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Sota Volume 45 Issue No. 33

Anpetu Iyamni, August 20, 2014

Inside this Edition –

Oyate Tribal officials, parents/grandparents voice concerns at Sisseton School Board’s annual IPP hearing

BIE restructuring plan fails to allow tribal participation

BIA 700 detour in effect during construction

Gwen Westerman named Bush artist-in-residence

Next week: Award-winning Bluedog Blues Band has ties to Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate!

Oyate member, veteran Dennis Isaac Seely wins a brand new Indian Chief Claasic motorcycle from a Deadwood casino last week

Deadline for receipt of copy for consideration is 12:00 noon Fridays

Open invitation to all Oyate –

Come be part of “Grassroots Solutions for a Better Community”

By Crystal Owen

SWO Meth Prevention Coordinator

Dear Community Members:

There will be "Grassroots Solutions for a Better Community" meeting on (this Wednesday) August 20, 2014 beginning at 10:00 a.m. in the Tribal Council Chambers.

This meeting is to continue the conversation, identified concerns, solutions, goals and strategies in combating the rising drug problem in our communities.

As we all know, drug abuse does not discriminate. We are all affected, the user, the family and the community. This Grassroots effort was created by recovering drug addicts, family members and community members. We know we all must do our part of finding the solutions. It is not a hopeless and we are not a hopeless community.

In our meeting one of our goals for the month was to extend an invitation to you because also are an important role of the discussion and solutions for the community.

Invitations were sent to Probation Officers of surrounding counties and tribal, Child Protection Program, ET DEMO, IHS, Tribal Council, Public Defenders, County and tribal prosecutors, Circuit Court and Tribal Judges, Housing Authority and Board, County Sheriff's offices and tribal Law Enforcement, District Chairman's Association, Aliive Roberts County, 7 GOV, BIA Law Enforcement, BIA Criminal Investigator, Local School Superintendents, Parolee Pilot Program Director, and U.S. Attorney Brenden Johnson.

We look forward to seeing you at the next meeting. If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact Crystal Owen at 698-3070.

Sota news/editorial –

Sisseton School Board holds annual IPP hearing last Monday

By CD Floro

Sota Editor

The Sisseton School Board held its annual Indian Policies & Procedures hearing before its regular meeting last Monday evening, August 11th, in the high school library. A small group of Tribal members and officials attended to ask questions and make comments concerning how well the local public school system handles the educational needs of its Native American students – which represents more than 50 percent of its total student population.

Pidamiya to our Tribal officials, parents and grandparents who spoke up at last Monday’s annual hearing on the Sisseton School Board’s Indian Policy and Procedures. These include the Oyate's own Tribal Vice-Chairperson Sara Lincoln, who must be frustrated that her fellow Board members pay little or no heed to what she has to offer.

Your voices must continue to be raised until the School Board finally gets the message that no longer can it run over the rights of Oyate families with children enrolled in the public schools, no longer can it operate the federal impact aid fund as its private slush fund, and no longer can it ignore the outreached hand of our Oyate people and the Tribe.

The meeting failed to make any headway whatsoever on the main issues involved in this impasse, which are the point of an ongoing federal lawsuit brought by the Tribe against the School Board.

Despite overtures by the Tribal, repeated last week by Tribal Councilperson Dawn Eagle (as well as Dr. Sherry Johnson and Kathryn Akipa) that the hand of friendship and cooperation is extended, the Board neglected to acknowledge the invitation to come to TiWakan Tio Tipi.

The Board members and administration neglected to respond to the invitation to come and learn about the community life of the people whose children they are charged to “educate.”

And two very direct questions by Dr. Johnson, concerning specific action taken by the Board at a recent meeting concerning the flow of funds from impact aid to the general fund, were completely ignored.

Instead, we got the same baloney from President Hellwig, at the conclusion of the hearing … how he sees “things getting better … much improvement … I see no problem … we are doing all that is required ….”

It would have been refreshing, if not so depressing, when Perry Mahpiya Sna spoke about his experience years ago when he dropped out, telling other Oyate “What do you expect?”

When President Hellwig called the IPP hearing to order Superintendent Dr. Schulte took the floor.

He gave a narrative about how the Sisseton schools are providing “many opportunities for parents to come with questions and input.”

Dr. Schulte told how the school system is “meeting the needs” of the Native American students as well as all the students enrolled.

He read selections from a document not distributed at the meeting, the “Policies and Procedures Insuring Tribal and Indian Parental Involvement in the Development and Equal Participation by Indian Students in Those Programs for the Sisseton School District.” This version of the IPP was approved by the Board at its July 14th, 2014 – without consultation with or input by the SWO and an Oyate parent committee (as required by federal law).

The document reads somewhat better than previous versions (our observance), but does not substantively address the major impasse between the Board and the Oyate: When will the Board accept the Tribe and their Native American parents as partners in the education of Oyate children in the Sisseton schools?

As Dawn Eagle later pointed out, these are “just words” on paper.

The new IPP changes some language, for example the Board no longer has to “publish” hearing and meeting notices in the Sota Iya Ye Yapi but “provide” the information. We suppose that means if we publish the notices the SWO Tribe will have to pay or we will simply provide it as a public service as the Sisseton Courier is the official newspaper of the Sisseton Schools.

But, hey, the document assures all parents that you can see all of this information at any time, whenever you’d like to come into the school and ask to see it.

And you are all invited to come in for one-on-one communication with school officials … especially if you’re uncomfortable attending a formal meeting.

Also, Dr. Schulte emphasized that all this information is easily accessible on the school’s website and on the state website.

Back to the Superintendent’s presentation. He had high praise for Title XII and Sioux Voices Club, who these programs help meet the needs of the Native students. He said, “I think we do a phenomenal job (with these programs).” True, these programs do provide for meaningful opportunities and we enjoy putting news of their activities in the Sota.

Rather than summarize more of the Superintendent’s excerpts from the document, here is the document itself:

Policies and Procedures (IPP) Year

1. Specify how the tribal officials and parents of Indian children have been given, an opportunity to comment on whether Indian children participate on an equal basis with non-Indian children in the educational programs and activities provided by the LEA.

Opportunities for comment and participation exist in various forms, for all persons, irrespective of race, which specifically include annual MP meetings involving the school board and tribe/parents and monthly public board meetings which are open to the students, parents, and public in general. The dates and times of these meetings are publicized on the school's website, in school newsletters, posted in the school buildings, and advertised in the local newspaper. The August board meeting minutes reflect that the Tribe and communities does take advantage of the opportunity for comment.

The District ensures many avenues of communication are brought to parents attention, including the following:

*At the beginning of each school year, parents receive a copy of the Student Handbook which includes the parent compact, school-parent policy, parent right to know, and District parent policy.

*Attendance Center Open Houses are scheduled to familiarize parents with school changes, environment, curriculum, etc. Also, a time for parent to ask questions, etc. These take place in the fall before school starts in conjunction with our community back to school picnic.

*The fall and spring parent/teacher conferences are scheduled to provide parents with report cards and test results. Information for parents is broken down Ito very understandable statements. Conferences are scheduled at the elementary level and student lead conferences at the middle school in the spring are student lead. Dates are put on the school year calendar and advertised on the school website.

*During fall conferences, teachers spend time with parents discussing standardized testing results and provide printouts of the scores in an easily understandable format.

*The Parent Portal on the school website also provides parents with online grades and attendance for their children. Online student information is accessible to parents and students by password. Parents can email teachers any comments, concerns, or questions they may have concerning their children. Students can see updated data and information concerning school related material.

*Information is also shared with parents through email messages, telephone calls, newsletters, and notes sent home with the students, and via informal meetings and publication in the local and trial newspapers.

*Family activities are planned each school year in order to include time for families and for learning to take place for all members, such as homework help, reading and mob strategies, summer reading help, and test-taking tips.

 *Each month there are opportunities for school-to-home parent/student contests, parents are invited to classroom awards ceremonies to feel welcome and be a part of the classroom, parents receive telephone calls to continually communicate academic achievement, and parents are contacted on a regular basis in regard to attendance.

*Parents are also invited to participate in professional development opportunities and are encouraged to volunteer in the classroom to foster the parent/student/teacher connection.

*On-line State Report Card is an informative source produced by the state to give the public information on the school district or attendance center when it comes to making average yearly progress toward NCLB through the states assessment tool; Dakstep assessment, now changing to Smarter Balance. Link: http://sisseton.k12.sd.us/aa/default.aspx

*School Improvement/Title meetings, communications, and data that is required by the South Dakota Department of Education, which is monitored and approved.

*Parent advisory meetings: Meetings are held at the middle school and Westside elementary. Meetings are held to receive input from parents concerning school improvement.

*Title VII board meets once a month usually on the third Wednesday and has an annual public meeting. All meetings are advertised. The superintendent attends the majority of these meetings to answer any questions that may arise.

*Board budget hearing: Preliminary budget hearing is discussed at May's board meeting. The final budget hearing takes place sometime before September's board meeting.

*IPP meeting: Usually held at the beginning of the August board meeting. Advertised and allows for discussion.

*School Board meetings: Usually scheduled the second Monday of each month, time varies. Announcement to public is required. Agenda posted on district website the Thursday before and the minutes are sent to the tribal paper and the tribal chair. The budget hearing and IPP review is also advertised.

Thus, if a board meeting is too "formal" or "public" of a forum for some parents to feel comfortable expressing their thoughts, each of these foregoing referenced opportunities for "visit" to the school, the classroom, or private conversations with teachers during conferences provide parents and guardians an opportunity to give their opinions of their child's involvement in a more informal or one-on-one basis. In addition, parents are informed that they may provide comments in writing to the administration.

The School-Parent Compact is provided to parents each year at the beginning of school, and is a great reference to delineate School Responsibilities, Parent Responsibilities, and Student Responsibilities. See Parent/Family Engagement Plans and School-Parent Compacts of the District and Elementary Schools. It indicates, among other things, that parents are invited and encouraged to volunteer and participate in the child's class, states times in which staff is available to speak with parents, and indicates the ways in which parents support their child's learning. The School-Parent Compact is reviewed and modified annually, through efforts of the Parents Advisory Committee, or “PAC.” The Compact is addressed during PAC meetings, and the PAC members are asked for suggested changes, how to get in touch with people, information about tutoring, summer school, and volunteering. Another function of the PAC is to ensure parents are a part of the educational planning and process, and that they are aware that they have a “say.”

Parents are also provided a copy of the Title I District Family Engagement Plan, which outlines how and when information will be provided, how families can obtain the information, communicate with teachers, get involved in activities, and information regarding committee volunteering. In addition, the District has even used a creative approach of providing magnets with contact information and phone numbers, school’s website address, and the Parent Compact information.

2. Specify how LEA officials assessed the extent to which Indian children participated on an equal basis with non-Indian children served by the LEA.

Academically, student participation data can be found online through the State Report Card with the link being available to parents through letters, newspapers, and on the school website. Local district assessments are also presented to parents through letters, parent/teacher conferences, etc. Surveys from Family Engagement, parent walk-throughs are given and outcomes are discussed with staff and parent groups in order to consider any changes needed.

After-school programs – Participation by students in after-school clubs at the middle school. WASP after-school program and pre-school after-school program at Westside Elementary.

At the Middle School, all students have the option of taking Art Class, and the art t5eacher integrates Native American culture in the classroom.

Art Club now has been offered as an after-school activity since 2009-10. The statistics of participation are as follows:

2009-10           35 members      54% Native American

2010-11           47 members      53% Native American

2011-12           44 members      36% Native Americans

2012-13           24 members      29% Native American

Westside Elementary After-School Program statistics of participation are as follows:

2012-13           113 enrolled     55% Native American

2013-14           100 enrolled     54% Native American

Westside Elementary Summer School statistics of participation are as follows:

132 enrolled     49% Native American

High School Athletics (7th through 11th grade) statistics of participation are as follows:

2009-10           153 participants            30% Native American

2010-11           160 participants                        28% Native American

2012-13           172 participants                        30% Native American

High School Fine Arts Activities (9th through 11th grade) statistics of participation are as follows:

2010/11           105 participants                        34% Native American

2011/12           106 participants                        33% Native American

2012/13           87 participants              36% Native American

According to the South Dakota Department of Education, the District's enrollment of Native American students was 56% in the fall of 2013.

While participation is not 56% Native American children, these numbers reflect a significant participation in these programs as a result of the District's efforts.

Preseason athletic meetings are contained in the newspaper, on District's website, advertised on the local radio and television stations, and announced during school. In addition, to encourage participation, the District holds meetings regarding extra-curricular activities during the school day, rather than before or after school, which is unheard of at most, if not all, other public schools in the state. This is done to specifically reach out to the children and to meet their needs in being able to attend. In addition, every spring during high school orientation, all coaches and activity advisors go to 8th grade classrooms and discuss activities available in high school, and the activities director speaks to the 8th graders. Ultimately, the District facilitates and encourages participation.

3. Specify procedures on ways the LEA can modify its educational program to ensure that Indian children participate on an equal basis with non-Indian children served by the LEA.

Native Americans participate on an equal basis and take advantage of the educational programs. To ensure this, the District offers special programs and makes efforts to apply for specific grants and programs to benefit Native American students, namely, the Sioux Voices Program, the Wakan Gli Grant (US Department of Indian Education Grant designed to help decrease Native American high school dropout rates and increase the number of Native American graduates), and the South Dakota College Access Grant. Notably, Sioux Voices sponsors a Native American banquet and traditional ceremony for Native American graduates in addition to multiple efforts to ensure that the District's Native American students have every opportunity to participate in a variety of programs including academic, athletic and the arts. Certificates are given out at the Sioux Voices Banquet.

The District also offers Academic Enrichment Classes, which are comprised primarily of Native American students. (This year, 86% are Native American, last year 78% were Native American.) The District also offers Positive Behavior Intervention and Support ("PBIS"), wherein teachers are trained in positive behavior and attitude needed to be successful in school, and each of those trained teachers is then assigned to mentor one of the most at-risk students or those who struggle because of outside factors and provide 'intervention services' to encourage that student and assist them, and provide rewards and celebrations. The District also has constructed and implemented Academic Coaching Time, with established goals and checklist. The District not only offers the common core, but also emphasizes Native American history and culture in its classrooms, curriculum, teaching materials, and even its decor. Westside Elementary School and middle school, respectively, show a variety of ways in which Native American culture is displayed via language, paintings and books available. Multiculturalism is emphasized at the middle school. For instance, the daily announcements contain a phrase and interpretation in the Dakota language, Title VII home/school coordinators work with Native American students and families, and students are given two exempt days to attend cultural, traditional, and family events each school year.

In addition, the District's educational programs focus upon integration of Native American studies into the curriculum. With respect to the South Dakota Department of Education's creation of Indian Education standards, specifically, the Oceti Sakowin Essential Understanding and Standards, which are not mandated. Also, the middle school social studies incorporates these standards into its curriculum. Moreover, high school U.S and World History classes place great emphasis on Native American studies and culture throughout the year, and World History is tared by a Native American teacher.

Modifications are being made through data from assessments. Changes and data assessments are listed below:

Changes:   Response to Intervention (RTI)

After-school tutoring

Summer school

Credit Recovery

Assessments: Aims-Web, DACS, Achievement, Report Cards,

P/T conferences, Parent calls, Interest surveys, Relationships with student/parents/community.

4. Specify how the LEA disseminated relevant Impact Aid applications, evaluations, program plans, and information related to the educational programs of the LEA in sufficient time to allow the tribes and parents of Indian children an opportunity to review the materials and make recommendations on the needs of the Indian children Sand how the LEA may help those children realize the benefits of the LEA's education programs and activities.

Education programs: The District places a tremendous amount of information in the newspapers of what transpired at board meetings, such as official action and detailed discussion, and writes in great detail regarding the administrators' reports of what is transpiring at each school and the District overall, such as curriculum, attendance, enrollment, activities, and ideas. The State of South Dakota, State Report Card, has a significant amount of statistical data and assessments contained on their website with assessments of students on a variety of areas, including participation, performance, and academic achievement. The information is available for public access in a user-friendly format. Link: http://sisseton.k12.sd. us/aa/default.aspx

Activities: Information regarding activities, sports meetings, extra-curricular student groups, and parent/community groups is advertised on the radio stations, local and tribal newspapers, on the school's website, information is sent home with the students, and contained in the school newsletter.

Impact Aid: The application is sent to the tribal chair once completed.

School Data: School-wide plans that each school "has written which provide voluminous data regarding surveys, test scores, and other educational information are available online and thus accessible to parents/families and community members at all times, and have been discussed at board meetings, parent/teacher conferences, open house nights, and parent advisory committee meetings. School Improvement Plans also provide the explanation of the opportunities in which parents can be involved. The District also has a parent involvement policy, which is provided to the parents at the beginning of the school year. Westside Elementary School Parent Involvement and Title I District Parent Involvement Policies. Parents can also access student information on the Parent Portals.

5. Specify how the LEA gathered information concerning the Indian community views on education issues, including the frequency, location and time of meetings.

School board meetings are not the only forum available in which to communicate pertinent information. For instance, the District has a Title VII Indian Education Program, with the board being comprised of Native American adults who are compensated using Title VII Grant funds. Four of the five board members must consist of parents/grandparents/guardians of Native American students, and one must be a teacher or counselor within the school. Student participation takes place by having student representatives from Sioux Voices attending meetings to give input to the committee. The local Title VII Indian Education Program is to promote academic excellence, enhance educational opportunities and equality, and improve the quality of teaching and learning.

Title VII Brochure. The Superintendent helped to write the grant for the program. In addition, as referenced herein, the PAC has monthly meetings, and as soon as an individual attends one meeting, he or she receives a personal invitation from the District to attend the monthly meetings thereafter. In addition to monthly Title VII board meetings, there are monthly school board meetings, parent/teacher conferences, parent advisory meetings, school open houses, school board budget hearings, annual IPP meetings, parent portal/teacher websites wherein individuals can email teachers any comments, concerns or questions they may have, School Improvement/Title I meetings, activity nights, workshops//:mina:1gs, and classroom involvement. All of these are in place to gather input and information concerning parent and community viewpoints and ideas. Title VII meetings, annual impact aid and IPP meetings are very much geared toward receiving the Tribe and Native American community's input. The PAC meetings are tremendously geared towards parent engagement and its primary function is to enable parents to offer suggestions and, as a committee, have an opportunity and voice to effect change.

Other avenues of gathering information:

Questionnaires

Title VII monthly/annual meeting(s) - third Wednesday of each month.

Open Houses

Monthly Parent Advisory Committee meetings.

Surveys at Parent/Teacher conferences

Family/Friendly walk-through,

6.  Specify how the LEA notified Indian parents and tribes of the location and times of meetings.

As indicated throughout this Reply, every form of communication imaginable is utilized to inform parents and the community of the location and times of meetings-newspapers, radio, local television station, website, various flyers handed to parents and students, newsletters, email, personal phone calls, and posted announcements, just to name a few. More importantly as you can see from this Reply, significant additional effort is made to go beyond notice alone, by making much effort to facilitate and encourage attendance by Native American students and parents.

Newspaper - Courier

Sota - Tribal paper

Board minutes sent to tribal chairman and Sota.

Districts website

Newsletters

Letters to parents

Material sent home with students

Posted Announcements

Outside reader board

Tribal Vice-chairman on school board

7.  Describe how the LEA regularly consulted and involved tribal officials and parents of Indian children in the planning and development of the LEA's educational programs and activities assisted with Impact Aid funds.

All the documentation enclosed should provide evidence that tribal officials and parents of Indian children, who attend our school, have had an opportunity to be involved as well as an opportunity to comment on the educational programs and activities assisted by all school funding.

Involvement through monthly scheduled Title VII board meetings as well as through open participation in the annual Impact Aid Meeting is also available.

The District agrees that parental involvement is critical, which is why the District goes to such great lengths to encourage parents to visit their children's classrooms, and routinely extends personal invitations to parents to engage in classroom activities and committee involvement, and specifically in this process, target Native American parents. For instance, the schools have Data Retreats, which occur every year for two days, for the purpose of looking at test scores, graduation rates, and the strengths and weaknesses of the schools in terms of academics, communication, and how to improve, in an effort to come up with ideas. The District goes beyond a mere publication or announcement. It makes personal phone calls to ensure the Data Retreat involves representatives of the Native American community, namely, parents and grandparents of students. The District also has Family Friendly Walk-Throughs every few years, allowing individuals to walk through the school to make sure it is welcoming and to make suggestions if improvement in that regard is needed in their view. T h e District also urges parental involvement in creative ways. For instance, the District has a Parent Involvement Challenge, wherein parents and grandparents are encouraged to visit classrooms, and every time someone volunteers for 15 to 20 minutes in the classroom, they are entered into a drawing for a weekend family night at a nearby large city with a hotel and waterpark. The District also sponsors a Parent Involvement Lunch twice a year to encourage parents to visit the school and have lunch with their children during the school day. Math Engagement Nights and Literacy Nights also occur, which are a 'fun' and family- focused opportunity to learn about the math and reading curriculum, find out what their children are learning, and essentially discuss their thoughts of the curriculum and ask questions in more of a 'non-formal' forum.

8. Specify procedures for modifying IPP's, if necessary, based upon input from the tribes and parents assessments of the effectiveness of their input rewarding the participation of Indian children in the LEA's education programs and activities.

The IPPs are reviewed on an annual basis after discussion and receiving proposals from the tribe and parents. Modifications are considered and made by board action after the IPP hearing is completed. Changes are made based on the effectiveness of their input regarding the participation of Indian children in the LEA's education programs and activities. Dates that adjustments have been made are listed on the IPP, even though no major adjustments have been made over the past number of years.

*****

Enemy Swim District Councilwoman Dawn Eagle took the floor and presented her case for having the Board, administration and staff including teachers, accept the “extended hand” of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate.

Tribal Chairman Shepherd and Tribal Council and SWO Education Coordinator Dr. Sherry Johnson have repeatedly invited them all to come to Tribal headquarters for an informal get-together, to share the Dakota culture … and a meal.

Never has an invitation been accepted not in the past few years we’ve been following this one-sided exchange.

Dawn said that in order to adequately address the needs of our Oyate children, you need to understand who they are, who we are as a people.

Some of the Board members haven’t ever been to a powwow held right here seven miles from the city of Sisseton.

She said you need to attend “powwow, giveaway … to understand our people.”

She spoke of having endured racism and discrimination while attending Sisseton public schools herself, and graduating.

She has had children attend.

Dawn said, “You need to hear this . . . Nothing has really changed.”

Today, she has grandchildren attending the public schools.

Dawn told of the school system “giving lip service” to get federal grants but “students should be treated equally.”

She echoed alleged racism, profiling, and bullying in the community and schools.

She said, “My kids and grandkids constantly deal with fallout from racism.”

Dawn also asked why there aren’t any Native American teachers in the Sisseton schools.

And she asked (again), “Why haven’t you replied to the SWO’s invitations to come to meet?” adding the caveat that they would be assured of getting a good meal.

“What are you actually doing,” she asked of the Board, above what is required.

It is going to take “heart,” she said.

“This paper (IPP) doesn’t mean anything.”

That’s a lot more than meeting requirements on a piece of paper, isn’t it?

Dr. Sherry Johnson, SWO Education Coordinator also spoke, thanking the Board for some changes in the IPP but questioning others. She also wanted to know why the Board had approved the document without Tribal input.

President Hellwig explained that it was a matter of time; the IPP needed approval before the start of the 2014-15 school year.

Dr. Johnson also asked specific questions about the Board’s tapping the federal impact aid fund last month for the general treasury.

First, she said that the federal lawsuit brought against the Board by the Tribe specifically included that the suit would not prevent the Board from using these funds. But then she inquired how they could use them without consultation, which is required by federal law. Of course, that is also part of the impasse that led to filing the lawsuit.

The Board continues to resist cooperation despite a mandate by the federal judge overseeing the case “to work it out yourselves.”

Finally, she asked what specific uses the money was being used for in the general fund.

There was no answer.

Other Oyate spoke at the meeting, besides elder Perry Mahpiya Sna who moved his wheelchair up to the Board to give his remarks. He spoke of nothing changing since he dropped out of the Sisseton public schools years ago.

Sierra Walcott talked of her frustrations trying to get a good education for her children, who face racism and bullying. She wants them to grow in their culture and language and in academics.

Tom Wilson, SHS graduate, said “We all need to be treated equal.”

Kathryn Akipa, SWO Head Start Program Director, another SHS graduate, talked about the need to work cooperatively for an environment better for everyone’s learning and one that is more accepting of everyone.

Others spent time on the floor before the hearing was concluded and the Board went into its regular meeting. All the Oyate shared the same offer of cooperation. All had attended Sisseton public schools and/or had children enrolled there.

We listened but did not really hear a reciprocating response from the Board, only that (in the words of its President) “we are doing all that is required.”

Construction begins this week on BIA 700

See detour map for road closures beginning this Monday, August 18th

Construction of BIA 700 on the North half of the project from approximately just north of the BIA 700 and 122nd Street intersection will begin on Monday, August 18th with Red Lake Builders, Inc. from Red Lake, Minnesota as the General Contractor.  This work will consist of re-grading the entire section, widening the roadway and installation of pipes and box culverts.  Work on Monday will consist of stripping of the topsoil and some road excavation work along the shoulders and inslopes so traffic may be slowed to one lane at times and eventually the entire section closed completely.  Complete closure of the roadway is scheduled to begin the following week on August 25th when the contractor will begin removing the existing asphalt pavement.

Construction schedule is to have majority of the major work completed by October 15, 2014 with the North, approximately 2.54 miles paved before winter.  The South half, approximately 2.54 miles, will begin construction in the spring of 2015.

A copy of the planned route for detour around the project is enclosed and I would advise all travelers to please allow for more time during your commutes to work, school, etc. and that you please utilize the detour plan as much as possible for your own safety and the poor conditions of the existing gravel roads between Agency Village and 122nd Street.

With increased volumes of traffic now routed to other roadway access, additional concerns for safety, commute time, dust control and roadway maintenance on these routes other than the designated detour route increase.  These other gravel routes that many may try to utilize as well are just not designed to handle this increased amount of heavy vehicle daily traffic and there are few maintenance dollars to continue maintaining these routes.  So please follow the detour route so that we can keep everyone safe and all of the local existing roads in good condition.

We apologize for the inconvenience this may cause to many of you but I am sure that we all agree that a short frame of inconvenience will have its reward in the end as BIA 700 will be a completely finished product by August 2015. 

BIE restructuring plan fails to allow for tribal consultation

Under the Obama administration, in response to the BIE Study Group Report that outlines years of failure by the Bureau of Indian Education, Secretary Jewell has ordered the Restructuring of the Bureau of Indian Education Order No. 3334.

The plan (see below) outlines phases that are presently being implemented although the tribes did not have an opportunity for Tribal Consultation.

Change is needed but the information that the tribes are receiving is little to none.

Thus, thirty-two community tribal schools, three regional and national Indian organizations, four representative from tribes, and four attorney's convened in Denver, Colorado on July 31and August 1, 2014 to work on a collaboration effort that will help return local control of community tribal schools to tribes and tribal organizations.

In attendance representing the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate was Dr. Sherry Johnson, Tribal Education Director.

Dr. Johnson and the 63 people spent the first day identifying local, regional, and national issues that are currently inhibiting local control of community tribal schools.

The primary issue seemed to be the increased intrusion of the federal government.

The second day was spent beginning the process of creating solutions to return control of Indian Education to tribes and, through them, tribal organizations.

The group also spent time setting the date of the next meeting and developing a coalition conceptual framework for further action. The coalition will ask other tribes, schools, organization and individuals to join them in the effort to return local control of education to tribes and tribal organizations.

What does the restructuring mean to tribes is still to be unveiled.

Restructuring the Bureau of Indian Education

Sec. 1 Purpose. Under the Federal Trust responsibility, the United States has charged itself with significant moral obligations to American Indian tribes. We cannot ignore a history of mistreatment and destructive Federal policies that have hurt tribal communities, including repudiated policies regarding the education of Indian children. The boarding school era and other historical failures have created a complicated and difficult legacy for Indian people and their relationship with the Federal Government. The United States must do better. The future of Indian Country rests on ensuring American Indian children receive a high-quality education that honors their cultures, their languages, and their identities as Indian people. To achieve this goal, the Department of the Interior will: (1) strengthen and support the efforts of tribal nations to directly operate Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) funded schools; (2) help tribes to identify, recruit, retain, and empower diverse, highly effective teachers and principals to maximize the highest achievement for every student in all BIE funded schools; (3) build a responsive organization that provides resources, direction, and services to tribes so they can help their students attain high levels of student achievement; (4) foster parental, community, and organizational partnerships to provide the emotional and social support BIE students need in order to be ready to learn; and (5) develop a budget that is aligned with and supports BIE's new institutional focus of providing resources and services to tribes.

The purpose of this Order is to begin the process of implementing those reforms by redesigning and restructuring the BIE into an innovative organization that will improve operations for both tribally-controlled and BIE-operated schools. The redesign and restructuring of the BIE will occur in two phases to ensure an orderly and minimally disruptive transition and will emphasize: (I) improving responsiveness of BIE operational support to schools; and (2) improving performance of individual schools. Sec. 2 Background. In the area of Indian education, tribal self-determination has become the dominant mechanism for providing education to Indian children. In education, as in other areas of Federal Indian services, Congress and the Administration have recognized that Indian education is most successful when Indian tribes manage their schools. Today, far more BIE schools are run by tribes than by the BIE. However, given the long historical challenges faced by Indian students, it will take time and resources to achieve significant improvement. The Department has comprehensively reviewed the operations of BIE to achieve improvements in Indian education, as described in Findings & Recommendations Prepared by the Indian Education Study Group. The review revealed that significant organizational changes are necessary to provide tribes the resources and support needed to directly operate high-performing schools, to remove institutional obstacles that hamper student achievement, and to enable principals to focus on instructional leadership. The review also highlighted the need to provide targeted and highly customized technical assistance that meets the unique instructional needs of each BIE-funded school, including instruction on the tribe's language, history, and culture. Sec. 3 Authority. This Order is issued in accordance with the authority provided by Section 2 of Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1950 (64 Stat. 1262) and 25 U.S.C. § 13 and § 2006.

Sec. 4 Organizational Changes - Phase I. Phase I will be a transitional phase expected to be operational before the start of School Year 2014-15. Phase I will utilize existing resources and Phase I will focus on improving BIE operational support to schools.

a.  Establishment of a School Operations Division. The School Operations Division shall be established and will report directly to the Director, BIE. The Division will focus on teacher and principal recruitment, acquisition and grants, school facilities, educational technology, and communications.

b.  Restructuring the ME. The BIE shall be restructured as follows:

i)   Realignment of the Associate Deputy Directors (ADDS). The three current BIE ADD positions will be realigned to the following responsibilities: ADD-Navajo, ADD-Grant Schools, and ADD-BIE-Operated Schools.

ii)  Establishment of Education Resource Centers and School Improvement Solutions Teams. The Education Line Offices (ELOs) shall be restructured and re-named Education Resource Centers, each to be staffed by a School Improvement Solutions Team. The teams will provide customized technical assistance to schools in such areas as: curriculum and instruction, data systems, intervention strategies, local job embedded professional development, and school leadership.

iii) Establishment of the Office of Sovereignty and Indian Education. There shall be established an Office of Sovereignty and Indian Education, reporting to the Director, BIE. The Office will focus on supporting tribal sovereignty by building the capacity of tribes to operate high performing schools and allowing tribes to shape what their children learn about their tribes, language, and culture. It will also support grant status for schools, provide support and guidance for effective use of incentive grants, and provide curriculum support for tribal culture, language, and traditions. Sec. 5 Organizational Changes - Phase II. Phase II completes the institutionalization of the redesign and restructuring of BIE, which is anticipated to occur by the end of the 2015-2016 school year. Phase II will focus on providing the resources and customized technical assistance to support tribes in establishing and operating high-performing schools of their own.

a.  Creation of School Support Solutions Teams. At the start of Phase II, School Support Solutions Teams will be created in the office of each of the three ADDs (ADD-Navajo, ADD-Grant Schools, ADD-BIE-Operated Schools). The Team members will be experienced professionals who can provide exceptional customized technical assistance to the schools in the areas of teacher and principal recruitment, professional development, and evaluation; acquisition; school facilities, financial management, and technology. The teams will work with individual schools and tribes to help maximize school performance.

b.  Realignment of Support of BIE-Operated Schools. At the start of Phase II, appropriate resources will be transferred from the Assistant Secretary-Indian Affairs (AS-IA) and the Bureau of Indian Affairs to the Director, BIE, for assignment to School Support Solutions Teams.

c.  Enhancing School Improvement Solutions Team Services. At the start of Phase II, School Improvement Solutions Teams will become responsible for expanding their capacity to support schools by developing local school improvement teams in each school to build and sustain a high quality education, including "cradle to the classroom" assistance with such services as parenting, early literacy, numeracy, vocabulary, local parent counseling, training, and mentoring (parents as trainers and mentors).

Sec. 6 Implementation.

a.  The AS-IA will perform a Phase I functional analysis for the new functions and develop a workforce plan to he submitted to the Secretary by August 31, 2014.

b.  The AS-IA will perform a Phase II functional analysis and develop a workforce plan, to be submitted to the Secretary before September 2014.

Sec. 7 Performance Monitoring and Evaluation. The AS-IA will ensure that progress is monitored toward the goal of American Indian children receiving a high-quality education that honors their culture, languages, and identities, as Indian people. Sec. 8 Administrative Provisions. The AS-IA and the Assistant Secretary - Policy, Management and Budget will take appropriate steps to implement the provisions of this Order.

Sec. 9 Effective Date. This Order is effective immediately and will remain in effect until its provisions are incorporated into the Department Manual, or until it is amended, suspended, or revoked, whichever occurs first.

Sally Jewell, Secretary of the Interior.

Northeast SD communities benefit from Bush Foundation grant

Sisseton, SD – The Northeast South Dakota Community Action Program doing business as GROW South Dakota has been awarded a Bush Foundation Community Innovation Grant for the implementation of Grow Housing, a technical assistance track to lunge rural communities forward in the community housing dialogue to the point of actively solving housing issues. The five communities committed to moving forward with Grow Housing are Ft. Pierre, Gettysburg, Sisseton, Britton, and Campbell County, South Dakota.

"GROW SD's expertise in housing and community development will engage residents and local organizations over the next two years to build up their capacity to ultimately create sustainable housing opportunities," stated Lori Moen, Chief Operating Officer and Grow Housing Project Director. "Grow Housing will allow GROW SD to collaborate with these five rural communities to breakdown their recent housing studies, create priorities, and carry out a plan of action to improve our rural housing stock."

Established in 2013, the Community Innovation Grant program is designed to inspire and support communities to use problem-solving processes that lead to more effective, equitable, and sustainable solutions. Projects receiving Community Innovation Grants can be at any stage in the problem-solving process, which includes: identifying the need, increasing collective understanding of the issue, generating ideas, and testing and implementing solutions.

"Community Innovation Grant recipients are tackling community problems in a way we believe most likely to result in real breakthrough solutions. They are engaging the community, collaborating with other organizations, and making the most of existing assets; in short, all of the things it takes to create a true community innovation," said Elli Haerter, Bush Foundation North Dakota and South Dakota activities manager.

The Bush Foundation will award nearly $5 million to 34 organizations in Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, and the 23 Native nations that share the same geography, through its Community Innovation Grant program. The full list of Community Innovation Grant recipients can be found at BushFoundation.org/2014CIGrants.

GROW South Dakota strives to reach rural communities to improve the quality of life through housing, community and economic development. Historically, these organizations have invested over $50 million in housing development and $54 million in economic development. For more information about GROW South Dakota's housing and business development programs and services please visit our website at www.growsd.org or call 605-698-7654.

"From the desk of Geri Opsal, Tribal Veteran Service Officer"

GeriO@SWO-NSN.gov

Phone 605-698-3388

*"Tough times never last, but tough people do." - Robert Schuller

*Spirit Lake Veterans Training: The SWO Veterans represented very well at the training. All 3 Commanders attended along with other Veterans from the Oyate. It was a 2 day training with the Office of Tribal Government Relations from Washington, DC Stephanie Birdswell's office that Obama created for Native American Veterans. There was a lot of great information and classes that we all attended and I can say that we all came away with more information to help our Veterans get better care. (See attached photos.) Spirit Lake Tribe hosted this wonderful event and I would like to thank them for their generosity.

*The U.S. military and veterans who served in Iraq, Kuwait and Afghanistan, lost a true friend and supporter Monday. Like the great Bob Hope, Robin Williams used his special brand of comedy to entertain troops stationed in 13 countries, while traveling on multiple USO tours. By all accounts, he was warm, engaging and accessible to every servicemember who met him. "Last year, the United States lost one member of its military every 18 hours to suicide. Veterans and their family members who feel that they may harm themselves should call the Veterans Crisis Hotline, 1-800-273-8255, press 1.

*PRESIDENT SIGNS CRITICAL VETERANS' LEGISLATION INTO LAW - the president signed H.R. 3230, the Veterans Access, Choice and Accountability Act of 2014 into law. The newly signed law will provide the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) with an additional $15 billion of emergency funding to ensure veterans who cannot be seen by a VA doctor will not be forced to wait months for care. It will also allow VA to begin building capacity and regain veterans' trust by hiring more physicians and building needed infrastructure and allowing the Secretary to fire top executives who don't have veterans' best interest at heart. The Veterans Access, Choice and Accountability Act of 2014 also includes critical provisions expanding traumatic brain injury care programs for veterans; improving education benefits for surviving spouses; critical funding for 27 new or expanded VA Community-based Outpatient Clinics; and a provision offering veterans in-state tuition at the public college or university of their choice within three years of leaving active duty. The new law comes in the wake of a nationwide scandal in which veterans and whistleblowers called attention to veterans languishing on appointment waiting lists at VA facilities.

*The Sioux Falls VA Health Care System and their partners will be hosting Veterans Stand Downs Aug. 22 in Sioux City, IA, Sept. 5 in Watertown, Sept. 11 in Wagner, and Sept. 19 in Sioux Falls. Call our office if you are interested in attending the Watertown event.

*TAPS: Condolences go out to Archie White, USN Korean War Era family who made his journey home on 8/10/2014.

*Veterans: For those of you that are in the Honor Guards please make sure that your copy of the DD214 is secured here at the TVSO office. At our last UVA meeting it was asked if they were all in per previous UVA Motion. We have a locked fireproof safe and it will be guarded with the utmost confidence.

*Thank you to those of you that stop in on a regular basis. Remember Veterans stop by our Office which is located in the Post Office building next to job service Office. The address is 205 East Oak Street Suite # 121. Our telephone is 698-3388.

*The best way for find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others. (Ghandi)

*WOMEN VETERANS CALL CENTER: 1-855-VA-WOMEN. Crisis Help Line: 1-800-273-8255, available 24/7, and tell them you are a veteran. All calls are confidential.

-WOMEN. Crisis Help Line: 1-800-273-8255, available 24/7, and tell them you are a veteran. All calls are confidential.

Have a good week.

Geri Opsal, Tribal VSO.

*Today's thought for the day: "True success is getting up in the morning and realizing you have a very good life." - Anna Quindlen

We must look for the opportunity in every difficulty instead of being paralyzed at the thought of the difficulty in every opportunity." -Walter E. Cole, Korean War Veteran.

Selected for 2014/15 Native American Artist-in-Residence Program

The Minnesota Historical Society is pleased to announce three recipients for the 2014/15 Native American Artist-in-Residence program. Each artist will serve a six-month paid residency to study the collections at MNHS and other institutions to aid in a better understanding of their respective art forms. They will also share this knowledge by developing community-based programming in their home communities.

Among the 2014/15 awardees is Gwen Westerman, Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate, is a textile artist who lives in Good Thunder, Minnesota. As a part of six generations of women in her family who have made quilts, she sees quilts as having not only a utilitarian function but also as containing stories.

Gwen Westerman has been expanding her textile arts with other traditional art forms to “find new ways to tell our stories.” Westerman plans on researching and revitalizing traditions of Dakota ribbonwork.

The 2014/15 Artists-in-Residence were selected based on the recommendations of a panel consisting of experts in the field of Native American arts and culture.

The panel members are Sasha Brown, Santee Dakota, who has worked in higher education with American Indian students and is involved in numerous environmental and social justice initiatives; Joe Horse Capture, A’aninin Tribe of Montana, former associate curator of Native American art at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts for 15 years and currently associate curator at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian; and Scott Shoemaker, Miami Nation, who leads efforts to make the ethnology and seed collections and the Science Museum of Minnesota more accessible to tribal communities.

The Native American Artist-in-Residence program is made possible in part by a grant from the Margaret A. Cargill Foundation.

The Minnesota Historical Society is a non-profit educational and cultural institution established in 1849. MNHS collects, preserves and tells the story of Minnesota’s past through museum exhibits, libraries and collections, historic sites, educational programs and book publishing. Using the power of history to transform lives, MNHS preserves our past, shares our state’s stories and connects people with history.

Dennis Isaac Seely wins 2014 Indian Chief Classic Motorcycle in Deadwood Casino

SWO Tribal member, Vietnam combat veteran Dennis Isaac Seely was winner in a drawing at the Silverado Franklin Casino in Downtown Deadwood, South Dakota, Saturday night, August 9, 2014.

The way Denny tells the story, “THE GREAT NATIVE AMERICAN SIOUX INDIAN” from SISSETON, SOUTH DAKOTA won this (Classic 2014 Indian Motorcycle)!

He said now he is the most famous Indian in Deadwood for the last one hundred years, “not since they lynched an Indian for (allegedly) horse stealing!”

In the drawing, he had to choose from among several “boxes.”

He selected number 17, as that was his old Police Badge number.

And it made him the winner.

Here he is pictured with some young and lovely ladies (Bonny was present watching over the scene) and a beautiful brand new Indian Chief Classic motorcycle.

Indigenous peoples review of US by UN C.E.R.D.

UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination meeting

Geneva, Switzerland – August 11, 2014 – Delegations representing Indigenous Nations and Peoples are in Geneva, Switzerland, this week to participate in the review of the United States (US) by the United Nations (UN) Committee on the Elimination on Racial Discrimination (CERD). The CERD is an 18 member UN Treaty body that monitors compliance with the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (ICERD). Compliance with the ICERD is legally binding for the 177 State Parties which have ratified it. The US ratified the ICERD in 1994. Its compliance with ICERD’s provisions will be reviewed on August 13 and 14 during the CERD 85th session, presided over by CERD President Francisco Cali Tzay, an Indigenous Mayan Kaqchikel from Guatemala.

The review will be based on the US government’s report submitted in June 2013 as well as Alternative or Shadow reports submitted by civil society and Indigenous Peoples which provide additional information and, in many cases, directly challenge the US’ own assessment of its compliance. After the review, CERD will publish Concluding Observations, including its recommendations for actions the US should take to fulfill its commitment under the ICERD to eliminate racial discrimination in its policies and practices.

Indigenous Peoples representatives are in Geneva to meet with CERD members and present their concerns addressing a number of vital issues. The International Indian Treaty Council (IITC) submitted six Alternative Reports for this process, co-submitted by over 50 Indigenous Nations, Peoples, organizations, societies, Treaty Councils and communities. These reports addressed core areas of discrimination and human rights violations faced by Indigenous Peoples as a result of US policies and practices including desecration of sacred areas; discrimination in the criminal justice system, including for Indigenous women and youth, and denial of religious freedom for Indigenous prisoners; Treaty violations; impacts of US past and current policies of removal of Indigenous children through boarding schools and foster care; impacts of uranium mining and other forms of environmental racism; and US failure to comply with international processes for decolonization in Alaska.

The IITC also submitted two Alterative reports which focused specifically on US failure to comply with key recommendations from its last CERD review in 2008. These called upon the US to use the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples “as guide to interpret the State party’s obligations under the Convention relating to indigenous peoples” and to “take appropriate legislative and administrative measures to prevent acts of transnational corporations registered in the [US] which negatively impact on the enjoyment of rights of Indigenous Peoples in territories outside the United States.” The IITC’s reports provided extensive documents and examples demonstrating the US lack of compliance with these recommendations.

Indigenous delegations currently in Geneva for the CERD review include the IITC, the Navajo Nation and Navajo Nation Human Rights Commission, Indigenous World Association, Chickaloon Native Village, Comanche Nation, National Indian Child Welfare Association, Laguna Acoma Coalition for a Safe Environment, Lipan Apache Women Defense and the Apache Alliance. Many organizations representing US civil society are also in attendance, including various members of the US Human Rights Network.

Lenny Foster, Dine Nation, is a member of IITC’s Board of Directors representing the National Native American Prisoners Rights Coalition and is also Program Supervisor of Navajo Nation Corrections Project. He is in Geneva attending the CERD review of the US to present the issue of discrimination against Indigenous prisoners including violations of their freedom of religious practice as well as the case of Leonard Peltier. “We thank the CERD members and CERD President Francisco Cali for their consideration of these and other very important matters which will be presented by Indigenous Peoples during the review of the US this week,” he stated. “We look forward to strong recommendations about how the US can take action to correct these injustices. This is an historic occasion to present the issues that affect our lives as we continue to strive for self-determination and express our support for the human rights of our brother Leonard Peltier as we seek executive clemency”.

The CERD members will hear directly from Indigenous Peoples and civil society delegations on Tuesday, August 12 and will question the US directly on August 13 and 14. Indigenous Peoples anticipate a strong response from CERD members to the issues they will present.

The CERD Concluding Observations addressing the US as well as Indigenous Peoples and other Alternative Reports are available online: http://www2.ohchr.org/english/bodies/cerd/. Visit www.treatycouncil.org for Alternative Reports co-submitted by IITC and background information about using the CERD to combat racial discrimination. For additional information regarding the events and activities in Geneva this week, contact Danika Littlechild, IITC Legal Counsel, danika@treatycouncil.org.

(Editor’s note: We are watching for outcome of the conference, for a rating of racial discrimination in the USA.)

Federal funds to help combat Veteran homelessness

Minot, ND – August 11, 2014 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today announced more than $900,000 in federal funds to the North Dakota Coalition of Homeless People headquartered in Bismarck to help assist low-income veterans and their families that are homeless or at imminent risk of becoming homeless.

These funds will be given to the North Dakota Coalition of Homeless People in Bismarck to offer veterans and their family members outreach, case management, assistance in obtaining VA benefits and assistance in receiving other public benefits. The Coalition can also offer temporary financial assistance on behalf of veterans for rent and utility payments, security deposits and moving costs.

“Our veterans willingly risk their lives so we may have the comfort of knowing our communities and families are safe,” said Heitkamp. “And by not making sure they find their own place to call home when they come back, we are failing to live up to our commitment to them. Our veterans have given so much to our country, and these funds will help us give a little back to them. I will continue to work in the Senate to make sure we do more to provide access to rural health care, a quality education, a support system and much more for our veterans.”

These funds are authorized by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and are awarded under the Supportive Services of Veteran Families program. The VA has committed to ending veteran homeless by 2015 and to helping the approximately 115,000 homeless veterans nationwide get the assistance they need to obtain permanent homes for themselves and their families.

Last week, Heitkamp unveiled her new legislation that would better connect new veterans with services, resources, and benefits that are available in their communities. Heitkamp’s bill, the Connect with Veterans Act, will create a database of contact information for newly-separated veterans that would allow them to connect to local resources. Throughout her discussions with veterans and work with the Senate Defense Communities Caucus, Heitkamp often heard from veterans about a desire to learn more about services and resources, and communities looking to help veterans. The Connect with Veterans Act is a direct result of that work.

Heitkamp also met with Jamestown-area veterans at the Knights of Columbus last week to discuss her new legislation as well as the bipartisan legislation the Senate just passed on August 1 to better support our veterans. The new bill works to restore trust in the VA and launches a nationwide Veterans Choice Card to improve access to care for rural veterans – an initiative Heitkamp has called for since before she joined the Senate.

Since joining the Senate, Heitkamp has fought to stand up for veterans in North Dakota and throughout the country. In July 2013, Heitkamp completed a statewide listening tour to discuss some of the most pressing issues facing veterans, holding meetings and discussions in Minot, Bismarck, Devils Lake, Grand Forks, and Fargo. Last month, Heitkamp hosted her first Native American Veterans Summit in Bismarck. She brought together about 140 Native veterans, officials from the VA and Indian Health Service (IHS), and other advocates to give veterans a chance to be heard. It was also an opportunity for Native veterans to learn more about ongoing initiatives to connect them with services and benefits. At the end of July, she launched a new one-stop-shop webpage for Native American veterans, aiming to more easily connect these veterans with information about benefits and services available to them.

SD Prairie Gateway helps promote your community!

The SD Prairie Gateway website is now even better and easier for your community to utilize for the promotion of available commercial property, jobs, news, events, and more!

Promoting our individual communities as a region is the premise behind SD Prairie Gateway. That is why we have added the ability for your community to submit items directly to our website. Last quarter, the Commercial Real Estate submission tool was made available to you and now three new modules are available for your convenience, including: News Manager; Events Calendar; and Available Jobs.

Public Submission Tools from SD Prairie Gateway: These tools can be easily accessed anytime on the SDPrairieGateway.org main page by using the menu tabs across the top of the page: Real Estate, Workforce, and News & Events. The submission will be approved by the web manager and then you listing will appear.

1. Submit a News Article

2. Submit an Event

3. Submit a Real Estate Listing

4. Submit a Job Listing

I encourage you to give this opportunity a try! It is one way we can support you in meeting your Workforce Development and Economic Development goals at no cost to you. Every quarter several hundred people view the SD Prairie Gateway website, which gives them one more opportunity to find out what your community has to offer!

Importance of ND Peace Officers, need for additional resources

Grand Forks, ND – August 14, 2014 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp, a member of the Senate Law Enforcement Caucus and North Dakota’s former Attorney General, today spoke with North Dakota’s Peace Officers at the North Dakota Peace Officers Association annual convention about the importance of the work they do keep our communities safe.

“Being here today in front of so many selfless public servants really brings back great memories of serving as Attorney General in North Dakota,” said Heitkamp. “One of the reasons I loved that job was being able to work with our state’s Peace Officers. North Dakota’s recent growth and prosperity has presented us with many opportunities, but it has also brought with it many challenges for the state’s various law enforcement officers. However, I know no matter how great the challenges may be, our North Dakota Peace Officers will rise to meet them, and I look forward to continuing my longstanding relationship with our state’s law enforcement as I continue working to make sure they have the resources needed to handle these new challenges.”

To build strong and safe communities across North Dakota, Heitkamp highlighted the need for additional personnel, resources, technology, and laws to allow Peace Officers to go after, arrest, and successfully prosecute criminals to combat the changing dynamics in the state. In June, Heitkamp brought Senator Tom Carper (D-DE) — Chairman of the Senate Committee on Homeland Security — to North Dakota to meet with Border Patrol agents, local sheriffs, tribal law enforcement, and other officials to hear firsthand about the security and law enforcement challenges facing North Dakota as the state’s population has boomed. In 2013, Heitkamp brought White House Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) Director R. Gil Kerlikowske to North Dakota to hear from federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement about the unique challenges North Dakota faces, especially in the oil patch. Following the ONDCP Director’s visit, Williams County was designated as a High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area by the federal government, making it eligible to receive more federal resources to help combat drug trafficking and abuse.

As Attorney General, Heitkamp worked closely with the state’s Peace Officers, and she has brought that first-hand experience with her to the Senate where she has continued to serve and advocate for these brave men and women. Since taking office, Heitkamp has continued to push to increase law enforcement resources for the Bakken region and the state as a whole. Heitkamp has worked to keep funding up for Community Oriented Policing Services, the Violence Against Women Act programs, and Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grants program (Byrne-JAG) grants, which are all federal programs that support local law enforcement efforts.

Federal Funding to support local law enforcement

U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today announced more than $520,000 in federal funding to support local law enforcement and governments working to improve the safety and well-being of their communities.

The funds will help local law enforcement better prevent and control crime based on their communities’ needs, including supporting state and local initiatives, training officers, and purchasing needed equipment and supplies. The funds will also help the state and local governments create substance abuse treatment programs in correctional and detention facilities, as well as maintain aftercare services for offenders.

“The population and economic growth North Dakota has seen recently is a great sign for our state’s future, but we need to make sure we’re securing the safety of our communities as we move forward,” said Heitkamp. “Since my time as North Dakota’s Attorney General, I have seen firsthand the challenges facing our state’s law enforcement and I know that with this growth, the challenges will continue. These funds are absolutely critical to providing local law enforcement and communities across North Dakota with the tools and resources they need to keep our families safe.”

The grants are distributed as follows:

· North Dakota Office of the Attorney General – $481,818, made available through the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant Program (JAG).

· North Dakota Office of the Attorney General – $42,244, made available through the Residential Substance Abuse Treatment (RSAT) for State Prisoners Program.

JAG and RSAT funds are both authorized through the U.S. Department of Justice.

Since serving as North Dakota’s Attorney General, Heitkamp has played a leading role in supporting and protecting North Dakota communities. In November 2013, Heitkamp announced that the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) named Williams County in western North Dakota a High-Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA), making it eligible for federal funds. That announcement came after Heitkamp brought then-ONDCP Director R. Gil Kerlikowske to North Dakota to hear from federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement and other officials about the major increase in drug crimes occurring in the oil patch and spreading to other areas of the state. In June, Heitkamp brought Sen. Tom Carper (D-DE) — Chairman of the Senate Committee on Homeland Security — to North Dakota to meet with Border Patrol agents, local sheriffs, tribal law enforcement and other officials and hear firsthand about the security and law enforcement challenges facing North Dakota as the state’s population has boomed.

Last week, Heitkamp announced more than $145,000 in federal JAG funding to support law enforcement efforts throughout North Dakota.

Funding to support Law Enforcement on Standing Rock, Turtle Mountain, MHA Nation Indian Reservations

Bismarck, ND – August 11, 2014 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today announced more than $50,000 in federal funds to support local law enforcement on the Standing Rock, Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa, and Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Indian Reservations.

The tribes will be able to use these funds to prevent and control crime in ways to meet the needs and conditions of the community. Some examples include using the funds to support local initiatives, provide technical assistance, train officers, and purchase needed equipment.

“Since I was Attorney General, improving the lives of Native families has been one of my top priorities,” said Heitkamp. “I’ve been working on everything from making sure the children have access to a quality education to finding ways to make housing affordable and safe. Supporting local law enforcement and making sure it has resources, training, and the personnel needed to protect Native families, like these funds will do, is another important piece to that puzzle. While these funds will help, there is still plenty to be done to make sure our Native communities are safe. I will continue to do my part to hold up our trust and treaty obligation and moral responsibility to our Native brothers and sisters.”

The grants are distributed as follows:

Standing Rock Sioux Tribe –$18,920

Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara - $17,006

Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa –$14,719

These funds are part of the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grants program (Byrne-JAG) and are authorized through the U.S. Department of Justice.

Commissions approve route for Big Stone South to Ellendale transmission line

Bismarck, N.D. – August 13, 2014 – The South Dakota Public Utilities Commission today unanimously approved a Facility Permit advancing the development of the Big Stone South to Ellendale (BSSE) transmission line. Project owners anticipate the final written order for the South Dakota segment of the line later in August. The North Dakota Public Service Commission issued its approval and final order on July 10, 2014, for the North Dakota portion of the line.

“The BSSE transmission line will connect to other similar transmission lines within the Midcontinent Independent System Operator (MISO) network,” said Henry Ford, Director of Electric Transmission Development at Montana-Dakota Utilities Co. and project manager for the BSSE line. “Together these projects will improve reliability for South Dakota, North Dakota, and the regional power system.” The BSSE project also will enable renewable energy to be integrated into the system and boost regional economies by creating jobs and supporting local businesses.

The approximately 160-mile 345-kv transmission line will connect a new Big Stone South substation planned about three miles west of Big Stone City in Grant County, South Dakota, and a new Ellendale substation proposed about 1.5 miles west of Ellendale in Dickey County, North Dakota.

Project owners Montana-Dakota Utilities Co. and Otter Tail Power Company expect a three-year construction period beginning in 2016. The project will cost approximately $293 million to $370 million. Maps of the route are available on the project web site at www.bssetransmissionline.com/maps/.

Montana-Dakota Utilities Co. distributes natural gas, generates, transmits and distributes electricity and provides related services in the northern Great Plains. The company serves approximately 137,000 electric customers and 258,000 natural gas customers in 262 communities in North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana and Wyoming. Montana-Dakota is a division of MDU Resources Group, Inc. For more information about Montana-Dakota visit www.montana-dakota.com. For more information about MDU Resources Group visit www.mdu.com.

Otter Tail Power Compny provides electricity and energy services to about 130,000 customers in 422 communities in North Dakota, South Dakota, and Minnesota. Otter Tail Power Company is a subsidiary of Otter Tail Corporation. For more information about Otter Tail Power Company visit www.otpco.com. For more information about Otter Tail Corporation visit www.ottertail.com.

Nearly $5 million to 34 organizations focused on community innovation, arts

 (Saint Paul, MN – Aug. 12, 2014) – The Bush Foundation, through its Community Innovation Grant program, will award nearly $5 million to 34 organizations pursuing breakthrough solutions to community problems – from poverty to human trafficking to economic development.

The Foundation selected these nine organizations working across South Dakota and the Native nations that share the same geography to receive 2014 Community Innovation Grants:

· Dakotafire Media, sponsored by GROW South Dakota – Sisseton – $200,000

· Eureka Community Development Company – Eureka – $43,600

· Native American Community Board – Lake Andes – $37,249

· Northeast South Dakota Community Action Program – Sisseton – $200,000

· Oceti Sakow Power Project sponsored by Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors – Washington, D.C. – $200,000

· Oglala Sioux (Lakota) Housing – Pine Ridge – $170,247

· Rapid City Public School Foundation – Rapid City – $177,960

· South Dakota Native Homeownership Coalition, sponsored by Lakota Fund – Kyle – $25,000

· Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation – Porcupine – $200,000

“Community Innovation Grant recipients are tackling community problems in a way we believe most likely to result in real breakthrough solutions. They are engaging the community, collaborating with other organizations, and making the most of existing assets; in short, all of the things it takes to create a true community innovation,” said Elli Haerter, Bush Foundation North Dakota and South Dakota activities manager.

Established in 2013, the Community Innovation Grant program is designed to inspire and support communities to use problem-solving processes that lead to more effective, equitable, and sustainable solutions. Projects receiving Community Innovation Grants can be at any stage in the problem-solving process, which includes: identifying the need, increasing collective understanding of the issue, generating ideas, and testing and implementing solutions.

Gipp appointed to Cobell panel

Bismarck, ND – UTN – David M. Gipp has been appointed by the American Indian College Fund to serve as the Fund’s representative on the Cobell Board of Trustees.

Gipp is the former president of United Tribes Technical College and currently serves as the college’s chancellor, focusing on outreach, partnerships and development.

“Dr. Gipp is very knowledgeable about education, tribal and federal relations, and is a skilled coalition builder,” said Cheryl Crazy Bull, president and CEO of the Fund.

Crazy Bull made the announcement of Gipp’s appointment in July, saying that Gipp is “very familiar with the Cobell case and settlement.”

Gipp is the founding executive director of the American Indian Higher Education Consortium. He is an emeritus trustee of the College Fund Board, and served on a committee that helped establish the Fund’s involvement in making scholarships with a portion of the Cobell settlement.

The $3.4 billion settlement in 2010 was named for Blackfeet Tribal citizen Elouise Cobell. It resolved historic claims of government mismanagement of royalties on Indian lands. Approximately $60 million was earmarked for educational scholarships for American Indian students.

The College Fund, based in Denver, CO, is the principal administrator and will distribute 80 percent of the program’s funds. The remainder will go through the American Indian Graduate Center of Albuquerque, NM.

The five member Cobell Trustee board, to which Gipp has been appointed, must set the criteria for eligibility and distribution to potential scholarship recipients. The funds are to be awarded over a 10 year period.

“I believe I can contribute to the development of a program that will make these resources available to the largest numbers of potential recipients,” said Gipp. “I appreciate the opportunity to be involved on behalf of the College Fund. The Fund has great competency and accountability for administering a program like this to the TCU's and scholarship recipients.”

Established in 1989, the College Fund is the nation's largest and highest-rated American Indian scholarship organization. The organization provides Native student scholarships and programmatic support for the nation's 34 accredited tribal colleges and universities.

Editorials –

Sota guest editorial –

Fallout from Canadian Mining Disaster continues as First Nation delivers eviction notice

Mount Polley disaster ripples through British Columbia, with blockades and layoffs

ByDeirdre Fulton, staff writer

(Published on Friday, August 15, 2014 by Common Dreams.)

The Neskonlith Indian Band on Thursday served an eviction notice to Imperial Metals, the company responsible for the massive tailings pond breach at Mount Polley Mine in British Columbia, which is seeking to site a separate lead and zinc mine near the headwaters of the Adams River — within Neskonlith territory and home to an important sockeye salmon run. Known as the Ruddock Creek Mine, the contested project is still in the development phase and has yet to go through the environmental assessment process.

"As...the caretakers of our land and waters, Neskonlith, part of the Lake Secwepemc People, have an obligation to protect our land for our future generations,” according to a statement issued by the First Nation band. “Neskonlith Indian Band cannot permit any mining development especially in these Sacred Headwaters that will contaminate the water or destroy our salmon habitat.”

In an interview with the Canadian Press, Neskonlith Chief Judy Wilson said the Mount Polley spill shows the company cannot be trusted to build and operate a mine while also protecting the surrounding environment. "The industry has proven at Mount Polley that they can't regulate all of that," she said.

Last week, a group calling themselves the Klabona Keepers blocked access to workers at the pending Red Chris Mine, also developed and operated by Imperial Metals and scheduled to open later this year.

In the Neskonlith statement, Wilson says that if Imperial Metals does not comply with their eviction notice, they will also block access to the Ruddock Creek Mine.

Imperial Metals, whose shares have fallen almost 40 percent since the Mount Polley disaster in early August, has said that there shouldn't be a concern about a similar tailings pond breach at Ruddock, as the tailings would be stored in a different way than the Mount Polley mine.

A union representative this week told CBC News that 42 workers have received layoff notices in the wake of the spill.

Sota guest editorial –

Rail CEOs to Investors: 'Bomb Trains' safe at almost any speed

By Justin Mikulka, Steve Horn

(Published on Thursday, August 14, 2014 byDeSmogBlog.)

Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) recently said it would proceed with plans to increase speeds for oil-by-rail unit trains in Devil’s Lake, N.D. to 60 MPH from 30 MPH, despite opposition from local officials.

BNSF’s announcement came merely a week after the Obama Administration announced its proposed regulations for trains carrying oil obtained via hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”) from North Dakota's Bakken Shale basin.

The rail industry’s position on speed limits for “bomb trains” is simple: they continuously claim velocity has nothing to do with oil-by-rail accidents or safety.

For example, Big Rail — as revealed by DeSmogBlog — lobbied against all proposed oil train speed reductions in its dozen or so private meetings at the Obama White House before the unveiling of the proposed oil-by-rail regulations.

Recent statements by rail industry CEOs during investor calls put the heads of many companies on record opposing oil-by-rail speed limits for the first time.

Time is Money

The position of the rail companies regarding speed and safety on their recent quarterly investor calls was consistent, coming just before the release of the new oil-by-rail regulations.

“I don’t know of any incidents with crude that’s being caused by speed. We keep slowing down in this North American network over the years. We don’t get better with speed. We get worse,” E. Hunter Harrison, CEO of Canadian Pacific, stated during the company’s investor call.

“Now you can’t get growing the country for example, growing the economy, growing the population, and continue to move stuff on rail, cutting the speed back, but don’t want to add any infrastructure. That doesn’t work. That’s a timetable to disaster.”

Charles “Wick” Moorman, CEO of Norfolk Southern and also on Chevron’s Board of Directors, sang a similar tune in response to a query about excessive train speeds potentially causing crude-by-rail accidents.

The question about whether that was the case came from analyst Jason Seidl of Cowen and Company.

“None to my knowledge,” Moorman stated bluntly.

Moorman also argued on the call for a much higher speed limit.

“We’ve had a lot of discussion with the regulators and I believe that we’ll be able to make our case that a minimum speed in the 40 to 45 mile an hour range is…safe,” Moorman continued. “[A]ny significant speed restriction would be in fact disruptive to the point of almost shutting down the North American rail network.”

CSX Corporation — whose oil-by-rail train exploded in Lynchburg, Va. in April — stood in solidarity with its rail industry colleagues on its recent investor call.

“We think [30 MPH speed limits] would…severely limit our ability to provide reliable freight service to our customers,” Michael Ward, chairman, president and CEO of CSX, stated on the company’s call.

“I would hope as we look at this with the federal government, we can show them the modeling of how disastrous that could be to the entire fluidity of the U.S. rail system as well as the adverse impact that will have as trucks deliver on to the highway system. So our view is that it would be very bad, but our view is also that cooler heads will prevail when they see the facts behind it.”

Unmentioned by Ward: CSX’s oil train that exploded in Lynchburg and spilled into the James River was rolling along at 24 MPH, below the 30 MPH limit he advocated against on the call.

Spokespeople from CSX, Canadian Pacific and Norfolk Southern did not respond to repeated requests for comment from DeSmogBlog.

“Will Cooler Heads Prevail”?

Ward is not the only insider who thinks “cooler heads will prevail” on the issue of oil-by-rail speed limits going forward.

Cowen and Company’s Jason Seidl — also a contributing editor at Railway Age — recently hosted a conference call on the new proposed oil-by-rail regulations. The highlights of that call showed up in an August 7 Railway Age editorial titled, “Will Cooler Heads Prevail?”

“We believe that the final draft of the [Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on High-Hazard Flammable Trains and DOT 111 tank cars] could be more friendly to shippers than the first proposal,” Seidl said in that call, according to Railway Age.

“Dwell Time”

In addition to expectations that the new final regulations will be watered down to make them industry friendly, Seidl introduced the term “dwell time” as the proposed new focus for the rail industry regarding oil train speeds near populated areas.

“The consensus opinion seemed to be that enforcing broad speed restrictions may not be the right approach,” Seidl also stated on the call.

“The panelists indicated that emphasis should be placed on reducing the total time that High Hazard Flammable Trains (HHFTs) spend in populated areas, and slower trains do just the opposite. Additionally, reduced train speeds would require more cars and detrimentally impact the supply chain, potentially resulting in higher dwell times in populated areas.”

Paraphrased then, speed is not the issue for Big Rail, but the time it takes for the oil train to pass through a community.

“Unsafe at Any Speed”?

However, as previously reported on DeSmogBlog, even rail industry insiders admit speed limits are a major factor for improving rail safety.

Gregory Saxton, chief engineer for rail tank manufacturer Greenbriar, made this clear at a National Transportation Safety Board conference on oil-by-rail safety in April.

“Kinetic energy is related to thesquare of velocity. So if you double the speed, you have four times as much energy to deal with,” argued Saxton. “Speed is a big deal.”

But the CSX oil train explosion in Lynchburg, which involved “safer” CPC-1232 rail cars going only 24 MPH, begs the question asked by Ralph Nader about the auto industry decades ago: is oil-by-rail “unsafe at any speed”?

Brief editorial comments from the editor’s desk –

On and Off the Lake Traverse Reservation

Please read Crystal Owen’s front page article, reprinted this week, inviting interested community members to “Grassroots Solutions for a Better Community.”

This open meeting will take place this Wednesday, August 20th beginning at 10:00 a.m. at TiWakan Tio Tipi in the Council chambers.

We are hoping for a good turnout. Large enough maybe we’ll have to move into the rotunda (although the acoustics are better in Council chambers).

*****

We are so glad to see 7GOV doing so much for our Oyate youth.

Pidamiya all who support our youth and youth council.

*****

Please cooperate with the Tribe’s Census Takers, who are out in all seven District through the end of August.

Accurate information helps the Tribe’s planning and access to resources.

For more information contact Ella Robertson at 698-8215 or 698-3911 ext. 6630.

*****

We are watching to see what comes of last week’s meeting in Geneva of the UN Committee on the Elimination on Racial Discrimination (CERD).

Our mainstream media are pretty good at putting out reports of human rights violations of others across the world, here we hope to see our own country is rated on its treatment of our Indigenous peoples, our Oyate.

*****

We offer congratulations to Gwen Westerman, who has been selected as a 2014-15 artist-in-residence by the Bush Foundations.

Gwen is afforded this honor for her amazing Dakota traditional quilt making.

Please see the article elsewhere in this issue.

*****

Our congratulations to Denny Isaac Seely on winning the new Indian Chieftain motorcycle in Deadwood a week ago.

He’s promised us the chance to ride it.

I’d enjoy taking a spin on it, but it’s been a lot of years since I was riding bikes.

Don’t want to “spin out!”

*****

We’re pleased to publish a feature on a super band, the Bluedog Blues Band.

And we’d like our readers to know about the band’s ties to the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate.

Consider purchasing their music, and of course coming to any concerts you can when they play across the region.

We will have links, in this column and on our website to new videos of their live performances.

Our article will be published next week.

*****

Our 147th annual SWO Wacipi photo gallery is going online this week.

Check it out on our website:

http://www.earthskyweb.com/news.htm

*****

Please read our Legal notices section.

The Reservation Election Board has posted important information about the process for the primary and general elections.

You will also find information about how to make proposed amendment changes.

This week there is a link to election forms available online on the Tribe’s website:

http://www.swo-nsn.gov

Please note that for the first time, there will be automated balloting for the Tribe’s elections.

Watch for more information in coming weeks!

*****

Candidates:

Also note that the Sota is returning to a former policy of ONLY PUBLISHING PAID IN ADVANCE POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENTS.

This policy must be followed because of not being able to collect on outstanding invoices.

Because we do not accept credit cards, checks must be made at the time of ordering a political ad.

Our political ad rate is discounted at $2.50 per column inch in order to make it less painful on candidates’ pocketbooks.

Please specify size desired when ordering:

Examples –

2 columns x 5 inches, for 10 col. inches @ 2.50 = 25.00

3 columns x 11 inches [quarter page] 33 col. inches @ 2.50 = 82.50

6 columns x 11 inches [half page] 66 col. inches @ 2.50 = 165

6 columns x 22 inches [full page] 132 col. inches @ 2.50 = 330

Submit payment to the Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279

Copy may be submitted electronically to earthskyweb@cs.com

We urge you to plan accordingly so that you are not telephoning or messaging at the last minute to have an ad placed without pre-payment.

Pidamiya!

*****

Elder's Meditation:

"There are many people who could claim and learn from their Indian ancestry, but because of the fear their parents and grandparents knew, because of past and present prejudice against Indian people, that part of their heritage is clouded or denied." -- Joseph Bruchac, ABENAKI

There were many injustices done to Native people. Sometimes I wonder; why am I connected to the past injustices done to Indian people? Why am I so angry about the past? The Elders say our ancestors are alive within each of us. Therefore, I may experience anger and resentment inside of me because of the injustice done to them. The way I get rid of these past feelings is to forgive. It may be necessary to even learn to forgive the unforgivable. Great Spirit, teach me the path of forgiveness; teach me the courage to forgive; teach me to let go. Give to me a forgiving heart.

*****

Words to consider (or, perhaps not!):

I feel like a fugitive from the law of averages. William H. Mauldin (1921 - 2003)

Humor is our way of defending ourselves from life's absurdities by thinking absurdly about them. Lewis Mumford (1895 - 1990)

They say such nice things about people at their funerals that it makes me sad to realize that I'm going to miss mine by just a few days. Garrison Keillor (1942 - )

Humanity has advanced, when it has advanced, not because it has been sober, responsible, and cautious, but because it has been playful, rebellious, and immature. Tom Robbins (1936 - )

The place where optimism most flourishes is the lunatic asylum. Havelock Ellis (1859 - 1939)

When we got into office, the thing that surprised me the most was that things were as bad as we'd been saying they were. John F. Kennedy (1917 - 1963)

All the President is, is a glorified public relations man who spends his time flattering, kissing and kicking people to get them to do what they are supposed to do anyway. Harry S Truman (1884 - 1972), Letter to his sister, Nov. 14, 1947

The universal brotherhood of man is our most precious possession, what there is of it. Mark Twain (1835 - 1910), Following the Equator

If there were in the world today any large number of people who desired their own happiness more than they desired the unhappiness of others, we could have paradise in a few years. Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

*****

The Sota is always looking for news of the Oyate.

If you have information and/or photos of newsworthy happenings in your family or community, please consider sharing with your Sota staff.

For submission deadlines and other information, see below:

Except for holidays copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – is to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/open letters to the Oyate, or “opinion” letters, which must be received by 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author’s name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel and must be brief, ideally 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor’s explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Earlier receipt of copy is always appreciated. So, if you are aware of a date or message that needs to be publicized or advertised, please let us know about it in advance of the weekly deadline.

The preferred way to submit typed articles and ads, art and photos, is by e-mail.

The editor can be reached at the following e-mail address:

earthskyweb@cs.com

For more information, leave a message on the Sota production office voicemail (605) 938-4452, or send a fax to the 24-hour dedicated line (605) 938-4676.

-- CDF

Obituaries –

Funeral services for Archie White

Archie Melvin White, (Wakinyan Waste Daka) “ One who likes the Thunder” age 79, of Keshena, Wisconsin was born on January 13, 1935 and entered the spirit world on August 11, 2014.

Archie was born to Donald Gill and Mary White, and grew up in the Enemy Swim area.

He married Gloria White on the January 13, 1973. He helped raise his two stepchildren: Antoinette Babe White of Montana and Elroy Walter White Jr. of New Effington, South Dakota. He and Gloria raised Arlene Chipper White-Argo. He married Diana Hesse on June 26, 2000 in Wheaton, Minnesota.

He has four step-children: Jeannine, Jamie, Gregory Jr. and Forrest Gauthier of Wisconsin.

He and Diana lived primarily in Keshena, Wisconsin, on the Menominee reservation in northern Wisconsin.

He was adopted by the Cordelia Beauprey family and Kaquatosh family. He has two Hunka daughters: Kathy Waukau of Neopit, Wisconsin and Jeannie Bad Moccasin (deceased).

His pastime included tanning hides, fishing, woodworking, playing cards, telling story's, and beading. He also loved singing prayer songs, picking traditional herbs, and taking car rides.

He followed the traditional Dakota ways and was a Sundancer of The Wambdi Hdeska (Spotted Eagle) Oyate.

He helped bring the Eagle Sundance back to people.

He is survived by three sisters: Amy Crawford of Agency Village, Delphine Wanna of Sisseton, and Donna Sitake of Mesa, Arizona; numerous nieces, nephews, grandchildren and great grandchildren; adopted sisters Cordelia & Marcene Beauprey.

He is preceded in death by his parents, his brothers Cyrus White, Francis, Fred, Gilbert, Donald Jr. and Gaylord Gill, and by three sisters: Marcella Gill, Barbara Mendoza, Janice Gill and adopted brother Quentin Beauprey.

Traditional Dakota funeral services were held at Buffalo Lake Sundance Grounds.

Graveside services were held on Friday afternoon, August 15th, 2014 at St. James Cemetery in Waubay, South Dakota. Wambdi Hete ska Oyate officiated.

Special music by Tim White, family drum and Bryan.

All night wakes were held on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at the Community Center, Agency Village.

Honorary Casket Bearers: Larry Kitchen, Myron Williams, Russell Smith, Jim Madison, Emery White, Clement White,

Dennis Gill Sr., Ron DuMarce, Duane “Doc” Wanna.

Casket Bearers: Jeff Wanna, Johnathan Gill, Darin Gill, Elias Mendoza, Timothy “Mato” Bourdon, Russell Thompson, Robert Gill, Brian Crawford Akipa, Galen DeMarris

The Chilson Funeral Home in Winsted, Minnesota served the family. Online condolences may be made to www.chilsonfuneralhome.com/.

Wambdi Hde ska odowan

Tunkansina ke heya a uye

Tunkansina ke heya a uye

O mahpiya kin Hoksina wan ye

He ya ya a uye

'The grandfathers, many they are coming, they are saying this, the young eagles they are saying this blanketing the sky'

Services Monday for Tamara Shepherd

Funeral services for Tamara Lee Shepherd, 46, of Sisseton, SD scheduled this Monday afternoon, August 18th, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. at the Enemy Swim Cultural Center, Enemy Swim, SD.

Officiating is Rev. George Parmeter, Clyde Kampeska, John Cloud III, Mike Lafontaine, Val Rondell, Levi Keoke, and Frank Barse.

Pallbearers will be Tom DeCoteau, Dave Drum, Levi Williams, Marcelle Dumarce, Kipp Renville, Anjelo Shepherd, Tyler Shepherd and Corwin Bluedog.

Honorary Pallbearers will be Tami's Family and Friends.

Interment will be in the St. James Episcopal Cemetery, Enemy Swim, SD.

Wake services were held Friday evening and all night Saturday and Sunday at the Enemy Swim Cultural Center.

The Cahill Funeral Chapel, Sisseton, SD is in charge of arrangements.

Tamara was born on September 16, 1967 at Sisseton, South Dakota to Raymond Shepherd and Marva Redthunder.

Tami grew up and lived in the Enemy Swim, Lake Traverse and Old Agency area.

She attended Waubay Elementary and Browns Valley High School.

Tami enjoyed visiting with family, friends and cruising.

She always enjoyed spending time with her grandchildren, Charley, Cody, Carmelle, Janae, Jayana, Joely, Destiny, Jayson and Darren Jr.

Tami worked various jobs, Tekakwitha Living Center, Browns Valley Nursing Center and Dakota Magic.

She was a very caring lady and helped when she could.

Tami died on August 13, 2014 at Sanford Hospital in Fargo, North Dakota.

Tamara is survived by four children, Charles Shepherd of Agency Village, Nathan Shepherd of Enemy Swim, Derrick Shepherd of Sisseton, and Darren Shepherd of Lake Traverse; four brothers, Leonard Shepherd of Agency Village, Raymond Shepherd III of Enemy Swim, Daniel Shepherd of Fargo, ND, and Brandon Shepherd of Sisseton; three sisters, Charlotte Shepherd of Browns Valley, MN, Raylyn Shepherd of Rosholt, and Katelyn Shepherd of Rosholt; and nine grandchildren.

Tamara was preceded in death by her parents; one son Jason Shepherd; one daughter Jessica Shepherd; one sister Claudette Keeble; three brothers Joshua Shepherd, Andrew Shepherd and Adrian Keeble; paternal grandparents Raymond Shepherd Sr. and Eva Hayes Shepherd and maternal grandparents Marvin Philbrick and Joyce Spider.

For Tamara's obituary and on-line registry please visit www.cahillfuneralchapel.com/.

Buffalo Field Campaign mourns loss of Rosalie Little Thunder

 (September 19, 1949-August 9, 2014)

The Buffalo Field Campaign family is mourning the passing of Rosalie Little Thunder, our co-founder, leader, and a strong source of inspiration to all who had the honor of knowing her. She passed away on Saturday, August 9. Since hearing the news I’ve been having a hard time finding words to express who she was, the impact she made with her life, and how much she gave for the buffalo and all beings.

Seeing the Montana buffalo slaughter firsthand in 1997 inspired her to found Buffalo Nations, the organization that would become Buffalo Field Campaign. In her words:

Since I witnessed the 1996-97 slaughter, I have continued to be involved in the ongoing effort to stop the slaughter. Mike Mease and I collaborated and founded Buffalo Nations, whose mission was simply to protect the Yellowstone buffalo herd. Two strategies evolved and therefore, two projects also evolved. The immediate threats to the herd, demanding immediate action, was undertaken by Buffalo Field Campaign. The second strategy was to coordinate cultural approaches and seek tribal involvement. Buffalo Nations continued to function by its Lakota name, Tatanka Oyate.

In the winter of 1999 Rosalie led 40 Lakota men and women and 60 others from different tribes on a 507-mile walk from the Black Hills of South Dakota to Yellowstone’s Roosevelt Arch, at Gardiner, MT. She carried the Sacred White Buffalo Calf Pipe Bundle of her people. The walk was, in her words, an act of spiritual activism for the buffalo. In her view, activism is an integral part of community and community is essential to survival:

Remind yourself every morning, every morning, every morning: ‘I’m going to do something. I’ve made a commitment.’ Not for yourself, but beyond yourself. You belong to the collective. Don’t go wandering off or you will perish.

While we knew her as a visionary activist, artist, and organizer who dedicated a great part of her life to protecting wild buffalo, Rosalie was so much more. She was a counselor, a professor, a guardian of the Lakota language and culture, and a well-respected elder who fought tirelessly for the rights of Native (and all) people. As a mother and grandmother she was devoted to her extended family and their well-being.

Rosalie was a member of the Sicangu Lakota Oyate; Burnt Thigh Band, of the Little Thunder Tiospaye and the Rosebud Sioux Tribe. She lived in the Black Hills Treaty Territory in Rapid City, South Dakota.

Rosalie remained active in the struggle to protect the buffalo until the very end of her life. In April Rosalie and BFC habitat coordinator Darrell Geist co-wrote “The Bloody Politics of Bison Slaughter: An Open Letter to Tribal Leaders and the American People,” calling on tribes and tribal organizations to stop participating in the wild buffalo slaughter and calling attention to the corrupt bison management policies of Montana and the federal government:

Traditional people must guide our tribal leadership in a manner that reflects the integrity of our historical and cultural relationship with our relative, the buffalo. Montana politics has made a mockery of a keystone species.

A close friend of Rosalie’s, Jacie Estes, wrote on her blog about the belief that after you pass you meet a grandmother who asks whether you have helped the people, fed the hungry, and been kind to all. “Knowing Rosalie,” she wrote, “she has been having good conversations with her but we know her answer to all questions is yes.”

A memorial fund has been set up in her honor. Please contribute if you can by sending a check to:

Rosalie Little Thunder Memorial Fund

PO Box 1894

Rapid City, SD 57709

Wakes were held last Thursday and Friday, and the burial was scheduled to take place on Sunday, August 17.

In Memory of Rosalie,

Daniel Brister Director Buffalo Field Campaign.

Notice of editorial policy

(Editor’s note: The following comes from the editor’s column and the Sota “deadlines and policies” statement published weekly in the Sota.)

Copy to be considered for publication – news, advertising, editorial opinion letters, etc. – are to be submitted to: Sota, P.O. Box 5, Wilmot, SD 57279 by 10:00 a.m. on Thursday. FAX and e-mail submissions will be accepted until 12:00 noon on Friday (with the exception of letters to the editor/Open letter to the Oyate, or “opinion” letters, which must be received no later than 10:00 a.m. Thursday).

If you are writing an opinion letter, please note that it must be signed and the author’s name will appear in print. Letters must not contain libel or offensive language and must be brief, 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for content. Omissions will be identified with periods . . . editor’s explanations will be provided in [brackets]. Readers who want access to unedited versions will need to contact the authors.

Open letter to the Oyate

Members of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate:

I write to inform you and clear up a situation that seems to be directed toward the Office of the Tribal Secretary mainly me as the Tribal Secretary and would like to state my side of the story.

Recently it came to my attention that the Enemy Swim District went on motion for me to issue an apology to two individuals in their district because they were accused of stealing a food coupon.

First of all, neither I nor any employees of the Tribal Secretary's office has/had accused anyone of them of stealing any type of card. When the Enemy Swim councilperson brought the issue up in council she stated "an elder had been accused.” I informed her that I had no knowledge of an elder being accused of stealing, I did know that an individual "Crystal Owen" was being investigated.

I went on to inform the Enemy Swim Councilperson that "this was NOT my investigation." The investigation in question was being brought forward by their District Chairman who had called my assistant and let her know that a card had been stolen from the district center and requested assistance in obtaining the card number to provide to the Tribal Police for him to get the investigation done.

My assistant upon request by Mr. Gill provided the Tribal police with the card number as requested. I had written a letter to the Enemy Swim District letting them know that it was a district matter and that is was up to them on how to pursue it.

The only involvement my office had was providing the card number as requested by Enemy Swim Chairman. I personally let Ms. Crystal Owen know that I had nothing to do with the investigation and that the investigation was between her and her own district along with the Tribal Police who is assisting them in the investigation.

In closing, I cannot apologize for something I did not do. The investigation in question was not my doing, and I cannot tell a district on how to perform/handle an incident that happened at district level which is not under or within the authority of the Tribal Secretary's Office.

I am not the type of person who would accuse someone of something like this without having proof before me and it being within my authority to do so.

I had spoken with some of the Enemy Swim district members in regards to their motion and was informed that they themselves weren't informed/told that it was a card that was taken from their own district or that the district itself was doing the investigation.

I also sent a letter to the Enemy Swim District trying to explain what I just written above. If anyone want to see the letter I sent, I will gladly give you a copy.

Sincerely, Robin Quinn, SWO Tribal Secretary.

Open letter to the Oyate

Concerns of a United States Military Veteran:

I would like to comment on an "open letter" to the editor that was published August 6th and authored by a disgruntled and confused tribal member. First, I openly and publicly say it is unfortunate a Vietnam Veteran sustained an injury due to slipping on ice and hope he is getting the medical attention he needs. If the evidence shows the Tribe is in fact at fault for the cause of the fall then the Tribe's Insurance needs to cover the Veteran's claim. I am in favor of a thorough investigation for both the Veteran and Tribe.

With that said, the title and status of being a Veteran is viewed patriotic by a majority of the nation. Serving this country honorably and protecting our freedom and rights as American citizens', peace time and or war, is the most honorable duty any citizen can fulfill. I honor and respect all Veterans regardless of combat or non-combat status; every job in the United States military serves a viable and important purpose. Are there some duties that are more dangerous than others? Yes there are, but that does not take away from anyone's honorable and patriotic service to this country or the injuries they incurred as a result of military service, peace time and or war.

The comments made at the end of the August 6th letter are a slap in the face to the thousands of Veterans, including myself, that have received the Military Order of the Purple Heart for enemy generated concussion injuries that resulted in real traumatic brain injuries. It is unfortunate the author of the open letter did not take into consideration the thousands of World War II Veterans that were awarded the Purple Heart for concussion injuries or the thousands of Gulf War Veterans that have also been awarded for concussion injuries.

The following statement is taken from two credible organizations, The Military Order of the Purple Heart Organization and Recognize the Sacrifice Organization, (both organizations can also be found on the internet,) Criteria-Section B, subsection (c), "The Purple Heart is clearly an individual decoration, the Purple Heart differs from all other decorations in that an individual is not "recommended" for the decoration; rather he or she is entitled to it upon meeting specific criteria." Apparently the author of the August 6th letter does not understand the history of the Purple Heart award or the criteria that needs to be met in order to receive the award. It is also a slap in the face to the thousands that have died as a result of concussion injuries and to the thousands that suffer lifelong conditions. Sadly, Traumatic Brain Injuries, commonly known as TBI, affect cognitive disorders, memory loss, headaches, photophobia, and other conditions that never heal. These conditions lead to unwanted stress and intolerable pain and in thousands of cases resulted in suicide. When TBI's are coupled with Post Traumatic Stress Disorders the suicide rates are even higher. The author of August 6th open letter misconstrues who or what constitutes a greater combat injury and how it impacts a Veterans quality of life. Also, being awarded the Purple Heart is a humbling honor but it does not elevate a Veterans' status above and over other fellow Veterans that served in war zones and combat zones. From my personal experience, my roommate at Brooke Army Medical Center, (BAMC), Fort Sam Houston, was a burn victim and lost his ability to have children, two female soldiers in my Platoon at BAMC were amputees, one had lost both arms from the shoulders down, and one had no legs whatsoever, and there were hundreds of us that suffered other types of combat injuries including real traumatic brain injuries. I knew and seen soldiers that lost their lives because of TBI while stationed at Fort Carson, Colorado Springs, and Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio. There are other military bases and hundreds of cases whereupon soldiers, marines, airmen, and sailors have lost lives due to TBI. The soldiers and marines I served with and met at BAMC supported each other and never differentiated who was injured more seriously; we all served the same purpose, and hundreds of San Antonio WWII, Korea, and Vietnam Veterans supported all of us 100%. Veterans from across the nation visited us and never once compared the seriousness of combat injuries. It is unfortunate some are able to cope while others cannot, and unfortunate some have lost their lives because they cannot deal with the pain and stress.

Shame on you, (you know who you are!), for differentiating the seriousness of combat related injuries. Who are you to judge the seriousness of combat injuries? What gives you the right to judge who should be entitled and who is not? I am disgusted, but I am more disheartened that you would think World War II Veterans and other combat Veterans that suffered combat concussion injuries are less deserving of the Purple Heart. Very sad, very sad indeed! I feel unsika for you. I also feel for the Vietnam Veteran that is used in the letter to compare the seriousness of combat related injuries. Obtaining a head injury/concussion injury from accidently falling out the back of a military vehicle, or slipping on ice at the chow hall, or getting a beer bottle bashed over the head at local watering hole is not the same as obtaining a concussion injury/TBI from an enemy generated explosion; IED's, RPG's, and IDF. Accidently shooting yourself in the foot is not the same as actually being shot in the foot by the enemy. There are reasons criteria is put in place, accidental and negligent injuries are not the same as combat injuries, get your facts straight. If any of you dislike the criteria then call Human Resource Command at Langley, or better yet write to Congress and tell them that "some head concussion" is not a serious injury and should be stricken from the criteria. I am appalled that this author/tribal member could be so asinine in making the comment, "…..he didn't get his Purple Heart for some head concussion either. He lost part of his leg." It is unfortunate this Vietnam Veteran lost part of his leg and has trouble walking; it is unfortunate my roommate lost his manhood and ability to have children; it is unfortunate thousands of combat Veterans suffer intense headaches, nausea, photophobia, vertigo, on a daily basis. It is unfortunate the author of the August 6th letter is confused and feebleminded to compare combat related injuries. To all my fellow Veterans, if I offended any of you please pardon my sentiment and saying what I had to say, I respect all of you, you are all heroes in my book!

Also, (if anyone reads this far), please let our Tribal leadership know that there was no American Flag or Tribal Flag in the Tribal Courtroom the other day during a very important hearing involving civil rights and Tribal rights. Whether people like it or not this Red, White, and Blue has been fought for, bled for, and died for by our own Dakota people in every war. The American Flag represents freedom, justice, civil rights, and many other ideals this country believes and stands for. Tribal, State, and Federal Courtrooms are sanctified places where we as citizens go when we seek justice and ask for fair and impartial hearings and trials. As a Veteran of Afghanistan I was not happy that our Tribal Courtroom did not display our American Flag or our Tribal Flag. Whether the hearing is a small matter or large matter our Flags need to be posted. Our Tribal Flag has recently been flown in Afghanistan and Iraq numerous times by our very own Gulf War Veterans and it needs to be posted opposite the American Flag. HAU, henana epekte!

For those of you that want to know more about the Military Order of the Purple Heart and its History or criteria please visit the official site www.purpleheart.org or www.va.gov/opa/publications/celebrate/purple-heart.pdf or www.recognizethesacrifice.org

Afghanistan Veteran, Dave Flute.

Honors Life-Long Native Family Services employee from Turtle Mountain

Named 2014 Angel in Adoption

Bismarck, ND – August 13, 2014 – U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today announced that Ina Olson of Belcourt will be honored as a 2014 Angel in Adoption. Nominated by Heitkamp, Olson will be recognized for her life-long work to improve the lives of foster and adopted children during a ceremony with advocates from across the country in September.

Ina, who is now the Director of the Turtle Mountain Child Welfare and Family Service Program, was drawn to the Program after college to pursue her life-long interest of helping families in her tribe. For more than 20 years, she has committed her life to making sure the children on the Turtle Mountain Indian Reservation are in safe and loving homes. Ina became a foster parent around five years ago to care for children in emergency placement situations. She has also opened her arms to welcome two adopted children that have become part of her family in addition to her two biological children.

“Ina is an inspiration. She has dedicated her personal and professional life to caring for foster and adoptive children on the Turtle Mountain Indian Reservation,” said Heitkamp. “Ina changes children’s lives because she understands that if a kid grows up in a loving and stable home, it has huge impact on that child’s future. Not only does she give so many children homes, she’s also helping set them on a path forward for success. Ina’s commitment and love for these children knows no bounds, and I’m honored to nominate her as an Angel in Adoption and give her the recognition she very much deserves.”

“It’s such an honor to receive this recognition. But the real Angels are the folks I work with who are with these kids every day to make sure they have a place to call home,” said Ina Olson. “I’ve been working with foster and adoptive children long enough to know that it is done best when individuals are working together. Thank you to Senator Heitkamp for raising awareness about the need to provide kids with loving homes and for nominating me as an Angel in Adoption.”

Angels in Adoption is the signature program of the Congressional Coalition on Adoption Institution, which provides an opportunity for Members of Congress to honor the good work of constituents who have enriched the lives of foster and adopted children. Each year the Congressional Coalition on Adoption Institute holds a three day event for Angels in Adoption awardees, followed by a Gala, in Washington, DC. Events this year will be held September 15 -17.

Local Native American landscaping business spotlighted by GROW SD

GROW SD officials recently honored entrepreneur Frank Greene on his landscaping business operated in the Sisseton community – Greene Edge Landscaping.

The company specializes in residential and commercial landscaping services.

They offer, mowing, weed control, seeding, planting, hedge trimming, fertilizing, and shrub planting and removal.

For larger jobs, they can partner with other companies to ensure their customers’ needs are met and they get the quality service they deserve.

One of the partners has been the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Tribe.

In recent weeks, Greene Edge has worked on grounds preparation at the Enemy Swim and Heipa-Veblen pow wow arenas and landscaping on Tribal properties in Sisseton.

The owner is a 21 year Honorably Retired Marine First Sergeant and started the business out of his passion for yard work.

He is Native American and is and enrolled member of the Spirit Lake Tribe in North Dakota – a sister Tribe to SWO.

Frank is an active member of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Desert Era Veterans group and volunteers his time at numerous honor guards and special events.

His business was recently recognized by the Sisseton Chamber of Commerce with a "Saluting Success" certificate for the contributions made to Sisseton and the surrounding communities. The business hours are seven days a week 8:00 a.m. to sunset by appointment, and can be reached at the following:

P.O Box 156

Sisseton, SD 57262

(605)742-0456 office (605)742-0458 fax frank@greeneedgelandscaping.com

Frank credits SD Small Business Development Center’s Carla Burns for helping him get started with his company.

Here’s what he says about motivation for building his business: “I formed the company in order to provide quality landscape services to the Sisseton Community and Lake Traverse Reservation, and also as way to better provide for my children as a single Dad.”

Spotlight on Adoption

By Senator John Thune

Out of any title a person can hold, the role of “mom” or “dad” may be the most important. While the title doesn’t bring you fame and notoriety, the role bears tremendous responsibility and brings with it great joy and rewards.

Each year, I recognize a South Dakota family who made a difference in the life of child by opening their hearts and homes through the process of adoption. This year, I nominated Scott and Jamie Nagy and their family from Brookings. While the titles of “mom” and “dad” didn’t bring them notoriety, the Nagy family knows a little something about the spotlight.

As the head coach for the South Dakota State University (SDSU) Men’s Basketball team, Scott has coached his team to the highest levels of college basketball drawing attention to the program and the school from around the country. Yet it is his work off the court that has helped build a loving home for their four biological children and their adopted daughter, Naika.

In 2006, Scott and Jamie adopted their daughter Naika from Haiti, joining their biological children Nick, Tyler, TJ, and Natalie. Through their adoption journey, the Nagys developed a heart for helping others navigate difficult transitions as families learn to unite. Following Naika’s adoption, Jamie collaborated with another adoptive family to create an adoption networking group in Brookings. Jamie, who was adopted as an infant, not only wanted to share the family’s experience but also found that the networking group helped her better understand her own adoption story.

The Nagys’ adoption experience also inspired Scott’s involvement in Samaritan’s Feet, an organization providing shoes to orphans and impoverished children in developing countries. In 2009, Scott was one of the first coaches in the country to coach barefoot during a SDSU basketball game to help raise awareness for Samaritan’s Feet. Since then, Scott has taken the SDSU Men’s Basketball team to Haiti and Burundi to distribute shoes and conduct basketball coaching clinics.

Scott and Jamie’s story demonstrates how adoptive parents and families can foster patience, grace, and understanding to open their hearts and homes to a child in need. While the spotlight may remain on the court for Scott and the family, their work to help others understand the effect of overwhelming change in adoption, and their work to bring awareness to children in need will provide them with lasting joy and satisfaction. I hope the Nagys’ story continues to inspire other South Dakota families to make a difference in the life of a child.

Returning to Campus: What we’re doing to keep students safe

By Rep. Kristi Noem

August 15, 2014

We’re taking my oldest daughter back to college this week. It’s hard to believe that she’s going to be a Junior already! I hope and pray that she understands just how proud Bryon and I are of her and what she’s working to achieve. We trust that she’ll make the right decisions, but it’s still hard not to feel uneasy sometimes because we just don’t have control over who surrounds her anymore.

South Dakota is extremely blessed to have college campuses filled with tremendous faculty, personnel and students. While our campuses are much safer than many around the country, today’s college culture can sometimes put good kids in bad situations.

Nationwide, one in five young women and one in 16 young men are targets of sexual assault or attempted sexual assault while they are college students, according to the U.S. Department of Justice. The vast majority – about 89 percent – occur when the victim is incapacitated due to alcohol. The independent Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network points out that college-aged women are four times more likely to face sexual assault than any other age group.

Schools have taken great strides in recent years to improve education and awareness on campuses to help guard students from putting themselves in a dangerous situation. Reporting requirements have also helped better address complaints and deal with recurring problems. There is more that can and should be done, however.

At the end of July, I helped introduce the House version of the Campus Accountability and Safety Act. This is a bipartisan bill that takes aim at sexual assaults on college campuses by empowering students, strengthening accountability measures, and establishing stiff penalties for non-compliance with training and data standards.

More specifically, if passed, colleges and universities would need to designate Confidential Advisors to serve as a resource for victims. This Advisor would help coordinate support services, provide information about options for reporting, and offer help in reporting the crime to campus authorities or law enforcement, if the survivor chooses to do so.

We’ve also created minimum training standards for on-campus personnel to ensure they are equipped to handle investigations and the disciplinary process as well as included stronger accountability provisions. For instance, the bill prohibits athletic departments or other subgroups to handle complaints of sexual violence for members of that subgroup alone. As such, there will be a uniform way of addressing claims of assault. I’m hopeful this will ensure any potential bias is suppressed and that both campus authorities and local law enforcement can focus on solving the crime rather than debating jurisdiction, as has happened too often in the past.

I am very grateful to all those at our colleges and universities who help ensure our young people are safe as they work toward a college degree. What you do is incredibly important. With this legislation, I’m hopeful we can give you and the students you serve even more tools, resources, and guidance.

Social “helper” column dedicated to young generation Oyate –

Wawokiyape

By Sherielle “Shay” DuMarce

How do the "wasicu" businesses view Native Americans?

This is a question that was made all too clear by one of our own tribal members who is a manager at a wasicu business.

Now, granted that stereotyping will always be a part of life on the rez. By stereotyping let me give you a few examples that this "manager" made sure to call all Native mothers …

1. All mothers are on welfare.

2. Anyone who comes into "her store" is a drunk or thief.

3. All Natives are on government assistance.

4. All Native mothers use w.i.c.

There is nothing wrong with being on these programs because they are there for help but for one of our own tribal members to public announce peoples name and point fingers at people that they know personally, on a very public page on Facebook is downright disgraceful and disrespectful.

I wanted to make this known so that people will know what is being thought of them when they walk into a store around town to buy groceries, baby formula or anything else. Because it is our business and our money that keeps these stores up and running.

And as for this "manager" who just so happens to be Native American, publicly made it know just how "her store" thinks of Native Americans. Yes, I understand there are a few bad apples but DO NOT ASSUME all Native people are drug addicts, drunks and on welfare because that is not the case.

All in all, I don’t know how many times I have said this but I will say it again.....

"Do not judge unless your hands are clean!"

Respectfully, Shay.

Ripple Effect –

T-Shirt to Tote

Here in the Red River Valley plastic bags in trees along the riverfront are a common sight and very difficult to clean up.

Even though plastic bags have only been around for 50 years, next year more than 300 million tons of plastic will be produced worldwide. Many of these items might only be used for a day, but they will remain in landfills for centuries. While plastic bags haven’t been around long enough for us to see how long it takes them to decompose, scientists estimate that it will be somewhere between 500 and 1,000 years. Even so, only 1% of the billions produced and consumed every year are recycled.

More than 8 million pounds of that plastic debris ends up in oceans, lakes and rivers, including our own Red River. That plastic then often drifts to storm drains where they contribute to clogs and flooding, or drift to open water where it can be ingested by aquatic animals, even the plastic that does make it to the landfill can leach harmful chemicals into our ground and drinking water.

Fortunately there are many easy ways to reduce use of plastic in our daily lives:

· Use canvas, paper or cloth tote bags when shopping.

· Use plastic bags as many times as possible

· Recycle plastic bags at recycling bins in grocery and department stores

By using a cloth bag rather than a plastic one, the average individual would save 6 plastic bags a week, 24 bags a month, 288 bags a year, or 22,176 bags in a lifetime. If just 1 out of 5 people in the United States switched from plastic bags to canvas, 1.3 trillion plastic bags would be saved in our lifetime.

Make your own unique tote from an old t-shirt by cutting off the sleeves and neckline, turning the t-shirt inside out and sewing the bottom closed. Turn your new tote right side out and you’re ready for your next trip to the store!

By making these small adjustments to daily activities, you can help reduce plastic waste, protect wildlife, the Red River, and your own health. To donate your old T-Shirts to be made into totes, or to volunteer to help make the totes, visit www.riverkeepers.org.

Until the next Ripple Effect, The Red River Basin Commission (RRBC).

*****

The RRBC is a grassroots organization that is chartered not-for-profit corporation under the provisions of Manitoba, North Dakota, Minnesota, and South Dakota law. Our offices in Fargo, ND and Winnipeg, MB can be reached at 218-291-0422 and 204-982-7254, or you can check out our website at http://redriverbasincommision.org

Health and Wellness –

Zani Unpi

DIABETES AND THE HEPATITIS B VACCINE

Submitted by Robert Hansen, RN, BSN,

Public Health Nursing Department

Woodrow Wilson Keeble Memorial Health Care Center

Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics have higher rates of the Hepatitis B virus than the general population.

What is Hepatitis B?

Hepatitis B is a virus that is usually spread when blood and other body fluids from a person infected with hepatitis B virus enters the body of someone who is not infected. Hepatitis B is a liver disease. At first, you develop an "acute" infection with a range of severity from very mild illness with few or no symptoms to a serious condition requiring hospitalization. Acute hepatitis B is the first 6 months after being infected. "Chronic" Hepatitis refers to the illness when the virus remains in a person's body. Over time, this can cause serious damage to the liver leading to complications such as liver failure and liver cancer.

 The Hepatitis B virus is 50-100 times more infectious than HIV which makes it easily transmitted.

The Hepatitis B virus can survive outside the body at least 1 week. During this time, the virus can still cause infection if it enters the body of an uninfected person.

What Can I Do To Prevent Hepatitis B?

*Prevent exposure to hepatitis B by NOT sharing diabetes care equipment (finger stick devices, syringes, insulin pens, glucose monitoring equipment).

*The BEST WAY to prevent Hepatitis B is by simply getting vaccinated. The CDC recommends the hepatitis B vaccine for adults with diabetes. The hepatitis B vaccine is a series of 3 shots given over a 6 month time period (0, 1, 6 month schedule).

*If you have not received the hepatitis B vaccine series talk to your doctor about getting vaccinated. If you think you have already been vaccinated, confirm with your doctor.

As the saying goes, "AN OUNCE OF PREVENTION IS WORTH A POUND OF CURE."

References: www.cdc.gov/hepatitis & www.diabetes.org

Zani unpi!

Youth, school activities highlights –

Education watch on the Lake Traverse Reservation

New fifth grade teacher at TZTS

Kristin Platamone is the new 5th grade teacher at Tiospa Zina Tribal School.

This is her first year teaching and she couldn't be more excited.

Mrs. Platamone obtained her teaching credential in the states of South Dakota and California. While in California, she worked for the Los Angeles Unified School District and Simi Valley School District.

Mrs. Platamone is a California native, recently relocating to Britton, SD this past February.

She lives with her husband, Jason, and two dogs.

New TZ second grade teacher

My name is Angie Gareis and I am a new second grade teacher.

I am married and have three sons ages eight, six, and three.

I graduated from University of Minnesota, Morris.

Last year I student taught at Tiospa Zina under Deb Ellsworth. This was an enjoyable experience and gave me a great introduction to the school.

I am excited to have my own classroom this year and meet all my students and their families.

Tiospa Zina high school teacher

Hello! My name is Mike Ketchen.

I will be teaching three different subjects at the high school this year. They include U.S. History, Geography, and Current Events.

I am very excited to be here.

I taught middle school social studies last year in Clark, SD.

I am looking forward to working with each one of the students as well as the families.

Here's Credit 101 for your college freshman

By Jason Alderman

To parents with a freshman entering college this fall: You're probably expecting to shell out major bucks for tuition, room and board and a million other necessities over the next few years. But before you send your kid off, make sure you share one gift likely to steer him or her along the road to financial security – a sound understanding of how credit works.

You probably learned the hard way yourself that young adults encounter many unfamiliar expenses – and temptations – upon entering college or the workforce. So it's important to help your kids avoid early financial missteps that could damage their credit for years to come.

The first step in managing personal finances is mastering the basic checking account and debit card. A few tips you can pass along:

Look for a bank or credit union that charges no monthly usage fee, requires no minimum balance and has conveniently located ATMs so you don't rack up foreign ATM charges. Enter all transactions in a check register or in a budgeting tool like Mint.com and review your account online at least weekly to verify when deposits, checks, purchases and automatic payments have cleared. Avoid writing checks or making debit card transactions unless your current balance will cover them – such transactions often clear instantly. A good way to build sound credit is to demonstrate responsible credit card use. But people under age 21 must have a parent or other responsible adult cosign credit card accounts unless they can prove sufficient income to repay the debt. So how can parents help their kids begin building a credit history if they can't open their own account? A couple of alternatives:

Make them an authorized user on one of your accounts. They'll get their own card and you can usually restrict the amount they're able to charge. Authorized users are not legally responsible to pay balances owed – that's your responsibility, so tread carefully. You can add them as a joint account holder to a new or existing account – preferably, one with a small credit limit. Joint account holders are equally liable to pay off the account. Just remember, any account activity, good or bad, goes on both your credit reports, so careful account monitoring is critical. If your kids haven't yet demonstrated financial maturity they may not be ready for an unsecured credit card or loan. Other alternatives include:

A secured credit card, where users can charge up to the amount deposited to open the account. Purchases are charged against the account's revolving credit limit. As they pay off the balance the available credit rises, just like a regular credit card. After a period of on-time payments, ask the lender to convert it to an unsecured card, or to at least add an unsecured amount to the account. A prepaid debit card, where you load the card with money in advance and they use the card for purchases or ATM withdrawals. You monitor account activity online or by phone. With each, fees and restrictions may apply so shop around for the best terms. If you need help educating your kids about personal financial management, a good resource is What's My Score (www.whatsmyscore.org), a financial literacy program for young adults run by Visa Inc. It features a comprehensive workbook called Money 101: A Crash Course in Better Money Management, which can be downloaded for free.

Bottom line: Getting your kids off on the right foot, credit-wise, can make all the difference to their future financial health.

*****

Jason Alderman directs Visa's financial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www.twitter.com/PracticalMoney.

Garden Corner

By Eric Hanssen

Browns Valley, Minnesota

Leafcutter bees are actively creating nests and that means lots of leaves looks like someone took a cookie cutter to them. The leafcutter beetle cuts the edges of leaves in a very distinctive style, making a mostly smooth semicircle cut along the edges of the leaves. The missing leaf tissue was not eaten be the bee but carried back to create nest cells. The nests are filled with all the materials a young bee needs, nectar and pollen, and then a female bees lays an egg inside the nest and seals it. While they will make a nest out of any leaf, the favorites are roses, ash and lilac. Leafcutter bees are the timid cousins of the honey bee, they do not usually sting people and when they do, the sting is less painful. The bee is also solitary so you don’t have to worry about a swarm of bees. These bees are also beneficial as they serve as pollinators for many different plants. The damage they do to plants by cutting the tissue is minimal and probably it is best just too tolerant the minor damage rather than treat. The only exception to this policy of “live and let live” is for roses. The leafcutter beetle will make nests in the soft pith of rose canes. When pruning rose canes seal off the exposed pith with candle wax to discourage entry by the bee. The leafcutter bee does not generally tunnel into rose canes unless there is a wound that exposes the pith.

We are also seeing a lot of hackberry branches with bright yellow leaves. Usually these are branches scattered throughout the canopy so there will be bright yellow patches of leaves mixed in with the normal green. If you look close, however, you find that the yellow leaves are only associated with certain limbs in the tree. And if you look near the base of these limbs you’ll find the bark stripped in ½ inch sections or more that go almost completely around the limb. The reason for the bark being stripped is a fox squirrel feeding on the inner bark and the damage was done last spring. No one knows for sure why squirrels strip bark from hackberry and elm branches. The most likely reason is the squirrels are feeding on the sweet inner bark of these trees in the spring. Usually the feeding does not extend completely around the branch so the branches often do not turn color and die until later in the summer. Unfortunately, there is not much that can be done to prevent it.

Walnut anthracnose is starting to show up. As with other anthracnose diseases, the tree becomes infected in the spring as the new leaves emerge in the cool, moist spring environment, but the symptoms – yellowing leaves with black spots that drop prematurely – do not occur until now. The disease overwinters in the twigs and fallen leaves. The disease is not harmful to the tree and now is not the time for control.

This article comes from professor John Ball, SDSU Forestry Specialist in his Pest Update publication available online at http://sdda.sd.gov/legacydocs/Forestry/educational-information/PDF/Pest-alert-2014-Aug-8.pdf.

Legals

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

IN TRIBAL COURT

CASE: D-14-582-378

D-14-583-379

IN THE MATTER OF THE CHANGE OF NAME OF: AERITH ROSE ROUSSEAU, CHRISTOPHER LEE ROUSSEAU, Minor Children,

And concerning: JOEY D. HEMINGER, Petitioner.

ORDER AND NOTICE OF HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Petitioner's request for a change of name from AERITH ROSE ROUSSEAU AND CHRISTOPHER LEE ROUSSEAU to AERITH ROSE HEMINGER AND CHRISTOPHER LEE HEMINGER shall be heard before the Honorable B.J. Jones, Judge of Tribal Court, in the Courtroom of the Sisseton Wahpeton Tribal Court at Agency Village, South Dakota at 10:00 A.M. on the 22nd day of AUGUST, 2014.

Dated this 29th day of July, 2014.

BY ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/ B.J. Jones CHIEF JUDGE

ATTEST: E. Pfeiffer CLERK OF COURTS

31-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 00-144

SWOCSE/Lita German, PLAINTIFF

VS.

VINE MARKS, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Review Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of August, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 23rd day of July, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow

 Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Carleen Stone

Acting SWOCSE Clerk of Court

31-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 09-117

SWOCSE/ Linda Thompson, PLAINTIFF

VS.

LUONDA STEVENS, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of August, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 23rd day of July, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow

 Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Carleen Stone

Acting SWOCSE Clerk of Court

31-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 12-125

SWOCSE/ Candice Brown, PLAINTIFF

VS.

COLLEEN BROWN, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of August, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 23rd day of July, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow

 Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Carleen Stone

Acting SWOCSE Clerk of Court

31-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 04-154

SWOCSE/Lois Kohl, PLAINTIFF

VS.

ALISHA HAUG, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of August, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 23rd day of July, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow

 Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Carleen Stone

Acting SWOCSE Clerk of Court

31-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 14-158

SWOCSE/Julie Watts, PLAINTIFF

VS.

AARON KEEBLE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of August, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 23rd day of July, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow

 Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Carleen Stone

Acting SWOCSE Clerk of Court

31-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 09-326

SWOCSE/ Karen Heminger, PLAINTIFF

VS.

EDWIN ROBERTSON, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of August, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 23rd day of July, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow

 Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Carleen Stone

Acting SWOCSE Clerk of Court

31-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 14-174

SWOCSE/Doris Bursheim, PLAINTIFF

VS.

VERA HEMINGER, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of August, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 23rd day of July, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow

 Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Carleen Stone

Acting SWOCSE Clerk of Court

31-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 13-056

SWOCSE/ Tamara Dumarce, PLAINTIFF

VS.

WHITNEY DUMARCE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of August, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 23rd day of July, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow

 Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Carleen Stone

Acting SWOCSE Clerk of Court

31-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 13-119

SWOCSE/Ashley Blackthunder, PLAINTIFF

VS.

WAMBLI BRANT, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Modify Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of August, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 23rd day of July, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow

 Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Carleen Stone

Acting SWOCSE Clerk of Court

31-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 13-145

SWOCSE/ SD/Ursula Rouse, PLAINTIFF

VS.

WAMBLI BRANT, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of August, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 23rd day of July, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow

 Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Carleen Stone

Acting SWOCSE Clerk of Court

31-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 12-133

SWOCSE/Brittney DuMarce, PLAINTIFF

VS.

FRANCIS KOHL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Modify Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of August, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 23rd day of July, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow

 Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Carleen Stone

Acting SWOCSE Clerk of Court

31-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 12-075

SWOCSE/Mason Kohl, PLAINTIFF

VS.

FRANCIS KOHL, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Modify Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of August, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 23rd day of July, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow

 Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Carleen Stone

Acting SWOCSE Clerk of Court

31-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 10-013

SWOCSE/ Evangeline Ree, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DONALD FROST, Sr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of August, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 23rd day of July, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow

 Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Carleen Stone

Acting SWOCSE Clerk of Court

31-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 10-074

SWOCSE/ Lynn Ree, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DONALD FROST, Sr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of August, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 23rd day of July, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow

 Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Carleen Stone

Acting SWOCSE Clerk of Court

31-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 14-168

SWOCSE/Floyd Cloud, Jr., PLAINTIFF

VS.

GAYLA GERMAN, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 27th day of August, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 23rd day of July, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow

 Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Carleen Stone

Acting SWOCSE Clerk of Court

31-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 14-129

SWOCSE/Serena Brant, PLAINTIFF

VS.

KENNETH CLEVELAND, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Paternity and/or Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of August, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of July, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow

 Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Carleen Stone

Acting SWOCSE Clerk of Court

31-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 13-097

SWOCSE/Cynthia Knudsen, PLAINTIFF

VS.

NANCY ANTELOPE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of August, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of July, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow

 Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Carleen Stone

Acting SWOCSE Clerk of Court

31-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 14-139

SWOCSE/Lois Kohl, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JUAN TREVINO, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Paternity and/or Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of August, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of July, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow

 Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Carleen Stone

Acting SWOCSE Clerk of Court

31-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 14-039

SWOCSE/Alisha Haug, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JUAN TREVINO, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Paternity and/or Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of August, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of July, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow

 Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Carleen Stone

Acting SWOCSE Clerk of Court

31-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 10-044

SWOCSE/ Kristin Campbell, PLAINTIFF

VS.

IAN MARQUARDT, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of August, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of July, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow

 Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Carleen Stone

Acting SWOCSE Clerk of Court

31-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 09-112

SWOCSE/Vernette Renville, PLAINTIFF

VS.

AWON ANYOUN, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Modify Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of August, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of July, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow

 Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Carleen Stone

Acting SWOCSE Clerk of Court

31-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 10-059

SWOCSE/Elizabeth Owen, PLAINTIFF

VS.

AWON ANYOUN, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Modify Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of August, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of July, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow

 Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Carleen Stone

Acting SWOCSE Clerk of Court

31-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 10-036

SWOCSE/ Barry LaCroix, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JERLYN SPIDER, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of August, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of July, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow

 Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Carleen Stone

Acting SWOCSE Clerk of Court

31-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 10-044

SWOCSE/ Kristin Campbell, PLAINTIFF

VS.

IAN MARQUARDT, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of August, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of July, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow

 Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Carleen Stone

Acting SWOCSE Clerk of Court

31-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 09-085

SWOCSE/ Jennifer Rockman, PLAINTIFF

VS.

CHARLES ST. JOHN, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of August, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of July, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow

 Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Carleen Stone

Acting SWOCSE Clerk of Court

31-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. I: 09-012

SWOCSE/Shannon Keoke, PLAINTIFF

VS.

TODD LYONS, Sr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Modify Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 28th day of August, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 24th day of July, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow

 Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Carleen Stone

Acting SWOCSE Clerk of Court

31-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 14-146

SWOCSE/Lorinda Sampson, PLAINTIFF

VS.

TAI DEMARRIAS, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of August, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of July, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow

 Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Carleen Stone

Acting SWOCSE Clerk of Court

31-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 03-117

SWOCSE/ Lynn DuBois, PLAINTIFF

VS.

BRIAN RENVILLE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of August, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of July, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow

 Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Carleen Stone

Acting SWOCSE Clerk of Court

31-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 14-172

SWOCSE/Doris Bursheim, PLAINTIFF

VS.

JEREMY OWEN, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Complaint to Establish Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of August, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of July, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow

 Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Carleen Stone

Acting SWOCSE Clerk of Court

31-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 02-295

SWOCSE/DaVanna Blackthunder, PLAINTIFF

VS.

RICHARD LAWRENCE, DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that due to the inability of the Plaintiff to locate the Defendant that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Modify Child Support has been filed and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of August, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 o’clock A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Complaint describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of July, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow

 Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Carleen Stone

Acting SWOCSE Clerk of Court

31-3tc

 

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 13-024

SWOCSE/ Elizabeth Hosie, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DUSTY CLOUD, Sr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of August, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of July, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow

 Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Carleen Stone

Acting SWOCSE Clerk of Court

31-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 08-045

SWOCSE/ Jonita Barse, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DUSTY CLOUD, Sr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of August, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of July, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow

 Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Carleen Stone

Acting SWOCSE Clerk of Court

31-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 14-086

SWOCSE/ Mary Goette, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DUSTY CLOUD, Sr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of August, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of July, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow

 Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Carleen Stone

Acting SWOCSE Clerk of Court

31-3tc

 

SISSETON-WAHPETON OYATE

IN TRIBAL COURT

LAKE TRAVERSE RESERVATION

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

CASE NO. CS: 10-073

SWOCSE/ Mona Williams, PLAINTIFF

VS.

DUSTY CLOUD, Sr., DEFENDANT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION &

NOTICE OF HEARING

It is hereby Ordered that Notice by Publication is hereby provided for a Motion to Show Cause for Failure to Pay Child Support and Notice of Hearing is hereby provided that a hearing will held at the Tribal Admin Building in Tribal Court, Agency Village, South Dakota, on the 29th day of August, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 o’clock P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible.

You are required to be at the hearing. If you fail to appear a Warrant will be issued and Bond set at the amount of the arrears. Upon request, the OCSE Clerk will provide you with a copy of the Motion describing the matter.

Dated this 25th day of July, 2014

BY THE ORDER OF THE COURT:

/s/

Michael T. Swallow

 Presiding Judge

ATTEST: Carleen Stone

Acting SWOCSE Clerk of Court

31-3tc

 

 

 

Trading Post ads

Psychic Spiritual Reader

Are you worried, confused, don’t know where to turn, need help. I give advice on all matters of life past, present and future . . . call today for a better tomorrow. I also offer past life readings. For appointments call (605) 271-7277. 5201 West 41st. St. Suite 1, Sioux Falls, SD 57106.

 

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate

Job Openings

The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate is seeking to fill the following positions(s):

Public Defender, Public Defenders Office

Cook, Head Start

Cook, Early Head Start

Bus Driver, Head Start

Admissions Coordinator/Evaluations. Dakotah Pride

Tracking Paraprofessional, Early Childhood Intervention Program

Closing Date: August 22, 2014 @ 04:30 PM

Teacher, Early Head Start

Assistant Cook, Tribal Elderly

Cook/Supervisory, Administration Building

Tutor, JOM

Peer Tutor, JOM

Closing Date: August 29, 2014 @ 04:30 PM.

All interested applicants may obtain application and job description information at the Human Resource Department, of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate or contact Arnold Williams at (605) 698-8238 or Denise Hill at (605) 698-8362. (Tribal preference will apply)

 

Dakota Western Corporation

Accounting Assistant

Dakota Western Corporation has an immediate opening for an experienced Accounting Assistant. Duties will include but are not limited to payroll, accounts receivable and inventory. Minimum of 3 years of recent experience and college level accounting courses. Must have experience with MS Word, Excel and accounting software. Bring a resume and submit application in person at Dakota Western Corporation, 45679 Veterans Memorial Drive, Agency Village, SD 57262. Applications that do not meet the minimum qualifications will not be considered. Closing date: August 29, 2014.

 

DAKOTA PLAINS LEGAL SERVICES

VACANCY ANNOUNCEMENT

POSITION: Dakota Plains Legal Services (DPLS), a non-profit legal services program, is accepting applications for a Legal Secretary/Paralegal position in our Sisseton, South Dakota, branch office. The Sisseton office serves the Flandreau, Lake Traverse and Yankton Sioux Tribe Indian reservations in South Dakota and the counties of Grant, Roberts and Charles Mix in South Dakota.

RESPONSIBILITIES: The person hired for this position will perform duties as both a legal secretary and a paralegal. The legal secretary duties involve providing secretarial and grant compliance services for branch office personnel as well as performing various administrative duties as directed by DPLS Administration. The paralegal duties involve assisting licensed attorneys in the delivery of legal services to DPLS clients and representing persons in criminal and civil matters before tribal courts and in administrative hearings.

QUALIFICATIONS: Applicant must be a graduate of an accredited high school, or its equivalent; must be familiar with legal terms and pleadings; must be able to type 60 words per minute; must have two years' experience working in a law office, or its equivalent; must be able to maintain a good working relationship with DPLS staff and the client community; and must have experience utilizing word processing software. In addition, applicant, through formal education, training, and experience, must have knowledge and expertise regarding the legal system, substantive and procedural law, and the ethical considerations of the legal profession which qualify him/her to do work of a legal nature under the supervision of a licensed attorney. Applicant must have strong written and oral communication skills, must be self-motivated, must be willing to assume immediate responsibility and handle a significant caseload, and must have a demonstrated commitment to serving the needs of low-income people and Native Americans. Applicant must be qualified to obtain a license to practice in the local Tribal Courts.

CLOSING DATE: Open until filled.

SALARY: DOE and qualifications.

APPLICATION: Please submit a letter of interest and resume to: John J. Buchy, Executive Director, Dakota Plains Legal Services, PO Box 727, Mission, SD 57555, (605) 856-4444, dpls1@gwtc.net.

Native Americans, women and minorities are encouraged to apply. Dakota Plains Legal Services is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

 

Sisseton Wahpeton College

Sisseton Wahpeton College is seeking to fill the following position:

*Vice President of Academic Affairs

The successful candidate will provide leadership for the instructional programs of the College and to oversee other functions related to instruction. Provide visionary leadership, development, and implementation of effective instructional programs, while maintaining a collegial environment. The successful candidate will have the ability to plan, organize and direct the activities of Academic programs; develop and evaluate comprehensive plans to satisfy present and future college and community needs; work effectively in a team management environment; communicate effectively both orally and in writing; work effectively with people at all levels of the college including management, faculty, staff and students.

*Master's degree in Education, Curriculum Development, or Educational leadership required

*Indian Preference will apply

Send resume to: Sisseton Wahpeton College Human Resources

Agency P.O. Box 689

Sisseton, SD 57262

Deadline: August 21st, 2014 at 8:00 AM.

For further information call (605) 742-1105

Visit our website: www.swc.tc for a full job description and application.

 

ENEMY SWIM DAY SCHOOL

AFTERSCHOOL PROGRAM

Group Leader Positions -Excellent part-time opportunity!

Do you enjoy working with children? We are looking for team players to join our afterschool program as a part-time Group Leader for the 2014-2015 academic school year! Spend time supervising K-8 grade students during after school hours in a fun and energetic environment, while promoting the importance of the arts, physical fitness, and academic achievement.

Schedule: 2014-2015 academic school year (September-May 2015). Mon.-Thurs. 12:30-5:30 pm and some evenings. Hourly wage. Indian preference will apply. Visit www.esds.us for an application or contact Rebecca Dargatz at 947-4605 ext. 3062.

 

Tiospa Zina Tribal School

Employment Opportunities

2014-2015 School Year Vacancies: Vacancy: Special Education Teacher (High School) Sign-on Bonus Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Special Education Teacher Opening Date: March 7, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Secondary Art Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Secondary Art Teacher Opening Date: July 1, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Alternative Learning Center Teacher Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a Secondary Teacher Opening Date: July 1, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Kitchen Supervisor Qualifications: High School Diploma/GED, 1 year of successful supervisory experience, and willing to obtain State School Food Service Training and Certification.? Opening Date: May 16, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: School Counselor Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a School Service Specialist School Counselor Opening Date: May 23, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: School Bus Driver Qualifications: High School Diploma/GED, Current South Dakota Certified School Bus Drivers License with both passengar and air brakes endorsements, and willing to complete annual school bus training. Opening Date: May 28, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: School Social Worker Qualifications: Current South Dakota Certification meeting the Highly Qualified status for a School Service Specialist School Social Worker Opening Date: May 28, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Dishwasher/Clerk Qualifications: High School Diploma or GED Opening Date: May 30, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

2014-2015 Extra Curricular Vacancies: Vacancy: Technology Mentor (High School) Qualifications: GED/High School Diploma with knowledge and skills to assist staff with minor technology questions related to, but not limited to, software, educational websites, Microsoft, LCD projectors, Campus, NWEA Maps, Ipads, Computers, and Promethean Boards and needs as needed throughout the school day. If interested please submit an application and Adviser Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School. Opening Date: April 11, 2014 Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: Assistant Volleyball Coach

Vacancy: Assistant Girls Basketball Coach

Qualifications for Above Listed Coaching Assignments: GED/High School Diploma, and must meet 2014-2015 SDHSAA coaching requirements at the time that your applications is submitted. Those requirements are to complete the following courses through the National Federation of High School Sports (NFHS): Fundamentals of Coaching, First Aid and Safety for Coaches, and Concussion in Sports – What you need to know. If interested please submit an application and coaching applicant questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School. Closing Date: Open until filled

Vacancy: 7th/8th Grade Girls Basketball Coach.

Vacancy: (2) 8th Grade Class Adviser

Vacancy: AISES Adviser (American Indian Science and Engineering Society)

Vacancy: Close-Up Foundation Adviser

Vacancy: Destination Imagination Adviser

Vacancy: (2) Junior Class Adviser

Vacancy: (3) Senior Class Adviser

Vacancy: Military Club Adviser

Vacancy: Middle School Student Council Adviser

Vacancy: Rodeo & Riding Club Adviser

Qualifications for the Above Listed Coaching or Adviser Assignments: GED/High School Diploma. If interested please submit an application and Coaching or Adviser Questionnaire to the Human Resources Department at Tiospa Zina Tribal School. Closing Date: Open until filled

If you would like to apply to be a part of the TZ tiwahe you may pick up an application from the TZTS HR office located at #2 Tiospa Zina Dr. Agency Village, SD 57262. Applications may also be printed off the HR web page by downloading from links under employment forms to the left. Completed applications may be sent to PO Box 719, Agency Village, SD 57262. Faxed to: 605-698-7686. For further information call 605-698-3953 ext. 208. Indian Preference employer. At will employer. All applicants are subject to a Background Check and Pre-Employment Drug Test, pursuant to SWSB policy.

 

Dakota Magic Casino

Job Openings

Cage Department: Cashier (3 Full-Time) 1 Swing 2 Graveyard

Count Department: Team Member (Full-Time) 3am to Finish

Foods Department:

Bus Person (2 Full-Time) Swing

Cashier (2 Full-Time) Swing

Cook I (4 Full-Time) 1 Day, 3 Swing

Cook II (Full-Time) Swing

Hotel Department: Front Desk Clerk (Full-Time) 4pm to 12am

Surveillance Department: Observer (Full-Time) Rotating

Support Services Department: Laborer (2 Full-Time) Rotating

Closing Date: August 22, 2014 at 4:00 p.m.

Starting Wage: D.O.E.

High School Diploma or GED required for most positions

Two identifications documents required upon hire

If interested please submit application to Human Resources Department, 16849 102nd Street SE, Hankinson ND 58041.For complete Job Description contact James Neconish 701-634-3000 ext. 2582 Indian Preference will apply / EEO. (Please Provide Tribal Enrollment). Must be licensable by the SWO Gaming Commission.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

M.I.S. (Management Information Systems): COMPUTER SPECIALIST/PROGRAMMER (1 Full-Time) GENERAL FUNCTION: Your level of responsibility will assist end-users with computer issues. You are also responsible for computer maintenance. You will design and write code for programs as needed. You will also write custom reports for end-users when needed. You will be responsible for assisting end-users with computer issues, computer maintenance, and other IT tasks as designated by M.I.S. Manager or Supervisor. REQUIREMENTS: Excellent interpersonal and written communication skills. Flexibility and ability to work in a team environment. Associates degree in computer science, information systems, 2+ years experience in computer science, computer programming, information systems, or a related field or 6+ years experience in a related position; A+ Certification in beneficial. Extensive knowledge of Windows XP, Windows 7, 2000, 2003, 2008, MSSql Databases, Active Directory, VMWare, Crystal Reports, Visual Studio, Java and other programming languages. Ability to lift equipment in excess of 30lbs. Proficiency in Linux, IIS, POS systems, RAID technology, computer hardware, AS/400, networking and anti-virus methods is beneficial. Knowledge of servers if beneficial. Must obtain Key Gaming License upon hire.

This position will be advertised until it is filled.

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel

Job Openings

Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel is seeking to fill the following position(s):

 

 

Indian Preference will apply/EEO.

Contact the Human Resources Department for complete job descriptions at 1-800-658-4717 ext. 1652.

If interested please fill out an application and submit to: Dakota Sioux Casino & Hotel, Human Resources Department, 16415 Sioux Conifer Road, Watertown, SD 57201.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

Position: Associate Manager

Department: Administration

Qualifications:  B.A. in Business Administration, or minimum of 3 years management experience. Supervisory skills, excellent communication skills-both written and verbal, excellent people skills, computer literate. Able to work independently and with direction. Ability to effectively and accurately relay information to employees. Knowledge of Indian gaming. Must be able to obtain a Key Gaming License.

Hours: Rotating Shifts

Opening Date: Thursday, August 7, 2014

Closing Date: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 @ 4:00 pm

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

Security Department: Officer (2) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, weekends & holidays. Mobility throughout the facility 45% percent of time; will be stooping, bending, walking for long periods of time, able to lift up to 40 pounds, computer skills required for report writing. Will be exposed to noise and tobacco smoke. Appropriate dress code. Must be at least 21 years old & have a High School Diploma or G.E.D. Must be able to obtain a Key License.

Opening date: Thursday, August 14, 2014

Closing date: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 @ 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.

 

Dakota Connection Casino

Job Openings

Restaurant Department: Prep Cook/Cook (2) full-time, rotating shifts, day, and swing, includes weekends & holidays. Previous experience is preferred. Must be able to multi-task; have the ability to work under pressure; the ability to operate necessary equipment; knowledge of food preparation safety requirements; physical ability to clean, lift heavy object up to 200 lbs or more, and restock inventory. Have the physical ability to stand for prolonged periods of time. Must be at least 18 years old & must have a High School diploma or GED.

C-Store Department: Deli Attendant (2) full-time, rotating shifts, day, swing, graveyard, includes weekends & holidays. Ability to operate necessary

& motivational skills; communication skills; customer service equipment. Physical ability to stand for long hours, clean, lift heavy objects up to 30 lbs., and restock inventory. 6 mos. previous cooking experience preferred, 6 mos. working with the public. Knowledge of food preparation safety requirements. Must be dependable & available to work any & all shifts. Must be at least 18 years old & must have a High School diploma or GED.

Facilities/Maintenance Department: Maintenance Worker (1) full-time, available for any & all shifts including graveyard, weekends & holidays; able to follow verbal & written instructions; have organizational skills; have knowledge of safety requirements and knowledge to operate necessary equipment; mechanical & carpentry skills; be physically able to move throughout the facilities & surrounding grounds; have the physical ability to lift heavy objects 100+ pounds; have at least 2 years' experience with all aspects of building maintenance, general maintenance, property maintenance, equipment maintenance with special emphasis on plumbing, air conditioning, electrical, and C-Store fuel pumps. Must have a High School Diploma or GED; be very dependable; have a valid state driver's license; and must be at least 21 years old. (Pay DOE).

Opening date: Thursday, August 14, 2014

Closing date: Wednesday, August 20, 2014 @ 4:00 p.m.

All positions will be exposed to noise & tobacco smoke

Indian preference will apply/EEO Employer.

Apply with the Human Resources Department, call or write for job description. Submit application to: Human Resources Department Dakota Connection Casino, 46102 SD Hwy 10, Sisseton, SD 57262.