread winner so to speak and when that is jeopardized his feeling of worth in the relationship goes down drastically.

During this time it is very important for you to be supportive rather than bombard your spouse with ultimatums or stressful questions because even though you think he needs to be reminded, he doesn't, he knows what he needs to do and all you need to do is be encouraging.

Everything you say or do during this time is critical in making sure the marriage either survives this bump in the road or succumbs to it. Although, I know you may be feeling like the weight of the world is on your shoulders but just imagine how your husband must feel knowing that he left you with the burden of taking care of the family.

Men are not always willing to express their feelings openly...especially in front of their spouse or children. In your children's eyes and yours, the man is the family's rock' they're strength and the everlasting oak that can never be swayed, he does not want the image that he built to be tarnished. Which is probably the reason he has been spending so much time alone so that his family does not have to see him at his worst.

But do not be quick to assume he doesn't want to be with you or that there's something else going on because assumptions are always a recipe for over thinking a situation to death or planting doubt, worry or fear in your mind. In addition, you have to remember that his self-esteem is derived from the loss of his job and he is trying to find ways to cope on his own.

For example, as women, what do we do when I self-esteem is at an all-time low? We sometimes withdraw from our daily activities, we want to be left alone, or want someone there to encourage us and build us back up or just be there to be supportive. Either way, during this time, we don't want to argue and we don't need to be criticized right? So think of that the next time you approach your husband but most importantly let him know that you are there to comfort him, listen to him and just believe in him wholeheartedly. Apologize for not understanding and just ask him if there's anything that he needs to talk about. Reassure him that he is not alone in fighting this battle.

In closing, remember that your spouse has no greater asset or resource than your unwavering faith in his worth, your words of encouragement and your everlasting support. When all else fails your love and assurances of respect will keep his spirits high in a dark time and remember: "This difficult season, like all of the seasons of life, shall pass."

Best wishes, Shay.

Tackling Diabetes

By Rep. Kristi Noem

October 17, 2014

This last week, I met with a nine-year-old girl from Black Hawk. Her name was Lauren. She is an incredible young lady and I had a great time getting to meet her. But Lauren and I were there to visit about a very serious issue. Lauren, like more than 200,000 young people in America, has diabetes.

Each year, tens of thousands of Americans – including many children – learn they have diabetes. While nearly 10 percent of Americans have the disease, there are still a number of misperceptions surrounding diabetes and what it means for everyday life. That’s why I wanted to take a moment this week to write about some things each of us should be aware of regarding diabetes.

First, there are two kinds. Type 1 diabetes, which is what Lauren and my nephew Hunter have, occurs when a person’s immune system destroys cells that release insulin. Without insulin, we can’t absorb sugar, which is needed to produce energy. With Type 2 diabetes, people aren’t able to use the insulin that is produced right away and over time, the pancreas may begin making less and less insulin. The majority of people with diabetes have Type 2.

Type 1 diabetes can’t be prevented and children with a family history of Type 1 diabetes or certain genetic factors can be at increased risk. Type 2 diabetes can be delayed, if not prevented altogether, by maintaining a healthy weight, eating right, and exercising.

There are different ways to treat diabetes. Both Lauren and Hunter, for instance, wear an insulin pump. This essentially gives them short-acting insulin 24 hours a day so their sugar levels are kept in check. Other people may take shots, oral medication or adjust their eating habits to help control blood-sugar levels.

Some with Type 2 diabetes may be able to make lifestyle adjustments that allow them to reverse the diagnoses. But for those with Type 1 diabetes, there is currently no cure. Scientists are working very hard, however, to identify one for kids like Lauren and Hunter and advancements have been made.

During our visit, I asked Lauren if there was anything else she wanted people to know about diabetes. She said, “Diabetes is not contagious, so don’t be scared to be around someone with it.” To me, that comment was another reminder that we can all do more to debunk myths and increase awareness about diabetes. In South Dakota, Governor Daugaard has declared October as “Diabetes Awareness Month” after learning about Lauren’s brave efforts to take on diabetes.

I can’t begin to tell you how much it means to have folks focusing on diabetes – especially childhood diabetes – this month. I still remember when our family found out Hunter had diabetes. We all had so many questions and those first few months after he was diagnosed were a crash course for all of us. To be honest, it’s something our family continues to learn about as he grows and as new technologies and treatments become available to him. But he’s been such a great kid through it all and he’s turning out to be an incredible young man.

Hunter has been an inspiration to our family and I’m thankful we have young people like him and Lauren out there, encouraging other kids who have been diagnosed, moving researchers and lawmakers to tackle this disease, and inspiring each of us.

Short of breath in the night

By Richard P. Holm MD

Joe was a middle-aged guy, smart and full of personality. He had developed Hodgkin's lymphoma a number of years back, had chemotherapy and radiation to his chest as part of his treatment, which successfully shrunk the malignant lymph nodes there, and brought him back to a normal cancer-free life.

Recently he had been waking up in the night feeling like he was suffocating. He told me he would go to the window, throw open the sash, and breath in the cool autumn air to get relief. For a week now he found that he was more comfortable sleeping in the recliner. He had also noted that he had been having trouble walking any distance and he got short of breath just coming up from the basement.

On exam, as I listened to his lungs I could hear crackles, and as I listened to his heart I noted it was beating a hundred times per minute sounding like a horse galloping. His neck veins seemed distended and there was swelling of his ankles. He wondered if there was something wrong with his lungs.

The problem was not with his lungs, but rather with his heart. Although the name for his condition is called congestive heart failure, I think the word failure sounds too doomed and guilt-ridden. I would rather it be called heart weakness instead, because we have treatment to remove the excess water, ease the load on his heart, and there shouldn't be doom or guilt about it.

Normally blood returns to the heart from veins into that mighty pump as it fills and dilates during the relaxation phase. When the heart squeezes, the entrance valves slam shut, and the only way out is past the exit valves. Repeating this cycle with relax-then-squeeze past one-way-valves, the heart pump pushes blood out to supply every cell with the oxygen and nutrients needed to flourish.

Causes for heart weakness are myriad including long standing high blood pressure, blockage of coronary arteries, a life-time of excessive alcohol or inadequate nutrition, viral infections of the heart muscle, valves that leak or are too tight, and the list goes on.

Joe's heart was weak partly from radiation injury and probably from a viral infection. Just the right balance of medications gave him relief and hope for a future.

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

SHS Sioux Voices Club members read to Westside Elementary students

Members of the SHS Sioux Voices Club went to read at the Westside Elementary on Thursday October 9th in recognition of Native American day. Those reading were: Jerrica Donnell, Chaunce Peltier, Doralynn LaCroix, Kiara LaFromboise, Jasmine Anderson, Halie Williams, Fiona White Eagle, Katie Christopherson.

Here are photo highlights.

Grant expands workforce training at ‘Tribes’

Bismarck, ND – The Heavy Equipment Operator (HEO) program at United Tribes Technical College has expanded with help from the North Dakota Department of Commerce.

The department authorized a $532,372 grant in July to acquire more training equipment. The funding allowed the college to add five units that will broaden the training experience in heavy equipment operation.

New in the fleet are a motor-grader, loader, bulldozer, excavator and skid-steer loader. Previously the program used a back-hoe and a small loader.

All of the equipment is immediately recognizable by the yellow color and the “CAT” label, manufactured by the Caterpillar Corporation.

Training Connection

The college formed a training connection with the world-wide manufacturer that makes available Caterpillar’s digitized instructional materials for the operation and maintenance of each piece of equipment.

“This is exceptionally good for us,” says Steve Shepherd, the college’s Workforce Training coordinator. “It enhances our program with equipment and the Caterpillar experts will make presentations to our students on a scheduled basis.”

The UTTC program also uses virtual-reality simulators in the classroom to prepare students for the real thing.

State of ND Support

The Dept. of Commerce funding came from a pool of $5 million in workforce development grants authorized for the state’s tribal colleges by the last Legislature. The grants support degree- or certificate-granting programs that qualify students to earn highly recruited jobs in the state. They also provide assistance to students to establish new businesses operating within the state that will employ North Dakotans.

“We feel very good about our partnership with the state to help address opportunities afforded by energy development in the Bakken region,” said Phil Baird, UTTC interim president. “We remain committed to providing workforce training for all state citizens in the long term.”

Commerce administers the grants through an application process. Recipients report back on several factors including expenditures, number of students assisted, graduation rates, new or improved training or other programs leading to a certificate or degree, job placement rates, rate of students assisted who seek further educational opportunities, and the number of jobs or businesses created.

“Tribal Colleges in North Dakota continue to serve a critical role across our state in providing education and training needed to fulfill career goals,” Commerce Commissioner Al Anderson said. “This grant will increase UTTC’s ability to prepare students for our growing statewide economy.”

Next Training Cycle

The college’s fall semester is underway now and the next cycle of training in the 16 week HEO program is scheduled to begin January 6. The deadline for applications is December 19.

For more information contact Steve Shepherd 701-255-3285 x 1537, sshepherd@uttc.edu, or Neal Barnes 701-255-3285 x 1571, nbarnes@uttc.edu.

Hope STEMS, Native American Students Blossom

Denver, Colo., Oct. 15, 2014 - A hardscrabble childhood didn't "harden" Erika Torres-Hernandez, but it did sharpen the Chippewa-Cree tribe member's resolve to achieve her goals and give back.

A recipient of a Toyota Tribal College Scholarship, Torres-Hernandez studies math at a tribal college in Rocky Boy, Mont. Once the 3.7-GPA student earns her four-year degree from a university, she plans to return to the reservation to teach high school.

"All of my life I've loved math and helping people learn new concepts," she says.

To help Torres-Hernandez and other Native American students earn an education in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM), Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A., Inc. is donating $1 million to the American Indian College Fund (the College Fund). The national Native American education non-profit is commemorating its 25th anniversary.

Since 1999, Toyota has helped more than 1,300 Native American students earn a college degree through its Toyota Tribal College Scholarship Program with the College Fund. Four-hundred thousand dollars of this landmark gift will continue Toyota's scholarship program through 2018.

In addition to the $400,000 in scholarships, Toyota's donation includes $250,000 in unrestricted funds to the College Fund; $150,000 in-kind gifts; and $200,000 to fund environmental sustainability programs at the TCUs.

The resurgence of interest amongst Native American students in the environmental sustainability and science fields dovetails with Toyota's philanthropic goals that focus on education, safety and the environment.

"We consider it a great privilege to celebrate the American Indian College Fund's 25th anniversary with this gift. Their ongoing work is critical not only in the Native American community, but for all of us who value diversity of thought and culture in our communities." says Michael Rouse, Toyota vice president of diversity, philanthropy and community affairs.

Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund says, "We are pleased to expand our partnership with Toyota in support of the education of our students. Tribal colleges address the dismal reality that only about 1% of Native American people get to go to college. Because of the support of Toyota, we are able to provide access to college to dozens of students. This is an amazing and welcome commemoration of the College Fund's 25th anniversary and directs us down the path of even more educational success for the next 25 years."

Do You Need ID Theft Insurance or Credit Monitoring?

By Jason Alderman

You'd have to be living under a rock not to be concerned about identity theft. It seems like every other month there's a new report about another massive data breach somewhere in the world.

Not surprisingly, a thriving industry has sprung up around helping to protect consumers from identity theft. Most of these services are pretty expensive and many consumer organizations argue that they merely take actions you could easily carry out yourself for free. But if you don't have the time or wherewithal, you may want to enlist a professional to help unravel the mess.

Following are some of the identity theft prevention services being marketed, as well as questions to ask when considering them:

ID theft insurance is commonly offered as a rider to homeowners or renters insurance and typically costs $25 and $60 a year. Note: it doesn't protect you from being victimized in the first place nor does it cover direct monetary losses resulting from identity theft. Rather, it reimburses costs associated with reclaiming your financial identity (e.g., phone calls, making copies, mailing documents, wages lost when pursuing resolution and hiring an attorney).

Questions you should ask:

What are the policy's limits? Is there a deductible? If lost wages are covered, what limits apply and what triggers this coverage? If legal fees are covered, what limits apply and must the insurer preapprove the work? How much personalized assistance will you get – will they assign a case manager to execute on your behalf or merely give you a checklist to follow? Credit monitoring services track your credit reports and contact you whenever key changes occur – things like new accounts opened in your name, address changes, credit inquiries and increased credit limits. They usually cost from $10 to $30 a month and services provided are all over the map. For example:

Some monitor and provide credit reports from all three major credit bureaus; but some only track one. More expensive plans provide additional services including monitoring public records, black market website surveillance, and computer protection programs like antivirus and keystroke encryption software. Some provide one or more free (or low-cost) credit scores. Keep in mind when considering whether to buy credit monitoring:

Many creditors report information to all three credit bureaus, but some only report to one, so your three credit reports may contain different information. Because many lenders only report activity to credit bureaus monthly, it could take weeks before your monitoring service spots fraudulent behavior. Ask how you'll be notified of flagged changes (email, text and/or mail) and how frequently (daily, weekly, monthly). You can order one free copy of each credit report from www.annualcreditreport.com per year, so by staggering them, you could get a different report every four months. If you know – or fear – that an account has been compromised but don't want to fully block access to your credit reports through a credit freeze, you can place a free, 90-day initial fraud alert with the three credit bureaus. This means businesses must verify your identity with you before opening new accounts.

You can renew the alert after 90 days. If you don't want to be bothered remembering, some monitoring services will file your renewals for a fee.

For more tips, see the Federal Trade Commission's "Privacy and Identity" page at www.consumer.ftc.gov/topics/privacy-identity.

Bottom line: Do you want to monitor your own credit (which is free but time-consuming) or hand off the task to a third party and pay hundreds of dollars? Either way, make sure it gets done.

*****

Jason Alderman directs Visa's financial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www.twitter.com/PracticalMoney.

Garden Corner

By Eric Hanssen

Browns Valley, Minnesota

The multicolored Asian lady beetles are on the move again this fall. The insect typically feeds on aphids but will also feed on sweet fruit in the fall. However the biggest problem with these insects is they like a warm place to live for the winter – your house! Soon people will be noticing these lady beetles on the windows of any sunny rooms. Not only is it a nuisance to have all these insects walking on the windows and flying through the house, they also can bite! The bites do not draw blood, nor do they carry any diseases, but it is another annoyance. Finally if you smack one you’ll find it gives off a yellow-orange fluid that has a foul odor and stains surfaces. And if that is not enough about 25% of people have allergic reaction to contact with the beetles. Not the best house guests.

No one is quite sure what triggers the mass migration of these beetles from field to homes but their aggregation to building is most likely related to the shorter day lengths, a drop in temperature (40-50 F) at night and warmer (60-70 F) days. Typically the lady beetles begin moving sometime in early October. Keeping the beetles out of the house requires several different strategies. First step is to seal as many opening into the house as possible. This means around doors and windows, fascia board and vents and any other opening more than 1/8-inch or larger. Once in the house, do not use a household insecticide, instead a vacuum cleaner is a good means of getting rid of the insects though you’ll find you are repeating this treatment on almost every sunny day this fall if you did not seal the house well enough. The second approach is to apply an insecticide on the outside walls of the house. The insecticide should be applied around doors windows, and rooflines. The most common active ingredient used for control is products containing permethrin, though there are several other effective active ingredients as well. Do not apply the insecticide to the landscape as beetles can travel long distances to houses and do not necessarily land on nearby trees and shrubs before reaching the house. There is also an inexpensive light trap that can be built by homeowners. The instructions are available at http://ipm.osu.edu/lady/L.T.instr.htm. Remember the strategies focus on keeping them out of the house, once they are in, you now have winter guests that will not leave.

The multicolored Asian lady beetles were introduced into this country from Russia, Japan and Korea beginning in 1916 with most introductions in the 1960s and 1970s. They were brought over as they are efficient aphids feeders, better than our native lady beetles, and in our region are important controls for the soybean aphid and the corn leaf aphid. The multicolored Asian lady beetles may be yellow, orange or red and sometimes with spots.

Information in this article comes from professor John Ball, SDSU Forestry Specialist in his Pest Update publication available online at http://sdda.sd.gov/legacydocs/Forestry/educational-information/PDF/Pest-Alert-2010-Oct13.pdf.

Legals

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 14-220

SWOCSE/Samantha DuMarce, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CAMERON CHARBONEAU, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of October, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 14-020

SWOCSE/Alissa Fryer, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CAMERON CHARBONEAU, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support Arrears has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of October, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 03-005

SWOCSE/ Amanda Iyarpeya, PLAINTIFF

VS.

PERRY LUFKINS, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of October, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 04-378

SWOCSE/ Doris Lewis, PLAINTIFF

VS.

PERRY LUFKINS, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of October, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 00-362

SWOCSE/ Arlys Max, PLAINTIFF

VS.

PERRY LUFKINS, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of October, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 05-543

SWOCSE/ Dawna Walking Bull, PLAINTIFF

VS.

PERRY LUFKINS, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of October, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 12-048

SWOCSE/SD/Deann Huff, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ERIC SHEPHERD, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Recognize a Foreign Order has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of October, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 10-067

SWOCSE/Teresa White, PLAINTIFF

VS.

GAYLA GERMAN, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support Arrears has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of October, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 13-021

SWOCSE/Jodeen Hansen, PLAINTIFF

VS.

GAYLA GERMAN, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support Arrears has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of October, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 14-143

SWOCSE/SD/Loretta Runs After, PLAINTIFF

VS.

GARY MONTREAL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Petition to Recognize a Foreign Order has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of October, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Petition describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 14-141

SWOCSE/SD/Buffy Chasing Eagle, PLAINTIFF

VS.

GARY MONTREAL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Establish Child Support Arrears has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of October, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 14-149

SWOCSE/SD/Toni Handboy, PLAINTIFF

VS.

GARY MONTREAL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Establish Child Support Arrears has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of October, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 07-199

SWOCSE/ Peggy Thompson, PLAINTIFF

VS.

GARY MONTREAL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of October, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 08-009

SWOCSE/ Christine Renville, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SAMUEL FARMER, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of October, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 09-073

SWOCSE/ Claudine Farmer, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SAMUEL FARMER, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of October, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 10-049

SWOCSE/Natasha DuMarce, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DAMON WHITE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Modify Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of October, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 13-006

SWOCSE/Theresa Wilson, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DAMON WHITE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Modify Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of October, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 02-334

SWOCSE/Aron Keeble, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DAMON WHITE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Modify Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of October, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 12-141

SWOCSE/Alana Dumarce, PLAINTIFF

VS.

THEODORE THODE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Review Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of October, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 06-086

SWOCSE/ Sylvana Flute, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CORNELIUS KIRK, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of October, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 14-029

SWOCSE/ Paul Hoax, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CORNELIUS KIRK, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of October, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 14-021

SWOCSE/ Mary Merrill, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CORNELIUS KIRK, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of October, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 11-095

SWOCSE/Lacy Lee, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MICHAEL DUMARCE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of October, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 12-002

SWOCSE/Stacy Eisenbise, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MONTIE GUFFIN, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Modify Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of October, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 12-118

SWOCSE/Delores Hayes, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ROLAND HEMINGER, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Paternity and Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of October, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 08-011

SWOCSE/ Bernice Rodriguez, PLAINTIFF

VS.

BRANDON ST. JOHN, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of October, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 14-159

SWOCSE/Michelle Brant, PLAINTIFF

VS.

MELISSA KEOKE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of October, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 14-207

SWOCSE/SD, PLAINTIFF

VS.

SHERRY SCHERER, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of October, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 13-195

SWOCSE/ Dana Krump, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LEEANA HOLMAN, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of October, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 14-105

SWOCSE/Michael Farmer, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JESSE BOMMERBACH, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Paternity & Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of October, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 07-080

SWOCSE/ Melissa Favila, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LOREN MARKS, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of October, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 12-166

SWOCSE/ Geri Goodhouse, PLAINTIFF

VS.

RICHARD DUBOIS, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of October, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 12-176

SWOCSE/Amber Frost, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LELAND FRYER, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Modify Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 30th day of October, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the SWOCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 14-215

SWOCSE/Bessie Genia, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CHRIS BLUE, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 31st day of October, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 11-009

SWOCSE/ Emma Grey Bull, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DUSTY SNOW, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 31st day of October, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 14-198

SWOCSE/Jonita Abraham, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LINDSEY ORTLEY, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 31st day of October, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 09-065

SWOCSE/ Nolita Manoucheria, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LACASSA DUMARCE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 31st day of October, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 14-218

SWOCSE/Mary Jo Keeble, PLAINTIFF

VS.

WILFRED FAYANT, Jr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 31st day of October, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 12-123

SWOCSE/ Candice Brown, PLAINTIFF

VS.

BRENT BLACKTHUNDER, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 31st day of October, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 13-140

SWOCSE/ Doris Cooper, PLAINTIFF

VS.

BRENT BLACKTHUNDER, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 31st day of October, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 14-108

SWOCSE/Solomon Goodsell, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ANPAO BUCKANAGA, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Amend Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 31st day of October, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 26th day of September, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ Michael T. Swallow, Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Melinda Heminger, SWOCSE Clerk of Court

40-3tc

Trading Post ads

GPTCHB Vacancy

Great Plains Tribal Chairmen’s Health Board (GPTCHB) is hiring a Health Insurance Exchange Navigator and Community Health Worker in your community. This is a great opportunity to join a great organization! Apply online at www.gptchb.org or contact Kristine Watts at 605.721.1922 or kristine.watts@gptchb.org for more information.

 

Job Openings

Wac'ang'a (Sweetgrass)

Wac'ang'a, INC. is seeking to fill the following position: Part-Time Shelter Advocate

All interested applicants may obtain application and job description information from the Wac'ang'a administrative office located at 417 Veteran's Ave. Sisseton or contact Julie Watts at (605)698-3510 (Tribal preference will apply).

Closing Date: October 31, 2014 at 4:30 p.m.

 

Grow SD

Part-Time Executive Associate: Office Location - Sisseton, SD. Applications will be taken until Friday, Nov. 7. To request a job application and job description, contact GROW South Dakota, 104 Ash St. E., Sisseton, SD 57262 or call (605)-698-7654 or 1-888-202-4855. EOE.

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Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

Job Openings

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate is seeking to fill the following positions(s):

Teacher Aide, Head Start

MCH Aide, CHR/MCH

Generalist, CHR

Realty Specialist/Leasing, Realty

Closing Date: October 24, 2014 @ 04:30 PM

Project Coordinator, Diabetes Prevention Program

Bus Driver (Part-time), Head Start Program

Closing Date: November 14, 2014 at 4:30 p.m.

All interested applicants may obtain application and job description information at the Human Resource Department, of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate or contact Arnold Williams at (605) 698-8238 or Denise Hill at (605) 698-8362. (Tribal preference will apply)

 

Tiospa Zina Tribal School

Employment Opportunities

2014-2015 School Year Vacancies:

Substitutes needed for custodial, kitchen, teaching, and transportation - starting at $10/hr Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma (please contact the HR office for more information) Applications are accepted on an on-going basis

Vacancy: Special Education Teacher (High School) Sign-on Bonus Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Special Education Teacher Opening Date: March 7, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Art Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a K-12 Art Teacher Opening Date: July 1, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Alternative Learning Center Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Secondary Teacher Opening Date: July 1, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: School Counselor Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a School Service Specialist School Counselor Opening Date: May 23, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Administrative Assistant (Elementary) Qualifications: High School Diploma/GED and Associate's degree (A. A.) or equivalent from two-year college or technical school; or one year to three years of related experience and/or training; or equivalent combination of education and experience. Opening Date: September 8, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Cook Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma and holds/willing to obtain South Dakota certification in Child and Adult Nutritian Services. Opening Date: October 8, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

2014-2015 Extra Curricular Vacancies:

Vacancy: 7th/8th Grade Girls Basketball Coach Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma. If interested please submit an application and coaching applicant questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School. Opening Date: April 8, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: AISES Advisor (American Indian Science and Engineering Society) Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma. If interested please submit an application and Advisor Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School. Opening Date: April 11, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Destination Imagination Advisor Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma. If interested please submit an application and Advisor Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School. Opening Date: April 11, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Rodeo & Riding Club Advisor Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma. If interested please submit an application and Advisor Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School. Opening Date: May 8, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Web Master Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma, familiar with and can assist staff in administration of their Adobe Dreamweaver CS4 web page software, able to keep school web pages updated and efficient. Opening Date: August 25, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

If you would like to apply to be a part of the TZ tiwahe you may pick up an application from the TZTS HR office located at #2 Tiospa Zina Dr. Agency Village, SD 57262. Applications may also be printed off the HR web page by downloading from links under employment forms to the left. Completed applications may be sent to PO Box 719, Agency Village, SD 57262. Faxed to: 605-698-7686. For further information call 605-698-3953 ext. 208. Indian Preference employer. At will employer. All applicants are subject to a Background Check and Pre-Employment Drug Test, pursuant to SWSB policy.

 

ESDS

FACE PARENT EDUCATOR

Enemy Swim Day School has an immediate opening for a FACE Parent Educator for the 2014-2015 school year. Parent Educator for FACE Home-Based conducts personal visits with families of prenatal to 5-year old children on a weekly or bi-weekly basis to provide research-based information on how children grow and develop and how parents can foster learning and nurture development. Hours are 8:00 am to 4:00 pm, with some evening hours for scheduled events. Please visit our web site at www.esds.us for a detailed position description and application. This position includes benefits. Indian Preference policies apply. If interested please call (605) 947-4605 or (888) 825-7738 for more information, ask for Virginia. Open until filled.

42-2tc

 

Dakota Magic Casino

Job Openings

Foods Department:

Bus Person (2 Full-Time Temporary) Day, Swing

Bus Person (2 Full-Time) Day, Swing

Cashier (Full-Time Temporary) Day

Cashier (4 Full-Time) Day, Swing

Cook II (Full-Time Temporary) Swing

Foods Clerk (Full-Time) Day

Hotel Department:

Front Desk Clerk (Full-Time) 4pm-12am.

Closing Date: October 24, 2014 at 4:00 p.m.

Starting Wage: D.O.E.

High School Diploma or GED required for most positions

Two identifications documents required upon hire

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department, 16849 102nd Street SE, Hankinson ND 58041.For complete Job Description contact James Neconish 701-634-3000 ext. 2582 Indian Preference will apply / EEO. (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment). Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

SECURITY: SECURITY SERGEANT (2 Full-Time) ROTATING GENERAL FUNCTION: Supervises security personnel on shift. Safeguards company assets. Supervisor will assist Security Director in training officers. The security officer protects company assets and provides a safe environment for customers and employees. Exhibit a friendly, helpful and courteous manner when dealing with the customers and employees. Maintains security activities and performs credit transactions adhering to company, Tribal, State and Federal guidelines. Work closely with Casino & Hotel Management. REQUIREMENTS: Must have a high school diploma or G.E.D. equivalent. Must not have a felony on their record. Should have some type of law enforcement background. Supervisory experience is necessary, In-house security background will be considered. Must be physically fit and able to lift 40+ lbs. Capable of doing scheduling and administrative paperwork. Must obtain a Key Gaming License upon hire.

This position will close on October 22, 2014 at 4 pm.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

Security Department: Officer (1) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, weekends & holidays. Mobility throughout the facility 45% percent of time; will be stooping, bending, walking for long periods of time, able to lift up to 40 pounds, computer skills required for report writing. Will be exposed to noise and tobacco smoke. Appropriate dress code. Must be at least 21 years old & have a High School Diploma or G.E.D. Must be able to obtain a Key License.

Opening date: Thursday, October 16, 2014

Closing date: Wednesday, October 22, 2014 @ 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.